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Diabetic Lotion For Feet

Foot Care

Foot Care

Drugstore Do’s and Don’t’s Even with diabetes, your feet can last a lifetime, and they stand a better chance of doing so if you treat them with tender, loving care. That includes giving them a daily inspection for cuts and abrasions as well as asking your doctor to examine them periodically for any signs of nerve damage, such as loss of sensation, or reduced blood flow, such as coldness or hair loss on the feet and legs. The tools or products you use on your feet at home can have profound effects on their health, particularly if you have any degree of nerve damage or reduced blood flow in your feet. Using the right products can help to keep your skin – and feet – intact, while using the wrong ones can lead to breaks in the skin, which can allow bacteria to enter and, in the worst-case scenario, lead to foot ulcers. Here, then, is your guide to over-the-counter foot products, including some that are safe to use and some to avoid. Soap Washing your feet with warm or tepid water and soap every day keeps them clean and gives you a good chance to do that daily inspection. (If it’s hard to see your feet, run your fingers over them to feel for calluses or sore spots. The backs of your hands are sensitive to heat and can be run over your feet to find hot spots, which can indicate infection.) There must be at least 50 varieties of soap on the shelves of most drugstores – liquid soaps, solid bar soaps, scented soaps, unscented soaps, etc. Which to choose? In general, bar soaps are a better choice than liquid soaps, and soaps that have moisturizing lotion in them are the best choice of all. The compound in soap that gives it its lather is a fatty acid called lanolin, and the more lather, the softer the soap. In most cases, bar soaps have more lather than liquid. The Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Care Cream: Common Ingredients

Diabetic Foot Care Cream: Common Ingredients

In the battle against diabetes complications, foot care is one of the most important aspects. Taking good care of your feet often involves using an appropriate lotion or foot cream. From keeping your feet moisturized to helping you deal with peripheral neuropathy, diabetic foot care cream can help with a number of issues. What's in diabetic foot care cream? With over 14 years of diabetes experience under my belt, I have tried out my share of creams and lotions for the feet. A quick perusal of my medicine cabinet turned up several items with a wide variety of ingredients. I made a list of the most common ingredients, gleaned information on some from the packaging and turned to the power of the Internet to look up the others. Here are a few of the most popular ingredients in those foot creams, along with what they do and why you might use them: L-Arginine HCL. This ingredient comes from a naturally occurring amino acid. It warms the feet, so it can be a good idea for those who have trouble with feet that stay uncomfortably cold. Capsaicin. This natural active component of chili peppers provides slow, gentle warming upon application. This can help ease the aches and pains of the feet. Aloe. This natural cooling pain relief can also help heal wounds on the feet. Urea. This product is commonly used in lotions for the re-hydrating effect it can have on the skin. This is especially effective for areas that are extremely dry. Ammonium lactate. This ingredient calms itchy skin and leaves behind a moisturized, cool feeling. Lidocaine. This topical pain reliever can be mixed with other ingredients to provide a cooling sensation and relief of minor aches and pains. TriOxygenC. Some products include this patented formula, which helps increase oxygen flow to the skin. Retin-A. This i Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Care: Taking The Right Steps

Diabetic Foot Care: Taking The Right Steps

As the number of type 2 diabetes (T2D) cases continues to escalate each year, pharmacists are likely to encounter patients inquiring about proper diabetic foot care. Foot problems are very common in patients with T2D, accounting for a significant portion of diabetes- related complications and health care costs.1 Pharmacists are in a pivotal position to educate patients with a new diagnosis of diabetes about their care. Pharmacists should remind patients about the importance of routine diabetic foot care to prevent or delay complications, such as diabetic foot ulcers and amputations. Patients with diabetes, especially those with poorly controlled disease, are more susceptible to skin-related complications; therefore, patients should be reminded that many dermatologic conditions can be either prevented or effectively treated if identified early. Conducting a daily skin inspection and adhering to daily skin care, especially foot care, is imperative for all patients with diabetes. Pharmacists should seize every opportunity to stress the importance of maintaining tight glycemic control and remind patients how proper and routine foot care is critical to decreasing the incidence of foot ulcers and amputations. It is estimated that nearly 85% of amputations are preventable with education and early intervention.2 The primary goal of diabetic foot care is prevention of diabetes-related complications, such as changes in the skin (dryness and itching) and foot ulcers, which are often attributed to vascular disease, neuropathy, and relative immunosuppression.3,4 Foot problems are more common among patients with diabetes compared with the general population (Table 13,4). Strategies for preventing foot problems include patient education, patient involvement and adherence, maintenance Continue reading >>

11 Foot Care Tips For Type 2 Diabetes

11 Foot Care Tips For Type 2 Diabetes

Your feet might be the last thing on your mind when you're trying to control diabetes. But high blood sugar can damage the nerves in your feet as well as elsewhere in the body, and the risks to foot health increase if you also have high blood pressure and high cholesterol, says Holly Bertram, RN, a diabetes nurse educator with St. Mary’s Health System in Evansville, Indiana. If you have nerve damage, you may experience numbness or loss of feeling in your feet. As a result you may not feel blisters, cuts, or other wounds on your feet right away, which can give them time to worsen. Even small cuts and sores can become infected if left untreated. Foot health awareness and good foot care can reduce the risk of amputation by as much as 85 percent, according to the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA), which states that 65,000 lower-limb amputations occur each year because of diabetes complications. Despite those numbers, fewer than one in three adults with diabetes saw a foot doctor in the past year as is recommended, according to data released by the National Center for Health Statistics. To protect your feet from diabetes complications, practice prevention with these smart steps for foot care: 1. Maintain good blood sugar control. Achieving blood-sugar targets helps to protect your feet. Just how strong is this link? People with diabetes who have a higher A1C level are at greater risk of lower-limb amputation, according to data on more than 35,000 adults published in the November 2013 issue of the journal Diabetes Care. 2. Check your feet every day. “Examining both feet, including the bottom of the foot and between the toes, every day in the morning and evening is recommended,” says Michael Palladino, DPM, a podiatrist and assistant professor in the departme Continue reading >>

The 5 Best Foot Creams

The 5 Best Foot Creams

Your feet need a little TLC if you want them to look their very best. After all, they support you every day and take on the tough streets and uncomfortable shoes that we all tend to gravitate toward. Fortunately, there are a number of powerful foot creams that can help reverse damage and revive your feet in no time. What Is Foot Cream? Foot cream is a deeply moisturizing cream that penetrates deeper into the skin to make the feet look younger, smoother, and more rejuvenated. Whether you suffer from dry feet, cracked heels, or calluses, a powerful foot cream can repair the damage and help prevent dry skin in the future. It can also help with aches and pains in the feet. Foot creams will leave your feet looking and feeling softer and more youthful in no time. Apply them to dry feet anytime, and for extra moisturization benefits, consider slathering on foot cream and wearing thick cotton socks to bed to wake up to the softest, smoothest feet imaginable. Many people also find it very effective to wear foot cream under socks before working out or sweating, as this will allow your feet to absorb more of the cream, more quickly. Pay particular attention to heels, toes, ankles, and any other dry areas of the feet to have sandal-ready feet year round. Top 5 Foot Creams O'Keeffe's for Healthy Feet The O'Keeffe's for Healthy Feet Foot Cream claims to work in a matter of days. The unscented lotion can heal dry, cracked, split skin and seals in moisture so your feet are softer and smoother than ever. The odorless formula is non greasy, non oily, and hydrates the skin better than expensive prescription-strength creams. The concentrated daily foot cream is ideal for all skin types, including diabetic feet. This is Amazon’s #1 best-seller in foot creams and lotions, one of the “mos Continue reading >>

Best Diabetic Foot Cream: Our Top 5 Picks

Best Diabetic Foot Cream: Our Top 5 Picks

If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, your doctor may have recommended you start taking extra care of your feet. Or you may have concluded that on your own after experiencing an increasing number of foot problems such as calluses, blisters and dry skin. What is the connection between diabetes and foot health? There are several links. For one, high blood sugar levels damage nerves in your feet, a condition called diabetic neuropathy. This results in reduced sensation in your feet. You might get injured or develop blisters without knowing it. Diabetes may also cause reduced blood circulation, deformed feet and excessive skin dryness in your feet. If you are not careful, some of these problems may lead to eventual foot amputation. The foot creams we have recommended below are great if you are experiencing diabetes-related foot problems. We have chosen them for their safety and effectiveness. Read through the brief reviews and find the best one for you and start using it today to keep your feet well protected. With the natural scents of rosemary, lavender and mountain pain, this refreshing foot cream is one of the best. It comes in a 500ml dispenser and can be used on the feet as well as between the toes. It moisturizes your skin, ensuring they stay soft and supple through the day. This is especially important in preventing the formation of cracks which can lead to serious ulcers. Key features: Contains natural ingredients that are safe and effective. Helps prevent fungal infections on your feet and nails. Ideal for relieving aching and tired feet. If dry feet and cracked problems are a nagging problem, this softening cream will help. The first thing it does is rehydrate your skin, keeping it moist and supple for hours. It then combats any pain on your feet and uses its Continue reading >>

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Diabetes can cause long-term problems throughout your body, especially if you don’t control your blood sugar effectively, and sugar levels remain high for many years. High blood sugar can cause diabetic neuropathy, which damages the nerves that send signals from your hands and feet. Diabetic neuropathy can cause numbness or tingling in your fingers, toes, hands, and feet. Another symptom is a burning, sharp, or aching pain (diabetic nerve pain). The pain may be mild at first, but it can get worse over time and spread up your legs or arms. Walking can be painful, and even the softest touch can feel unbearable. Up to 50 percent of people with diabetes may experience nerve pain. Nerve damage can affect your ability to sleep, decrease your quality of life, and can also cause depression. Damaged nerves can’t be replaced. However, there are ways that you can prevent further damage and relieve your pain. First, control your blood sugar so the damage doesn’t progress. Talk to your doctor about setting your blood sugar goal, and learn to monitor it. You may be asked to lower your blood sugar before meals to 70 to 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) and your blood sugar after meals to less than 180 mg/dL. Use diets, exercise, and medications to decrease your blood sugar to a healthier range. Monitor other health risks that can worsen your diabetes, such as your weight and smoking. Ask your doctor about effective ways to lose weight or quit smoking, if necessary. Your doctor might suggest trying an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin (Bufferin), or ibuprofen (Motrin IB, Advil), which are available without a prescription but can cause side effects. Use a low dose for a short time to control your symptoms. Other options exist for stronger Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Tips For Daily Foot Care

Diabetes: Tips For Daily Foot Care

If you have diabetes, it's essential to make foot care part of your daily self-care routine. That's because "people can develop complications before they realize they even have a problem," says Bresta Miranda-Palma, MD, a professor with the Diabetes Research Institute at the University of Miami Medical School. "I've seen people walk on a nail for weeks until infection has developed." When feet and legs have nerve damage, a small cut or wound can go unnoticed. That's why it's critical to check for problems before they get infected and lead to serious complications -- like gangrene or amputation. "Daily foot care is the most important thing," says Miranda-Palma. "About 85% of amputations can be prevented if the patient gets a wound treated in time." That means checking your feet daily and seeing a foot doctor (podiatrist) every two or three months in order to catch problems early. Daily Care you might like Wash and dry your feet with mild soap and warm water. Dry your feet thoroughly, especially between the toes, an area more prone to fungal infections. Use lotion on your feet to prevent cracking, but don't put the lotion between your toes. Do not soak feet, or you'll risk infection if the skin begins to break down. And if you have nerve damage, take care with water temperature. You risk burning your skin if you can't feel that the water is too hot. Weekly Care Trim toenails straight across with a nail clipper. You can prevent ingrown toenails if you don't round the corners of the nails or cut down the sides. Smooth the nails with an emery board. Check the tops and bottoms of your feet, using a mirror if you need it; you can also ask someone else to check your feet for you. Also, be sure to get your feet examined at every doctor's visit. When examining your feet, look for Continue reading >>

47 Podiatrists Share Tips On Good Foot Care For Those With Diabetes

47 Podiatrists Share Tips On Good Foot Care For Those With Diabetes

Here is exactly what we asked our panel of experts: What tips would you give to someone who is newly diagnosed? Why do you think a lot of people ignore their foot care when it comes to diabetes? Featured Answer Dr. Ira H. Kraus, President, American Podiatric Medical Association A1: The most important tip I would give to anyone newly diagnosed with diabetes is to include a podiatrist in your care team. That may seem like a self-serving tip! But independent studies show that when a podiatrist is involved in caring for a person with diabetes, that person’s risk of hospitalization and diabetes-related amputations goes down dramatically. Seeing a podiatrist once a year can help you prevent diabetic ulcers, and if you do develop an ulcer, seeing a podiatrist can help reduce the risk of amputation by up to 80 percent. I would also suggest that people newly diagnosed with diabetes simply pay close attention to their feet. Prevention can be the key. Watch your feet daily for any changes, and if you see something that concerns you, get in to see your podiatrist as soon as possible! A2: A diabetes diagnosis can be overwhelming. It comes with a lot of lifestyle changes and a lot of concerns. Our feet are literally the furthest things from our minds, so it’s not surprising that many people overlook them as they’re growing accustomed to living with diabetes. Also, many people don’t understand the serious complications diabetes can cause in the feet, and by the time they realize there’s a problem, it is a significant problem. People do not realize that simple things that they have been living with for years like: dry skin, athletes foot, skin fissures or calluses can lead to serious complications. The good news is that those small steps of examining your feet once a day and Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Taking Care Of Your Feet

Diabetes - Taking Care Of Your Feet

Diabetes can damage the nerves and blood vessels in your feet. This damage can cause numbness and reduce feeling in your feet. As a result, your feet may not heal well if they are injured. If you get a blister, you may not notice and it may get worse. Check your feet every day. Inspect the tops, sides, soles, heels, and between your toes. Look for: Dry and cracked skin Blisters or sores Bruises or cuts Redness, warmth, or tenderness Firm or hard spots If you cannot see well, ask someone else to check your feet. Call your health care provider right way about any foot problems you have. DO NOT try to treat these problems yourself. Even small sores or blisters can become big problems if infection develops or they DO NOT heal. Foot ulcers are a common reason for hospital stays for people with diabetes. Wash your feet every day with lukewarm water and mild soap. Strong soaps may damage the skin. Check the temperature of the water with your hand or elbow first. Gently dry your feet, especially between the toes. Use lotion, petroleum jelly, lanolin, or oil on dry skin. DO NOT put lotion, oil, or cream between your toes. Ask your health care provider to show you how to trim your toenails. Soak your feet in lukewarm water to soften your toenails before trimming. Cut the nails straight across. Curved nails are more likely to become ingrown. Make sure the edge of each nail does not press into the skin of the next toe. Your foot doctor (podiatrist) can trim your toenails if you are unable to. Most people with diabetes should have corns or calluses treated by a foot doctor. If your doctor has given you permission to treat corns or calluses on your own: Gently use a pumice stone to remove corns and calluses after a shower or bath, when your skin is soft. DO NOT use medicated pads or Continue reading >>

The Best Foot Cream Reviews In 2017 Full Edition

The Best Foot Cream Reviews In 2017 Full Edition

The feet take a beating on a regular basis. From the challenges of wearing uncomfortable shoes to walking barefoot on rough cement, there are so many ways that our feet work through tough situations. Once we are able to sit down and take off our shoes, the best foot cream can make a world of difference. Whether you have issues like dry feet with cracked heels, numbness from diabetes, or you simply want to keep your feel supple and healthy, there are several different foot creams that will help you reach your goal. These products are made from ingredients that are designed to soften and strengthen the skin and are priced to fit into every budget. There are several products that would like to be named the best foot cream, but only a few make the cut. As one of the most recognizable names in luxury beauty products, L’Occitane makes a foot cream does not disappoint. L’Occitane Shea Butter Foot Cream is so highly regarded that it won awards from a popular fashion magazine for two consecutive years. The power in L’Occitane’s formula comes from lavender essential oil right from France. This purifies the skin so the anti-inflammatory arnica can do its work to calm redness and inflammation. The rich formula works all over the feet, from the heels to the toenails. Lavender oil fights inflammation and it heals scar tissue. It also helps improve circulation, which is one of the keys to healthy feet. Lavender oil has antifungal properties, which is why it helps create healthy toenails, too. Shea butter is also anti-inflammatory. Since shea butter includes fatty acids and vitamins, when this rich formula from L’Occitane is massaged into the feet, they feel fabulous. The product lasts all day. It is an ideal foot cream for people with incredibly dry, crac Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Foot problems are common in people with diabetes. You might be afraid you’ll lose a toe, foot, or leg to diabetes, or know someone who has, but you can lower your chances of having diabetes-related foot problems by taking care of your feet every day. Managing your blood glucose levels, also called blood sugar, can also help keep your feet healthy. How can diabetes affect my feet? Over time, diabetes may cause nerve damage, also called diabetic neuropathy, that can cause tingling and pain, and can make you lose feeling in your feet. When you lose feeling in your feet, you may not feel a pebble inside your sock or a blister on your foot, which can lead to cuts and sores. Cuts and sores can become infected. Diabetes also can lower the amount of blood flow in your feet. Not having enough blood flowing to your legs and feet can make it hard for a sore or an infection to heal. Sometimes, a bad infection never heals. The infection might lead to gangrene. Gangrene and foot ulcers that do not get better with treatment can lead to an amputation of your toe, foot, or part of your leg. A surgeon may perform an amputation to prevent a bad infection from spreading to the rest of your body, and to save your life. Good foot care is very important to prevent serious infections and gangrene. Although rare, nerve damage from diabetes can lead to changes in the shape of your feet, such as Charcot’s foot. Charcot’s foot may start with redness, warmth, and swelling. Later, bones in your feet and toes can shift or break, which can cause your feet to have an odd shape, such as a “rocker bottom.” What can I do to keep my feet healthy? Work with your health care team to make a diabetes self-care plan, which is an action plan for how you will manage your diabetes. Your plan should inclu Continue reading >>

Diabetes Foot Care

Diabetes Foot Care

If you have diabetes, it's essential to make foot care part of your daily routine. People with diabetes can develop complications before they realise they even have a problem. When feet and legs have nerve damage, a small cut or wound can go unnoticed. That's why it's critical to check for problems before they get infected and lead to serious complications - such as gangrene or amputation. Diabetes UK says around 80% of the more than 7,000 diabetes-related amputations in England every year are preventable. Make sure your diabetes specialist examines your feet during each check-up. An annual foot examination should be performed which should include an inspection of the skin - they may check for redness or warmth of the skin. The examination is also to check for pulses and the temperature of your feet and an assessment of sensation of the foot. How can diabetes affect my feet? Diabetes can cause two main problems that can affect your feet: Diabetic neuropathy. Uncontrolled diabetes can damage your nerves. If you have damaged nerves in your legs and feet, you might not feel heat, cold, or pain. This lack of feeling is called sensory diabetic neuropathy. If you do not feel a cut or sore on your foot because of neuropathy, the cut could get worse and become infected. The muscles of the foot may not function properly because the nerves that make the muscles work, are damaged. This could cause the foot to not align properly and create too much pressure in one area of the foot. It is estimated that up to 10% of people with diabetes will develop foot ulcers. Foot ulcers occur because of nerve damage and peripheral vascular disease. Peripheral vascular disease (PVD). Diabetes also affects the flow of blood. Without good blood flow it takes longer for a sore or cut to heal. Poor b Continue reading >>

How To Care For Your Feet

How To Care For Your Feet

Many people with diabetes have problems with circulation and nerve damage in their feet. This affects how well they can feel hot and cold, pain, and other sensations. People who have problems with feeling and sensation don't get the usual warning signs if something's wrong. They might have a wound that won't heal, or nerve damage might be changing the shape of their feet, without them being aware of it. Without good foot care, sometimes problems can get so bad that a damaged foot needs to be amputated. Good foot care, including daily foot care at home and foot exams at your clinic, can help keep foot problems from getting out of control. Checklist for Daily Foot Care Make these simple steps part of your daily routine. If you aren't able to care for your feet yourself, ask a caregiver or family member for help. Or contact the Resource Line for information about community resources in your area. Check your feet every day: If you can't bend your legs and ankles to see the bottoms of your bare feet, use a mirror. You can place a mirror on the floor and hold each foot over it to look at the bottoms of your feet. Look for cuts, blisters, red spots, and swelling. If you see anything that worries you, contact a member of your health care team right away. Keep your feet clean and moisturized: Wash your feet every day in room temperature water (less than 110° F.) Test the water with your hand or a thermometer to make sure it's not too hot. Dry your feet well after washing. Make sure you dry between your toes. Moisture between your toes can lead to the growth of fungus. Moisturize your feet with cream or lotion. Don't use moisturizer between your toes unless you're using a medicated cream to treat a fungus infection, such as athlete's foot. If your feet sweat easily, dust them li Continue reading >>

The Best Foot Creams To Treat Your Dry, Achy Feet

The Best Foot Creams To Treat Your Dry, Achy Feet

Tap here to turn on desktop notifications to get the news sent straight to you. 06/01/2015 01:44 pm ETUpdatedDec 06, 2017 The Best Foot Creams To Treat Your Dry, Achy Feet Photo Credit: James Darell via Getty Images Getting your feet in tiptop shape for summer requires more than just choosing the perfect nail polish color . You'll want to make sure that you're giving your soles a regular dose of TLC with foot cream . "From calluses to cracked skin and nail issues, there's no other part of your anatomy that reflects age as dramatically," said Suzanne Levine , a board-certified podiatrist and the author of " My Feet Are Killing Me ." Massaging with foot creams and balms eases aches and pains and treats extremely dry skin -- making feet look younger and feel softer. Look for foot care products formulated with hydrating ingredients such as urea, shea butter and jojoba and macadamia oils that will penetrate deeper into skin. Levine's best advice for moisturizing: lotion up each night, paying special attention to the heels. "Put some socks on, go to sleep and give your feet a good rub with the pumice stone in the morning," she said. Grab one of the best foot creams below and follow the doctor's orders. Continue reading >>

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