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Diabetic Heart Palpitations

What Are Heart Palpitations?

What Are Heart Palpitations?

Palpitations are the uncomfortable feeling that you are aware of your own heart beating. Symptoms include that your heart may feel like it is beating faster or harder than it usually does, or that it may be skipping a beat (irregular heartbeat). Heart palpitations are normal, and occur in times of stress, anxiety, fear or exercise. You may also notice heart palpitations and an irregular heartbeat if: You are drinking too much caffeine or alcohol You smoke tobacco You have anemia You have thyroid problems You are diabetic, and are experiencing a low blood sugar level You are taking certain medicines, such as diet pills, and decongestants You have certain heart conditions, such as mitral valve prolapse Heart palpitations may be normal, or they could be associated with a serious health problem. Call your healthcare provider if your heart palpitations last longer than a few hours, or if the irregular heartbeat occurs frequently. Heart Palpitation Symptoms: You may feel anxious, or "stressed out." You may feel your heart pounding in your chest or throat, which may cause pain or mild discomfort. You may also feel your heart "fluttering", and it may seem as if it is skipping a beat or beating irregularly. Some people may have chest pain in addition to their heart palpitations, which may range from excruciating, to a mild discomfort. The severity of pain does not indicate how severe the damage to the heart muscle may be. If you experience chest pain with your heart palpitations, seek emergency help immediately. Things You Can Do To Avoid Heart Palpitations: Make sure you tell your doctor, as well as all healthcare providers, about any other medications you are taking (including over-the-counter, vitamins, or herbal remedies). Remind your doctor or healthcare provider if you hav Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Palpitations

Diabetes And Palpitations

Learn all about diagnosis, risk factors, signs and symptoms of diabetes including heart palpitations, rapid heartbeat, dizzy, frequent urination at night in this article. Diabetes mellitus is a chronic nutritional disorder in which the body is unable to properly control the amount of sugar in the blood. It is characterized by an abnormally elevated level of blood glucose and by the excretion of the excess glucose in the urine. It results from an absolute or relative lack of insulin which leads to abnormalities in carbohydrate metabolism as well as in the metabolism of protein and fat. After a meal, food is broken down into a sugar called glucose, which is carried by the blood to cells throughout the body. Cells use the hormone insulin, made in the pancreas, to help them regulate blood sugar levels. People with diabetes cannot control the sugar in the blood. This can be caused by too little insulin in the body, by the inability to use insulin or both of these. Diabetes significantly raises the risk of heart disease and stroke, blindness and kidney failure. Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to death. Diabetes may manifest in various symptoms of diabetes including rapid heartbeat, dizzy, frequent urination at night, paleness, feel thirsty and hungry most of the time. Diagnosis Most sufferers do not experience any signs and symptoms of diabetes thus the best way to diagnose a diabetes is through medical tests. Diabetes can be easily diagnosed using a fasting blood glucose level test and the two-hour postprandial, which is after a meal. Diabetes is diagnosed if the test shows blood glucose is higher than 126 mg/dL on two different tests. If levels are between 100 and 126 mg/dL, this condition will be referred to as impaired fasting glucose or pre-diabetes and should be consider Continue reading >>

Arrhythmia

Arrhythmia

An irregular heartbeat. People with diabetes are at greater risk for developing a type of arrhythmia called atrial fibrillation. The heart has four chambers — two upper chambers, called atria, and two lower chambers, called ventricles. During a normal heartbeat, a complex set of electrical signals causes the atria to contract, sending blood into the ventricles, and then causes the ventricles to contract, sending blood to the lungs and the rest of the body. When the electrical impulses that coordinate heartbeats don’t work properly, the result is an arrhythmia. The risk of developing an arrhythmia increases with age; arrhythmias are common in older adults, and most serious arrhythmias affect people over the age of 60. Other risk factors for arrhythmia include having had a heart attack or heart failure — both of which indicate damage to the heart muscle — leaking or narrowed heart valves, and congenital heart defects. Other conditions that can increase the risk include high blood pressure, infections that damage the heart, diabetes, sleep apnea (in which breathing briefly and repeatedly stops during sleep), and an overactive or underactive thyroid gland. There are three common types of arrhythmias. Supraventricular arrhythmias originate in the atria or the AV node, a tiny area of tissue that allows electrical signals to pass between the atria and the ventricles. Types of supraventricular arrhythmias include premature beats, atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, and paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. The most common type of arrhythmia is premature beats, which usually are harmless and cause no symptoms. When symptoms occur, they usually take the form of a feeling of fluttering in the chest or a skipped beat. Other supraventricular arrhythmias fall under the ca Continue reading >>

How High Blood Sugar Throws Off Heart Rhythm

How High Blood Sugar Throws Off Heart Rhythm

How high blood sugar throws off heart rhythm Posted by Karen Finney-UC Davis October 1st, 2013 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4.0 International license. Scientists have identified a biological pathwayactivated by abnormally high blood sugar levelsthat causes irregular heartbeats. This condition is known as cardiac arrhythmia and is linked with heart failure and sudden cardiac death. Reported online in the journal Nature , the discovery helps explain why diabetes is a significant independent risk factor for heart disease. The novel molecular understanding we have uncovered paves the way for new therapeutic strategies that protect the heart health of patients with diabetes, says Donald Bers, chair of the pharmacology department at University of California, Davis and senior author of the study. While heart disease is common in the general population, the risk is up to four times greater for diabetics, according to the National Institutes of Health. The American Heart Association estimates that at least 65 percent of people with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke and has emphasized the need for research focused on understanding this relationship. Through a series of experiments, Bers, his team, and their collaborators at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine show that the moderate to high blood glucose levels characteristic of diabetes caused a sugar molecule (O-linked N-acetylglucosamine, or O-GlcNAc) in heart muscle cells to fuse to a specific site on a protein known as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, or CaMKII. CaMKII has important roles in regulating normal calcium levels, electrical activity, and pumping action of the heart, according to Bers. Its fusion with O-GlcNAc, however, led to chronic overactivation of CaM Continue reading >>

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Here's a fact: Most people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes had pre diabetes symptoms that if known, could have alerted them to make diet and lifestyle changes before their diagnosis. Most physicians only pay attention to fasting blood sugar when watching for diabetes. For instance, if a patient's blood sugar is between 110-125, mg/dL, it indicates prediabetes. But blood sugar results can test in normal ranges even as diabetes is developing. If people with a type 2 diabetes diagnosis knew ALL of the pre diabetic symptoms for which to watch, it could help them avoid being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is defined medically as the state in which fasting blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as type 2 diabetes. Blood sugars in the prediabetic range (between 100 - 126 mg/dl) indicate insulin resistance is developing, and a metabolic syndrome diagnosis is more likely in the future. Insulin resistance (IR) is a condition in which chronically elevated blood sugar and insulin levels have resulted in an inability of body cells to respond to them normally. IR is the driving factor as insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, prediabetes and diabetes are all linked together on a continuum. Pre Diabetes Symptoms: It's Not Just About Blood Sugar Medical information about pre diabetes comes from medical associations such as the American Diabetes Association. The ADA guidelines say that prediabetes is a function of a fasting blood sugar is between 100-125 mg/dl. However, I am convinced that signs of prediabetes can be spotted even when blood tests indicated blood sugars below 100 mg/dl. I saw this in my own life. Eight years ago, I had many of the pre diabetic symptoms listed below, but my fasting blood sugar was still classified as "n Continue reading >>

Diabetes Linked To Heart Disease, Palpitations, Attacks

Diabetes Linked To Heart Disease, Palpitations, Attacks

Adults with diabetes have an increased risk of heart disease, palpitations, and attacks, and a recent Johns Hopkins study found that the increased risk may be six times higher even if they have low cholesterol and appear healthy. The study found that people with diabetes and pre-diabetes may suffer from undetectable damage to their heart muscles, according to an article on MedlinePlus. The damage seems to occur no matter what the individual’s cholesterol level is. "Even if we treat people with diabetes with statins, we may not be able to fully address the increased risk of death and heart failure in that population," lead author Elizabeth Selvin, of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, told MedLine. "This underscores the need for prevention of diabetes and pre-diabetes." Urgent: Discover your risk for heart disease, take the test now! The study results, released in September 2014, were determined by looking at levels of troponin in blood. This protein is released when heart cells die, and emergency room doctors use troponin levels to determine if a patient is having a heart attack, MedLine said. Selvin and her team looked at an ultra-sensitive troponin test, which is 10 times more sensitive than that used in the emergency room and which is not yet approved by the Food and Drug Administration. "Our findings suggest that this test may be helpful to identify people with early heart damage," she said, adding that it could also eventually be used along with cholesterol tests as a standard screening tool. People with diabetes were more than twice as likely to have increased troponin in their blood, MedLine said. Those with pre-diabetes were about one-third more likely to have elevated troponin levels, the study said. The connection between heart disease and diab Continue reading >>

Diabetes Linked To Irregular Heartbeat

Diabetes Linked To Irregular Heartbeat

Diabetes is linked to a 40 percent greater risk of developing atrial fibrillation — the most common kind of chronically irregular heartbeat, researchers found in a new study.… The researchers also found that this risk for irregular heartbeat rises even higher the longer people have diabetes and the less controlled their blood sugar is. For three years, the researchers tracked more than 1,400 Group Health patients who had newly recognized atrial fibrillation. They compared these cases with more than 2,200 ‘controls.’ The controls were matched to the cases by age, sex, year, and whether they were treated for high blood pressure; but unlike the cases, they had no atrial fibrillation. Dublin’s study was the first to examine the relationship between atrial fibrillation and the duration of patients’ diabetes and their blood sugar levels. Unlike most prior studies, this one also adjusted for patients’ weight, which is important because both diabetes and atrial fibrillation are more common in heavier people. The researchers found that patients with diabetes were 40 percent more likely to be diagnosed with atrial fibrillation than were people without diabetes. The risk of atrial fibrillation rose by 3 percent for each additional year that patients had diabetes. For patients with high blood pressure (HBA1c more than 9 percent), the risk of atrial fibrillation was twice that for people without diabetes. But patients with well-controlled diabetes (HBA1c 7 percent or less) were about equally likely to have atrial fibrillation as people without diabetes. “When a patient with diabetes has symptoms like heart palpitations, clinicians should have a higher level of suspicion that the reason could be atrial fibrillation. This heart rhythm disturbance is important to diagno Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Fatigue: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetes And Fatigue: Everything You Need To Know

What exactly is fatigue? Is it just being tired after working a long week or not getting enough sleep? The answer is no. Fatigue is excessive tiredness that makes carrying out simple tasks difficult and interferes with one or more life functions. Sounds terrible, doesn’t it? Well imagine having a chronic illness along with the fatigue. Diabetes and fatigue have a strong relationship, and it can make a person’s life very difficult. The following article will discuss the relationship, along with ways to beat and reduce the risk of living with diabetes and fatigue. What is diabetes fatigue? As it was mentioned above, diabetes fatigue is an extreme tiredness that individuals with diabetes can experience. It is a tiredness that disrupts a person’s life and makes it difficult to function. It is very common, and studies have shown that 85% of those with diabetes experience fatigue. Some signs of fatigue include: Dizziness Irritability Headache Inability to concentrate Problems remembering things Blurry vision Slowed reflexes and muscle weakness Is feeling fatigue a sign/symptom of diabetes? Feeling fatigued is definitely a symptom of diabetes. However, fatigue can also be a sign or symptom of many other diseases, so it is important that you talk to your doctor about any problems that you are having. I advise reading the following: Reactive hypoglycemia, a term used to define the crash that a person gets after eating a lot of sugar and carbs, can be an early sign of diabetes. In order for the body to use the sugars and carbs that are consumed for fuel, each molecule must be paired with insulin to get into the cell. If there isn’t enough insulin available, then the sugar molecules stay in the bloodstream and cause high blood sugar. What happens is that over time, eating Continue reading >>

3 Foods That Cause Heart Palpitations

3 Foods That Cause Heart Palpitations

Often when I write about the best and worst foods for the heart, I talk in the context of heart-healing foods that are good to eat, as well as foods that should be avoided because they fan the flames of inflammation. Those discussions focus on how the things we eat and drink every day affect heart health over the long haul. Today, though, I want to shift gears and focus on foods (including beverages) that can have more immediate and noticeable impacts on the heart—starting with foods that can cause heart palpitations. In this article I’ll explore: And be sure to check out the latest (and last) article in my heartbeat series: In my days of active practice, one of the most common consultations I used to have was with patients who came in because they didn’t feel like their hearts were beating properly anymore. Some described skipped beats. Others, … Continue reading Why Foods Cause Heart Palpitations Feeling palpitations after eating is a relatively common experience, which tends to occur when a substance in your food or drink—or your body’s natural biochemical response to that substance—jolts the heart’s electrical system and causes fluttering sensations, skipped beats, or a feeling that your heart is beating too hard or too fast. Coffee drinkers, think about the last time you drank one cup too many. You know what I mean! If your heart is healthy and you have no history of arrhythmia or heart disease—and you’re not experiencing any other symptoms—there’s little need to worry about an occasional episode of these irregular beats. For people who do have arrhythmias or cardiac issues, however, it’s a different story. Palpitations caused by food can cause an existing disruption in your heart’s rhythm to escalate, and potentially lead to a major eve Continue reading >>

Heart Palpitations | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Heart Palpitations | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I was diagnosed around 2 months ago and the reason I went to my doctors was because of heart palpitations. I have been taking metformin 2 tablets and controlling my diet but my heart palpitations seem to be getting worse not better? Does anyone else has this problem as it is really scary and my doctor says I have to wait for my blood tests which isn't for another month! I suffer these at times and am paralysed, like if I'm tying my shoes or stretching and I have to hold my breath and ride it out. Everything loosens up then and I take take breaths for a while and am ok. It could be fatigue or anxiety. Some people can feel the irregularities and rapidity of heart rate/beat...I can, but I have slow A.F. i) Find your pulse at your wrist and count the number of beats in 30 secs and double it for your heart rate. ii) Also, is your pulse regular at all times as well as fast with the palpitations present? All sorts of problems can cause this; from too much coffee, to anxiety, to thyroid and diet problems etc. Older persons get fast atrial fibrillation where a fast irregular output beat is involved, but you sound young so it is unlikely. (Fewer get slow AF like myself.) It requires medical follow up the doctor needs to work through the possible reasons. I was diagnosed around 2 months ago and the reason I went to my doctors was because of heart palpitations. I have been taking metformin 2 tablets and controlling my diet but my heart palpitations seem to be getting worse not better? Does anyone else has this problem as it is really scary and my doctor says I have to wait for my blood tests which isn't for another month! Continue reading >>

When To Evaluate Heart Palpitations

When To Evaluate Heart Palpitations

Joseph Marine, M.D. researches, diagnoses, and treats different types of cardiac arrhythmias, among other cardiovascular conditions. What are palpitations? Palpitations are characterized as a general or heightened awareness of your own heartbeat – whether it’s too fast, too slow, or otherwise irregular. You might feel like your heart is thumping, racing, or fluttering. And you could feel this sensation in your chest or your neck. Palpitations are symptoms of everything from short or long-term stress to a variety of arrhythmias (irregular heartbeats). They may feel alarming, but do not always reflect a serious heart condition. Dr. Joseph E. Marine, Associate Professor of Cardiology at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, starts his evaluation by asking his patients what they hear. “I ask them to tap out what their heartbeat feels like. Then I get a sense of whether we’re dealing with isolated skipped beats or a more sustained arrhythmia,” says Dr. Marine. “Patients frequently will feel their skipped beats more at night, when they’re lying in bed and nothing is distracting them from it.” Diagnosing palpitations Palpitations can occur for a variety of reasons unrelated to heart disease. These include: Overexertion Caffeine, alcohol, tobacco, or diet pills Overactive thyroid Hormone changes associated with menstruation, pregnancy, or menopause Low blood pressure Heart disease or abnormal heart valves The body’s response to medications such as thyroid pills, cold medicines, and asthma drugs Palpitations can also result from a range of heart arrhythmias. These are classified by location, and type of heartbeat. A few common types: Supraventricular tachycardia – A rapid heart rate originating above the ventricles (lower heart chambers). It can cause the hea Continue reading >>

Palpitations

Palpitations

Palpations are sensations by a person that they are having hard, rapid, or irregular heartbeats or a combination of these sensations. The following is a brief description of the heart's function that should help readers to better understand palpitations. The heart is a two-stage electrical pump whose function is to circulate blood to the organs and tissues of the body. The heart's electrical system allows the heart muscle to beat in a coordinated fashion to maximize the pumping strength of the ventricles, the lower chambers of the heart, and make certain that there is an adequate amount of blood to be pumped. The upper chambers of the heart, called the atria (single=atrium) collect blood from the body and lungs and pump it into the ventricles. There needs to be a short delay to allow the ventricles to fill and then pump the blood back to the body and lungs to complete the cycle. The heart's electrical system allows this to happen, so that each chamber of the heart beats (contracts or squeezes) when it's supposed to. The sinoatrial node (SA node) is a collection of special cells embedded in the heart muscle of the right atrium. They act as the pacemaker for the heart by generating an electrical impulse 60 to 80 times per minute. This signal is transmitted to all the atrial muscle cells so that they can fire at the same time and pump blood from the atrium to the ventricle, the first half of a heartbeat. At the same time, an electrical impulse is sent to the atrioventricular node (AV node), located in the junction between the atrium and ventricle. The AV node acts as an electrical junction box and delays the electrical signal for a fraction of a second so that the ventricle can fill with blood from the atrium. It then sends the signal to all the muscle cells of the ventric Continue reading >>

Am I The Heart Attack?

Am I The Heart Attack?

A few weeks ago, I woke up at 3 a.m. with excruciating chest, arm, neck, and back pain. It was the kind of pain that resembled everything I’d ever read or heard about the pain which precedes a heart attack. I don’t know what the typical response is for a man who senses that he’s experiencing a cardiac emergency, but my response was probably a textbook example of what not to do: I stayed in bed and let my thoughts run wild. This can’t be a heart attack. I’m not breaking out in a cold sweat. I’m a healthy and well-controlled type 1 diabetic. I’m not short of breath. I exercised last night and felt fine. I had carrots and celery for my nighttime snack last night. I can’t afford to have a heart attack. What does a room in the cardiac ICU cost, ten thousand dollars a day? What if I die? What will my wife and son do without me? Why did I neglect my diabetes in my 20s? I ate too much pizza in college. God, I really can’t miss work today. I wonder if I can get to the emergency room and be out in time to get to work. After about 30 minutes of panicking and waiting for things to get better, I vomited. I remembered that my father-in-law had experienced the same symptoms when he’d had a heart attack two years ago – chest pains then vomiting. I woke my wife, Theresa. “I need to get to the hospital,” I said. We dressed quickly and as we were walking out the front door, my compulsive need to know my blood glucose level at all times (which apparently persists even under threat of cardiac arrest) forced me to test. It was 180 mg/dl, quite high for the middle of the night. Before we were out of our neighborhood, my chest pain had worsened. So had my state of mind. I was trying to convince Theresa to drive faster, but she was thinking clearly and decided we shoul Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Heart Palpitations

Diabetes And Heart Palpitations

I am a 46 year old male who has been experiencing an increase recently of palpitations. I was diagnosed a few years ago with Supraventricular Ectopic Episodes from wearing a holter monitor. I am diabetic type 2 and recently started on insulin for my blood sugars. I am wondering if there is some connection with being diabetic and having these heart episodes. I am wondering if anyone else experiences the same problem. I get anxious when I have these episodes and have presented at the emergency room a few times at night when heart palpitations have been really bad. I am on blood pressure medication and metropolol 25 mg twice a day but it slows the heartrate down but doesnt stop the palpitations i have wondered about the connection in between blood sugar and palpitations.Some time ago I went to the ER for palpitations.I had been sick with a nasty ear infection for a number of days and suddenly picked of hundreds of palpitations, I went to the ER they diagnosed PAC's and sent me home.They did note that my blood sugar was high which they thought was related to being sick.A follow-up test showed normal blood sugar, so if I have diabetes it must not be chronic.Often, if I eat a lot of junk food I will notice more palpitations, perhaps related to high sugar again?? Continue reading >>

Understanding Heart Palpitations After Eating

Understanding Heart Palpitations After Eating

A heart palpitation is noticeable when it feels like your heart skipped a beat or had an extra beat. It may cause fluttering or pounding in the chest or neck. It can also be a sudden increase in your heart rate. Heart palpitations don't always happen when you’re doing something strenuous or stressful, and they may not be a symptom of anything serious. You may experience heart palpitations after eating for several reasons: Dietary supplements Some dietary supplements people take with meals may cause heart palpitations, including: bitter orange, which some people take for heartburn, weight loss, and skin issues ephedra, which some people take for colds, headaches, and increasing their energy levels ginseng, which some people take for increasing mental and physical energy hawthorn, which some people take for heart conditions, including angina valerian, which some people take for sleep disorders, anxiety, and depression Meal experience Heart palpitations after eating may be related to the meal experience rather than the food. Palpitations can occur due to the act of swallowing. You may sometimes feel palpitations when standing up after being seated for a meal. Emotions can also trigger palpitations, especially if your mealtimes cause anxiety or stress. Diet Your diet can also cause palpitations. The following are some diet-related triggers and risk factors: If you’ve been diagnosed with hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, you may be at higher risk for having heart palpitations due to your diet. High-carbohydrate foods and processed sugars can cause palpitations if you have issues with low blood sugar. Alcohol can also play a role. Researchers in a 2014 study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found a link between alcohol consumption and atrial fibrillati Continue reading >>

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