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Diabetic Leg Cream

How To Care For Your Feet And Legs

How To Care For Your Feet And Legs

It’s easy to take your feet and legs for granted but paying these hard-working body parts some attention is worth the trouble. Having diabetes puts you at risk of foot and leg woes due to blood glucose-related changes in the nervous system and circulation. Here’s how to avoid some of the common problems. 1. Ingrown toenails: Cutting into the corners of your toenails can leave a nail spike, which may grow into the skin, causing pain, swelling and infection, so always trim nails straight across. “If you have any signs of infection, avoid ‘bathroom surgery’ and instead see a podiatrist, who has the right tools to remove the infected nail,” advises Dr Tegan Barthelson, senior podiatrist at Sydney’s South East Podiatry. 2. Fungal infections: Two types of common fungal infections that can affect your feet are athlete’s foot, which causes redness, itching, peeling and blisters, and fungal nail infections that can cause thickened or painful nails. “Sometimes you can come into contact with a fungus that thrives inside your shoes, as it loves warm, moist conditions,” says Diabetic Living podiatrist Danielle Veldhoen. It responds well to over-the-counter creams, but in severe cases, antifungal tablets may be needed. “For fungal nail infections, daily application of tea tree oil can help,” adds Barthelson. 3. Bunions: While we think of bunions as bony growths, they are due to a change in the angle of the metatarsal bones of your foot. They are largely hereditary, but tight, narrow footwear can exacerbate them. “Depending on the severity of your bunions, pressure-relieving insoles and footwear modification is where to start. If it’s cosmetically important, you could consider surgery,” says Barthelson. 4. Slow-healing wounds: Cuts and abrasions may take Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ulcers Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Management Of Systemic And Local Factors, Wound And Foot Care

Diabetic Ulcers Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Management Of Systemic And Local Factors, Wound And Foot Care

The management of diabetic foot ulcers requires offloading the wound by using appropriate therapeutic footwear, [ 8 , 9 ] daily saline or similar dressings to provide a moist wound environment, [ 10 ] debridement when necessary, antibiotic therapy if osteomyelitis or cellulitis is present, [ 11 , 12 ] optimal control of blood glucose, and evaluation and correction of peripheral arterial insufficiency. [ 61 ] Wound coverage by cultured human cells [ 29 , 30 ] or heterogeneic dressings/grafts, application of recombinant growth factors, [ 31 , 32 , 33 , 34 ] and hyperbaric oxygen treatments also may be beneficial at times, but only if arterial insufficiency is not present. Physicians of diabetic patients with ulcers must decide between the sometimes conflicting options of (1) performing invasive procedures (eg, angiography, bypass surgery) for limb salvage and (2) avoiding the risks of unnecessarily aggressive management in these patients, who may have significant cardiac risk. In general, the greatest legal risks are associated with delay in diagnosis of ischemia associated with diabetic ulceration, failure to aggressively debride and treat infection, and failure to treat the wound carefully. If a patient presents with a new diabetic foot ulcer, he or she should receive care from physicians, surgeons, podiatrists, and pedorthotists who have an active interest in this complex problem. Treatment of diabetic foot ulcers requires management of a number of systemic and local factors. [ 35 , 36 , 37 , 38 ] Precise diabetic control is, of course, vital, not only in achieving resolution of the current wound, but also in minimizing the risk of recurrence. Management of contributing systemic factors, such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia, atherosclerotic heart disease, obesity, or Continue reading >>

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Diabetes can cause long-term problems throughout your body, especially if you don’t control your blood sugar effectively, and sugar levels remain high for many years. High blood sugar can cause diabetic neuropathy, which damages the nerves that send signals from your hands and feet. Diabetic neuropathy can cause numbness or tingling in your fingers, toes, hands, and feet. Another symptom is a burning, sharp, or aching pain (diabetic nerve pain). The pain may be mild at first, but it can get worse over time and spread up your legs or arms. Walking can be painful, and even the softest touch can feel unbearable. Up to 50 percent of people with diabetes may experience nerve pain. Nerve damage can affect your ability to sleep, decrease your quality of life, and can also cause depression. Damaged nerves can’t be replaced. However, there are ways that you can prevent further damage and relieve your pain. First, control your blood sugar so the damage doesn’t progress. Talk to your doctor about setting your blood sugar goal, and learn to monitor it. You may be asked to lower your blood sugar before meals to 70 to 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) and your blood sugar after meals to less than 180 mg/dL. Use diets, exercise, and medications to decrease your blood sugar to a healthier range. Monitor other health risks that can worsen your diabetes, such as your weight and smoking. Ask your doctor about effective ways to lose weight or quit smoking, if necessary. Your doctor might suggest trying an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin (Bufferin), or ibuprofen (Motrin IB, Advil), which are available without a prescription but can cause side effects. Use a low dose for a short time to control your symptoms. Other options exist for stronger Continue reading >>

Otc Cream Improves Blood Flow In Feet

Otc Cream Improves Blood Flow In Feet

patients lose toes, feet, and legs to amputation. Even minor foot trauma can lead to major problems caused by diabetes-related nerve damage, medically known as neuropathy. Now early research offers hope that an over-the-counter cream can help save the lower limbs of people with diabetes. The cream contains the amino acid arginine, and the newly published study shows that it dramatically improves blood flow to the feet of patients with type 2 diabetes. American Diabetes Association (ADA) vice president Robert Rizza, MD, calls the findings from the small study "intriguing but preliminary," and says the next step is to determine if the cream can actually prevent or lessen the foot complications that lead to diabetes-related amputations. "This pilot study showed that arginine does increase blood flow, but it is not yet clear if this translates into fewer foot ulcers or better healing of ulcers," he tells WebMD. Up to 70% of all diabetics have some degree of nerve damage caused by the disease, with numbness, tingling or pain in the extremities being some of the common symptoms. Diabetes is the leading cause of nerve damage, it accounts of 50-75 % of nontraumatic, preventable foot amputations. Foot problems can be among the most common and troublesome complications of diabetes. Government statistics show, 15% of diabetics will develop foot ulcers, and as many as one in four of these patients will eventually require amputation. Diabetes-related foot ulcers occur because of neuropathy and vascular disease. Arginine is a naturally occurring amino acid that is a precursor of nitric oxide, which has been shown to control blood flow by relaxing the smooth muscle cell lining of the blood vessels causing blood vessels to dilate. In the study, published in the January issue of the ADA Continue reading >>

Foot Care

Foot Care

When you have diabetes you need to take care of your feet every day Having diabetes can increase your risk of foot ulcers and amputations Daily care can prevent serious complications Check your feet daily for changes or problems Visit a podiatrist annually for a check up or more frequently if your feet are at high risk Your feet are at risk because diabetes can cause damage to the nerves in your feet, blood circulation and infection. Having diabetes can increase your risk of foot ulcers and amputations. This damage is more likely if: You have had diabetes for a long time Your blood glucose levels have been too high for an extended period You smoke – smoking causes a reduced blood flow to your feet, wounds heal slowly You are inactive. It's important to check your feet every day. If you see any of the following- get medical treatment that *day * Ulcer Unusual swelling Redness Blisters Ingrown nail Bruising or cuts If you see any of the following- get medical treatment within 7 days Broken skin between toes Callus Corn Foot shape changes Cracked skin Nail colour changes Poor blood glucose control can cause nerve damage to feet. Symptoms include: Numbness Coldness of the legs A tingling, pins and needles sensation in the feet Burning pains in the legs and feet, usually more noticeable in bed at night. These symptoms can result in a loss of sensation in the feet which increases the risk of accidental damage because you can’t feel any pain. An injury to the feet can develop into an ulcer on the bottom of a foot which can penetrate to the bone. This could lead to infection of the bone (osteomyelitis) and a chronic infection in the bones and joints. If an infection isn’t treated at the earliest signs, this could result in ulceration (an infected open sore) and eventually Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Skin Care

Diabetes And Skin Care

Tweet Skin care is an important factor for people with diabetes. Skin conditions can be more likely amongst diabetics, and reduced sensitivity of nerves and circulation can often make it harder to spot emerging skin problems. The skin on our feet need particular attention as the presence of diabetic neuropathy can sometimes lead to skin issues not being identified until an advanced stage, when they can cause serious problems. Why are diabetics more prone to skin problems? People with diabetes may experience greater loss of fluid from the body due to high blood glucose levels, which can cause dry skin on the legs, elbows, feet and other areas of the body. If dry skin becomes cracked, germs can get into these areas and cause infection, meaning that taking care of the skin is essential. If not checked regularly, even minor skin care problems can evolve into serious diabetes complications, such as diabetic foot ulcers and even amputation. Keeping the skin, particularly of your feet, in good condition should be a priority for people with diabetes. What skin problems particularly affect people with diabetes? As well as dry and cracked skin, a number of specific skin problems are closely linked to diabetes. Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diabeticorum (NLD) Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diabeticorum (NLD) affects the shins and occurs gradually. It is a patch of plaque that can range in colour from yellow to purple. The skin in this area can get thin and ulcerate. When it heals, NLD can leave a brownish scar. The causes of NLD are unknown, but it affects more people with type 1 diabetes. Diabetic Dermopathy Diabetic Dermopathy is also a common skin problem for people with diabetes. Sometimes known as shin spots, this condition leaves round, raised lesions that can turn into ulcers. Bullosis Diab Continue reading >>

Original Article Use Of Calendula Cream Balm To Medicate The Feet Of Diabetic Patients: Case Series

Original Article Use Of Calendula Cream Balm To Medicate The Feet Of Diabetic Patients: Case Series

Abstract Introduction Different products are used on the foot injuries of diabetic patients with more or less effective results. Calendula officinalis, which is used for its effective antihaemorrhagic properties, also known to the ancient Romans, who used it directly on injuries, is used as a topical anti-inflammatory, healing, and antiseptic treatment, although this is scarcely documented. There is no study in the literature to demonstrate the effectiveness of calendula cream in the prevention and cure of foot injuries on diabetic patients. Bio Calendula, Dr. Theiss, cream balm by Naturwaren was recommended to 4 patients diagnosed with diabetes and various injuries (micro traumas) on their lower and upper limbs, which showed all the signs and symptoms of ongoing infection: lesions with pus, swollen, red edges, localised heat, and pain. The cream was to be applied twice daily, after cleansing with very mild soaps or bath&shower gel, and warm water, WITHOUT rubbing the cleanser onto the limbs. The cream was to be applied with a gentle massage, until fully absorbed, WITHOUT covering the injuries. It is well known that incorrect treatment to even small foot injuries on diabetic patients can lead to serious complications, including infections that can in turn lead to amputation. As shown in the photographs taken over different periods during the use of the cream balm, the results are excellent; the healing process is easy to see and the progress of the infection process has been blocked, reducing itching, redness, pain, dryness, the disappearance of various scars, regrowth of hair on the legs, no intolerance and great patient satisfaction. Observational studies of RCTs (Random Trial Controls) could help clinics in understanding whether or not this cream is suitable for inju Continue reading >>

Home - Magnilife

Home - Magnilife

I suffer from vertigo and migraines along with nausea. I have tried everything. Within 15 minutes I felt my headache leave, dizziness was better. Love this product. This really works, absolutely nothing else has.* I'm a migraine sufferer, so severe I get sick and come home from work. I've been trying to find a medication to help my migraine, now I've finally found the one - and that's your product! ... I'm going to tell everyone I know about this product and make it popular, you'll see, it's the best product I've ever had. Please keep making more!* I have had the worst migraine for 3 days now and been popping Excedrin almost like candy! I took a trip to the store to buy more and came across your product. I figured it couldn't hurt to try. With one dose, the migraine is GONE! THANK YOU!!!* Can Apple Cider Vinegar Help You Lose Weight? Youve probably heard before that apple cider vinegar poses many health benefits and can help you lose weight. Raw, organic and unpasteurized apple cider vinegar is one of the oldest and most used r If you have diabetes, skin conditions are par for the course. People who suffer from the disease often have skin-related complications, including skin breaks, blisters, and sores. Also, foot fungus is What isRestless Legs Syndrome?You snuggle into bed and get ready for a good nights sleep. Then it happens. Your Restless Legs Syndrome kicks in. Those hard-to-describe, unpleasant sensations Call us with Questions, Comments or to Order by Phone 24 hours per day. Orders are processed and shipped within 24 hours Monday-Friday. Purchase with confidence knowing your information is secure Questions, Comments, or Order by Phone 24 hrs a day: Sign up for our free, weekly newsletter to get weekly updates on the most recent health and wellness trends. Copyr Continue reading >>

Brown Spots On The Legs Of A Diabetic

Brown Spots On The Legs Of A Diabetic

Skin disorders are sometimes the first sign that a person has diabetes. Diabetes can affect every portion of a person’s body, including his skin. In fact, about 33 percent of diabetic people experience a skin disorder that’s either affected or caused by diabetes at some point in their lifetimes, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Some skin conditions can cause brown spots on a person’s legs. Video of the Day Three skin conditions are likely to cause brown spots on the legs of a diabetic. In the condition called diabetic dermopathy, diabetes affects tiny blood vessels that supply a person’s skin with blood. Dermopathy most often appears as light brown, scaly patches on the front of a person’s legs, according to the Cleveland Clinic. These can be oval or circular and look similar to age spots. Acanthosis nigricans is another condition. It results in tan or brown raised areas. These can show up on the knees but are more likely to appear at the groin, on the sides of the neck and in armpits, according to the ADA. With disseminated granuloma annulare, red-brown, red or skin colored rashes that have a defined ring or arc shape appear as raised areas on the skin. These rashes most often occur on the legs and other areas of the body far from the trunk area, according to the ADA. Diabetic dermopathy is sometimes referred to as “skin spots.” Although unsightly, it doesn't itch, blister or hurt. It's a harmless condition that does not require treatment, the ADA says. Acanthosis Nigricans usually occurs in people who are obese. Some creams can improve the appearance of the spots, but the best treatment is weight loss, according to the ADA. Topical treatments that improve appearance include retinoids, alpha hydroxyl acids and salicylic or lactic acid Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Skin Problems - How To Deal With Dry Itchy Skin

Diabetes And Skin Problems - How To Deal With Dry Itchy Skin

If you have diabetic skin problems, like itchy skin, it's important to care for your skin properly – read on for tips to add to your skin care regime! If you have diabetes then you’re more likely to have dry skin, which can lead to itchiness. Are you one of those who suffer with diabetes and itchy skin? Itchy skin and diabetes often go together. The good news is that by taking care of your skin, you may be able to help reduce the risk of developing skin problems due to dryness and maintain healthy-looking, smooth skin. 1 Itchy skin, diabetes related or not, can often be made worse by washing with the wrong skin care products that increase skin dryness. Although you might think you’re doing the right thing by keeping your skin clean, if you’re using the wrong products, or washing too frequently, then you can actually aggravate the problem. Try to use mild and gentle soaps that are free from harsh chemicals and heavy perfumes. Unless it’s necessary, don’t wash your skin more than twice a day – washing too often, especially with hot water, can actually dry the skin out more. Avoiding these triggers may help to minimize itchiness. 2 If you’ve got diabetes, itchy skin due to dryness can be a concern. A good moisturizer like Vaseline® Intensive Care™ Advanced Repair Unscented Lotion may help to soothe and relieve itchiness. With micro-droplets of Vaseline® Jelly and glycerin, this lotion locks in essential moisture to help facilitate the skin’s natural recovery process. It’s fast absorbing and gentle on skin. Moisturizing can help to calm your dry skin and may reduce the urge to scratch. Remember, even though dry, itchy skin can be uncomfortable, always try your best to avoid scratching as this can lead to skin becoming damaged. If you have diabetes an Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Protect Your Feet And Legs

Diabetes: Protect Your Feet And Legs

If you have diabetes, you are more likely than people without this disorder to develop leg and foot problems. Diabetes can destroy nerves and cause you to have poor circulation. Left unchecked, these complications can lead to amputation. But there's a lot you can do to prevent that from happening. How Diabetes Causes Limb Problems First, it's important to understand what causes these diabetes complications. According to Marilyn Tan, MD, an endocrinologist and the clinic chief of the Stanford Endocrine Clinic in California, risk factors include poor circulation from atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease, poor wound healing, and uncontrolled blood sugar increases, which increases the risk of infection. “Think of sugar as fuel for bacteria and fungus,” says Dr. Tan. Researchers also know that high blood glucose levels can cause nerve damage called diabetic neuropathy. The damage can occur in any part of your body, but it is most common in your arms and legs, with the lower extremities affected first. This type of nerve damage is known as peripheral neuropathy. Some people have no symptoms, while others experience numbness, tingling, burning, sharp pain, cramps, extreme sensitivity when touched, and a loss of coordination and balance. When you have peripheral neuropathy, small sores can go unnoticed because of the numbness — you simply don’t feel them. Left untreated, these little problems can become major infections that invade the bones. What’s more, poor circulation from diabetes means any ulcers and infections are harder to heal. If an infection invades your bones, then amputation could be required to save your life. “Diabetes is the leading cause of nontraumatic lower extremity (leg and foot) amputations in the United States,” says Tan. “Five perc Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

How can diabetes affect feet and skin? For people with diabetes, having too much glucose (sugar) in their blood for a long time can cause some serious complications, including foot and skin problems, as well as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, eye damage, and other problems. How can diabetes affect my feet? Diabetes can cause two problems that can affect your feet: Diabetic neuropathy — Uncontrolled diabetes can damage your nerves. If you have damaged nerves in your legs and feet, you might not feel heat, cold or pain. This lack of feeling is called diabetic neuropathy. If you do not feel a cut or sore on your foot because of neuropathy, the cut could get worse and become infected. Peripheral vascular disease — Diabetes also affects the flow of blood. Without good blood flow, it takes longer for a sore or cut to heal. Poor blood flow in the arms and legs is called peripheral vascular disease. (The word "peripheral" means "located away from a central point," and the word "vascular" refers to the blood vessels. Peripheral vascular disease is a circulation disorder that affects blood vessels away from the heart.) If you have an infection that will not heal because of poor blood flow, you are at risk for developing gangrene, which is the death of tissue due to a lack of blood. To keep gangrene from spreading, the doctor may have to remove a toe, foot, or part of a leg. This procedure is called amputation. Diabetes is the most common, non-traumatic cause of leg amputations. Each year, more than 56,000 people with diabetes have amputations. However, research suggests that more than half of these amputations can be prevented through proper foot care. What are some common foot problems of people with diabetes? Anyone can get the foot problems listed below. For people Continue reading >>

Diabetic Skin Problems And Diabetes Rash [and How To Treat Them]

Diabetic Skin Problems And Diabetes Rash [and How To Treat Them]

Skin complications in diabetic patients are extremely common. They may even be the primary reason for the diagnosis determination. About 33% of diabetics will have skin changes caused or complicated by diabetes during their lives. Some of these changes may occur in people who are not affected by diabetes but are much more common in those with diabetes mellitus. Such conditions provoke itching, fungal and bacterial infections. There are other characteristic conditions of diabetes only. Typical skin changes for diabetes patients Diabetic dermatopathy The condition is also known as “shin spots”. Diabetic dermatopathy is the most common skin pathology in diabetes mellitus and is considered to be a pathologic sign of diabetes. It is presented with small round or oval brown spots on the skin, which are very similar to the age spots. Usually, they are found on the front surface of the legs, the affected areas are often asymmetrical. These spots do not cause itching or pain. Generally, they do not require therapy. They are due to changes in the small blood vessels of the skin – diabetic microangiopathy. It is a skin disease that is often, but not always, associated with diabetes mellitus. Due to the strong relationship between diabetes and this particular disease, many studies have focused on diabetic microangiopathy as the leading etiological factor. Clinically, necrobiosis lipoid is characterized by one or several soft yellowish-brown plaques that slowly develop in the anterior surface of the lower legs for several months. They can continue to exist for years. Some patients also have lesions on the chest, upper limbs and torso. The lesion begins as brown-red or body-colored papules that slowly develop into a “wax” plaque of varying size. The slightly raised border r Continue reading >>

Healing Numb Feet

Healing Numb Feet

Overview of treatment approaches: • Nondrug therapies • Relaxation and biofeedback • Anodyne therapy • Exercise • Massage • Daily foot care Diabetes is hard on feet. Because the feet are farthest from the heart, any problems with blood flow can leave feet without enough circulation. Results can include numbness, loss of foot strength, and worse. Fortunately, there are some good ways to heal and protect your feet. As Birgitta I. Rice, MS, RPh, CHES, wrote here, much of the pain and numbness people with diabetes experience comes from nerve damage. The nerves are injured both by poor circulation and by high glucose levels. We really need healthy nerves. (As a person with a nerve disease, I know about this.) According to Rice, “Loss of nerve fibers can result in muscle weakness, numbness, loss of reflexes, foot deformities, change in gait, and impaired balance and coordination. Loss of sensitivity to pain or temperature can also occur, leading in turn to blisters and sores from foot injuries that go unfelt.” Numbness is dangerous. Sometimes, people can have a pebble in their shoe and not notice it. Others may get in a hot bath and not realize their feet are being scalded. These kinds of seemingly minor things can lead to infections, which don’t heal because of having poor circulation. This is the major pathway to losing a leg to amputation. People with diabetes are eight times more likely than other people to have a lower leg amputated. If you just woke up one day with numb feet, you would notice a big difference and ask about ways to treat it. It doesn’t work that way, though. Numbness comes on slowly over years, so you don’t notice day-to-day changes. Also, severe pain often comes before numbness, so that the numbness is perceived as a relief rather Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Cause Itching?

Does Diabetes Cause Itching?

People with diabetes experience skin itching at higher rates than those without the condition. Ultimately, itching can lead to excessive scratching, which can cause discomfort and pain. A study of nearly 2,700 people with diabetes and 499 without diabetes found that itching was a common diabetes symptom. An estimated 11.3 percent of those with diabetes reported skin itching versus 2.9 percent of people without diabetes. A person with diabetes should not ignore itchy skin. Dry, irritated, or itchy skin is more likely to become infected, and someone with diabetes may not be able to fight off infections as well as someone who does not have diabetes. There are a variety of treatments available that can help to reduce diabetes-related skin itching so that a person can be more comfortable and avoid other skin complications. Causes of diabetes itching There are many reasons why a person with diabetes might experience itching more often than someone else. Sometimes itching can result from damaged nerve fibers located in the outer layers of skin. Often, the cause of diabetes-related itching is diabetic polyneuropathy or peripheral neuropathy. This condition occurs when high blood glucose levels damage nerve fibers, particularly those in the feet and hands. Before the nerve damage occurs, the body experiences high levels of cytokines. These are inflammatory substances that can lead to a person's skin itching. Sometimes, persistent itchiness may indicate that someone with diabetes is at risk of nerve damage, so the itchiness should never be ignored. Also, people with diabetes can experience associated disorders that include kidney or liver failure. These conditions may also cause itching. A person with diabetes can experience skin itching related to a new medication they are takin Continue reading >>

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