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Diabetic Hands Peeling

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

How can diabetes affect feet and skin? For people with diabetes, having too much glucose (sugar) in their blood for a long time can cause some serious complications, including foot and skin problems, as well as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, eye damage, and other problems. How can diabetes affect my feet? Diabetes can cause two problems that can affect your feet: Diabetic neuropathy — Uncontrolled diabetes can damage your nerves. If you have damaged nerves in your legs and feet, you might not feel heat, cold or pain. This lack of feeling is called diabetic neuropathy. If you do not feel a cut or sore on your foot because of neuropathy, the cut could get worse and become infected. Peripheral vascular disease — Diabetes also affects the flow of blood. Without good blood flow, it takes longer for a sore or cut to heal. Poor blood flow in the arms and legs is called peripheral vascular disease. (The word "peripheral" means "located away from a central point," and the word "vascular" refers to the blood vessels. Peripheral vascular disease is a circulation disorder that affects blood vessels away from the heart.) If you have an infection that will not heal because of poor blood flow, you are at risk for developing gangrene, which is the death of tissue due to a lack of blood. To keep gangrene from spreading, the doctor may have to remove a toe, foot, or part of a leg. This procedure is called amputation. Diabetes is the most common, non-traumatic cause of leg amputations. Each year, more than 56,000 people with diabetes have amputations. However, research suggests that more than half of these amputations can be prevented through proper foot care. What are some common foot problems of people with diabetes? Anyone can get the foot problems listed below. For people Continue reading >>

I Am Diabetic Why Are My Hands And My Feet Peeling?

I Am Diabetic Why Are My Hands And My Feet Peeling?

I am Diabetic why are my hands and my feet peeling? I think diabetes (elevated blood sugar) is a clue to a chemical exposure that causes autoimmune issues in general, and for 'diabetes' as a side effect also (part of autoimmune hypothalamus?) In reading some of the posts of 'skin peeling on hands' one poster indicated he had a cough for 2 years prior to this.A cough or other flu symptoms could also be a sign of exposure to a chemical.The one I would look into first:Is there any exposure to 2-butoxyethanol? Another poster thought it might be Kawasaki disease (AKA mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome) I noticed on one of the posts of gulf war vets' family that their child was diagnosed as having Kawasaki Disease and as I looked into, it appears that this does show up frequently after carpet cleaning.I suspect the harmful component in carpet cleaning that would do this is 2-butoxyethanol or some product with a BUTYL component.I also think the cause of gulf war syndrome (BEST match for all the ailments they declare ... & on the list of solvents & pesticides they were exposed to ... is 2-butoxyethanol) Ask your doctor what can be done for stopping the immune system from attacking you ... and avoid any products that cause flu symptoms ... especially BUTYL .... and check into the new science of glycobiology for help Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes can affect many parts of your body, including your skin. When diabetes affects the skin, it’s often a sign that your blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high. This could mean that: You have undiagnosed diabetes, or pre-diabetes Your treatment for diabetes needs to be adjusted If you notice any of the following warning signs on your skin, it’s time to talk with your doctor. This skin condition often begins as small raised solid bumps that look like pimples. As it progresses, these bumps turn into patches of swollen and hard skin. The patches can be yellow, reddish, or brown. You may also notice: The surrounding skin has a shiny porcelain-like appearance You can see blood vessels The skin is itchy and painful The skin disease goes through cycles where it is active, inactive, and then active again The medical name for this condition is necrobiosis lipodica (neck-row-by-oh-sis lee-poi-dee-ka). TAKE ACTION Get tested for diabetes if you have not been diagnosed. Work with your doctor to better control your diabetes. See a dermatologist about your skin. Necorbiosis lipodica is harmless, but it can lead to complications. A dark patch (or band) of velvety skin on the back of your neck, armpit, groin, or elsewhere could mean that you have too much insulin in your blood. AN is often a sign of prediabetes. The medical name for this skin condition is acanthosis nigricans (ay-can-THOE-sis NIE-gri-cans). TAKE ACTION: Get tested for diabetes. 3. Hard, thickening skin When this develops on the fingers, toes, or both, the medical name for this condition is digital sclerosis (sclear-row-sis). On the hands, you’ll notice tight, waxy skin on the backs of your hands. The fingers can become stiff and difficult to move. If diabetes has been poorly controlled for years, it can f Continue reading >>

Is Peeling Skin On The Feet A Sign Of Diabetes?

Is Peeling Skin On The Feet A Sign Of Diabetes?

Is Peeling Skin on the Feet a Sign of Diabetes? All sorts of things can go wrong with the feet from diabetes and this includes peeling of the skin. You probably already know that diabetes often causes neuropathy (nerve damage), which results in the inability to feel pain in the foot. A blister, deep cut or ulcer can go unnoticed if you never visually examine your feet, due to not being able to feel the pain of these conditions. Diabetes can cause situations involving the skin of the feet, which is why diabetics and those who have not been diagnosed with this disease should inspect their feet on a regular basis, including the soles. Many people rarely examine their feet which should be examined at least monthly just for skin cancer alone. Why do so many people neglect to inspect this portion of their body on a regular basis? Is it because its rarely seen in day to day living, as opposed to the face, nose and hands? Its anybodys guess. One of the issues that diabetes can cause is dry skin affecting the feet. This very dry skin may crack and peel. So yes, diabetes can cause the skin on the feet to peel. But if you notice the skin on your feet peeling, and you have not been diagnosed with diabetes and dont have concerning symptoms such as red bumps on your feet, tingling and numbness in them or in your lower legs, unexplained weight loss and undue fatigue, there is no reason to panic over your discovery. When diabetes causes peeling skin on the feet, its because the neuropathy has dismantled the nerves that control oil and moisture production. Benign Causes of Peeling Skin on the Feet Continue reading >>

Very Dry Skin On One Hand

Very Dry Skin On One Hand

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi everyone. In the last weeks I've notice very dry skin on my right hand. Didn't care much, but tonight it started bleeding a bit between 2 fingers. I'm going to tell to my doctor tomorrow. For now using a body lotion on the hand. Did someone have similar issues? I have read that this might be related to diabetes. I have the same problem. Diprobase (available at the chemist) is very effective, I find. It can be used easily on broken skin and rehydrates skin quickly. Sent from my iPhone using DCUK Forum mobile app I have the same problem. Diprobase (available at the chemist) is very effective, I find. It can be used easily on broken skin and rehydrates skin quickly. Sent from my iPhone using DCUK Forum mobile app Hi, thanks for your answer. Since when are you having this problem? I've had the problem since first falling ill with Type 1 Diabetes prior to diagnosis. Achieving good control with Diabetes has helped but skin splitting and bleeding on my hands has never fully gone away. I've tried lots of hand creams but Diprobase is the most effective for me at stopping the skin splitting and bringing my hands back to normal. I believe it is very much to do with the diabetes. Sent from my iPhone using DCUK Forum mobile app I'm having the same sort of thing on the top of both my feet.. it's driving me crazy. I'm using aveeno at the moment trying to get it hydrated. But my skin has been getting drier than usual lately despite moisturising cream. I'm not sure if it has to do with any of my meds I'm on or what. I'm on bolus & basal insulin too. Hello @P17BULL what is your blood sugar doing at th moment? I find that high blood sugar can cause dry skin - high bl Continue reading >>

Say Goodbye To Dry Skin

Say Goodbye To Dry Skin

Say Goodbye to Dry Skin Everyone gets dry skin from time to time. But for people with diabetes, it can be a chronic problem if your blood glucose levels are regularly high. High blood glucose causes the body to lose fluids at a faster rate. Skin can also become dry when nerves are damaged from years of diabetes and don't get the message to sweat. For people with diabetes, dry skin can become more than an irritation -- it can be dangerous. When skin is dry, it sloughs off easier, and often the outer layer is lost. This outer layer is your skin's first defense against bacteria and acts as a barrier. And because bacteria feed on glucose, people with diabetes whose blood glucose isn't in control have a higher risk of bacterial infection -- the bacteria are literally on a feeding frenzy in the higher glucose levels. That's why even the tiniest cut can become a major infection when your glucose levels are regularly high. Experts say it's vital to keep a close eye on your skin. If you identify a cut, scratch, or burn early, it's possible to avoid major complications such as an amputation. "Don't wait! Even if a skin condition appears to be minor, see your doctor," says Fran Cook-Bolden, M.D., clinical professor of dermatology at Columbia University in New York City. Signs of Skin Problems Many skin conditions associated with high blood glucose levels cause changes in your skin's color, texture, or pigmentation. Watch for: Dull red raised areas. Light brown scaly patches, rashes, and depressions or bumps at injection sites if you take insulin. Dry skin. Skin on your legs that becomes hairless, thin, cool, and shiny (signs of thickening arteries and poor circulation). Moist, red itchy areas surrounded by tiny blisters and scales (sign of fungal infection). Controlled Glucose Mea Continue reading >>

Skin Peeling - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Skin Peeling - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Just wondering if this is a issue related to my diabetes or something separate to deal with? Currently started yesterday my finger tips are peeling, i have had this happen in the past and kind of came and went now it starting again. They don't hurt peeling more a rough thick skin coming off but they do seem to peel down and to very pink and sensitive skin. Cracking in some places. Just wondering if anyone else deals with this? Just wondering if this is a issue related to my diabetes or something separate to deal with? Currently started yesterday my finger tips are peeling, i have had this happen in the past and kind of came and went now it starting again. They don't hurt peeling more a rough thick skin coming off but they do seem to peel down and to very pink and sensitive skin. Cracking in some places. Just wondering if anyone else deals with this? Welcome at getting OLDER! It's cold and dry in Ontario right? My hands can get so dry that I can not use an Iphone LOL My wife and I run a humidfier in our bedroom, that helps. Also there's moisturizer out there that doesn't have a scent, this way your kids don't make fun of you, LMAO.. trust me I just grabbed the stuff my wife had kicking around and my sons goodfed on me. Continue reading >>

What Your Peeling Skin Is Trying To Tell You

What Your Peeling Skin Is Trying To Tell You

What Your Peeling Skin Is Trying to Tell You Got peeling skin? Find out what could be causing it. One of the most common causes of peeling is plain ol dry skin. You might be naturally prone to dry skin, and cold, windy weather wont help. Love your skin by using gentle cleansers and moisturizing wellyour skin will love you back. Check out these other helpful tips on how to avoid dry skin . Painful sunburn actually kills off the top layer of skin, which is why a few days later your skin will start to peel. So remember to use sunscreen and dont stay too long in the sun.(Dont forget the delicate spot most people skip when applying sunscreen .) Allergies are another frequent cause of peeling. Maybe you ate something which didnt agree with you, or used a new cosmetic or laundry soap. You may just have a mild irritation or rash, but a more serious reaction might make your skin peel. According to Rebecca Braxt , MD, MBA, FAAD, of Baxt CosMedical New Jersey, peeling skin can also result from an ordinary infection like a cold. Youve got a bad cold and a cough, and all of a sudden people get rashy and peely, she says. Our skin has lots of bacteria on it, but sometimes those very microbes can cause an infection that might make your skin peel. One of the most common, a staphylococcal infection , usually starts with single sore, but spreads easily. The skin gets tender and looks like wrinkled paper consistency. In severe cases (usually in babies or young children), all the skin can be lost, so a staph infection is best treated promptly with antibiotics for around a week. Find out the signs of an infected cut you should never ignore . These infections are some of the most easily spread, because they thrive in warm damp conditions and are very contagious, making them easy to pick up i Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Skin Care

Diabetes And Skin Care

Tweet Skin care is an important factor for people with diabetes. Skin conditions can be more likely amongst diabetics, and reduced sensitivity of nerves and circulation can often make it harder to spot emerging skin problems. The skin on our feet need particular attention as the presence of diabetic neuropathy can sometimes lead to skin issues not being identified until an advanced stage, when they can cause serious problems. Why are diabetics more prone to skin problems? People with diabetes may experience greater loss of fluid from the body due to high blood glucose levels, which can cause dry skin on the legs, elbows, feet and other areas of the body. If dry skin becomes cracked, germs can get into these areas and cause infection, meaning that taking care of the skin is essential. If not checked regularly, even minor skin care problems can evolve into serious diabetes complications, such as diabetic foot ulcers and even amputation. Keeping the skin, particularly of your feet, in good condition should be a priority for people with diabetes. What skin problems particularly affect people with diabetes? As well as dry and cracked skin, a number of specific skin problems are closely linked to diabetes. Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diabeticorum (NLD) Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diabeticorum (NLD) affects the shins and occurs gradually. It is a patch of plaque that can range in colour from yellow to purple. The skin in this area can get thin and ulcerate. When it heals, NLD can leave a brownish scar. The causes of NLD are unknown, but it affects more people with type 1 diabetes. Diabetic Dermopathy Diabetic Dermopathy is also a common skin problem for people with diabetes. Sometimes known as shin spots, this condition leaves round, raised lesions that can turn into ulcers. Bullosis Diab Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Skin

Diabetes And Your Skin

Protecting Your Outermost Layer The phrase “feeling comfortable in your own skin” is usually used figuratively to describe a level of self-confidence or self-acceptance. But when your skin itches, hurts, flakes, breaks out, changes color, or just doesn’t look or feel the way you’d like it to, the phrase can take on a new, very literal meaning. Diabetes can affect the skin in a number of ways that can make a person feel less than comfortable. In fact, as many as a third of people with diabetes will have a skin condition at some point in their lifetime. While some conditions may appear uniquely in people with diabetes, others are simply more common in people with diabetes. The good news is that a fair number of these conditions are treatable or can be prevented by maintaining blood glucose control and taking good daily care of your skin. Dry, itchy skin Dry skin can occur as a result of high blood glucose. When the blood glucose level is high, the body attempts to remove excess glucose from the blood by increasing urination. This loss of fluid from the body causes the skin to become dry. Dry skin can also be caused by neuropathy (damage to the nerves) by affecting the nerves that control the sweat glands. In these cases, neuropathy causes a decrease or absence of sweating that may lead to dry, cracked skin. Cold, dry air and bathing in hot water can aggravate dry skin. Dryness commonly leads to other skin problems such as itching (and often scratching), cracking, and peeling. Any small breaks in the skin leave it more exposed to injury and infection. It is therefore important to keep skin well moisturized. The best way to moisturize is to apply lotion or cream right after showering and patting the skin dry. This will seal in droplets of water that are present on t Continue reading >>

My Skin Is Still Peeling. I Am A Type 2 Diabetic With High

My Skin Is Still Peeling. I Am A Type 2 Diabetic With High

I am Dr.David and Im happy to help with your question today.I need the following information from you, so that I can provide you the best answer: Since how long are you diagnosed with diabetes? Is your blood sugar controlled with medications? What is the site on body where skin is peeling? I am online and is waiting for your reply. Doctor had me on 2 diabetic meds. 500 mg Metforman and 10mg glupizide. During that time when I notice this problem getting severe (june 2011) I finally went to my doctor and did blood work. My A1C is always at 5.0 but this time was 4.6 so he took me off the 10 mg glupize. skin is peelind between fingers and one or two spots on my palms. but on left hand middle and index finger its peeling on top. people out here notice it. I ment to mention at that time and before I was dealing with numbness of the hands and sometimes the arms. Every now and then my hands. Thanks for the valuable info you had given.Ive taken a close look at your question & the reply and come up with the following answer: When glucose levels are high, the skin and surrounding tissues are zapped of vital moisture resulting in extremely dry skin & peeling of skin occurs.Also because of lack of blood circulation,functioning of sweat glands slow down again resulting in dry skin & hence peeling of skin.This can allow the infections to enter frequently in the open wounds. Another great possibility of your symptoms is of eczema. Eczema is a sort of skin disorder causing inflammation of the skin resulting in peeling & other symptoms. Your poor blood circulation seems to be the most probable cause of peeling of your skin at peripheries like fingers & palm.Also this poor circulation seems to be the cause of your numbness in arms.Although you have normal A1C levels now but the harm due Continue reading >>

The 411 Skinny On Diabetes... And Your Skin

The 411 Skinny On Diabetes... And Your Skin

Here's a quick biology quiz: what is the largest organ in your body? Time's up! It's... your skin! Did you get it right? Despite the fact that your skin is on the outside, it is your largest organ and as we've discussed in previous editions in our 411 on Diabetes Complications series, diabetes can affect every organ in (or on!) your body. This goes for your skin too! With the summer heat barreling down, more of us are exposing our skin. We all know that we need to protect our skin from the sun by using sunscreen, but did you know there are other ways to keep your skin healthy from the damages of diabetes? Yep. According to the ADA, about a third of people with diabetes will have some kind of skin condition. Fortunately, most of them are easily detectable and treatable if caught early. Skin Complications: What Are They? Believe it or not, there are a lot of potential diabetes skin complications, ranging from fairly common (20-30% of PWDs) to extremely rare (less than .5%). We can't dig into all of them in just one post, but here are the highlights of some more common skin complications to keep an eye out for: Infections - Bacterial Infections: This includes gross things like styes, boils, carbuncles and infections around the nails. Yuck! Bacterial infections will also set in when you have a wound that won't heal, like a foot ulcer. Even blisters can become infected if not properly cared for. Infections are especially common in folks with peripheral diabetic neuropathy, because their wounds are much less likely to heal quickly. Although antibiotics can take care of this quickly, it's important to not let things fester (pun!). - Fungal Infections: One type of fungal infection, the yeast infection, is common in women with diabetes, but fungal infections can also occur betwe Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Skin Problems

10 Diabetic Skin Problems

1 / 11 Are You Suffering From a Diabetes-Related Skin Complication? About a third of people with diabetes will develop skin problems at some point. In fact, some skin issues can be warning signs of diabetes. The good news is that most skin conditions can be treated easily if they’re caught early. Keeping proper control of your blood sugar (glucose) can prevent skin problems and many other diabetes symptoms from happening in the first place. “For the most part, control of diabetes can help with related skin issues,” says Justin Ko, MD, the medical director and service chief of medical dermatology at Stanford Health Care, in Redwood City, California. “I’m always adamant that my diabetic patients take aggressive care of their skin and health in general. For the skin, moisturization, checking feet and legs daily for any blisters, sores, and skin breaks (especially between the toes), and nail care is extremely important. Nail and foot fungus can lead to skin cracks and breaks, allowing bacteria to enter and cause infection.” Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cracked Fingertips: Everyone's Hands Need Help

Diabetes And Cracked Fingertips: Everyone's Hands Need Help

People with diabetes are like everyone else, only more so. This realization has been slowly growing in my mind as I began to appreciate that while we talk all the time about how those of us with diabetes need regular exercise, good nutrition, and weight control, everyone needs that too. Even the complications of diabetes are more intense manifestations of what anyone may experience. For example, the problems that we often experience with our skin are similar to what just about everyone experiences, although maybe we experience them more often or more severely. High blood glucose levels can sure make wound control more difficult. But I know from my own experience that even as I have controlled my blood glucose, my hands can get just as dry and cracked as they ever were. Maybe more so. Maybe it’s the typical dryness of winter. Maybe it’s the special dryness where I have lived for the past three or four years. Maybe it’s because I’m more active outside now. But it’s certain that my hands need help. And everyone’s hands need help. My dermatologist, Yan Isabel Zhu, emphasized that to me last month when she checked me for skin cancer, as she does at least once a year. “We all need to apply a thin layer of hand and skin cream every time we wash our hands,” she told me during a recent check up. “In all seasons and in every part of the country.” Applying hand and skin cream every time I wash my hands has been a challenge. I’ve been a good boy. I wash my hands regularly – including every time I go to the bathroom or come into my place from outside. That avoids a lot of problems. But it causes problems too. My hands get awfully dry and cracks often develop. Apparently these “split fingertips” are an awfully common problem among people with and without d Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Skin

Diabetes And Your Skin

Want another reason to get your blood sugar levels under control and keep them that way? Doing so can help you avoid many diabetes skin problems. Still, skin conditions related to this disease are common. As many as 1 out of 3 people with diabetes will have one. Fortunately, most can be or successfully treated before they turn into a serious problem. The key is to catch them early. Common Skin Conditions Linked to Diabetes Itching skin, also called pruritus, can have many causes, such as dry skin, poor blood flow, or a yeast infection. When itching is caused by poor blood flow, you’ll likely feel it in your lower legs and feet. Lotion can help to keep your skin soft and moist, and prevent itching due to dry skin. Bacterial infections: Staphylococcus skin infections are more common and more serious in people with poorly controlled diabetes. When hair follicles are irritated, these bacteria can cause boils or an inflamed bump. Other infections include: Styes, which are infections of the eyelid glands Nail infections Most bacterial infections need to be treated with antibiotic pills. Talk with your doctor. Fungal infections: Warm, moist folds of the skin are the perfect breeding ground for these infections. Three common fungal infections are: Jock itch (red, itchy area on the genitals and the inside of the thighs) Athlete's foot (affects the skin between the toes) Ringworm (ring-shaped, scaly patches that can itch or blister and appear on the feet, groin, chest, stomach, scalp, or nails). A yeast-like fungus called "Candida albicans" causes many of the fungal infections that happen to people with diabetes. Women are likely to get this in their vaginas. People also tend to get this infection on the corners of their mouth. It feels like small cuts and is called "angular ch Continue reading >>

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