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Prevalence And Clinical Significance Ofdiabetes In Asian Versus White Patientswith Heart Failure - Sciencedirect

Prevalence And Clinical Significance Ofdiabetes In Asian Versus White Patientswith Heart Failure - Sciencedirect

Volume 5, Issue 1 , January 2017, Pages 14-24 Focus Issue: Thinking Outside the Box: Pathophysiology, Prediction, and Risk Prevalence and Clinical Significance ofDiabetes in Asian Versus White PatientsWith Heart Failure The study sought to compare the prevalence, clinical correlates and prognostic impact of diabetes in Southeast Asian versus white patients with heart failure (HF) with preserved or reduced ejection fraction. Diabetes mellitus is common in HF and is associated with impaired prognosis. Asia is home to the majority of the worlds diabetic population, yet data on the prevalence and clinical significance of diabetes in Asian patients with HF are sparse, and no studies have directly compared Asian and white patients. Two contemporary population-based HF cohorts were combined: from Singapore (n= 1,002, median [25thto 75th percentile] age 62 [54 to 70] years, 76% men, 19.5% obesity) and Sweden (n= 19,537, 77 [68 to 84] years, 60% men, 24.8% obesity). The modifying effect of ethnicity on the relationship between diabetes and clinical correlates or prognosis (HF hospitalization and all-cause mortality) was examined using interaction terms. Diabetes was present in 569 (57%) Asian patients versus 4,680 (24%) white patients (p< 0.001). Adjusting for clinical covariates, obesity was more strongly associated with diabetes in white patients (odds ratio [OR]: 3.45; 95%confidence interval [CI]: 2.86 to 4.17) than in Asian patients (OR: 1.82; 95% CI: 1.13 to 2.96; pinteraction= 0.026). Diabetes was more strongly associated with increased HF hospitalization and all-cause mortality in Asian patients (hazard ratio: 1.50; 95% CI: 1.21 to 1.87) than in white patients (hazard ratio: 1.29; 95% CI: 1.22 to 1.36; pinteraction= 0.045). Diabetes was 3-fold more common in Southeast As Continue reading >>

Copywriter Job In Burlington - Dealertrack

Copywriter Job In Burlington - Dealertrack

Experience and/or portfolio of material to demonstrate writing fluently and accurately for various purposes Excellent command of the English language and a good knowledge of grammar, spelling, and punctuation Genuine interest in client s products and services, automotive industry and dealership focused Ability to write in varying styles and assume different tones according client needs Works independently and as part of a team Ability to deal with criticism and sometimes even rejection and leverage into positive knowledge and skills growth and develop Bachelor s Degree, English, Marketing, Journalism, Communication preferred Dealer. com, a Cox Automotive Brand, provides market leading digital solutions for automotive retail including connected advertising, websites, and managed services. Through innovation and collaboration, our professionals develop state-of-the-art workflow solutions to automotive retail challenges. Cox Automotive is transforming the way the world buys, sells and owns cars with industry-leading digital marketing, retail, financial and wholesale solutions for consumers, dealers, manufacturers and the overall automotive ecosystem worldwide. The Cox Automotive family includes Autotrader , Dealer. com , Dealertrack , Kelley Blue Book , Manheim , NextGear Capital , vAuto , VinSolutions , Xtime , incadea and a host of other brands. With a complete and connected view of the automotive ecosystem, Cox Automotive is a global company connecting people, cars and capabilities with services that link the automotive value chain. Cox Automotive is a subsidiary of Cox Enterprises. For more information about Cox Automotive, visit www. coxautoinc. com. Remote Editors MommyjobsonlineVergennes, VT We receive a high volume of academic and business papers 24/7. Editors are Continue reading >>

Flying On Insulin | Diabetes Health

Flying On Insulin | Diabetes Health

Every pilot’s nightmare is the thought of losing his medical certification and being stopped from flying. That happened to me in May of 1986, when I was diagnosed with type 1. In accordance with the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Standards and Recommended Practices, Canada, along with every other country in the world, would not allow insulin-dependent pilots to hold any type of pilot’s license. My short eight-year career with Air Canada came to an abrupt end, and I was told in no uncertain terms that I would never be allowed to fly an aircraft again. ICAO worried that a type 1 pilot might not always be able to maintain the delicate balance of food intake, timing of meals, insulin, exercise and fatigue that all type 1’s struggle with. If a pilot suffered a low blood glucose during flight, he could lose consciousness, with obvious disastrous consequences. For these safety reasons, ICAO prohibited all persons with type 1 from acting as a crewmember. In 1986, no consideration was given to how well an individual could control his diabetes. Because I was only 30 years old at the time, I decided to start a new career. What followed was a five-year commitment to obtain my law degree and three years of private practice as a general practice lawyer. Although I did not specifically pick my new job as a lawyer with the intent of attempting to regain my pilot’s license, it turned out that this became a fortuitous benefit of my newly chosen career. Special thanks must go to Air Canada because they were very supportive during this transition period. I was hired as a simulator instructor and spent eight years as both a full-time and, during law school, a part-time simulator instructor on the DC-9, teaching other pilots how to fly this aircraft. In 1982, Trans Continue reading >>

Diabetic Recipes

Diabetic Recipes

Think diabetic recipes are bland? Think again. All of our diabetes-friendly recipes meet dietary guidelines for people with diabetes and are taste-approved through the Better Homes and Gardens® Test Kitchen. Plus, every recipe is carb counted for you so you can enjoy a healthy and delicious meal with confidence. Having diabetes doesn't equal deprivation and our recipes taste so good, your family and friends will love them too. Yum! Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Facts

Type 1 Diabetes Facts

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that occurs when a person’s pancreas stops producing insulin, the hormone that controls blood-sugar levels. T1D develops when the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells are mistakenly destroyed by the body’s immune system. The cause of this attack is still being researched, however scientists believe the cause may have genetic and environmental components. There is nothing anyone can do to prevent T1D. Presently, there is no known cure. Who T1D affects Type 1 diabetes (sometimes known as juvenile diabetes) affects children and adults, though people can be diagnosed at any age. With a typically quick onset, T1D must be managed with the use of insulin—either via injection or insulin pump. Soon, people who are insulin dependent may also be able to use artificial pancreas systems to automatically administer their insulin. How T1D is managed Type 1 diabetes is a 24/7 disease that requires constant management. People with T1D continuously and carefully balance insulin intake with eating, exercise and other activities. They also measure blood-sugar levels through finger pricks, ideally at least six times a day, or by wearing a continuous glucose monitor. Even with a strict regimen, people with T1D may still experience dangerously high or low blood-glucose levels that can, in extreme cases, be life threatening. Every person with T1D becomes actively involved in managing his or her disease. Insulin is not a cure While insulin therapy keeps people with T1D alive and can help keep blood-glucose levels within recommended range, it is not a cure, nor does it prevent the possibility of T1D’s serious effects. The outlook for treatments and a cure Although T1D is a serious and challenging disease, long-term management options cont Continue reading >>

Jmir Diabetes

Jmir Diabetes

"Excellent (5/5) - The editor and the reviewers assessed my manuscript in a very efficient and yet thorough manner. The communication was all very clear throughout the process." Anonymous Review on SciRev.sc View Theme View All Themes Background: Personalized blood glucose (BG) prediction for diabetes patients is an important goal that is pursued by many researchers worldwide. Despite many proposals, only a few projects are dedicated to the development of complete recommender system infrastructures that incorporate BG prediction algorithms for diabetes patients. The development and implementation of such a system aided by mobile technology is of particular interest to patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), especially considering the significant importance of quickly achieving adequate BG control for these patients in a short period (ie, during pregnancy) and a typically higher acceptance rate for mobile health (mHealth) solutions for short- to midterm usage. Objective: This study was conducted with the objective of developing infrastructure comprising data processing algorithms, BG prediction models, and an appropriate mobile app for patients’ electronic record management to guide BG prediction-based personalized recommendations for patients with GDM. Methods: A mobile app for electronic diary management was developed along with data exchange and continuous BG signal processing software. Both components were coupled to obtain the necessary data for use in the personalized BG prediction system. Necessary data on meals, BG measurements, and other events were collected via the implemented mobile app and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system processing software. These data were used to tune and evaluate the BG prediction model, which included an algorithm Continue reading >>

My Sister Died Because She Didn't Take Diabetes Seriously

My Sister Died Because She Didn't Take Diabetes Seriously

When Yolanda Acuna Ocana was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, her family was almost relieved. She was 14 and had been suffering from inexplicable weight loss, constant thirst and tiredness, and they were grateful for a diagnosis. Now — sadly — they feel very differently about diabetes. Last April, aged just 39, Yolanda died as a result of the disease, leaving behind a loving husband and devoted family. ‘No one expects diabetes to kill someone so young in this day and age,’ says Yolanda’s sister, Nicky Dixon, 38, a company director from Surbiton, Surrey. People often think diabetes, type 1 or type 2, is not a serious condition, says Dr Jeremy Allgrove, a paediatric endocrinologist at Barts and the London NHS Trust. ‘But if you don’t look after yourself, it’s a killer.’ The figures are stark: type 1 diabetes reduces life expectancy on average by 20 years. The condition is caused by the body attacking the cells of the pancreas responsible for making insulin. Insulin helps the body break down glucose from food and turn it into energy; without it, blood sugar levels become dangerously high, causing damage to blood vessels. Around 300,000 Britons have the condition. It can run in families, but experts believe the condition is usually triggered, possibly by some sort of virus. Unlike type 2 diabetes, type 1 is characterised by insulin dependence — once diagnosed, a patient must inject themselves daily for the rest of their life. The problem is that many people don’t take their insulin as they should, with potentially fatal consequences. Yolanda was supposed to inject herself seven times a day, but when she left home for university at 18, she reduced her intake because the jabs were causing her to put on weight. This growing trend has even been given a name Continue reading >>

Medical Information - Stanford Internal Medicine (sim) - Stanford University School Of Medicine

Medical Information - Stanford Internal Medicine (sim) - Stanford University School Of Medicine

Anderson, B. Stretching, 20th anniversary, revised edition. Published by Shelter Publications, Inc. 2000. . Jacobs, MB et al. Taking care. Published by Random House, New York, New York. 1997. Lorig, K et al. Living a healthy life with chronic conditions. Bull Publishing Company, Palo Alto. 1994. Morris, V. How to care for aging parents. Published by Workman Publishing. 1996. Sapolsky, RM. Why Zebras don't get ulcers: the updated guide to stress, stress-related diseases and coping. Published by W.H. Freeman and Company, New York. 1998. University of California at Berkeley Wellness Letter . Published by Health Letter Associates, P.O. Box 412, Prince Street Station, New York, New York 10012-0007. Subscriptions to P.O. Box 420148, Palm Coast, Florida 32142 (904-445-6414). Utley, DS. Stop the heartburn: what you can do to reduce your symptoms of one of Americans most common problems. Lagao Publishing: 1997. Vickery, DM, Fried, JF. Take care of yourself: the complete illustrated guide to medical self-care. Published by Perseus Books, 2000. Zilbergeld, B. The new male sexuality, revised edition. Published by Banton Doubleday, 1999. Continue reading >>

Artificial Pancreas Breakthrough Brings Hope For Type 1 Diabetics

Artificial Pancreas Breakthrough Brings Hope For Type 1 Diabetics

Artificial pancreas breakthrough brings hope for type 1 diabetics Ask anyone who lives with Type 1 Diabetes and theyll tell you how they hope for a cure. Type 1 diabetics are living with a form of the disease that usually develops early in life when cells of the pancreas responsible for insulin production are destroyed by the immune system. This results in 24/7 monitoring and management of diet, activity and blood sugar levels. Never having a day off from the struggle to keep blood sugar under control, type 1 diabetics face a challenging and sometimes exhausting balance that determines how they feel now and what complications their diabetes could cause in the future. Until now, the only treatment has been insulin replacement with injections or pumps, but researchers are getting closer to a new, ground- breaking therapy known as an artificial pancreas. Whenever you eat or drink, some of the food is broken down into glucose, a sugar that is released into your blood. It is a major source of energy for your body's cells and is transported from your bloodstream and into your cells with the help of insulin, which is made in the pancreas. Insulin is produced by the beta or islet cells inside your pancreas and works continuously to regulate the amount of glucose in your blood. When you eat, the amount of glucose in your bloodstream rises. In response to the elevated blood glucose level, your islet cells produce insulin. The insulin moves the glucose out of the bloodstream and into your cells. In turn, a lower level of glucose is left in the blood stream. To prevent your blood glucose level from getting too low, your body signals you to eat. This starts the process again so that your bodys cells continually receive the energy that they need. The artificial pancreas works in a s Continue reading >>

Flu And People With Diabetes

Flu And People With Diabetes

People with diabetes (type 1 or type 2), even when well-managed, are at high risk of serious flu complications, often resulting in hospitalization and sometimes even death. Pneumonia, bronchitis, sinus infections and ear infections are examples of flu-related complications. The flu also can make chronic health problems, like diabetes, worse. This is because diabetes can make the immune system less able to fight infections. In addition, illness can make it harder to control your blood sugar. The illness might raise your sugar but sometimes people don’t feel like eating when they are sick, and this can cause blood sugar levels to fall. So it is important to follow the sick day guidelines for people with diabetes. Vaccination is the Best Protection against Flu CDC recommends that all people who are 6 months and older get a flu vaccine. It is especially important for people with diabetes to get a flu vaccine. Flu shots are approved for use in people with diabetes and other health conditions. The flu shot has a long, established safety record in people with diabetes. People with type 1 or type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of developing pneumococcal pneumonia because of the flu, so being up to date with pneumococcal vaccination is also recommended. Pneumococcal vaccination should be part of a diabetes management plan. Talk to your doctor to find out which pneumococcal vaccines are recommended for you. Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when coughing or sneezing and throw the tissue away after using it; Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after coughing or sneezing; Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth (germs are spread that way); and Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care. If you are sick with flu-like symptoms you should sta Continue reading >>

Diabetic Guide To Chinese Food

Diabetic Guide To Chinese Food

How can you stay healthy and still enjoy Chinese food? You can do it by planning ahead, choosing wisely and watching how much you eat. Choose traditional food dishes that are high in fiber, vitamins and minerals, and low in fat. Great choices are beans, peas, tofu, bean sprouts and dark green vegetables such as Chinese broccoli, choy sum, watercress, Chinese chives, Chinese yard-long beans and amaranth also known as Chinese spinach. Other Chinese vegetables that are rich in iron are Chinese mushroom, seaweed and black fungus. Go for the mung beans (green gram beans), yellow bean and black bean dishes for soup or desserts with artificial sweetener. Sweet potatoes are also high in fiber and very nutritious which can be boiled or made into dessert with taro and tapioca using artificial sweetener. Whole wheat and rye bread and cornbread are good sources of fiber and are good for everyone. Watch out for dishes loaded with lard such as moon cakes. Also watch out foods that are loaded with fat and cholesterol such as Chinese sausages that are made with pork loin or pork or duck liver and roasted pigs or pork or ducks. Lastly, watch out for foods that are high in salt such as salty duck eggs and salty fish. For some people who like dim sum, choose steamed dumplings instead of fried dumplings and should limit to 5-6 servings for brunch. Choose fresh vegetables that are steamed or stir-fried with light vegetable oil or simmer into soup. Vegetables and grains should fill up most of your plate, but leave room for some lean meat, poultry or fish. Be sure to choose stir-fired chicken with dark green vegetables and remove the skin instead of the fried variety. For something different, try steamed fish with garlic and scallion in light vegetable oil and salt. What's for dessert? It's h Continue reading >>

Patient-centered Diabetes Education

Patient-centered Diabetes Education

Diabetes is a disease that can affect anyone at any time. Our bodies need and use glucose to fuel our cells, but certain conditions reduce cell access or ability to use glucose properly. If the body cant convert glucose into insulin, a person will develop diabetes, which can become a life-long health condition. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2017 Diabetes Report Card, there has been some good news. Among adults in the United States, the rate of new cases of diabetes, known as incidence, has gone down. Diabetes incidence in adults has been steadily declining since 2008. However, the bad news is that new cases of diabetes among children and adolescents have risen. Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition in which the pancreas doesnt make enough insulin. It is managed entirely through insulin therapy. Type 2 diabetes occurs when health conditions such as obesity lead to the cells not being able to use the insulin delivered to them. Type 2 diabetes can be managed through insulin therapy, or through lifestyle changes like eating healthfully, exercising, and losing weight. Diabetes can be dangerous, but it can be managed. Patients with this disease need to understand that it is a chronic condition, and need to be educated about how to treat it for optimal quality of life. Type 1 diabetes is managed via regular insulin injections or the use of an insulin pump. Type 2 diabetes can be managed through a controlled exercise and diet, but also may need medical management with injections and oral medications. The focus is on keeping the bodys blood sugar levels in a normal range. Patients need to be taught how to monitor diabetes with a glucose monitor. Glucose monitors or glucometers use test strips containing glucose oxidase, an enzyme that reacts Continue reading >>

Transferability Of Type 2 Diabetes Implicated Loci In Multi-ethnic Cohorts From Southeast Asia

Transferability Of Type 2 Diabetes Implicated Loci In Multi-ethnic Cohorts From Southeast Asia

Transferability of Type 2 Diabetes Implicated Loci in Multi-Ethnic Cohorts from Southeast Asia Affiliation Centre for Molecular Epidemiology, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore Affiliations Centre for Molecular Epidemiology, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore, NUS Graduate School for Integrative Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore, Genome Institute of Singapore, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore, Singapore Affiliation Centre for Molecular Epidemiology, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore Affiliation Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore, Singapore Affiliation Genome Institute of Singapore, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore, Singapore Affiliation Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore Affiliation Department of Biostatistics and Center for Statistical Genetics, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America Affiliations Centre for Molecular Epidemiology, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore Current address: Institute for Human Genetics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America Affiliation Genome Institute of Singapore, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore, Singapore * E-mail: [email protected] (E-ST); [email protected] (Y-YT) Affiliations Centre for Molecular Epidemiology, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore, NUS Graduate School for Integrative Science and Engineering, Nation Continue reading >>

The University Of Virginia/padova Type 1 Diabetes Simulator Matches The Glucose Traces Of A Clinical Trial

The University Of Virginia/padova Type 1 Diabetes Simulator Matches The Glucose Traces Of A Clinical Trial

The University of Virginia/Padova Type 1 Diabetes Simulator Matches the Glucose Traces of a Clinical Trial 1Department of Information Engineering, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. 2Center for Diabetes Technology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia. Address correspondence to:, Claudio Cobelli, PhD, Department of Information Engineering, University of Padova, Via Gradenigo 6/B, I-35131 Padova,, Italy, This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Background: In 2008, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) accepted our type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) simulator (S2008), equipped with 100 in silico adults, 100 adolescents, and 100 children, as a substitute for preclinical trials for certain insulin treatments, including closed-loop algorithms. Hypoglycemia was well described in the simulator, but recent closed-loop trials showed a much larger frequency of hypoglycemia events in patients compared with the in silico ones. In order to better describe the distribution of glucose concentration observed in clinical trials, the simulator has recently been updated, and modifications have been accepted by the FDA (S2013). The aim of this study is to assess the validity of the S2013 simulator against clinical data and compare its performance with that of the S2008. Subjects and Methods: The database consists of 24 T1DM subjects who received dinner (70.73.3 g of carbohydrate) and breakfast (52.90.1 g of carbohydrate) in two occasions (open- and closed-loop), for a total of 96 postmeal glucose profiles. Measured plasma glucose profiles were compared with those simulated in 100 in silico adults, and the continuous glucose error grid analysis (CG-EGA) was used to assess the validity of the simulated traces. Moreover, the most common outcome metrics have been co Continue reading >>

Carbohydrates: What You Need To Know Now

Carbohydrates: What You Need To Know Now

Diabetic Living / Food to Eat / Count Carbs Do you wonder which foods contain carbohydrate? Are you wary of the effects this energy-providing nutrient has on your blood sugar? This quick guide to carbs will help you put together a smart eating plan. By Hope S. Warshaw, R.D., CDE; Reviewed 2014 Along with the diagnosis of diabetes comes a new vocabulary. One of the most frequently used -- and misunderstood -- terms is "carbohydrate." "Confusion about carbohydrate still reigns," says Johanna Burani, R.D., CDE. "People I counsel are surprised to learn milk, yogurt, and fruits contain carbohydrate and are convinced that pasta, bread, and ice cream 'turn to sugar' and shouldn't ever pass their lips again." Yet carbohydrate is essential for healthy eating. As a person with diabetes, its important to learn how to unscramble the carb puzzle. Carb Counting , Diabetes Nutrition , Control Blood Sugar Think of foods as packages of nutrients combinations of carbohydrate, protein and/or fat. "No one food has all the nutrients your body needs, which is why eating a wide variety of foods helps you meet your nutrition needs,"Burani says. The three main calorie-containing nutrients are carbohydrate, fat, and protein. (Alcohol also contains calories.) Most of the calories in the following foods are from carbohydrate. - Starches: bread, cereal, pasta, whole grains - Starchy vegetables: potatoes, corn, legumes (beans) - Fruit: Apples, berries, melon, and fruit juice - Nonstarchy vegetables: green beans, tomatoes, broccoli - Sweets and sugary foods: ice cream, chocolate, regular soda, candy Carb Counting , Diabetes Nutrition , Control Blood Sugar What makes sources of carbohydrate healthy? Your goal should be to choose carbohydrate-containing foods that offer vitamins, minerals, and fiber - Continue reading >>

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