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Impact Of Diabetes On Hospital Admission And Length Of Stay Among A General Population Aged 45 Year Or More: A Record Linkage Study

Impact Of Diabetes On Hospital Admission And Length Of Stay Among A General Population Aged 45 Year Or More: A Record Linkage Study

Go to: Abstract The increased prevalence of diabetes and its significant impact on use of health care services, particularly hospitals, is a concern for health planners. This paper explores the risk factors for all-cause hospitalisation and the excess risk due to diabetes in a large sample of older Australians. The study population was 263,482 participants in the 45 and Up Study. The data assessed were linked records of hospital admissions in the 12 months following completion of a baseline questionnaire. All cause and ambulatory care sensitive admission rates and length of stay were examined. The associations between demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, lifestyle factors, and health and wellbeing and risk of hospitalisation were explored using zero inflated Poisson (ZIP) regression models adjusting for age and gender. The ratios of adjusted relative rates and 95% confidence intervals were calculated to determine the excess risk due to diabetes. Prevalence of diabetes was 9.0% (n = 23,779). Age adjusted admission rates for all-cause hospitalisation were 631.3 and 454.8 per 1,000 participant years and the mean length of stay was 8.2 and 7.1 days respectively for participants with and without diabetes. In people with and without diabetes, the risk of hospitalisation was associated with age, gender, household income, smoking, BMI, physical activity, and health and wellbeing. However, the increased risk of hospitalisation was attenuated for participants with diabetes who were older, obese, or had hypertension or hyperlipidaemia and enhanced for those participants with diabetes who were male, on low income, current smokers or who had anxiety or depression. This study is one of the few studies published to explore the impact of diabetes on hospitalisation in a l Continue reading >>

Diabetic Services | Duncan Regional Hospital

Diabetic Services | Duncan Regional Hospital

The Diabetics Self Management Training Programs at Duncan Regional Hospital can provide you with the keys to successfully manage your diabetes. Diabetic patients can receive in-depth education for patients living with diabetes on either an individual or group basis. According to the American Diabetes Association, 200,000 Oklahomans have been diagnosed with diabetes. Even more alarming, there are approximately 100,000 Oklahomans who are unaware that they have diabetes. Although diabetes is a life-long condition, it is controllable and you are in the drivers seat. The mission of the Diabetes Self-Management Program at Duncan Regional Hospital is to provide you with the keys necessary to effectively manage your diabetes for a lifetime. Medicare covers 10 hours of Diabetes Self Management Education and 3 hours of Medical Nutrition Therapy the initial year of education. Then Medicare covers 2 hours of Diabetes Self Management Education and 2 hours of Medical Nutrition Therapy each year there after. Most insurances cover the education the same way that Medicare covers. Is the Diabetes Self Management Program right for you? You are a person newly diagnosed with diabetes You are someone who has had diabetes for some time, but never has had any formal education You are someone who has had diabetes for some time but are having difficulty controlling your blood sugar You are someone who has had diabetes education but needs a refresher and review. You have had a recent change in your diabetes management plan (change in medication or meal plan) You are a woman who has diabetes and are pregnant or thinking of becoming pregnant You are a woman with gestational diabetes (diabetes that occurs only during pregnancy) This individualized program provides the participant with comprehensive Continue reading >>

Diabetes | Medical Center Hospital

Diabetes | Medical Center Hospital

The MCH Diabetes Center helps individuals with diabetes develop and practice self-management skills, knowledge and attitude which will improve their health status, quality of life and reduce the risk of diabetes-related complications. The 12-month program will assess patients readiness to make critical lifestyle changes and supports them in that process through: A core education series which provides basic skills and information recommended by the American Diabetes Association. Individual education modules that focus on specific needs: weight management, insulin administration, oral medications and exercise. Specialized education, including insulin pump use, the management of diabetes during pregnancy, and advanced nutrition such as carbohydrate counting. Support groups that offer additional diabetes management education with the opportunity to share experiences with other individuals who have diabetes. Encourages patients to keep regular appointments with their physician. Periodically assesses patients progress in reducing Hemoglobin A1c levels through self-management skills. Provides the patients physician with regular reports detailing patient status and progress toward goals. This program is covered by most major medical insurance, including Medicare. To refer patients to our program, or to receive more information about our Diabetes Center, Information can also be found on the following websites: Continue reading >>

Diabetic Care | Chippenham Hospital

Diabetic Care | Chippenham Hospital

Whether you've had diabetes for a long time or are newly diagnosed, our program offers the knowledge, skills, and motivation to help you live life to the fullest. According to the American Diabetes Association , 25.8 million children and adults in the United States, or 8.3% of the population, have diabetes. That number continues to increase, as does the diagnosis of pre-diabetes, currently estimated at 79 million individuals. The good news is that diabetes can be controlled with a healthy diet, daily activity, and sometimes diabetes medication. Our expert staff will help you learn how to manage diabetes, reduce the risk of complications, cope with lifestyle changes, and work through any fears or problems you may encounter. Our bodies make the hormone insulin which helps move sugar (glucose) from the blood into the cells that need the sugar for energy. When the body can't make enough insulin or can't use the insulin correctly the blood sugar level rises causing high blood sugar (hyperglycemia). Common symptoms of high blood sugar are extreme thirst, frequent urination, fatigue, and sometimes infections. People with a family history of diabetes, a history of gestational diabetes (during pregnancy), obesity, little or no activity, and people of certain ethnic backgrounds (African American, Hispanic, Native American, Asian, and Pacific Islands) are at higher risk for developing diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is a metabolic disorder that occurs when the cells in the pancreas that make insulin stop working. It's typically diagnosed during childhood or early adulthood. People with Type 1 diabetes must take insulin to control their blood glucose levels. Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder that occurs when the body can't produce enough insulin or can't use insulin (insulin resis Continue reading >>

Hospital Diabetes: How Quality Of Care Matters To Both Patients And Hospitals

Hospital Diabetes: How Quality Of Care Matters To Both Patients And Hospitals

Hospital Diabetes: How Quality of Care Matters to Both Patients and Hospitals Mills-Peninsula Health Services, San Mateo, California Corresponding Author: David C. Klonoff, M.D., FACP, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, 100 South San Mateo Drive, Room 5147, San Mateo, CA 94401; email address [email protected] Keywords: diabetes, glucose, hospital, insulin, quality, technology Copyright 2011 Diabetes Technology Society This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Hospital patients with diabetes and hyperglycemia, compared with patients without diabetes, have an increased risk of mortality, increased incidence of complications, increased length of stay, and increased costs per admission. Hospital patients benefit when their physicians have expertise in treating diabetes and hyperglycemia. Hospitals need to have management systems to ensure that hyperglycemic inpatients achieve and maintain target blood glucose levels. Multiple safety systems must be in place at hospitals where intravenous insulin is used to effectively treat hyperglycemia and to avoid hypoglycemia. Systems are needed for the following hospital personnel: (1) nursing staff, so that nurses will be proficient in checking blood glucose levels; (2) clinical laboratory staff, so that glucose monitors will be maintained as accurate and disinfected; (3) medical staff so that insulin doses will be ordered at appropriate levels; (4) diabetes educator staff, so that patients can receive proper education in self-management; and (5) hospital administrators, to establish and support attainment of quality assurance programs. Use of electronic medical records in the hospital environment will facilitate adoption of and compliance with all these types of safety systems. Since 1980, the number of hospital discharge Continue reading >>

Diabetes Care At Mayo Clinic

Diabetes Care At Mayo Clinic

Experience and expertise. Mayo Clinic doctors have expertise in treating people with all types of diabetes, including those with hard-to-control blood sugar. Each year, Mayo Clinic doctors treat nearly 47,000 people with diabetes. Education. Mayo Clinic offers a comprehensive educational program for those with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who are receiving an intensive insulin therapy — or multiple daily injection — program. The three-day educational series covers a broad range of topics, including the guidelines and principles of insulin dose adjustment on normal days, during exercise, on sick days and during special circumstances, as well as comprehensive dietary advice. Multispecialty team of experts. Mayo Clinic's team of specialists works together to create a customized treatment plan for you. Your team may include a doctor, diabetes educator and registered dietitian who will work closely with you to keep your blood sugar level as close to normal as possible. Referral and prompt access to eye, kidney and foot specialists is also readily available when needed. Newest research. A research partnership between Mayo Clinic and the University of Minnesota has the goal of finding optimal treatments and ultimately curing diabetes. Mayo Clinic researchers are on the forefront of diabetes research, with specialty labs exploring ways to regenerate insulin-producing cells and to monitor blood sugar and deliver the appropriate dose of insulin to people with type 1 diabetes (artificial pancreas). Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., ranks No. 1 for diabetes and endocrinology in the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals rankings. Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., is ranked highly performing for diabetes and endocrinology by U.S. News & World Report. Mayo Clinic also ranks among th Continue reading >>

Hospital Use Among Diabetic Patients And The General Population.

Hospital Use Among Diabetic Patients And The General Population.

1. Diabetes Care. 1994 Nov;17(11):1320-9. Hospital use among diabetic patients and the general population. Aro S(1), Kangas T, Reunanen A, Salinto M, Koivisto V. (1)National Research & Development Centre for Welfare & Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. OBJECTIVE: This register-based linkage study compared hospital use among diabeticand nondiabetic populations. The study focused on overall use, use by diseasecategories, and inpatient care caused by complications.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The patient data were derived from the HospitalDischarge Register and the Central Drug Register in Finland. All drug-treateddiabetic patients and discharges of patients in a 3-year period were included in the study. Hospital use was measured by inpatient days, mean length of stay, and discharge rate.RESULTS: Among diabetic patients were eligible for drug reimbursement, 14.2% had at least one hospital stay because of diabetes in a year, while 50.7% had atleast one hospital stay for any cause. Only 12.4% of the nondiabetic populationwas hospitalized annually. Patients with diabetes as the principal diagnosisconsumed about 3% of all inpatient days; patients who had diabetes either as the principal or as a subsidiary diagnosis used 8.3%; and people who were eligiblefor antidiabetic drug reimbursement used 13.3% of total inpatient days. Amongdiabetic children, the risk for hospitalization was 6.5 times higher than amongnondiabetic children. With advancing age, causes other than diabetes increasinglydominated hospitalization among diabetic patients. Inpatient days because ofcardiovascular diseases were 1.6-18 times more common among diabetic patientsthan among nondiabetic patients, depending on gender and age-group. Diabeticpatients used many more hospital inpatient days than did the Continue reading >>

Diabetes | The Brooklyn Hospital Center

Diabetes | The Brooklyn Hospital Center

- If your parent, brother or sister has diabetes, you may be more likely to develop diabetes. - Previous diabetes test showing impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) - Sedentary lifestyle and lack of exercise - High blood pressure (140/90 mm Hg or higher) - Low HDL (good) cholesterol and high triglycerides - Ethnicity is a factor: If you are African-American, Hispanic/Latin American, American Indian, Alaska Native, Asian-American, Pacific Islander These simple tests cantell you if your diabetic or pre-diabetic A urine analysis may show high blood sugar. But toconfirm adiabetes diagnosis, other tests must be done: - Hemoglobin A1c test (Pre-diabetes: 5.7%-6.4%; Diabetes: 6.5%+) Diabetes can be damaging to your health so keep healthy now. Diabetes can lead to risk of kidney disease, eye disease, nervous system disease, heart attack, and stroke. Fortunately, Type 2 Diabetes can betreated throughnutrition, exercise, and medicine to control blood sugar level. Continue reading >>

13. Diabetes Care In The Hospital

13. Diabetes Care In The Hospital

Consider performing an A1C on all patients with diabetes or hyperglycemia admitted to the hospital if not performed in the prior 3 months. C Insulin therapy should be initiated for treatment of persistent hyperglycemia starting at a threshold ≥180 mg/dL (10.0 mmol/L). Once insulin therapy is started, a target glucose range of 140–180 mg/dL (7.8–10.0 mmol/L) is recommended for the majority of critically ill patients A and noncritically ill patients. C More stringent goals, such as 110–140 mg/dL (6.1–7.8 mmol/L) may be appropriate for selected critically ill patients, as long as this can be achieved without significant hypoglycemia. C Intravenous insulin infusions should be administered using validated written or computerized protocols that allow for predefined adjustments in the insulin infusion rate based on glycemic fluctuations and insulin dose. E A basal plus bolus correction insulin regimen is the preferred treatment for noncritically ill patients with poor oral intake or those who are taking nothing by mouth. An insulin regimen with basal, nutritional, and correction components is the preferred treatment for patients with good nutritional intake. A The sole use of sliding scale insulin in the inpatient hospital setting is strongly discouraged. A A hypoglycemia management protocol should be adopted and implemented by each hospital or hospital system. A plan for preventing and treating hypoglycemia should be established for each patient. Episodes of hypoglycemia in the hospital should be documented in the medical record and tracked. E The treatment regimen should be reviewed and changed if necessary to prevent further hypoglycemia when a blood glucose value is <70 mg/dL (3.9 mmol/L). C There should be a structured discharge plan tailored to the individual p Continue reading >>

Joslin Diabetes Center - Doctors Community Hospital - Lanham, Md

Joslin Diabetes Center - Doctors Community Hospital - Lanham, Md

If you are affected by obesity, you know first-hand that losing weight can be difficult. You probably also know it can be one of the most important things you can do to improve your healthand how hard it can be to lose weight and keep it off alone. Learn More . Free Online and In-Person Diabetes Classes On the Road to Wellness is an online course that helps you learn more about diabetes and the management of this complex disease. It includes all the information from the in-person classes , which are presented at various locations throughout Prince George's County. Learn more>> Multidisciplinary Diabetes Care in one Convenient Location If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you are not alone. Diabetes affects 25.8 million people or 8.3 percent of the U.S. population. In Prince Georges County, Maryland, those who have diabetes have a high rate of related emergency department visits. Educating yourself about diabetes empowers you to manage your day-to-day life while living it to the fullest. You can improve your quality of life by understanding how diabetes works, knowing potential complications and making well-informed lifestyle decisions. When you need help, we are here. We are dedicated to helping you better manage your diabetes. Our comprehensive program includes the Joslin Diabetes Center, which is the only such program in Prince George's County accredited by the American Diabetes Association. Also, our multidisciplinary program provides: Day-to-day diabetes management including insulin pump education and management Personalized and ongoing care tailored to your unique needs Ongoing support to help you better manage your diabetes as it changes and your needs evolve Education about diabetes and what you can do to take charge of your health Comprehensive diagnostic Continue reading >>

Top 10: Best Hospitals For Diabetes Care In The United States

Top 10: Best Hospitals For Diabetes Care In The United States

TOP 10: Best Hospitals for Diabetes Care in the United States TOP 10: Best Hospitals for Diabetes Care in the United States Diabetes remains the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, with over a million new incident cases being reported each year, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Over 29.1 million people (9.3 percent) of the U.S. population currently has diabetes, reports the Centers for Disease Control, and it is an epidemic that seems to be growing. Not only is diabetes detrimental to ones health, but it is also a costly disease to treat. The total estimated cost of diagnosed diabetes in 2012 was $245 billion, according to the ADA, including $176 billion in direct medical costs and $69 billion in reduced productivity. When it comes to treating diabetes, the following hospitals perform the best, house top nursing staffs, deliver quality care and use the most advanced technology. 10. University of Washington Medical Center (Seattle, WA) The Endocrinology/Diabetes Clinic at Harborview provides care to patients for the evaluation, management and education of patients with diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2, endocrine diseases (thyroid, adrenal, pituitary, lipid and gonads), hypercholestremia, hyperlipidemia and obesity. Additionally, a Diabetes Care Center provides care for patients with type 1 or type 2diabetes; pre- and post-transplantdiabetes; and pancreatic diabetes through nutritional counseling, clinical pharmacy, psychiatry and comprehensive classes in diabetes management and devices. The Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension at UCLA provides services for a full range of endocrine problems. The UCLA Diabetes Program provides both primary and consultative diabetes care to referred patients. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Education - Spencer Hospital

Diabetic Education - Spencer Hospital

It's not just an exercise plan. It's more than a diet. Lifetime wellness requires developing healthy habits to help you reach your optimal health. We invite you to contact us with your questions and comments to keep you well informed regarding our health care services and your care. 712-264-6198 - Speak with a receptionist from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. each day who can direct your call appropriately. 712-264-8300 - Access and automated directory if you know the name of the service or person you wish to contact. Patient Representatives Welcome Your Call Patients or family members with concerns are encouraged to contact our patient representative at 264-6208, Monday through Friday from 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Learn More If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, let our Diabetic Educator help you learn how to better manage your health and be more confident in your lifestyle choices. Spencer Hospital's instructors are approved and certified through the Iowa Department of Public Health and are recognized by the American Diabetes Association. Diabetes is the condition in which the body does not properly process food for use as energy. Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose, or sugar, for our bodies to use for energy. The pancreas, an organ that lies near the stomach, makes a hormone called insulin to help glucose get into the cells of our bodies. When you have diabetes, your body either doesn't produce enough insulin or can't use its own insulin as well as it should. Healthcare providers trained to help you better understand and manage your diabetes include: If you are diagnosed with diabetes, your family physician may refer you to Diabetic Education services. Our professional services are covered by many insurance companies and also by Medicare and Medicaid. To reach our Diabetic Continue reading >>

Caring For Wounds And Foot Ulcers In Diabetic Patients

Caring For Wounds And Foot Ulcers In Diabetic Patients

Caring for wounds and foot ulcers in diabetic patients Sunrise Hospital & Medical Center August 20, 2017 The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that there are 30.3 million people living with diabetes in the United States. Diabetes comes with many serious complications, including chronic wounds, nerve damage and foot ulcers. The American Podiatric Medical Association reports that 15 percent of diabetic patients will develop a foot ulcer. Further, diabetes is the leading cause of nontraumatic, lower-extremity amputations in the U.S. caused by infected wounds and foot ulcers that cannot heal. While difficult to treat, foot ulcers often can be prevented. Controlling risk factors and monitoring the skin daily is key to minimizing the negative effects of diabetes, said Nancy Estocado, Advanced Wound Care Clinical Coordinator at Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center. For anyone with diabetes, understanding how to prevent and properly address wounds especially foot ulcers is integral to living a healthy life. A diabetic foot ulcer is an open wound or sore, commonly located on the bottom of the foot, in a patient with diabetes. However, not all ulcers on the foot are diabetic. Distinguishing between a diabetic foot ulcer and a foot ulcer caused by other reasons is important because it will inform treatment options. A good history, the primary cause of the wound and the wound location are all important to know when diagnosing a diabetic foot ulcer, Estocado said. Why are diabetics prone to foot ulcers and other chronic wounds? Diabetic patients are more prone to developing chronic wounds for a few reasons. Two of the most influencing factors are nerve damage and blood circulation issues that are common among diabetic patients. Nerve damage, or neuropathy, tends to Continue reading >>

Services | Diabetes Wellness

Services | Diabetes Wellness

Brookhaven Memorial Hospital Memorial Center's Diabetes Self-Management Education Program is recognized by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) for delivering high-quality, evidence-based diabetes self-management education (DSME) classes The Program provides knowledge, skills and tools for individuals living with diabetes to enable them to successfully manage their chronic condition and avoid the many associated complications. Diabetes is a complex and chronic condition. If you have been diagnosed with diabetes there are many health decisions that are to be made daily such as what to eat and what to do when your blood sugar is high. Our team of health care professionals will team up with you to help you develop the new skills that you will need to transition through what can be a period of uncertainty. Several of the skills that you will learn include: Brookhaven Memorial Hospital Medical Center is proud of its relationship with the Suffolk County Lions Diabetic Education Foundation since 2007. The Association of Lions Clubs, an international service organization, works to eradicate preventable blindness, which can occur from having diabetes. To that end, the 50 Lions Clubs of Suffolk County support the efforts of the Diabetes Self-Management Education Program at BMHMC. For more information about the Lions Clubs of Suffolk County, call 631-427-4448 or visit www.suffolkcountylions.org. Learn more about Lions Diabetes Education Foundation . We participate in most Medicare commercial insurances. Please call 631-687-4188 to find out more about insurance coverage. If you're interested in participating in any of these programs, a physician's referral is required. To expedite the registration process, please fill out this insurance form and diabetes self-assessment form be Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

There are certain things that you should expect from your medical team. If you have just been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes you should have: A full medical examination- this may also include a referral to a specialist eye clinic. A talk with a diabetes care nurse who will explain what diabetes is and about your treatment. Several sessions with your diabetes nurse for basic instruction on injection technique, looking after your insulin, blood glucose meter and pen, blood glucose testing and what the results of your own testing means. You should also expect to have a discussion about hypoglycaemia (hypos) and how to deal with it. After this initial help, you should have access to a diabetes care team where you will have the opportunity to talk to doctors, nurses and dieticians. They will assess your diabetes control and discuss any problems with you. You should also be given a contact number so that you are able to contact a member of the team for advice whenever you need it. Most diabetic clinics have a specialist nurse who will visit you at home between hospital appointments especially in the early days after your diagnosis. Each year you are entitled to an Annual Review assessment by the diabetes care team.This should include a blood pressure check, a measurement of height and weight, drawing blood to find out your cholesterol level and your HbA1c (average blood glucose over the last few weeks), plus a urine test to check whether your kidneys are working well. They should also examine your feet and reflexes to check that your nerves are okay, and they may ask you whether you smoke and offer help to give up if you would like to do so. In addition, the annual review should include an examination of your eyes, although this may be done at a specialist eye clinic. Drops w Continue reading >>

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