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Diabetic Lunch Ideas Eating Out

Tips For Dining Out With Diabetes

Tips For Dining Out With Diabetes

CONTRAVE® (naltrexone HCI/bupropion HCl) is a prescription weight-loss medicine that may help adults with obesity (BMI greater than or equal to 30 kg/m2), or who are overweight (BMI greater than or equal to 27 kg/m2) with at least one weight-related medical condition, lose weight and keep the weight off. CONTRAVE should be used along with diet and exercise. One of the ingredients in CONTRAVE, bupropion, may increase the risk of suicidal thinking in children, adolescents, and young adults. CONTRAVE patients should be monitored for suicidal thoughts and behaviors. In patients taking bupropion for smoking cessation, serious neuropsychiatric adverse events have been reported. CONTRAVE is not approved for use in children under the age of 18. Stop taking CONTRAVE and call a healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following symptoms, especially if they are new, worse, or worry you: thoughts about suicide or dying; attempts to commit suicide; depression; anxiety; feeling agitated or restless; panic attacks; trouble sleeping (insomnia); irritability; aggression, anger, or violence; acting on dangerous impulses; an extreme increase in activity and talking (mania); other unusual changes in behavior or mood. Do not take CONTRAVE if you have uncontrolled high blood pressure; have or have had seizures; use other medicines that contain bupropion such as WELLBUTRIN, APLENZIN or ZYBAN; have or have had an eating disorder; are dependent on opioid pain medicines or use medicines to help stop taking opioids such as methadone or buprenorphine, or are in opiate withdrawal; drink a lot of alcohol and abruptly stop drinking; are allergic to any of the ingredients in CONTRAVE; or are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. Before taking CONTRAVE, tell your healthcare provider ab Continue reading >>

Lunch Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Lunch Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a progressive disease with many potential complications. These include blindness, kidney failure, heart disease, stroke, and loss of toes, feet, or legs. Roughly 1 in every 11 people in the United States currently has diabetes, but although the condition may be familiar, it is hardly harmless. It is the country's seventh leading cause of death, and people with diabetes have a 50 percent higher risk of death than those without the condition. Fortunately, even though diabetes is a chronic disease, it can be managed. One way that complications can be prevented is by following dietary guidelines. Classic lunch ingredients that are good for people with diabetes With planning and conscious eating, people with diabetes can safely enjoy a satisfying and varied diet. The following common lunch items can also be part of a healthful lunch for people with diabetes: canned tuna or salmon hard-boiled eggs salads with dressing on the side low-salt soups and chili whole fruit, such as apples and berries cottage cheese plain, unsweetened Greek yogurt peanut or almond butter Lunch ideas People who need to control their blood sugar can still select from a wide variety of options when they are looking for a tasty lunch. The following lunch ideas provide about 3 servings of carbohydrates each, or about 45 grams (g), or less: soup and salad, such as tomato soup with a kale-apple salad whole-wheat wrap (tortilla = 30 g carbs or less), such as turkey with hummus, cucumber, tomatoes, feta cheese, and olives spinach salad with canned tuna, ½ mayonnaise, ½ Greek yogurt, celery, and lemon juice, served over greens and diced apple hard-boiled egg served with five whole-wheat crackers, string cheese, a piece of fruit, and veggie sticks with peanut butter smoothie made with 1 cup frozen Continue reading >>

13 Tips For Eating Out If You Have Diabetes

13 Tips For Eating Out If You Have Diabetes

Source: Healthy Cooking, February/March 2011 Managing your diabetes doesn’t mean you have to start avoiding your favourite eatery. With just a few easy-to-swallow tips and smart strategies for fitting friends and restaurant fare into your menu plans, you can avoid some common pitfalls and keep your calories, carbs, blood sugar‘and even appetite’in line. Before you go 1. Splurge on an upscale restaurant. They tend to serve smaller portions of top quality foods and to feature local, in-season ingredients. Then, check out the lower-calorie, ‘special-diet’ selections. 2. Dine with other health conscious people. Research shows that diners tend to mimic the people around them. So if your friends order grilled, baked or broiled fish and salad with dressing on the side, you’re more likely to do the same. (Psst: Don’t forget to sample their entrees. The variety will make you feel as if you’ve indulged’and you’ll get an idea of what to order next time.) 3. Have a small snack at home an hour before your dinner reservation, if you’ll be eating later than usual. Munching on fruit, low-fat cheese or celery and carrots will curb your appetite and keep you wolfing down complimentary bread or tortilla chips while waiting to be served. 4. Go ahead, wear those tight-fitting pants or that fancy blouse‘anything that will help you steer clear of gorging or of taking a chance on ruining you best clothes with greasy ribs or heavily sauced entrees. At the table 5. After being seated, take a quick stroll around the room. Before ordering, excuse yourself to wash your hands; then, on your way to the restroom, check out other diners; dishes for portion sizes, heavy sauces, etc. You’ll have a better idea of what to order. 6. Start with a salad or clear soup. Either one is l Continue reading >>

8 Tips For Eating Out With Diabetes

8 Tips For Eating Out With Diabetes

Sticking to a diabetes meal plan is one of the most important parts of managing type 2 diabetes. Knowing what foods to eat and which cooking methods are healthiest are key parts of eating well at home or when eating out. Following your meal plan becomes tricky when you aren’t the one preparing the food, but eating out doesn’t have to knock you off course. It’s possible to get delicious, healthy meals at restaurants and still stick to your diabetes diet. Continue reading >>

Tips For Dining Out With Diabetes

Tips For Dining Out With Diabetes

Two of the best tips you can use at restaurants are to watch the salt and cut the portions. Experts recommend that people with diabetes get only 1,500 milligrams of sodium daily. That's less than a teaspoon. These course-by-course tips will help: Appetizers Choose fresh fruit or vegetables. Avoid soups and broths. Stay away from bread and rolls with salty, buttery crusts. Salads Avoid pickles, canned or marinated vegetables, cured meats, seasoned croutons, cheeses, and salted seeds. Order salad dressings on the side, and use small amounts of them. Main courses Choose plain foods including broiled, grilled, or roasted meat, poultry, fish, or shellfish. Select plain vegetables, potatoes, and noodles. Ask your server about the low-salt menu choices, and ask how the food is prepared. Ask for food to be cooked without salt or monosodium glutamate (MSG). Avoid restaurants that do not allow for special food preparation (such as buffet-style restaurants and diners). Avoid casseroles, mixed dishes, gravies, and sauces. At fast-food restaurants, skip the special sauces, condiments, and cheese. Avoid salted condiments and garnishes such as olives and pickles. Desserts Choose fresh fruits, ices, sherbet, gelatin, and plain cakes. Servings at many restaurants are often big enough to provide lunch for 2 days. When eating out: Ask for half or smaller portions. Eyeball your appropriate portion, set the rest aside, and ask for a doggie bag right away. If you have dessert, share. Continue reading >>

Eating Out

Eating Out

Having diabetes doesn’t deprive you of eating out. If you eat out regularly, you will need to pay close attention to food choices and serving sizes to manage your weight and diabetes. Don’t limit your enjoyment by thinking you need to go to a special restaurant or eat special meals just because you have diabetes. You’ll soon discover that many restaurants serve foods that are suitable for healthy eating. Most will also value your patronage and are more than happy to help if you can’t find something suitable on the menu. Ask restaurant staff about the dish of your choice and the way it’s been cooked, and request simple changes if required. Try to choose meals that: Are lower in fat and particularly low in saturated fat Contain breads, cereals (preferably wholegrain), vegetables (including legumes) and/or fruits Do not have a large amount of sugar added. Insulin & Eating Out When eating out there a few things you need to consider. Your meal may be served later than usual, so to avoid a ‘hypo’, take your insulin with you and give your injection as the meal arrives. Be sure to choose a meal with enough carbohydrate. Ask for extra bread, rice, potato, fruit or fruit juice if you need more. If you are having a bigger meal with more carbohydrate than usual, you may need to increase your insulin dose prior to the meal on that special occasion. Discuss this with your doctor, dietitian or Credentialled Diabetes Educator first. What to Drink When you arrive ask for a jug of iced water before ordering other drinks. Throughout the meal drink: Water: plain, mineral or soda Low joule/calorie soft drinks Coffee, tea, herbal tea. Don’t drink fruit juice (unless you need additional carbohydrates). If you want to drink alcohol limit it to: 2 standard drinks a day for men 1 Continue reading >>

Diabetic-friendly Fast Food Lunch Ideas

Diabetic-friendly Fast Food Lunch Ideas

Lunchtime may be a welcome break from the daily grind for most people, but if you have diabetes, a quick lunch at the local burger joint can quickly turn into too many carbs and unwelcome blood sugar spikes. But it doesn’t have to be that way. By keeping some simple tips in mind, even fast food can be diabetes friendly. Learn some tips to navigate the menus at common fast food restaurants. Burger Restaurants When a burger is all that will soothe your midday craving, stick to a single patty to save on calories. Paying attention to condiments can also be a huge help. Since many fast food restaurants will automatically add mayonnaise to burgers, ask that they hold it on yours. “One tablespoon has around 100 calories,†says Amy Kimberlain, RDN, LDN, RYT, a registered dietitian at the Diabetes Research Institute in Miami. Request mustard or ketchup packets instead. That way, you’re saving calories and controlling the amount yourself. Also avoid other key carb and fat offenders, such as bacon, cheese, and fries. Opt for a lower-carb side salad instead. Chicken Restaurants Chicken may seem like a healthier choice overall. When compared to a higher-fat burger, it might be, but there’s still room to go overboard here, too. To keep carbs in line, watch the wording. “Crispy typically means more calories and carbohydrates, since the chicken has been battered,†says Alison Massey, MS, RD, LDN, CDE, director of diabetes education at the Center for Endocrinology at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. Order your sandwich grilled instead. For your side, choose a non-starchy vegetable such as steamed veggies or coleslaw instead of french fries. Of if you skip the bun, you can make room for healthy complex carbs like beans or fruit. Mexican Restaura Continue reading >>

If You Have Diabetes, Here's Exactly What To Order At 8 Types Of Restaurants​

If You Have Diabetes, Here's Exactly What To Order At 8 Types Of Restaurants​

When you have diabetes, eating out can seem more complicated than deciphering the new tax code. But it doesn’t have to be. “People with diabetes can enjoy most any kind of restaurant,” says Jill Weisenberger, RDN, CDE, author of Diabetes Weight Loss Week by Week. “The key is to stick as closely to your usual meal plan as possible.” Here’s how. (Find out how to stop the craving cycle before it starts and burn fat around the clock with the naturally sweet, salty, and satisfying meals in Eat Clean, Lose Weight & Love Every Bite.) Worried about all that crust? Go with one slice of thin crust pizza and you’ll lighten the carb count of your slice by a third compared to a regular slice. If a single slice sounds too skimpy, pump up the volume—and the fiber—by adding plenty of chopped veggies. And speaking of veggies, filling up on a salad before your pie arrives can also put the breaks on hunger. These pita pizzas will totally change the way you think about dinner: “Given that pasta is packed with carbohydrates, it’s probably not the best idea to make it the center of your meal,” says Weisenberger. Just one order of spaghetti and meatballs can easily pack 150 grams of carbs. That doesn’t mean you have to go 100% pasta-free though. Weisenberger recommends ordering pasta as a side dish and limiting your portion to a half-cup, or about the size of a tennis ball. Pair it with an order of mussels fra diavolo, chicken cacciatore, or grilled calamari. (And make sure you try these 6 ways to make Italian food flat belly-friendly!) We hope you enjoy the products we're recommending as much as we do! Just so you know, Prevention may get a share of sales from the links on this page. If you’re eating Chinese food, chances are there’s going to be rice on your pla Continue reading >>

Eating Out With Diabetes

Eating Out With Diabetes

Eating out at restaurants can sometimes be tricky Eating out at restaurants, cafes or takeaways can be tricky for people with diabetes. Without being able to see the ingredients beforehand, we are often forced to do a fair amount of guesswork as to what a dish may contain. This leads to some people with diabetes being left to guess how much medication to take. Avoid or have small quantities of sugars and simple carbohydrates (chips, potatoes, white bread, white rice, pastry, sponges etc). Download the FREE Diabetes Cookbook 2016. Watch the saturated fat content. Fried and battered foods have a high saturated fat compared with grilled and boiled foods. Many sauces and dressings tend to be high in sat fat so opt for simple olive oil based dressings if you can and ask for sauces to be served separately. Be wary of salt intake which is linked with high blood pressure . Salt adds flavour, so restaurants may be quite liberal with their use of salt. Avoid adding table salt and using less sauces (such as soy sauce) can help to keep your salt intake lower. If you're drinking, be aware that alcohol may affect your blood sugar levels . Order a good quantity of vegetables. Vegetables add fibre and contain a vital source of vitamins and minerals . Restaurants often leave people waiting, often making them all the more hungry, which can lead to over-ordering. Watch out for this and dont feel you have to finish your plate or bowl. Be aware that the body also responds to over eating by releasing more sugar into the blood stream to help digestion, which is no good for sugar levels . If you get the chance, it may be advisable to ask in advance whether they will have certain ingredients on hand. If you plan to order a curry, you could ask whether they will be able to serve brown rice, whi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Nutrition: Eating Out When You Have Diabetes

Diabetes Nutrition: Eating Out When You Have Diabetes

Diabetes nutrition — Make restaurant meals a healthy part of your diabetes meal plan. If you have diabetes, eating out while sticking to your nutrition plan has gotten easier. Many restaurants offer healthy alternatives. And you can plan what you want to order by looking at menus online, some of which provide nutrition information. Using this resource, minding portion sizes and choosing food carefully can help you make restaurant meals part of your overall plan for diabetes nutrition. Keep portion sizes in check Restaurants tend to serve large portions, possibly double or more what you normally eat. Try to eat the same size portions you would if you were eating at home by: Choosing the smallest meal size if the restaurant offers options: for example, a lunch-sized entree Sharing meals with a dining partner or two Requesting a take-home container Making a meal out of a salad or soup and an appetizer Avoid "all you can eat" buffets. It can be difficult to resist overeating with so many options. Even a small amount of many foods on your plate can add up to a lot of calories. Make substitutions Don't settle for what comes with your sandwich or meal. Instead of French fries, choose a diabetes-friendly side salad or a double order of a vegetable. Use fat-free or low-fat salad dressing, rather than the regular variety, or try a squeeze of lemon juice, flavored vinegar or salsa on your salad. Ask for salsa or pico de gallo, an uncooked salsa, with your burrito instead of shredded cheese and sour cream. On a sandwich, trade house dressings or creamy sauces for ketchup, mustard, horseradish or fresh tomato slices. Watch the extras Bacon bits, croutons, cheeses and other add-ons can sabotage diabetes nutrition goals by quickly increasing a meal's calories and carbohydrates. Even Continue reading >>

Diabetes Friendly Restaurants

Diabetes Friendly Restaurants

With some planning, it is possible to eat out and maintain control of your diabetes. Since diabetes medications and insulin are balanced with food intake, it helps to try to stick with your normal routine for meal times and amounts of food. Many restaurants have choices that can work with diabetes if you have a meal plan and know what to look for. Video of the Day Restaurant portions are often much larger than what a person needs to eat. While it may seem like you're getting more food for your money, that food is wasted when you eat more than your body really needs. To cut down on large portions, you can share an entree, order an appetizer instead of an entree, or ask for a to-go container so you can take home part of your meal. Look for broiled or baked meat options without sauces or coating, which add carbohydrates. Starches such as potatoes, bread, rice, and pasta are also sources of carbohydrates. Menu options with fewer starches and more vegetables tend to work better with a diabetes meal plan. For example, look for restaurants that let you order salad or vegetables as a side dish instead of potatoes. Be aware that coatings or breading on meat or vegetables add carbohydrates and fat. Ask your server how the food is prepared if you're not sure. Beer, wine, and cocktails made with fruit juice or regular soda also add additional carbohydrates. While salads are often a healthy option, high-fat dressings and other toppings can add additional unwanted calories. Instead, ask for a low-fat dressing on the side and stick with vegetable toppings. Diabetes meal plans are highly individualized and depend on each person's specific treatment and health care needs. It helps to stick with your usual meal plan as closely as possible when eating out in terms of meal timing, portion Continue reading >>

8 Best Fast Food Options For Diabetics

8 Best Fast Food Options For Diabetics

When it comes to your diabetes care, you know the importance of eating to keep both your blood sugar and weight balanced. Since fast-food restaurants often serve products full of sugar and saturated fat, it is best to stay away from them. However, if you find yourself without many dining options, it is good to know what diabetic-friendly choices are offered by these chains. Check out this list of the best fast-food options for diabetics. Complete nutrition facts including carb counts for the recommended items are available in the restaurants themselves or on their websites. nutrition diet You Might Also Like Continue reading >>

Eating In Restaurants If You Have Diabetes

Eating In Restaurants If You Have Diabetes

Dining out should be a pleasure... ...not a chore. Whether there’s a special occasion to celebrate, a catch-up is long overdue, or simply just ‘because’, gathering together with friends and family to share food is a huge part of how we live our lives. There can’t be many of us who don’t enjoy a meal out, and having diabetes shouldn’t stop you. However, changes to eating routine, unknown ingredients and carb content in food, often generous portion sizes – these are just a handful of some of the issues which dining out can present, and are worth thinking about. Whether you have diabetes or not, these tips can help you keep the balance right when eating out and about. Portion sizes We've all had a meal in a restaurant that either seems really huge, or really small when it finally arrives on the table. While the latter can be disappointing, it's receiving a mountain of food that can really impact your otherwise healthy diet. Judging portion sizes can be tricky at the best of times, and made even harder when you're not preparing the dish yourself. If you're concerned about overeating or having more of a certain food than you should, read our advice on portion sizes. Making healthy choices Not only are so many options on a menu tempting, there's also the added disadvantage of not knowing exactly how the food has been prepared or what's gone into a meal. There are lots of ways you can maintain your healthy diet when eating out, such as choosing lighter, smaller versions of mains, opting for grilled meats that will likely be lower in fat, ask for dressings to be served on the side, and checking for steamed or grilled food as opposed to fried. For lots more tips, check out our information on eating out. Are you discovering that meals out are affecting your diabetes Continue reading >>

The 14 Best Restaurant Meals For Diabetics

The 14 Best Restaurant Meals For Diabetics

Breaking news: you don’t need to fret about your blood sugar spiking when you eat out! The team at Eat This, Not That! has got the 4-1-1 on the healthiest meals diabetics can order. If you have Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) or Type 2 DM, eating out can be a struggle. For example, you may not be as willing to sample an appetizer, or order that bowl of pasta because you’re not sure how many grams of carbs are hidden between each twirl of noodles. And dessert? Forget about it. There’s probably way too much sugar for your pancreas to handle. Enough is enough. You’re allowed to indulge and order that carby dish you’ve been craving for since yesterday. All you need to do is a little bit of research before tackling the menu. The best news of all is you’re not alone. According to the CDC, 29.1 million people have diabetes in the United States—that’s 10% of the entire population. Fortunately, Type 2 DM may be reversible if you eat a variety of fruits, vegetables, grains, and lean protein while avoiding processed foods. Until then, here are a handful of diabetic-friendly meals you can order from your favorite restaurants. And make sure to read up on the 15 Secret Diabetes Remedies for more helpful tips on how you can manage your Type 2 Diabetes. Nutrition: 370 calories, 15 g fat (5 g saturated fat), 1,460 mg sodium, 33 g carbs (4 g fiber, 6 g sugar), 27 g protein Full disclosure here: Above are the nutrition facts for the full size dish, and this salad contains both noodles and cheese for a total of only 33 grams of carbs. Shoutout to Noodles and Company for keeping this dish low carb! One thing that could be improved is the sodium content because it’s a bit high. If you’re feeling like going all out and having a bowl of pasta at Noodles (which we wouldn’t b Continue reading >>

What Are The Diabetes-friendly Options At Restaurants?

What Are The Diabetes-friendly Options At Restaurants?

Find diabetes-friendly meals at restaurants with these tips from Healthy Dining's team of registered dietitians. Q: I have just been told I have diabetes. I like all sorts of foods. What do you suggest I order? You are not alone! There are 29.1 million people (children and adults) in the U.S. with diabetes and another 86 million people with pre-diabetes. People with diabetes may be trying to lose weight, watch their sodium intake, and/or watch their saturated fat intake. (Check with your doctor or dietitian to discuss which of these you should be doing.) And all the while, you are likely keeping an eye on carbohydrate intake—since it’s carbohydrates that cause changes in blood glucose levels. Use these tips when dining out to help you manage your diabetes: Plan ahead – Choose where you are going to eat, make reservations, if possible, and plan ahead for the wait-time until your meal is served so that you eat on your normal schedule and don’t risk becoming hypoglycemic. Eat your usual portion size – Restaurants often give servings two, three, or even four times the recommended serving sizes. To keep from eating too many calories, carbohydrates, saturated? fat, or salt, portion part of your meal to eat at the restaurant and ask that the rest be packaged to take home. Include lean protein – Choose fish, beans, skinless chicken, turkey, or lean cuts of red meat (i.e., beef or pork loin, roast beef) for some satisfying protein without the extra fat. Limit excess fat – Opt for baked, broiled, sautéed, or grilled items instead of fried foods; ask for sauces, gravies, and dressings on the side and use them sparingly; and ask for foods to be cooked with no added butter. These steps help you limit saturated fat – especially harmful when it comes to your arteries Continue reading >>

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