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Diabetic Holiday Meals

Diabetic Christmas Dinner Ideas: 20 Festive & Healthy Holiday Recipes

Diabetic Christmas Dinner Ideas: 20 Festive & Healthy Holiday Recipes

Our Best Low-Carb Recipes: 30 Low-Carb Dinner Recipes, Desserts, and More Eating healthy has never tasted so good with this FREE eCookbook. From low-carb breakfast recipes to low-carb dinners and even low-carb desserts, you'll be able to stick to your healthy eating lifestyle with ease! Bonus: Get our newsletter & special offers for free. We will not share or sell your email address. View our Privacy Policy Home > Editor's Picks > Diabetic Christmas Dinner Ideas: 20 Festive & Healthy Holiday Recipes Diabetic Christmas Dinner Ideas: 20 Festive & Healthy Holiday Recipes You must be logged in to add a private note. Login | Register We are adding the recipe to your Recipe Box. The holidays can be a difficult time for someone that needs to abide by a diabetic-friendly diet. With so many sweets readily available, it can be tough to resist temptation. That's why we've put together this free eCookbook, so you canmunch on all the foods you lovewithout feeling guilty. We start off the free eCookbook with healthy Christmas dinner ideas, including everything from main dishes to potluck sides, and even enticing Christmas desserts. We love these recipes because they're tasty enough for everyone in the family to enjoywe bet they won't even know that you've made their favorite dishes healthier! And if you're looking for a sweet treat to give to your friends this Christmas, we're sure they'd love to have an edible gift. It's a great way to save money during this expensive time of year! Continue reading >>

Sweet Holiday Tips For Diabetics

Sweet Holiday Tips For Diabetics

With care and moderation, people with diabetes can indulge, too For diabetics, the holiday season is fraught with temptations. Candy is everywhere. Your well-meaning co-workers bring in plates of cookies that taunt you from the break room. You've got invitations to party after party where it seems like the foods were chosen either to test your will or spite you. But before you decide to give everyone a piece of coal and hibernate through the holidays, you should know that being diabetic doesn't mean you have to give up your favorite seasonal foods. "During the holidays, don't deprive yourself for heaven's sake," says Elaine Magee, MPH, RD, a consulting expert with WebMD and the author of Tell Me What to Eat if I Have Diabetes : Nutrition You Can Live With. "If there's something you want to eat during the holidays, whether it's English toffee or rum balls or what have you, you can eat it. You've just got to plan ahead." Diabetic and On Insulin ? Take a Quality of Life Quiz. Although sweets are often considered a diabetic's worst enemy, managing diabetes is more complicated than simply avoiding sugar. For instance, other carbohydrates -- like a serving of mashed potatoes -- can cause a surge in blood sugar just like a candy bar. It's the total number of carbohydrates that counts and not the form you're eating them in. Fat, which abounds in holiday cooking, should also be kept to a minimum. So what should you be eating during the holidays? "As at any time of the year, you should be eating a healthy, balanced diet low in saturated fat ," says Gene Barrett, MD, of the department of internal medicine at the University of Virginia. He also stresses that you should be getting a good amount of fiber and complex carbohydrates. That can be tricky during the holidays. But neither Continue reading >>

Top 8 Easiest & Best Snacks For A Diabetic

Top 8 Easiest & Best Snacks For A Diabetic

We all get hungry in between meals. So instead of reaching for those chips and nasty saltine crackers, opt for one of these easy tasty snacks instead. They are all low in carbs and perfectly diabetic friendly – of course! 1. Olives Olives make the perfect snack. They are full of healthy monounsaturated fats and contain all the same benefits extra virgin olive oil offers – the ability to lower blood glucose, increase insulin sensitivity, lower cholesterol, reduced risk of heart disease and just improve overall health. When it comes to diabetes, monounsaturated fats are the best types of fats to eat – you'll also find this type of fat in avocados and nuts. Olives are a great source of antioxidants – vitamin E, flavonoids, and polyphenolic compounds that all reduce oxidative stress and inflammation. Just grab a handful, chew them slowly and thoroughly, and your hunger pangs will soon be entirely satisfied. Nutrition Facts: 10 olives: Calories (Energy): 50g Fat: 4.70g Carbohydrate: 2.80g Fiber: 1g Sugar: 0g Protein: 0.40g. 2. Cucumber Cucumbers are low in calories – being mostly made up of water, which makes them perfect for quenching thirst and hunger. According to Organic Facts: “The flesh of cucumbers is rich in vitamins A, C, and folic acid while the hard skin of cucumbers is rich in fiber and a range of minerals include magnesium, molybdenum, and potassium.” Tip: Cucumber rounds make the perfect cracker replacement. They are crisp, provide a firm base, and aren't overly powerful on taste. So you can top them with whatever you like for a super healthy diabetic snack. Or, even use them as crackers for dips. The idea is to replace your processed crackers with cucumber crackers instead (see recipe below). Nutrition Facts: Half cup slices: Calories (Energy): 8 Continue reading >>

Holiday Meal Planning From The American Diabetic Association

Holiday Meal Planning From The American Diabetic Association

Holiday Meal Planning from the American Diabetic Association Holiday Meal Planning from the American Diabetic Association Holidays can be a time of great anxiety for people with diabetes because it is so focused on food. Don't let questions about what to eat, how much to eat, and meal timing dampen your holiday. Plan in advance, so you can fend off stress and fully enjoy the day and keep your diabetes management on track. Many families eat large meals at odd times on holidays. For example, Thanksgiving dinner may be served in the middle of the afternoon. Plan in advance for how you will handle making changes if your meal does not line up with your regular meal schedule. If you take insulin hormone that helps the body use glucose for energy. The beta cells of the pancreas make insulin. When the body cannot make enough insulin, it is taken by injection or through use of an insulin pump.X injections or a pill that lowers blood glucose. The food you eat gets digested and broken down into a sugar your body's cells can use. This is glucose, one of the simplest forms of sugar.X, you may need to have a snack at your normal meal time to prevent a low blood glucosethe main sugar found in the blood and the body's main source of energy. Also called blood sugar.X reaction. Check with your health care team about this. The best way to compensate for eating a little more than usual is to be active. Start a new tradition that involves moving around away from the food. Ideas include taking a walk with the whole family or playing Frisbee, soccer, or touch football with your children, grandchildren, or the neighborhood kids. Try Healthier Versions of Your Favorite Holiday Foods 1. Will the casserole taste just as good with fatone of the three main nutrients in food. Foods that provide fat Continue reading >>

Altering Meal Times

Altering Meal Times

Knowing how to plan meals is an important part of managing all types of diabetes. Eating meals and snacks at the same time every day helps control blood sugar levels. Sometimes, it is not always possible to do this. Schedules change, special occasions arise or travel plans may make it necessary to change meal times. By using the tips below, you can control your diabetes even when meal times vary. What if your dinner will be later than usual? Usually, you can eat a meal 1 hour before or after your normal mealtime without any effect on your blood sugar levels. If your dinner will be two or more hours later, eat your evening snack close to your usual dinner time. Then, eat your dinner at your usual snack time. This will help avoid low blood sugars at dinner. It will also keep you from getting too hungry. What to do at a brunch? For brunch, it is still best to eat a small "snack-type" meal (fruit and a slice of toast with margarine) at your normal breakfast time. This small meal will keep you from eating too much at the brunch. If you do take insulin or diabetes pills, take your dosage at the normal time. Your doctor can advise you in this matter. After the brunch, eat your afternoon snack at its normal time. What can you do about holidays? Often, the holiday meal is served at noon. Eat your normal breakfast. Have the bigger meal for lunch and a lighter "lunch-sized" meal (sandwich and fruit) for dinner. If you have a bigger lunch, an afternoon snack may not be needed. If the holiday meal is in the middle of the afternoon, eat your breakfast at the normal time. Also, have a late morning snack. An evening snack may or may not be needed. What happens when you have delays at restaurants? If you take insulin or other diabetes pills and your restaurant meal is delayed for one ho Continue reading >>

Diabetes Recipes: The Best Places To Find Them Online

Diabetes Recipes: The Best Places To Find Them Online

Medically reviewed by Peggy Pletcher, MS, RD, LD, CDE on March 16, 2016 Written by Anna Schaefer When someone in your household is diagnosed with diabetes, life changes for everyone. One of the more difficult adjustments occurs in the kitchen, where meals must now be prepared with their potential blood sugar effects always at the top of your mind. Whether youre the cook or the one with diabetes or both finding recipes that accommodate your dietary needs can cut meal prep frustration and boost mealtime enjoyment in a big way. Weve selected the top nine websites and tools that are making it easier to cook for diabetes. Check them out to find your next diabetes-friendly meal. Carolyn Ketchum was diagnosed with gestational diabetes while pregnant with her third child. Thats where her affinity for low-carb eating began, and it continues on All Day I Dream About Food today. She specializes in turning high-carb delights into low-carb recipes, proving you dont have to go without your favorites just because you have diabetes. Theres a lot of deliciousness to choose from, but were particularly enticed by Carolyns desserts, like her peanut butter Texas sheet cake . This one promises perfect proportions of cake and frosting with every bite! Caroline Potter was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 20, but that didnt put a dent in her joy of cooking. Colorful Eats is a literal feast for your eyes, filled with enticing photography of some truly fantastic diabetes-friendly recipes. We are having serious cravings for her chipotle roasted acorn squash with prosciutto and pomegranates . The name of the recipe might seem daunting, but its actually pretty easy to put together, not to mention gorgeous to look at. If youre a big fan of cooking from scratch, Diabetic Foodie is the place to g Continue reading >>

Diabetic-friendly Holiday Meal Planning | Healthywomen

Diabetic-friendly Holiday Meal Planning | Healthywomen

By Jo-Anne M. Rizzotto, M.Ed, R.D., L.D.N., C.D.E. Q: I have a family member who's coming to our house for the holidays. She has diabetes. Is there anything I should keep in mind when planning meals? Meal planning guidelines for individuals with diabetes are the same as for those of us who do not have diabetes and want to eat healthy. Eating healthy but allowing for some indulgences during the holiday season is OK for everyone, including those with diabetes. The key is planning ahead when having a guest with diabetes for dinner. With your thoughtfulness in preplanning the holiday meal, it will be easier for your friend to enjoy herself. Serve foods, such as fruit, nuts in the shell, or a fresh vegetable tray with light spreadable cheeses or dips, to be enjoyed whenever guests need to eat. Certain diabetes medications may require a person to eat a snack sooner than the meal can be served. When planning your menu, provide a balance of carbohydrate, protein and fat. The Thanksgiving meal is a good example: roasted white meat turkey, baked sweet potato, plenty of greens and perhaps a fruit cup for a starter. You might add a tossed salad as an option (even if it isn't a traditional part of the holiday meal). Serve food family style or buffet-style so guests can choose their selections and control portion sizes. People with diabetes generally are advised to fill most of their plate with vegetables, whole grains and unsweetened fruits, with smaller portions of low-fat dairy products and lean protein foods, and very small amounts, if any, of alcohol-containing, high-fat or high-sugar foods. Provide a choice of low-sugar, low-fat desserts. For example, substitute artificial sweeteners for part or all of the sugar used in recipes. Using artificial sweeteners will decrease the ca Continue reading >>

Ten Tips To Manage Diabetes During The Holidays

Ten Tips To Manage Diabetes During The Holidays

10 Tips To Help Manage Diabetes During The Holidays Enjoy the festivities of the holiday season and manage your A1C levels with these easy tips and tricks. If you have diabetes, managing your A1C levels is always top of mind. During the holiday season however, when cookies, cakes and indulgent dishes beckon at every turn, it can be even more of a challenge to stick to your meal plan and keep your blood sugar levels steady. "It can be difficult to maintain a healthy meal plan when holiday get-togethers are often centered around foods we wouldnt always consider eating," says Rachel Johnson , a registered dietitian for Abbott. "The good news is that although you should be mindful of what you eat, the right planning can help you make healthier choices while still enjoying this time with family and friends." Here are some simple planning strategies and nutrition swaps, so you can enjoy the festivities and stay on track. Before you get to any event, have a plan in place for what you will eat. For example, if you know that there will only be hors d'oeuvres, plan to select those that are lower in calories and wont spike your blood sugar, such as vegetables and lean proteins. Be cautious of dips or sauces that can add hidden calories, salt or sugar. You can also plan ahead by looking at online restaurant menus to plan your meal ahead of time. If the event is at a house, ask the host what he or she is planning to serve, and offer to bring your own healthy dish that complements the meal. Skipping a meal can negatively impact your blood glucose level, Johnson says. If the holiday schedule has you busy, keep diabetes friendly options close like Glucerna shakes and bars. Made by Abbott, they have blends of carbohydrates that are slowly digested and absorbed to help minimize blood su Continue reading >>

6 Holiday Cooking Tips For Loved Ones With Diabetes

6 Holiday Cooking Tips For Loved Ones With Diabetes

California's Leading Provider of Skilled Nurses 6 Holiday Cooking Tips for Loved Ones with Diabetes Holiday cooking is already quite a challenge, especially if your loved one is one of the 11.8 million Americans over the age of 65 who is affected by diabetes. The American Diabetes Association has published updated information on holiday cooking for diabetes that may be valuable to you and your loved ones. This holiday season, its important to pay close attention to what your loved one is eating in order to prevent diabetic complications, emergency room visits, and unnecessary hospitalizations. With a little preparation, you and your loved one can still enjoy the holidays, and all of the traditional food that comes along with it. Diabetics should avoid sugar, and one of the main sources of sugar can come from starches, such as peas, potatoes, bread, corn, and rice. Many holiday meals include starchy foods, which can make cooking a diabetic-friendly meal a challenge. For example, many families believe that potato dishes are a must have during the holiday season, but potatoes can elevate blood sugar faster than any other starch. The American Diabetes Association recommends replacing foods that are high in starch with whole grain foods, such as brown rice, rye flour, and oats, or vegetable dishes, which can prevent dangerous spikes in blood sugar. We recommend the following 6 tips to help a loved one with diabetes stay on track during the holiday season! Follow the Create Your Plate plan. Fill your loved ones plate with non-starchy vegetables, and limit portions of starchy food and protein. Bring a dish to the party. Many holiday parties or get-togethers are potlucks, welcoming the opportunity to bring a diabetic-friendly dish. Swap the old for the new. Replace cheese with Continue reading >>

16 Diabetic-friendly Holiday Recipes | Reader's Digest

16 Diabetic-friendly Holiday Recipes | Reader's Digest

When you've got a jam-packed day ahead, turn to this slow-cooker recipe. It'll be a favorite in your home in no time. Recipe shared by Marion Lowery, Medford, Oregon. Wine and mushrooms lend elegance to this oh-so-simple pork dish. Use pre-sliced mushrooms and minced garlic to save time. Cleanup is one-pan easy. Recipe shared by Kim Gillis, High Falls, New York. My favorite brunch dish got a makeover with egg substitute and lower-fat cheese. The lightened-up version still tastes delicious, but it won't weigh you down! Recipe shared by Alice Hofmann, Sussex, Wisconsin. I wanted a hash brown casserole I could feel good about eating. This light version keeps the cozy flavor while nixing a lot of the fat. Recipe shared by Kelly Kirby, Shawnigan Lake, British Columbia. My family begs me to make this recipe during the holidays. They like it because pumpkin pie spice enhances the flavor of the sweet potatoes. I like the fact that it can be made a day ahead and warmed before serving. Recipe shared by Senja Merrill, Sandy, Utah. Now THIS is a ham: sweet and smoky, with just enough clove and ginger flavor to let you know you're in for a holiday treat. Recipe shared by Sharon Tipton, Winter Garden, Florida. My mom used to dress up peas with buttered cracker crumbs when I was little and it remains one of my favorite dishes. Just about any type of savory cracker can be substituted, including herb-flavored varieties. Recipe shared by Sue Gronholz, Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. Creamy mozzarella and Swiss cheeses create the base for these tasty veggies, while a hint of cayenne pepper gives them a kick guests will adore. Recipe shared by Jenn Tidwell, Fair Oaks, California. Beef Tenderloin with Roasted Vegetables Recipe I appreciate this recipe because it includes a side dish of roasted pota Continue reading >>

Diabetic Holiday Main Dishes

Diabetic Holiday Main Dishes

Every one of these holiday main dishes is not only a dazzling addition to the table, but also appropriate for friends and family members with diabetes. Simply seasoned with sage, chives, thyme and parsley, this easy roasted turkey gets a 5-star rating from our readers. As one reader told us, "My family and I have enjoyed this recipe for the last 5 years. We are constantly amazed at how easy it is and how beautifully if turns out with such little effort." 2 of 10 Becky Luigart-Stayner; Cindy Barr A low-fat turkey breast stuffed with a spinach and feta cheese mixture is an impressive entree to serve for a holiday meal, particularly if you do not need to serve an entire turkey. Lean beef tenderloin flavored with fresh herbs and a spice rub is an ideal choice for a healthy holiday main dish. An elegant, 4-ingredient entre is a welcome addition to your holiday repertoire. You can prepare the beef tenderloin one a day ahead, then bake it just before serving. Cornish hens are a great choice for a holiday meal for a small group. This entree is really a one dish meal with the herbed hens and roasted potatoes. The memorable flavor of this tender pork roast comes from the Dijon mustard and the crispy coating of whole wheat breadcrumbs, peppercorns, and fresh thyme. Because of the peppercorn and fresh herbs, very little salt is needed. Simple Baked Ham Recipe Smoked ham is typically high in sodium, but this Cooking Light recipe uses a 33%-less-sodium ham and has 819 mg sodium per serving. This is on the high side for a diabetic main dish, but still lower than that of a traditional smoked ham. For another reduced-fat, reduced-sodium option, try the Orange-Baked Ham, which is flavored with orange juice glaze, mustard, ginger, and cloves. Continue reading >>

10 Holiday Survival Tips If You Have Diabetes

10 Holiday Survival Tips If You Have Diabetes

Some of my patients with diabetes ask me whats the big deal if their blood sugar levels go up a little or they gain a few pounds over the holidays. They say they can always lose the weight afterward and get their sugar levels under control. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy To an extent, that could be true. If youre in good overall health, doing well with your diabetes control and manufacturing reasonable amounts of insulin, a day or two of indulging a bit more than usual in holiday food shouldnt be a problem. How long that overindulgence goes on, and how many times, though, are important factors. The holidays can easily extend well past New Years. If you slip into bad eating habits, you can do long-term damage, raise your blood sugars and gain weight. You can keep your weight and blood sugar levels under control during the holidays using these tips. If you overeat, trying to catch up by skipping a meal afterward may cause you to overeat when you have your next meal or if a snack is available. Even on your holiday and days away from work, try to get up, eat, exercise and take your diabetes and any other medications about the same time as you usually do. If you are taking insulin or medications that lower your blood sugar, check your blood sugar more frequently during the holidays, especially before driving a car or adjusting your insulin doses. Make allowances for the changes in your work and exercise schedules as well as your eating opportunities. To keep your blood sugars from skyrocketing, include sweets and treats as part of your carbohydrate budget not in addition to it. Choose the meat and side vegetables and salad at dinn Continue reading >>

Diabetes Meal Plan Recipes

Diabetes Meal Plan Recipes

It's not always easy to follow your diabetes meal plan day after day, but these delicious recipes may help. Appetizer recipes Beverage recipes Bread recipes Breakfast recipes Dessert recipes Main dish recipes Salad recipes Sandwich recipes Sauce and dressing recipes Side dish recipes Soup recipes Vegetable recipes Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Holiday Dishes

Diabetes-friendly Holiday Dishes

Take Control of Thanksgiving Dinner The current approach to dietary management of diabetes is to tailor the meal plan for each individual. But in general, a healthy diabetic diet involves controlling total carbohydrates (particularly refined carbohydrates), reducing calories and sodium, increasing fiber, and replacing saturated fats and trans fats with more heart–healthy mono– and polyunsaturated fats. This approach, of course, is healthy for anyone who wants to eat better. Try these healthier recipes when you're in charge of Thanksgiving cooking. First up: Sunflower seeds and brown rice pack a double nutrition punch, enhancing our Multigrain Pilaf with Sunflower Seeds side dish with vitamin E and niacin. View Recipe: Multigrain Pilaf with Sunflower Seeds Tuscan Turkey Forget dry, tasteless turkey. A rub of roasted garlic and fresh sage permeates every ounce of the bird, while a Dijon and white wine baste locks in moisture for juicy, tender meat. Save the giblets for our Classic Turkey Gravy. If your turkey starts to overbrown after the first hour in the oven, cover loosely with foil, and continue roasting. Remember to let the turkey rest so juices can redistribute and the bird can cool enough to carve. View Recipe: Tuscan Turkey Chorizo and Roasted Poblano Wild Rice Stuffing Hot cooked wild rice is incredibly nutty and fragrant, a perfect counter to smoky paprika, quick roasted poblano peppers, and spicy fresh chorizo. Look for ground, raw Mexican chorizo rather than Spanish chorizo (cured, cased sausage). The rice will absorb the drippings from the sausage as the two bake together in the casserole dish. If you can’t find Mexican chorizo, try hot Italian pork or turkey sausage. We treat the rice the same as a bread stuffing—binding it with a mixture of stock, e Continue reading >>

5 Tips For Hosting A Diabetic-friendly Holiday Meal

5 Tips For Hosting A Diabetic-friendly Holiday Meal

5 Tips for Hosting a Diabetic-Friendly Holiday Meal Everyone should feel included in the holiday festivities Meals can easily incorporate the dietary needs of diabetics without detracting any flavor, but as a host, what is the best strategy for creating a diabetic-friendly holiday meal? Twenty-nine million Americans suffer from diabetes, which means that someone sitting at your holiday dinner table quite possibly has the disease. The holidays are meant to represent the spirit of giving, understanding, and compassion, and theres nothing that better signifies these principles than being aware of your guests eating restrictions. Meals can easily incorporate the dietary needs of diabetics without detracting any flavor, but as a host, what is the best strategy for creating a diabetic-friendly holiday meal? Dietician Rory C. Pace , director of nutrition services at Satellite Healthcare in San Jose, California, and an expert in nephrology, diabetes, and cardiac rehabilitation, has some answers. No one food is necessarily excluded from a diabetics diet , but its important to maintain a balance between starchy foods, like stuffing and yams that raise blood sugar, and vegetables. Steamed or sauted green beans, asparagus, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and green salad are great options to round out a holiday meal, Pace notes. Additionally, corn, peas and potatoes should be considered starches rather than vegetables. Its better to allow guests with diabetes to season and sauce their own food. Leaving dressings and other condiments on the side will help guests manage their food choices more easily while enjoying their favorite holiday dishes, Pace says. Sweet cocktails, eggnog, and mulled wine are iconic holiday beverages, but these drinks are loaded with sugar and can affect blood su Continue reading >>

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