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Diabetic Margarita

Slideshow: Diabetes-friendly Drinks And Cocktails

Slideshow: Diabetes-friendly Drinks And Cocktails

Drink in Moderation Most people with diabetes can enjoy some alcohol. Rules are the same as for everyone else: one drink per day for women; two for men. But you need to know how alcohol affects your blood sugar. A sugary drink might spike your blood sugar. But if you drink on an empty stomach or take certain meds, your levels could swing too low. A 12-ounce beer has about 15 grams of carbohydrates, compared to 3 to 6 grams in light beer. Also, “light” and “low carb” are pretty much the same thing -- and also your best bet. Be careful with craft beers. Most have twice the alcohol and calories as regular beer. Some research says wine (red or white) may help your body use insulin better and may even make you less likely to get type 2 diabetes in the first place. It may also have heart benefits, to boot! Moderation is the key as too much alcohol can cause hypoglycemia. A standard 5-ounce serving has about 120 calories, nearly all of which come from alcohol, not carbs. Recipes vary, but depending on the fruit and juices involved, this drink may have as much sugar as a regular soda. Instead of sangria, go with one glass of dry red or white wine. Those only have about 4 grams of carbs. Avoid sweeter varieties, like flavored wines and dessert wines. One ounce of liquor, depending on the proof, has about the same amount of alcohol as 5 ounces of wine. While liquor is often carb-free, mixers like soda and juice can send blood sugar levels through the roof. To prevent a spike, mix your liquor with a calorie-free drink like water or seltzer. Sweet drinks like margaritas and mojitos don’t have to be off-limits. Use sugar-free mixers for margaritas and fresh fruit for daiquiris. And instead of pouring simple syrup into mojitos and martinis, try a natural sweetener like stev Continue reading >>

Sugar-free Margarita

Sugar-free Margarita

This skinny Margarita recipe is both sugar-free and as low-carb as it gets! It tastes so great, you'll never go back, and your friends will never know you're actually serving them something healthier than a traditional Margarita. Most liqueurs and cordial are very high in sugar and relatively low in alcohol content compared to regular spirits. Triple sec alone has 10.9 grams of sugar per 1 fl oz! By substituting agave syrup* for sugar and orange extract for triple sec, you can greatly reduce the GI and carb count of this classic cocktail. Your taste buds won't know you've cut out all that sugar, but your body will thank you for it (as much as it could thank you for adding alcohol to your system. . . ). Enjoy this recipe responsibly. It's a potent elixir that you're sure to want more of! * agave nectar consists primarily of fructose and glucose, and has a much lower glycemic load than table sugar (sucrose). Because it is much sweeter than sucrose, much less is needed. It should, in fact, be considered optional in this recipe altogether! I wanted to make the measurements for this as easy as possible. By using the cap from my cocktail shaker as a measure, I've provided a basic ratio of ingredients: 1/2 jigger of lime juice - bottled has slightly fewer carbs, and is handy when the limes at your shop don't look so hot, but otherwise, fresh limes are way tastier I used a shaker to do this, since it came with its own convenient measuring cap. However, any sort of glass or pitcher (if you wanted to scale up the measurements) will do. I prefer my margaritas on the rocks, no salt. But if you're a salt or blended lover, well, that's pretty easy to accommodate. An easy way to salt your glass is to spread salt on a plate, wet the rim of your glass, and dip the rim in the salt. Que Continue reading >>

5 Things You Need To Know About Drinking And Diabetes

5 Things You Need To Know About Drinking And Diabetes

Having a drink at a barbecue or the cottage is a popular way to unwind and relax on the long weekend, but for people living with diabetes there are some serious risks involved. Joanne Lewis, dietitian and Manager of Diabetes Research for the Canadian Diabetes Association, sat down with Current to discuss some facts and tips for drinking and diabetes. Whether it’s counting your calories or making the right beverage choices, here are five things every person with diabetes needs to know: 1) Alcohol Alone Won’t Raise Your Blood-Sugar: Although it’s a common misconception, Lewis says alcohol in itself won’t raise your blood sugar. It’s often the added sugars found in coolers, liqueurs and soda that can raise your levels. “A lot of people are under the misconception that it can raise your blood sugar, and so what they might do is they might have a drink and not eat, because they’re thinking, ‘ok, the alcohol is going to raise my sugar’. “But if they’re taking insulin or certain oral medications, they can actually end up with a low blood sugar, because alcohol affects the liver that way. The liver gets busy detoxifying the alcohol to where it’s not producing the sugar it needs to produce to get into the blood to keep everything leveled,” she says. 2) Choose Your Beverage Wisely: You may be longing for a tangy margarita, or tempted to try a mixed drink with sugar sodas, but the reality is these drinks will raise your blood sugar levels. Lewis says if you have to drink, dry wines (including Merlot, Malbec, Sauvignon Blanc and Pinot Grigio), beer or straight liquor is less likely to raise your blood sugar. 3) Beer and Carbs are Complicated: Carbohydrate counting can often be as much a concern as blood sugar levels. Lewis says experts no longer count alco Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Alcohol: Do The Two Mix? (part 3)

Diabetes And Alcohol: Do The Two Mix? (part 3)

Over the last two weeks, we’ve been taking a closer look at alcohol. Several of you have submitted great questions and comments about alcohol, too. The use of alcohol among people with diabetes often stirs up controversy: There are those who feel that people with diabetes shouldn’t drink at all, while others remain on the fence and believe it’s OK to have alcohol once in a while. It’s important to point out that there are no hard and fast rules when it comes to drinking alcohol. That’s why I repeatedly state that it’s important to have this discussion with your health-care provider, as the “rules” can vary from person to person. But, assuming that you’ve gotten the green light from your provider to carefully and safely enjoy alcohol on occasion, how do you fit it into your meal plan? How much can you drink? And what are the best choices? Let’s go through these questions one by one. Fitting alcohol into your meal plan Alcohol is unlike carbohydrate, protein, and fat. However, alcohol is metabolized, or handled, by the body in a manner similar to fat. This means that calories from alcohol can easily be stored as fat unless you burn them off. Alcohol contains 7 calories per gram; fat contains 9 calories per gram, and carb and protein contain 4 calories per gram. So alcohol is a prime source of calories. If you’re trying to lose or maintain your weight, you need to think about this carefully. An occasional glass of wine isn’t a problem. But if you tend to have a glass of wine every night, you need to consider that 4 ounces of wine contains about 90 calories. Over time, this can add up. You may want to cut out 90 calories somewhere else in your meal plan to balance things out and avoid that spare tire around your waist. Remember, too, that alcohol may Continue reading >>

Can People With Diabetes Consume Alcohol?

Can People With Diabetes Consume Alcohol?

I always get a little frustrated when I hear doctors answer this question, because they usually respond as though it’s a medical question. But people don’t drink alcohol because it’s good or bad for them. They drink because they like it. They like the way alcohol makes them feel or they find it easier to socialize when they include alcohol in the mix. Sometimes they have an alcohol addiction or dependency, plain and simple. Even when we do focus just on the health aspects, there are pros and cons. Alcohol in moderation may reduce heart disease risk, but it appears also to increase the risk of certain cancers, notably breast cancer. So deciding whether and how much anyone drinks, whether or not they have diabetes, can be complex and depends on many factors. There are specific things someone with diabetes needs to keep in mind about alcohol use. Alcohol can have a major impact on blood sugar levels, but the precise effect depends on what you are drinking and how much. Beer and sweet wines have alot of sugar and unfermented carbohydrate in them, so they will raise the blood sugar for a few hours after drinking. And, of course, many spirits are mixed with soda or other things that may contain a lot of carbohydrate. These, too, may raise the blood sugar. On the other hand, alcohol itself will typically lower blood sugar by stimulating insulin release. So a straight up drink will usually have the opposite effect from a drink with sweet mixers. This effect is intensified by drugs that prompt additional insulin production by the pancreas -- especially the sulfonylurea medications like glipizide. The bottom line on alcohol and diabetes is sort of what you would expect from common sense. You can drink safely in moderation, but be careful about the impact on your blood sugar Continue reading >>

The Best Skinny Margarita Recipe Sugar Free, 5 Minutes

The Best Skinny Margarita Recipe Sugar Free, 5 Minutes

Learn how to make the best skinny margarita recipe. This sugar-free, low carb, paleo margarita is naturally sweetened. Takes only 2 minutes & 5 ingredients! Continue Reading The Best Skinny Margarita Recipe Sugar Free, 5 Minutes Thank you! Check your email for a confirmation link. Add [emailprotected] to your email contacts so that you don't miss it. Once you confirm, you'll receive a link to download the ebook! Sign up to get a FREE low carb recipes e-book, plus get access to subscriber exclusives! This post may contain affiliate links. I may earn a small commission from purchases made through them, at no additional cost to you, which helps keep this content free. ( Full disclosure ) Happy National Tequila Day! Did you know thats a thing? Yep. I didnt either, until it randomly showed up on my news feed this morning. Itsgreat timing, though, because I happen to have a low carb drink recipe with tequila to share today. And, Im pretty sure this is the best skinny margarita recipe Ive ever had! Apparently, theres actually a separate National Margarita Day in February. Today, its all about simply tequila. But if you ask me, a skinny margarita recipe is the best way to use tequila, anyway. It feels a little strange to be talking about drinkinga sugar-free margarita in the middle of a Monday afternoon. I mean, lets be real.Youre probably not going to be drinking right now. Most of us are working at this time, including me. That doesnt mean you cant save this easy skinny margarita recipe for this weekend. I still thought today is a great day to share it! Do you know how much sugar is in a margarita? You might be surprised. Virtually all sweet mixed drinks are incredibly high in sugar, and margaritas are no exception. The amount of sugar in a regular margarita varies depending Continue reading >>

Low Carb Margarita - Step Away From The Carbs

Low Carb Margarita - Step Away From The Carbs

This low carb margarita is an almost-zero-carb version of the traditional drink! The following post contains affiliate links, which means that at no extra cost to you I can make a tiny bit of money to help support this blog. Thank you! A margarita is one of my favorite drinks. But restaurant-made or commercially bought versions are usually LOADED with sugar. The traditional ingredients are tequila, lime juice and Cointreau (a brand of triple sec) or Grand Marnier. The tequila is zero carb, and the lime juice is low carb but those sweet orange spirits are where the problem lies. Even worse if the cocktail is made from a margarita syrup! A neighbor of mine recently had the idea of using orange extract instead of the triple sec, and then I added some Da Vinci sugar free sweetening syrup the latter acted as part sweetener, part mixer! The result was really convincing! Find the instructions below, or check out my recipe video! Cut a lime wedge and run it round the edge of a margarita glass or martini glass . Sprinkle some salt onto a plate, invert the glass and dip it into the salt, coating the rim in salt. Add crushed ice, tequila, lime juice, orange extract, sweetening syrup and the juice from the lime wedge to a cocktail shaker . Shake well, and strain into the prepared glass. Add more crushed ice if desired this cocktail is pretty strong! Run the lime wedge around the edge of a glass. Dip the rim of the glass into a plate of salt. Add the remaining ingredients to a cocktail shaker and shake well. Drain into the prepared glass and serve with extra ice if desired. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Friendly Margaritas

Diabetes Friendly Margaritas

I am a huge fan of margaritas. Sometimes in college my friends and I would head over to this restaurant after class and share a pitcher of margaritas on the rocks, salt all around. A few years later, I developed Type 1 diabetes and had a near impossible time drinking margaritas. It wasnt until our trip to Orlando for the Friends for Life conference last week that I was able to have a margarita again. The restaurant we went to the first night used agave nectar in their margaritas, making them low carb and delicious. I had never tried agave nectar before, but was looking forward to the results. Two hours after my margarita, I was happily at 107 mg/dl and was excited to come home and try my own. I finally found some agave nectar, and thought Id try my hand at making one. I passed on the sugary and way too sweet sour mix and just used fresh lime juice- it made all the difference. The agave nectar tastes sweet, no chemical after taste. If youre in the mood for something refreshing, low carb, and tangy, give this margarita a try! Continue reading >>

Is It Ok If My Mom With Type 2 Diabetes Drinks Alcohol?

Is It Ok If My Mom With Type 2 Diabetes Drinks Alcohol?

A fellow caregiver asked... My mother, recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, enjoys having a glass of wine with her friends. Is it safe for her to drink alcohol? Expert Answers With clearance from her physician and some caution and common sense, your mom may still partake in the pleasure of a glass of merlot if her diabetes is well controlled. Her doctor, though, may advise against drinking alcohol because of related complications such as nerve damage or high blood pressure. Some other caveats: If your mom takes glucose-lowering diabetes pills or if she uses insulin, drinking isn't advisable. She would run the risk of her blood sugar levels going dangerously low if she mixes these medications with a margarita. Likewise, your mother should never drink on an empty stomach, since this increases her risk of having a low blood sugar episode. So suggest that she have that drop of pinot over dinner, or at least with some carbohydrate-containing nibbles such as cheese and crackers. The standard alcohol consumption guidelines that apply to the general population apply to people with diabetes as well: Your mom should limit her intake to one unit a day (men may drink two units daily.) It's also advisable to have two alcohol-free days a week. A unit of alcohol is equal to 4.5 fluid ounces of wine (one small glass); 1.5 fluid ounces of liquor, sherry, vermouth, liqueur, or aperitif; or half a pint of regular-strength beer. Remember, too, that when your mother drinks, she's consuming empty calories -- no nutrients -- so she runs the risk of gaining weight, since alcoholic beverages (especially cocktails filled with fruit juice and other mixers ) are high in calories. Light beer and dry wines make better choices than a Fluffy Duck or a Bloody Mary, and she should substitute low-cal Continue reading >>

A Most Fabulous Sugar Free Margarita Recipe To Try

A Most Fabulous Sugar Free Margarita Recipe To Try

Its summer and we are looking for A Most Fabulous Margarita Recipe ! This is a recipe for margaritas with no sugar added. Known for its refreshing taste of lime, a margarita is a fabulous choice for a summer barbecue or gathering. You can make this recipe with or without alcohol added. It really is a perfect summer beverage for us to enjoy. Margaritas are such a popular beverage for the people that I know. We drink ours at gatherings or when we are out to dinner . In the summer we especially enjoy ours frozen on a hot day. It seems as if most commercially or restaurant varieties of this beverage come with a lot of added sugar. We know that much of that sugar can also be added calories too. This is why I like to make my own whenever I can do so. Margaritas are that lime based drink that we associate with Mexican food I have nothing against Mexican food as I enjoy margaritas with nachos etc with my friends and family whenever I am able to. This is a popular thing to do around here. You probably are fond of Mexican style food and drinks as well. Most margarita recipes are comprised of three main ingredients. The ingredients that you may add to a basic margarita include Tequila, Lime juice, and some kind of a sweetened mixer. That sweetened mixer is where the sugar will come in as most of these mixers have a bit of sugar added to them. There is the question of over ice or frozen that we like to ask. Frozen margaritas come with a lot of ice. That ice can help water down any added sugar or alcohol. Many of us agree that ice is also enjoyable when it is hot outside. I wish that name was used because something could make us skinny. However, that would never happen with my luck. There are a lot of skinny margarita recipes out there and I am grateful for that. This is because th Continue reading >>

Sugar-free Margarita Recipe

Sugar-free Margarita Recipe

*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calorie a day is used for general nutrition advice. This sugar-free margarita cocktail recipe is made with tequila, lime juice, and orange extract instead of the traditional Triple Sec or Cointreau orange liqueurs which have high concentrations of sugar. You can add a small amount of agave syrup should you wish, but note that the recipe will no longer be sugar-free. Try tasting your cocktail before adding agave syrup; you may not miss the extra sweetness. Margaritas can be served straight up, on the rocks, or blended into a slushy consistency with crushed ice for a frozen margarita. You can coat the glass rim with coarse salt, if you prefer, and garnish with a lime wedge. 2 tablespoons lime juice (freshly squeezed) Optional: 1 tablespoon agave syrup or stevia In a cocktail shaker, combine tequila, lime juice, water, orange extract, agave syrup, if using,and a small handful of ice. Shake until well blended. Alternatively, you can mixingredients in a blender until slushy. If desired, wet the rim of a margarita or martini glass with lime juice or plain water and dip it into a small plate of margarita or kosher salt. Pour mixture from shakerinto glass, either over ice or straight up. If blended, pour straight into glass. Although agave syrup has become a popular alternative to sugar, there are a few things to keep in mind when choosing it as a substitute. In terms of calories, per tablespoon sugar has 40 calories whereas agave syrup has 60 calories. However, agave syrup is much sweeter than sugar so you don't need to use as much. Agave syrup is high in fructose but low on the glycemic index, making it a better choice than sugar for those people with diabetes (although Continue reading >>

Skinny Margaritas - Marlene Koch Marlene Koch

Skinny Margaritas - Marlene Koch Marlene Koch

Made with tequila, orange liqueur, and fresh lime juice, these margaritas are the real deal. Most skinny mixes use the essence of lime, but in my book, skinny doesnt mean skimping on taste, so youll not find that here. Love Mexican food, but not the long prep time or calories? Youll find a terrific Two-Minute Fire-Roasted Salsa, Three-Minute Tomato and Avocado Salad, Any Day Chicken Enchiladas and 10-Minute Mexican-Style Pintos in Eat What You Love Everyday! cup orange liqueur (like Triple Sec or Gran Marnier) 3 tablespoons granulated no-calorie sweetener (or 4 packets)* 1. Pour tequila, lime juice, water, orange liqueur, and sweetener into a pitcher. Stir well. 2. For each drink, pour cup of the mixer into a shaker filled with ice. Shake well. Wet the rim of an ice-filled rocks glass with the lime wedge. Dip in salt, if desired. *Any packets will work. Truvia (in the green packet) is my all natural choice! Marlene Says: Alcohol, in moderation, may actually have health benefits. If you choose to imbibe, opt for drinks without sugary mixers, and dont forget to count the calories! If you have diabetes, you may be pleased to know that alcohol itself does not raise blood sugar. Check with your doctor or a registered dietitian for personalized guidelines on alcohol consumption. NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING: Calories 140 | Carbohydrate 7g (Sugars 5g) | Total Fat 0g (Sat Fat 0g) | Protein 0g | Fiber 0g | Cholesterol 0mg | Sodium 0mg | Food Exchanges: 3 Fat, Starch | Carbohydrate Choices: | Weight Watcher Plus Point Comparison: 3 Continue reading >>

Skinny Margarita Recipe

Skinny Margarita Recipe

Its Friday! And were feeling even more celebratory than usual because this morning I got dressed and then immediately took my jeans off. Over the last few months, Ive been running, which is code for mostly walking between weeks-long hamstring problems and keeping an eye on calories in vs calories out. Such a rude awakening the first time I punched my daily calories into my phone and saw just how terrible those weekend margaritas actually were. I mean I knew they werent great but times 3? Ouch. A single lime margarita was an empty calorie bomb with 300+ calories and nearly 40g of sugar. Per glass. And, um, lets be honest here. Im pretty sure that Ive never stopped at just one margarita. Sure, theyre completely fresh and so much better tasting than any mix youll ever find but it is a lot of sugar for something that isnt frosting. Or doesnt have frosting on it. So we set out to make a skinny margarita by replacing the sugar in the homemade mix with liquid stevia* and the orange liqueur in the margarita with fresh orange juice. How does that stack up in numbers? But more importantly, how does it stack up in taste? The skinnier margarita is refreshing, citrusy, and really easy to drink. The orange flavor is brighter and sweetness can easily be adjusted with a couple extra drops of stevia per glass (and I find that it usually needs a couple extra drops but the standard serving amounts are listed below). And even two of them wont break your calorie bank or undo all the good you did in the gym earlier today. Its also a paleo diet friendly if you, like me, have a margarita-loving paleo-following friend. Save the calories and sugar - this margarita is fresh, homemade, lower-carb, and much skinnier than the original. And bonus! It's Paleo-friendly! Continue reading >>

The Skinniest Skinny Margarita {sugar Free, Low Carb}

The Skinniest Skinny Margarita {sugar Free, Low Carb}

You are here: Home / 30 Minute Meals / The Skinniest Skinny Margarita {Sugar Free, Low Carb} The Skinniest Skinny Margarita {Sugar Free, Low Carb} The Skinniest of all Skinny Margaritas. Totally free of sugar, low carb and mixed together in just a couple minutes! Last night I mixed this store-bought limeade (that is organic, all natural and 0 calories, 0 carbs and 0 sugars what!?) with some good Tequila, a ton of ice and a squeeze of fresh lime. When I took the first sip, I was like, Whoa! This tastes more like a margarita than any of the low cal versions Ive tried! So, I immediately shared about it on Instagram , Facebook and Snapchat (are you on there? If so, friend me EverydayMaven) because I clearly couldnt keep it to myself. I figured that would be it but I got so many messages and comments about this easy little Low Carb and Sugar Free Super Skinny Margarita that I promptly asked my husband to run to Whole Foods (on Super Bowl Sunday no less) and pick me up some more of the Limeade so I could make more, take some photos and share it with you today. This is super freaking good. Its ridiculous. And easy. And will quickly become your go-to margarita. The only catch is you need to find this Braggs Organic Apple Cider Vinegar Limeade drink. I know, I know. Its probably not available everywhere and as an FYI, here in Seattle, I buy it at either Whole Foods Market or PCC Natural Market. The good news is you can totally order some online or take a close look at the label and play with the ratios until you recreate your own. There is something perfect about the combo that tastes like a damn good margarita. Just the right mix of sour (from lime and apple cider vinegar) and a touch of sweet (from stevia). Come back and tell me what you think when you make it! Or tag me on I Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Alcohol

Diabetes & Alcohol

Drinking alcohol can lead to serious low blood sugar reactions. Alcohol can also affect diabetic nerve damage, eye disease, and high blood triglycerides. You may wonder if drinking alcohol is safe for people with diabetes. If you drink alcohol, there are some things you need to know first about alcohol safety. Is it Safe to Drink Alcohol? Check with your doctor to make sure alcohol doesn’t interfere with your medications or complicate any of your medical conditions. Drinking alcohol can lead to serious low blood sugar reactions, especially if you take insulin or types of diabetes pills that stimulate the release of insulin from the pancreas. Alcohol can also affect other medical conditions you may have, like diabetic nerve damage, diabetic eye disease, and high blood triglycerides. Get guidelines for alcohol use from your medical provider. How Much Alcohol Can I Drink? If you choose to drink alcohol, drink in moderation. Limit your intake of alcohol to no more than one serving per day for women, and no more than two servings per day for men. One serving size of alcohol equals: 12 ounces of beer 5 ounces of wine 1½ ounces of distilled spirits (such as rum, whiskey, gin, etc.) Alcohol and Risk of Low Blood Sugar If you are managing your diabetes with diet and exercise alone, drinking alcohol can stil increase your risk of low blood sugars. And if you take insulin or types of diabetes pills that stimulate insulin production, drinking alcohol can lead to even more serious low blood sugar reactions. Normally, the liver releases glucose to maintain blood sugar levels. But when you drink alcohol, the liver is busy breaking the alcohol down, so it does a poor job of releasing glucose into the bloodstream. This can lead to a drop in blood sugar levels if you are drinking alco Continue reading >>

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