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Diabetic Macular Edema Presentation

Diabetic Macular Edema

Diabetic Macular Edema

Diabetic Macular Edema (DME) is an accumulation of fluid in the macula—part of the retina that controls our most detailed vision abilities—due to leaking blood vessels. In order to develop DME, you must first have diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy is a disease that damages the blood vessels in the retina, resulting in vision impairment. Left untreated, these blood vessels begin to build up pressure in the eye and leak fluid, causing DME. DME usually takes on two forms: Focal DME, which occurs because of abnormalities in the blood vessels in the eye. Diffuse DME, which occurs because of widening/swelling retinal capillaries (very thin blood vessels). Diabetic Retinopathy and DME are common problems for diabetics. Roughly 8% of the U.S. population is diabetic, and about 28% of those diabetics have eye trouble because of it. Often, DME is associated with: those who have had diabetes for an extended amount of time, severe hypertension (high blood pressure), fluid retention, hypoalbuminemia (low levels of protein in body fluids), and hyperlipidemia (high levels of fats in the blood). DME Symptoms: Common symptoms of DME are blurry vision, floaters, double vision, and eventually blindness if it goes untreated. Treatments for DME: The treatments for focal and diffuse DME differ, but they both involve laser procedures. Most doctors use focal laser treatment to treat focal DME and grid laser treatment to treat diffuse DME. The goal of both kinds of procedures is to stop the leakage in the macula. DME Procedure Recovery: Normal recovery time after a DME procedure is 3-6 months. As the eye heals and the swelling in and around the macula subsides, you may experience sensitivity to light, irritation in the eye, and black spots in the center of your vision. These are nor Continue reading >>

Verseon Reveals Preclinical Data On Novel Drug Candidates To Treat Diabetic Macular Edema

Verseon Reveals Preclinical Data On Novel Drug Candidates To Treat Diabetic Macular Edema

Verseon presented preclinical data on multiple novel drug candidates for the treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME) at the 2017 BIO International Conference in San Diego last week. Verseon is developing plasma kallikrein inhibitors that target a validated disease pathway2 and treat an underlying cause of DME. The current standard of care comprises monthly injections into the eye and laser treatments, which are associated with side effects such as inflammation, infections, and cataracts.3 To avoid these unwanted effects, Verseon is designing its inhibitors for eye drop or oral delivery. Studies estimate that one in three people living with diabetes for more than 20 years may develop DME.4 Chronically high blood sugar associated with diabetes can weaken the blood vessels in the eye, leading to fluid leaking into the retina (edema). Over time, fluid may accumulate in the macula, the central region of the retina (see illustration), resulting in swelling, blurred vision, and eventually central vision loss (see photos).i If current trends continue, researchers estimate that about one in three US adults could be suffering from diabetes by 2050,5 leading to a sharp increase in the number of people affected by DME. Recent research suggests that the serine protease plasma kallikrein may be a promising new target for the treatment of DME.ii The level and activity of plasma kallikrein are both known to be upregulated in the eyes of DME patients. This results in the activation of inflammatory pathways and vasodilation in the retina, leading to edema. By inhibiting plasma kallikrein, Verseons drug candidates target the direct cause of downstream inflammation caused by this hyperactivity and can potentially lower leakage into the retina. We are designing several series of compound Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network (drcrnet) Public Web Site

Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network (drcrnet) Public Web Site

Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network (DRCRnet) public web site Please be patient while the page loads... 1. Protocol I - Randomized Trial Evaluating Ranibizumab Plus Prompt or Deferred Laser or Triamcinolone Plus Prompt Laser for Diabetic Macular Edema Click here for presentation 2. Protocol I-Intravitreal Ranibizumab for Diabetic Macular Edema with Prompt vs Deferred Laser Treatment: 3-year Randomized Trial Results Click here for presentation 3. Protocol I-5-Year Follow-up of a Randomized Trial Evaluating Ranibizumab Plus Prompt versus Deferred Laser for Diabetic Macular Edema Click here for presentation 4. Protocol M -Effect of Diabetes Education During Retinal Ophthalmology Visits on Diabetes Control Click here for presentatio n 5. Protocol N-Randomized Clinical Trial Evaluating Intravitreal Ranibizumab or Intravitreal Saline for Vitreous Hemorrhage from Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Click here for presentation 6. Protocol T - A Comparative Effectiveness Study of Intravitreal Aflibercept, Bevacizumab and Ranibizumab for Diabetic Macular Edema Click here for presentation 1. Protocol I - Rationale for the DRCR.net Treatment Protocol for Center-Involved DME Click here for presentation 2. ProtocolI - Green or YellowLaser Treatment for Diabetic Macular Edema Click here for presentation 3. ProtocolI-Expanded 2-year Follow-up of Ranibizumab Plus Prompt or Deferred Laser or Triamcinolone Plus Prompt Laser for Diabetic Macular Edema Click here for presentation 4. Protocol I - Worsening of Diabetic Retinopathy in a Randomized Clinical Trial Evaluating Ranibizumab and Triamcinolone:Exploratory Analysis Click here for presentation 5. ProtocolI -Repeated Intravitreous Ranibizumab Injections for DME and Risk of Sustained IOP Elevation or Need for Ocular Hypotensive Continue reading >>

Managing Longstanding Refractory Diabetic Macular Edema

Managing Longstanding Refractory Diabetic Macular Edema

Managing Longstanding Refractory Diabetic Macular Edema V.Swetha E. Jeganathan Princess Alexandra Eye Pavilion and College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, Edinburgh, Scotland Diabetic macular edema (DME) poses a significant management dilemma for visual impairment. We present a challenging case of persistent, bilateral maculopathy. The patients diabetic parameters were poor, and laser photocoagulation had failed. A recent stroke precluded ranibizumab use. A fluocinolone implant was considered to save his vision. No similar reports have to date been published. A 54-year-old schizophrenic man presented with bilateral proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) and DME. He noticed gradual, painless blurring of vision for several months, with recent profound loss of vision in his right eye. Three years earlier, he had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Following a period of erratic control, aggravated by poor compliance, he recently tightened his control. His medications included gliclazide, lisinopril, and sulpiride. His Snellen VA was right count fingers and left 6/36. Slit lamp examination revealed mild cataracts and aggressive PDR and DME. Other causes of poor vision were excluded. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) confirmed right diffuse DME and left focal edema (Figure 1). Fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) identified mixed maculopathy. The patient had elevated blood pressure (185/87) with HbA1c 70 mmol/mol, and an acute decline in renal function with significant albuminuria and normochromic normocytic anemia. Figure 1. Spectral-domain OCT showing diffuse edema in the right eye and focal edema in the left eye. He had urgent bilateral panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) and concurrent macular laser with the Pascal system. Over the next 20 months, he rece Continue reading >>

A Case Of Diabetic Macular Edema With Prominent Chorioretinal Folds

A Case Of Diabetic Macular Edema With Prominent Chorioretinal Folds

A Case of Diabetic Macular Edema with Prominent Chorioretinal Folds Sato T.a Kohmoto R.a Fukumoto M.a Morishita S.a,b Kimura D.a,c Tajiri K.a Kobayashi T.a Kida T.a Kojima S.a Ikeda T.a aDepartment of Ophthalmology, Osaka Medical College, Takatsuki, Japan bDepartment of Ophthalmology, Osaka Kaisei Hospital, Takatsuki, Japan cDepartment of Ophthalmology, Takatsuki Red Cross Hospital, Takatsuki, Japan 2-7 Daigaku-machi, Takatsuki City, Osaka 569-8686 (Japan) Purpose: To report a case of diabetic macular edema with prominent chorioretinal folds. Case Report: This study involved a 55-year-old male with untreated bilateral diabetic retinopathy who had undergone cataract surgery at another clinic. Following that surgery, diabetic macular edema rapidly exacerbated, accentuating marked cystoid macular edema and radial chorioretinal folds in the macula. Investigation of his medical history revealed that in addition to diabetes, he had uncontrolled hypertension and severe diabetic nephropathy. Vitreous surgery was performed on both eyes due to a resistance to a subtenon injection of triamcinolone acetonide or intravitreal injection of an antivascular endothelial growth factor agent. After surgery, the macular edema and chorioretinal folds showed a tendency towards improvement. Thereafter, kidney transplant surgery was performed for renal failure, and a mild tendency of chorioretinal folds was observed. Conclusion: In the case presented in this study, we observed remarkable cystoid macular edema in the fovea centralis and theorize that distortion with the surrounding tissue might have occurred, thus leading to the formation of chorioretinal folds around the macula. 2017 The Author(s)Published by S. Karger AG, Basel Chorioretinal folds are known to occur due to a variety of factor Continue reading >>

Unmet Needs In Diabetic Macular Edema

Unmet Needs In Diabetic Macular Edema

There are on-going studies comparing intravitreal anti-VEGF and other therapies both with each other and with standard laser photocoagulation. There are also studies looking at combination therapies (laser with adjunctive intravitreal anti-VEGF or steroid injections) compared with laser alone or anti-VEGF treatments alone. Some of these treatments have recently shown greater improvements in visual acuity outcomes compared with the ETDRS laser photocoagulation results. The Ranibizumab for Edema of the Macula in Diabetes-1 (READ-1) study showed evidence of resolution of macular edema and improvement of visual acuity in treated eyes. At the primary end-point at month seven, median and mean OCT thicknesses were reduced by 261 and 246m respectively from baselinean 85% reduction in excess foveal thickness.15 Based on the positive results seen with READ-1, READ-2 was initiated. In READ-2, 126 eyes were randomized to ranibizumab versus ranibizumab with laser versus laser alone. The six-month primary outcome results from the READ-2 study have recently been evaluated.16 At six months, about one-quarter of patients gained three or more lines in the ranibizumab group versus 12% in the ranibizumab with laser group versus no eyes in the laser alone group. Two-year data are now available. After the initial six months, all three groups of patients were eligible to receive intravitreal ranibixumab every two months. At two years, there was no significant difference in the visual acuity outcomes, which were a gain of 7.7 (ranibizumab group initially), 5.1 (laser group initially), and 6.8 (combination group initially) letters. However, there were fewer injections required in year two for those eyes that received some laser treatment. Therefore, it appears that there is long-term benefit f Continue reading >>

Predictors Of Functional And Anatomic Outcomes In Patients With Diabetic Macular Edema Treated With Ranibizumab - Sciencedirect

Predictors Of Functional And Anatomic Outcomes In Patients With Diabetic Macular Edema Treated With Ranibizumab - Sciencedirect

Volume 122, Issue 7 , July 2015, Pages 1395-1401 Predictors of Functional and Anatomic Outcomes in Patients with Diabetic Macular Edema Treated with Ranibizumab Presented in part at: Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology Annual Meeting, May 2014, Orlando, Florida. Author links open overlay panel RaafaySophieMD1 NaLuPhD2 Peter A.CampochiaroMD1 To investigate baseline predictors of month 24 best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and central foveal thickness (CFT) in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME) treated monthly with ranibizumab or sham. Post hoc analysis of DME patients in 2 identical phase 3 studies. Patients randomized to ranibizumab (n= 502) or sham (n= 257). Multivariate regression on predictors with P < 0.20 in univariate logistic regression using backward selection to retain predictors with P < 0.05. Patient characteristics correlating with month 24 BCVA in Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study letter score 70 (20/40) or 50 (20/100), gain or loss from baseline BCVA of 15, or CFT250 m. Baseline predictors of BCVA 20/40 in ranibizumab-treated patients were good BCVA, submacular fluid, no cardiovascular disease, no scatter photocoagulation, and male gender, whereas in sham-treated patients, they were mild increase in CFT, presence of hard exudates in center subfield, and absence of renal disease. Predictors of improvement in BCVA letter score 15 in ranibizumab-treated patients were poor BCVA, submacular fluid, young age, and short diabetes duration, and those in sham-treated patients were poor BCVA, young age, and mild increase in CFT. Predictors of resolution of edema (CFT 250 m) in ranibizumab-treated patients were mild foveal thickening and prominent subfoveal fluid, and those in sham-treated patients were poor BCVA, mild foveal thicke Continue reading >>

Diabetic Macular Edema

Diabetic Macular Edema

*Central Military Emergency University Hospital Dr. Carol Davila, Ophthalmology Department, Bucharest, Romania Correspondence to: Cernat Corina Cristina M.D. 31 Dinicu Golescu Blvd, Floor 4, District 1, Bucharest, Romania Mobile phone: +40721 567 809, E-mail: [email protected] Copyright Romanian Society of Ophthalmology This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Diabetic macular edema (DME) remains the most common cause of vision loss among diabetic patients. New understanding of the underlying pathophysiology has interest in the potential benefits of the specific pharmacologic therapy, such as treatment with intraocular steroids, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and protein kinase C-beta (PKC) inhibition. At the last time, laser photocoagulation, according to the guidelines of the Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS), continues to be primary standard care treatment in most communities. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is very useful in monitoring macular edema progression and response to treatment. Keywords: diabetic macular edema, risk factors, clinical presentations, physiopathology Diabetic macular edema (DME) is manifested as retinal thickening caused by the accumulation of intraretinal fluid, primarily in the inner and outer plexiform layers. It is believed to be a result of hyperpermeability of the retinal vasculature. DME can be present with any level of diabetic retinopathy. ETDRS Criteria for Clinically Significant Macular Edema (CSME)(1): Retinal thickening at the center of the macula Retinal thickening and/or adjiacent hard exudates at or within 500 of the center of the macula ( Fig. 1 ) An area of retinal thickening greater than or equal to one disc area, any part of which is within 1 disc diameter of the c Continue reading >>

Macular Edema In Diabetesclinical Presentation

Macular Edema In Diabetesclinical Presentation

Macular Edema in DiabetesClinical Presentation Author: Emmanouil Mavrikakis, MD, PhD; Chief Editor: Hampton Roy, Sr, MD more... Specific inquiry should be made into risk factors for the development of diabetic retinopathy. These include the type of diabetes, the duration, and the degree of control. After 20 years of disease, nearly all patients with type 1 and 60% of patients with type 2 diabetes have some degree of retinopathy. The risk increases with the duration of disease. Hence, diabetic retinopathy is more likely to be present in patients older than 40 years. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) clearly demonstrated that tighter control of blood sugar is associated with reduced incidence of diabetic retinopathy. Glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] should be less than 7%. Proteinuria is a good marker for the development of diabetic retinopathy; thus, patients with diabetic nephropathy should be observed more closely. Elevated blood pressure increases the risk of retinopathy; patients with diabetes and hypertension may develop diabetic retinopathy with superimposed hypertensive retinopathy. Elevated triglyceride and lipid levels increase the risk of retinopathy, while normalization of lipid levels reduces retinal leakage and deposition of exudates. Finally, diabetic retinopathy can progress rapidly in pregnant women, especially those with preexisting diabetic retinopathy. Funduscopy under stereopsis and high magnification should be performed on every patient with diabetes to assess for diabetic macular edema (DME) and diabetic retinopathy. An indirect ophthalmoscope does not provide adequate magnification for the diagnosis of diabetic macular edema. Diabetic macular edema is defined as retinal thickening within 2 disc diameters of the center of the macul Continue reading >>

Anti-vegf For The Management Of Diabetic Macular Edema

Anti-vegf For The Management Of Diabetic Macular Edema

Anti-VEGF for the Management of Diabetic Macular Edema Francisco Rosa Stefanini ,1,2 Emmerson Badar ,1 Paulo Falabella ,1,2 Michael Koss ,2,3 Michel Eid Farah ,1and Maurcio Maia 1,3 1Retina Division, Retina Division, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Federal University of So Paulo (UNIFESP), 821 Botucatu Street, 2nd Floor, 04023-062 So Paulo, SP, Brazil 2Doheny Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, 1450 San Pablo Street, Los Angeles, CA 900033, USA 3Department of Ophthalmology, Goethe University, 7 Theodor Stern Kai, 60590 Frankfurt am Main, Germany Received 8 November 2013; Accepted 22 December 2013; Published 5 February 2014 Copyright 2014 Francisco Rosa Stefanini et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is an important cause of vision loss around the world, being the leading cause in the population between 20 and 60 years old. Among patients with DR, diabetic macular edema (DME) is the most frequent cause of vision impairment and represents a significant public health issue. Macular photocoagulation has been the standard treatment for this condition reducing the risk of moderate visual loss by approximately 50%. The role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in DR and DME pathogenesis has been demonstrated in recent studies. This review addresses and summarizes data from the clinical trials that investigated anti-VEGF for the management of DME and evaluates their impact on clinical practice. The literature searches were conducted between August and October 2013 in PubMed and Continue reading >>

Clearside Biomedicals Phase 1/2 Open Label Clinical Trial Of Cls-ta With And Without Eylea In Diabetic Macular Edema Presented At The American Academy Of Ophthalmology 2017 Annual Meeting

Clearside Biomedicals Phase 1/2 Open Label Clinical Trial Of Cls-ta With And Without Eylea In Diabetic Macular Edema Presented At The American Academy Of Ophthalmology 2017 Annual Meeting

Clearside Biomedicals Phase 1/2 Open Label Clinical Trial of CLS-TA With and Without Eylea in Diabetic Macular Edema Presented at the American Academy of Ophthalmology 2017 Annual Meeting (NASDAQ:CLSD), a late-stage clinical biopharmaceutical company developing first-in-class drug therapies to treat back-of-the-eye diseases, announced that, on , during the Retina Subspecialty Day of the , MD, PhD, presented preliminary results from an exploratory clinical trial (the HULK trial) of CLS-TA, Clearsides proprietary suspension formulation of the corticosteroid triamcinolone acetonide for suprachoroidal administration (suprachoroidal CLS-TA), with and without intravitreally injected EYLEA (aflibercept) (intravitreal Eylea) for the treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME). DME is the most common cause of vision loss in people with diabetes mellitus. A consequence of diabetic retinopathy, DME is swelling of the retina caused by leaking blood vessels. DME affects up to 30% of people who have had diabetes for 20 years or more, and if untreated, approximately 20 to 30% of people who have it will experience moderate visual loss. , Clearside completed patient enrollment in the HULK trial, an open-label, multicenter Phase 1/2 clinical trial designed to assess the safety and efficacy of suprachoroidal CLS-TA in combination with intravitreal Eylea in 10 patients with DME who are nave to treatment. The trial is also assessing the safety and efficacy of suprachoroidal CLS-TA alone in 10 patients with DME who have previously been treated with intravitreal anti-VEGF agents or intravitreal corticosteroids and still require further treatment. The HULK trial findings presented by Dr. Wykoff at AAO 2017 showed a visual benefit for patients receiving CLS-TA, with a greater benefit in treatmen Continue reading >>

Correlation Between Visual Acuity And Morphologic Subtypes Of Diabetic Macular Edema Based On A New Clinical Grading Protocol (save) | Iovs | Arvo Journals

Correlation Between Visual Acuity And Morphologic Subtypes Of Diabetic Macular Edema Based On A New Clinical Grading Protocol (save) | Iovs | Arvo Journals

ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract| April 2014 Correlation between visual acuity and morphologic subtypes of diabetic macular edema based on a new clinical grading protocol (SAVE) Department of Ophthalmology, General Hospital Linz, Linz, Austria Department of Ophthalmology, General Hospital Linz, Linz, Austria Department of Ophthalmology, General Hospital Linz, Linz, Austria Department of Ophthalmology, General Hospital Linz, Linz, Austria Commercial Relationships Matthias Bolz, None; Josef Pretzl, None; Nicole Klaida, None; Siegfried Priglinger, None Correlation between visual acuity and morphologic subtypes of diabetic macular edema based on a new clinical grading protocol (SAVE) You will receive an email whenever this article is corrected, updated, or cited in the literature. You can manage this and all other alerts in My Account Matthias Bolz, Josef Pretzl, Nicole Klaida, Siegfried Priglinger; Correlation between visual acuity and morphologic subtypes of diabetic macular edema based on a new clinical grading protocol (SAVE). Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):3378. ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present) Purpose: A new grading protocol for diabetic macular edema (DME) was presented previously based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescence angiography (FA). Aim of this study was to correlate visual acuity to several different subtypes of DME based on this grading protocol. Methods: 71 eyes of 50 patients with clinically significant DME were examined with macular map OCT scans and fluorescence angiography using Spectralis HRA and OCT (Heidelberg Engineering). Visual acuity was performed according to the ETDRS protocol (early treatment of diabetic retinopathy study) on the same day. All imaging data was evaluated by 2 readers according to a grading Continue reading >>

Diabetic Macular Edema-current Treatment Modalities

Diabetic Macular Edema-current Treatment Modalities

We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime. Diabetic macular edema-Current treatment Modalities Diabetic macular edema-Current treatment Modalities Choosing amongst current modalities to manage Diabetic Retinopathy At Medical Retina Clinic, Eye Department WAPDA Teaching Hospital Complex Lahore 1. To review the current management options for DR 2. To share authors four years follow up from Jan 2008 to Nov 2011 at Medical Retina Clinic, Eye Department WAPDA Teaching Hospital Complex Lahore. 3. Discussion on future Trends in management of DR. Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of new blindness in the world, Argon LASER treatment has established itself as a gold standard in the management of DR. Intravitreal therapies in the form anti VEGF agents and steroids are also being widely used nationally and internationally. These therapies do not replace but complement each other. Author will share his four years experience at Medical Retina clinic WAPDA hospital complex Lahore. 125 patients with DR were enrolled during this period. Treatment modalities used, included Argon Green Laser, Intravitreal Anti VEGF (Bevacizumab), Intravitreal Triamcinolone and subtenon Triamcinolone. Staging and severity of the disease as well as response to the offered therapy were the parameters used to tailor the treatment options. FRCS (Edin), FRCS (Glasgow), FCPS, CICOphth (UK) Asstt Professor Central Park Medical College Lahore. Consultant Eye Surgeon and Head of Eye Department Continue reading >>

Abicipar Pegol Palm Study Phase 2 Data In Diabetic Macular Edema (dme) Presented At 2016 Aao Annual Meeting

Abicipar Pegol Palm Study Phase 2 Data In Diabetic Macular Edema (dme) Presented At 2016 Aao Annual Meeting

Abicipar Pegol PALM Study Phase 2 Data in Diabetic Macular Edema (DME) Presented at 2016 AAO Annual Meeting ZurichSchlieren, October 15, 2016. Molecular Partners AG (SIX: MOLN) today announced that Tarek S. Hassan, MD, Professor of Ophthalmology at Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine and Senior Partner and Director of the Vitreoretinal Fellowship Training Program at Associated Retinal Consultants in Royal Oak, Michigan, presented the data of PALM, A Multicenter, Double Masked Phase 2 Clinical Trial Evaluating Abicipar Pegol (abicipar) for Diabetic Macular Edema (DME) at the American Academy of Ophthalmology Annual Meeting (AAO) 2016 in Chicago. A total of 151 patients with DME (BCVA 75 and 24 letters) were enrolled. The efficacy of abicipar was demonstrated in all treatment groups. Abicipar 2 mg (Q8weeks and Q12weeks, following three monthly loading doses) demonstrated functional (BCVA) and anatomical (CRT) effects comparable with monthly ranibizumab, and with fewer injections over a 28 week period. The most common ocular adverse events were vitreous floaters and conjunctival hemorrhage in the abicipar arms. Intraocular inflammation occurred in 7, 5 and 4 patients treated with abicipar 1Q8, 2Q8 and 2Q12 groups, respectively and none with ranibizumab. These adverse events were mostly mild to moderate in severity, and resolved with treatment. These data support progression to phase 3. Allergan is currently enrolling patients in a phase 3 trial for AMD using an updated formulation of abicipar. Enrollment is progressing well and topline results are expected in 2018. Christian Zahnd, CEO of Molecular Partners, commented: We are very pleased to see that abicipar may help certain patients suffering from DME. We look forward to Allergan initiating the phase Continue reading >>

Diabetic Macular Edema (dme) Symptoms Overview

Diabetic Macular Edema (dme) Symptoms Overview

Identifying Diabetic Macular Edema (DME) Symptoms Diabetic macular edema, or DME, develops from an eye condition called diabetic retinopathy, or DR. It is a leading cause of vision loss in people with diabetes and can develop at any time in a person with DR. In the early stages, DME can be treated and a persons vision preserved. Because vision loss can occur very quickly, it is important to get regular screenings before symptoms appear. However, up to 50% of patients with diabetes do not get their eyes examined regularly and are diagnosed when it is too late for treatment to be effective. If DME has advanced to the point where there are visual symptoms, these may include: At the first sign of these diabetic macular edema symptoms, it is very important to see a retina specialist to have the best chance to preserve your vision. Even though you may not be experiencing any symptoms, it is important to get regular eye screenings if you have diabetes. In addition to DME-related vision loss, there are other vision problems that can be brought on by diabetes that may also require treatment, so be sure to speak with your eye care professional about any tests that you may need to identify potential complications. Coping with Diabetic Eye Disease in the home Janelle and Bart reveal some of the adaptions they have made around the home to minimise the impact of Diabetic Eye Disease on their working lives and make Janelles day-to-day life easier. Learn more about Janelle Colquhoun: Biography Janelle Colquhoun is a successful opera singer, public speaker, writer and director of Salubrious Productions, an agency specializing in disabled artists. Janelle was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes as a child, and has suffered from many of the complications that are associated with the condition Continue reading >>

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