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Diabetic Guide To Thanksgiving

A Diabetic At The Thanksgiving Table

A Diabetic At The Thanksgiving Table

Yahoo!-ABC News Network | 2018 ABC News Internet Ventures. All rights reserved. Many people feel stuffed and uncomfortable after gorging themselves on turkey, stuffing, and desserts on Thanksgiving. But for diabetics, the situation can be downright dangerous, as eating high-sugar foods can send blood sugar into a chaotic rollercoaster. The problem lies in simple carbohydrates and sugars -- common ingredients in holiday meals -- that boost blood sugar immediately and can throw glucose levels out of whack. However, other options such as whole grains can provide carbohydrates that impact the blood sugar more slowly. With a little foresight, meals can be tweaked to integrate diabetic-friendly options, say diet experts. "People with diabetes need to give thought to what they will eat so that they can keep their blood sugars in a normal range," says Connie Diekman, current president of the American Dietetic Association, noting that most non-diabetics are not accustomed to this level of precise planning. "People with diabetes can enjoy most of the foods so typical to the holiday season if they know how to balance the right portion of food into their meal plans. Such planning might be difficult for a new diabetic, but with a little experience it really isn't that tricky." For example, Diekman says, eating basic foods such as turkey, potatoes, vegetables, and salad is easier when options don't appear to be loaded with hidden ingredients. Serving plenty of whole grains, fruits and vegetables is a healthy option for all guests. Other diet experts agree that healthy options can be incorporated into holiday meals for all. "It is important to keep health in mind when planning the menu for the good of all party guests, not just those with diabetes," says Dr. George Blackburn, a profe Continue reading >>

5 Healthy Eating Tips For The Holidays

5 Healthy Eating Tips For The Holidays

Your recipe for staying on track no matter whats cooking. Tis the season for family, festivity, and foodlots of food. Temptations are everywhere, and parties and travel disrupt daily routines. Whats more, it all goes on for weeks. How do you stick to your diabetes meal plan when everyone around you seems to be splurging? Here are 5 tips that can help: You may not be able to control what food youre served, and youre bound to see other people eating a lot of tempting treats. Meet the challenges armed with a plan: Eat close to your usual times to keep your blood sugar steady. If your meal is served later than normal, eat a small snack at your usual mealtime and eat a little less when dinner is served. Invited to a party? Offer to bring a healthy dish along. If you have a sweet treat, cut back on other carbs (like potatoes and bread) during the meal. Dont skip meals to save up for a feast. It will be harder to keep your blood sugar in control, and youll be really hungry and more likely to overeat. If you slip up, get right back to healthy eating with your next meal. Have pumpkin pie instead of pecan pie. Even with a dollop of whipped cream, youll cut calories and sugar by at least a third. Break physical activity up into smaller chunks so it fits into your schedule, like walking 10 minutes several times a day. Schedule some me time every daya nap, dog walk, or hot bath to get your energy back for the next celebration. When you face a spread of delicious holiday food, make healthy choices easier: Have a small plate of the foods you like best and then move away from the buffet table. Start with vegetables to take the edge off your appetite. Eat slowly. It takes at least 20 minutes for your brain to realize youre full. Avoid or limit alcohol. If you do have an alcoholic drink Continue reading >>

The Diabetics Guide To Navigating Thanksgiving Dinner

The Diabetics Guide To Navigating Thanksgiving Dinner

The Diabetics Guide to Navigating Thanksgiving Dinner The Diabetic's guide to Thanksgiving Dinner Are you diabetic? Is one of your family members or friends diabetic? We've put together this infographic to help you, or your loved one navigate Thanksgiving dinner. Although the recommended meal plan for someone with diabetes is not very different than someone without, regulating blood sugar levels can help prevent other medical complications resulting from diabetes. Diabetes costs $174 billion annually, including $116 billion in direct medical expenses. MyID offers an easy and convenient method to track all of your medications and conditions that can quickly be accessed in an emergency situation. Infographic by ENDEVR Makers of MyID and STRENGTHTAPE To publish this image on your blog or website, copy this code: Infographic by ENDEVR. Makers of MyID and STRENGTHTAPE Continue reading >>

A Happy Healthy Thanksgiving: Holiday Tips For Diabetic Patients

A Happy Healthy Thanksgiving: Holiday Tips For Diabetic Patients

Dont skip meals or snacks to save calories for Thanksgiving, because it may be harder to manage your blood sugar. Be sure to eat breakfast and small snacks throughout the holiday, so that your blood sugar levels will remain more stable. These are just a couple of the tips Becky Dobosy has shared with diabetic patients this week by offering the Diabetes Friendly Guide to a Healthy Thanksgiving Plate, written by the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Becky Dobosy is Alliances new Nutrition Intern from North Carolina State University who is working with Dr. Joyner. Commenting on the information she has shared, Becky stated that It fits well with the upcoming holidays and builds off of the plate method guidelines we use. Because Thanksgiving is all about sharing food with the ones we love, it is important for diabetic patients to be careful about which foods they choose from their smorgasbord of options on the Thanksgiving table. The American Association of Diabetes Education advises that people with diabetes fill of their plates with vegetables, while avoiding creamy vegetable casseroles which are heavy in butter. If the table is low on healthy vegetable options, fruits such as cranberries and baked apples can be substituted. For the other of the plate, the guide recommends to fill up of the plate with starches such as stuffing and sweet potatoes, and of the plate with lean turkey slices (no dark meat!). Instead of gravy, a fruit based relish is a healthier option which still provides a kick of flavor. Dr. Joyner is very excited that Becky has shared these tips, and she feels it is important for diabetic patients to be aware of this information during the holidays. The plate method is what we use for all of our diabetic patients, but its nice to have a special gu Continue reading >>

A Diabetics Guide To Thanksgiving

A Diabetics Guide To Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving dinner is one of the most highly-anticipated meals of the entire year, but it can be disastrous on your waistline. Not only are the stuffing, cranberry sauce and potatoes packed with carbohydrates, but theyre also high in calories. In fact, the Calorie Control Council estimates that the average American consumes more than 4,500 calories on Thanksgiving! Although the holidays are a tempting time of year to ignore your dietary guidelines, if you are diabetic adhering to a diabetes diet is key in managing this chronic disease . Luckily, keeping your diabetes in check on Thanksgiving doesnt have to be restricting. All it really takes is some careful planning and replacing foods high in carbohydrates, saturated fats and sugar with healthier options. Delicious Recipes for a Diabetic Thanksgiving From the turkey to the side dishes, these recipes for diabetics allow you to enjoy the all the different tastes of the season without jeopardizing your health. Plus, theres no reason why you cant indulge in these appetizing dishes year-round. Herb-Roasted Turkey ( Courtesy of the American Diabetes Association ) Not only is this herb-roasted turkey a good source of protein, but it also has enough flavor that you dont have to top it off with any cranberry sauce, which is high in carbohydrates and added sugar. But if youre still craving some cranberry sauce, just add a tablespoon to your turkey any more than that and it wont benefit your diabetes diet. 3 teaspoons fresh minced rosemary, divided Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste 1 cups low-fat, reduced-sodium chicken broth 1 5-pound turkey breast, skin on, washed and patted dry 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line a large roasting pan with foil. Set a rack inside the roasting pan and coat it with cooking Continue reading >>

10 Tips To Enjoy Your Diabetic Thanksgiving (plus 20+ Recipes)

10 Tips To Enjoy Your Diabetic Thanksgiving (plus 20+ Recipes)

to choose one meat, one starch and a few sides of vegetables and not have an a smorgasbord of options. Another great strategy is to let each person pick one favorite dish and prepare it. That way, everyone feels acknowledged and can feel there is something special they took ownership in. 10 Tips to Enjoy Your Diabetic Thanksgiving and Continue to Take Care of YOU Here are some key tips to enjoy your diabetic Thanksgiving without sabotaging your healthy efforts: balanced breakfast with some protein and fiber. If you show up to the meal starved, your willpower will be low and you will find it very easy to excuse overeating. plain Greek yogurt with berries, nuts/seeds. KEY TIP: Don't skip breakfast on Thanksgiving Avoid congregating around gobs of food as this will only make the temptation to eat mindlessly or nervously greater. Conversation will trend around food and you will be more likely to keep picking at foods as you see others doing this. Or you may use food as a filler during awkward silences. KEY TIP: Try to move conversations away from the food area Okay, so you might splurge a bit, but make your splurges count. Seriously. Dont waste 40 grams of carbs on a dumb store-bought roll or pre-packaged pie. Find that homemade dessert or favorite potato dish and savor a few bits of it. KEY TIP: Choose wisely and make every bit count Dont feel guilty. Enjoy your meal and make it last. (the feeling of fullness) a meal provides is psychological and emotional. If you dont take the time to on what youre eating, be thankful for the food, and savor it, you are likely to overeat and still want more. KEY TIP: Focus on enjoying each and every bite by being present in the moment The holidays are not (or shouldn't be) about food. The word origin comes from Holy days. These are days Continue reading >>

Remaking Thanksgiving Menus

Remaking Thanksgiving Menus

Despite its historical trappings, Thanksgiving, for most of us, is a holiday about food and family (and, often, the watching of televised sports). While it's also a day for home cooks to show their stuff, the expectations of the people doing the eating are what shapes the menu, which may be why that menu doesn't change much year after year. So how do you keep your family's tradition going when you're also trying to stay healthy? We've tinkered with some of the stalwarts of the Thanksgiving table, stripping out fat and carbs while keeping the customary flavors very much intact. Think of it as a much-needed makeover. Rustic Mashed Potatoes With Olive Oil and Garlic You'll notice that these potatoes use no heavy creamand, in fact, no dairy at all. Instead, their smoothness is the result of olive oil and some of the potatoes' cooking liquid. Another update: Parmesan cheese. Since Parmesan is quite intense, only a little bit is needed to produce a lot of flavor, compared with a milder cheese. Mashed Sweet Potatoes With Pineapple and Spices First up: We cut way down on the butter, which you probably won't even miss. That means a lot less unhealthy fat. And instead of the usual brown sugar, crushed pineapple adds plenty of sweetness, meaning we could skip the goopy melted marshmallows, too. The star here is the whole wheat bread, far heartier than the usual white, and full of good fiber. Instead of being loaded with butter, this stuffing is held together by the addition of very hot broth, which the bread cubes soak up. Meanwhile, dried cranberries or cherries add color and zing. Holiday Pumpkin Pie With Maple Ginger Crust The secret is in the crust! Using graham-cracker crumbs instead of a traditional wheat flour means you need only add a teaspoon of canola oil rather than th Continue reading >>

Enjoying Thanksgiving With Diabetes

Enjoying Thanksgiving With Diabetes

Thanksgiving can be challenging for people with diabetes who are trying to manage blood glucose levels and weight. Many traditional Thanksgiving foods are high in fat as well as carbohydrates, but with careful planning, you can make healthy choices that fit into your diabetes meal planand enjoy this wonderful celebration with friends and family, says Tracey Lucier, R.D., Nutrition Educatorat Joslin Diabetes Center. Start the day off with a good breakfast so you wont be tempted to overeat. Nibble on raw vegetables with low-fat dips before dinner rather than salted nuts or cheese and crackers. Choose white rather than dark turkey meat, without the skin. Make mashed potatoes with low-fat milk and margarine instead of butter, and take it easy with the gravy. Skim the fat off the top of the gravy before serving. Steam vegetables like peas and green beans rather serving them in a casserole with creamed sauces. Bake stuffing in a casserole dish rather than inside a turkey so you can make it with less fat. Bake with low-fat broth and margarine. Make cranberry sauce with fresh cranberries. Canned cranberry sauce is high in sugar. If youre going to drink a glass or two of wine, do it with dinner, rather than starting earlier. Consider diluting white wine with seltzer water to make a wine spritzer. Have dessert with everyone else, but choose pumpkin pie over pecan pie, or bring a dessert youve made with an artificial sweetener . Top it with low-fat whipped cream. It is unquestionably hard to stick to your diabetes meal plan on Thanksgiving when you see allof thefood and everyone else is overindulging. It's also difficult if you have food police in your family who try totell you what you can or cant eat, or havesomeone who wants to load more food on your plate, saying its only onc Continue reading >>

How To Cook For A Diabetic At Thanksgiving

How To Cook For A Diabetic At Thanksgiving

How to Cook for a Diabetic at Thanksgiving How to Cook for a Diabetic at Thanksgiving For someone monitoring his or her blood sugar, indulging in a traditional Thanksgiving feast can be distressing. From the carb-laden appetizers to the sweet potato casserole and pumpkin pie, its easy to throw caution to the wind when low-sugar options are sparse. Though fear not, for we are here to provide you with an easy guide to help make your Thanksgiving every bit as tasty while also being diabetic-friendly. After all, everyone should be able to enjoy the holiday with as little stress as possible. Diabetic-Friendly ThanksgivingAppetizers Eating healthy should still be delicious. Sign up for our daily newsletter for more great articles and tasty, healthy recipes. A diabetic should be snacking on a little something every few hours to keep blood sugar levelsin check. It would not be wise to attempt to fast the whole day leading up to the big meal. This could result in your blood sugar dropping too low and leave you feeling lethargic and dizzy. Instead, aim to incorporate snacks with protein, whole grains, and heart-healthy fats every few hours. Easy munchies: Raw vegetables with hummus, protein-packed cheese board , roasted nuts, shrimp cocktail Caramelized Onion, Gruyere, and Bacon Spread Diabetic-Friendly ThanksgivingMain Meals Believe it or not, this is where things get easy. A ton of easy substitutions can makelightening the carbohydrate and sugar content of Thanksgiving staples a breeze. In fact, well walk you through every inch of the traditional spread to make it fail-proof. The Bird: Turkey is an excellent source of lean protein, which you want plenty of on this holiday. Consuming protein in combination with carbohydrates and sugar will help prevent spikes in blood sugar and Continue reading >>

Tips For A Healthy Thanksgiving Dinner With Diabetes

Tips For A Healthy Thanksgiving Dinner With Diabetes

Holidays like Thanksgiving, that are centered around sharing an abundance of food with family and friends, aren'talways easy for someone who has diabetes. Much of the traditional food on the table, such as mashed potatoes, stuffing, and cranberry sauce, is rich, and laden with calories and carbohydrates . This can become increasingly difficult when the entire day becomes one long smorgasbord of eating. The good news is that you still enjoy Thanksgiving while watching what you eatall your need is a small amount of preparation and some creative thinking. Here are some ideas to get you through. A wide variety of foods make up the typical Thanksgiving dinner. Several kinds of side dishes, lots of old family favorites and many kinds of desserts, are often on the table, beckoning you to try each and every one of them. But, do you have to eat them all? Not if you plan in advance what you're going to eat. Strategic planning can help you make good choices and keep your carbohydrate intake from shooting through the roof. If you are not hosting you can offer to bring a low-calorie, lower carbohydrate dish or two. Consider a green bean dish, cauliflower mashed potatoes, or roasted Brussel sprouts, to name a few. If Thanksgiving is at your house, you have control over what goes into, or stays out of the food. If your family loves some higher calorie traditions you can always search for ways to make them more nutritiousby adding vegetables, reducing the amount of fat, and making baking substitutions. When it comes time to build your plate, don't forget about the turkey. We often over stuff ourselves on appetizers that we miss out on the main course. Aim to reduce your intake of pre meal snacks (chips, cheese, dips, etc) and appetizers so that you have an appetite for some of the hea Continue reading >>

Diabetic Thanksgiving Recipes | Accu-chek

Diabetic Thanksgiving Recipes | Accu-chek

What's in (and out) for this Thanksgiving dinner What's in (and out) for this Thanksgiving dinner The mounds of food on a Thanksgiving table can really test your carb-counting expertise and willpowerespecially if you try to keep your carbs between 45 and 60 grams per meal. So we thought we'd make some suggestions for smart options that lighten the carb, fat and sugar load. Out: Crackers and dips. In: Cheese and veggie platter. Low-fat cheeses are better for you than full-fat cheeses or traditional cream-cheese dips. Pair with slices of bell peppers, raw zucchini, sliced pears and even small green salads for a light and tasty appetizer. Out: Turkey smothered in gravy. In: Herbed, roasted turkey. Coated in fresh lemon, rosemary, sage, thyme and apple cider, this herbed, roasted turkey is moist and flavorful without ladles full of gravy. Out: Cranberry sauce. In: Cranberry relish. Whether you buy it or make it, cranberry sauce calls for a lot of processed white sugar to cover up the bitterness of raw cranberries. This cranberry relish is sweetened with an apple and some fresh orange juice, which you can even cut even more with water. Out: Mashed potatoes. In: Mashed cauliflower. Cauliflower is one of the most versatile veggies out there. Make this creamy, herbed, mashed cauliflower , and you might even fool some of your dinner guests. Out: Candied sweet potatoes. In: Roasted rosemary sweet potatoes. We know that all those mini-marshmallows, brown sugar sprinkles and pools of butter are a family tradition, but there is more than one way to have sweet potatoes at Thanksgiving. And who knows? Maybe your roasted rosemary sweet potatoes will be a new family fave. Out: Green bean casserole. In: Lemony green beans. Green beans are so delicious, why do we smother them once a year Continue reading >>

25 Tips For Managing Diabetes On Thanksgiving

25 Tips For Managing Diabetes On Thanksgiving

25 Tips for Managing Diabetes on Thanksgiving Oh, you know how all these articles begin: Theres nothing more challenging than managing diabetes during the holidays, especially Thanksgiving. Sure, its true: it aint easy. But you know what: it aint impossible either. There are many things you can do to enjoy this food-focused holiday even if your body is lacking in the Insulin Department. (My own Insulin Department went out of business in 1999.) The fact is you can make a variety of adjustments in your medications as needed, you can swap and trade your carb choices carefully, you can cook unique recipes , and of course, you can fill up on turkey and green beans and forgo the potatoes and the cranberry sauce and the pies and cookies. The point is: you have options. And feeling like the poor ol diabetic who doesnt get to enjoy Thanksgiving doesnt have to be one those of options. Here are tips and strategies from our Facebook community on enjoying the holiday season as a person withany type of diabetes: Test. Test. Test! Dont sacrifice your favorites! Manage diabetes around them and be HAPPY! Kayte Summer Will just have turkey and green beans with gravy and low carb pumpkin pie. Good enough for me and no bad spike. Jody Mack Being real careful with starches! Following the plate method. Louise Floret I am pretty disaplined every day with my diet as I manage my T2 with diet alone. However I plan on enjoying myself Thanksgiving dinner! Just the dinner, not the entire day! Donnie Cox I pick one thing to enjoy and shun the rest. Sysy Morales Ieat small portions of food and plenty of water afterwards, diet soda doesnt always help either. Always take my before meal insulin but take a few more units according to what Im eating. that helps to keep my numbers in a health normal range Continue reading >>

7 Diabetic Friendly Recipes For Thanksgiving

7 Diabetic Friendly Recipes For Thanksgiving

7 Diabetic Friendly Recipes for Thanksgiving Millions of Americans eagerly await the Thanksgiving feast every year. For people living with diabetes, however, the inability to indulge in their festive favorites can lead to disappointment. But managing diabetes doesnt have to mean missing out on an amazing meal -- particularly when caregivers incorporate plenty of healthy options into the menu. Read on for a roundup of seven diabetic friendly recipes perfect for pleasing all of your guests this Thanksgiving. Looking for some help this holiday season? Check out our ebook: Turkey is the main attraction on any Thanksgiving table, but if youve ever choked down a piece of dry, flavorless turkey, you know turkey can go very wrong if not properly prepared. The secret to an impossibly moist and flavor-packed gobbler? Orange slices tucked under the skin. This turkey is so tasty that no one will ever know its a diabetic friendly recipe. 2. Sauteed Brussels Sprouts with Bacon & Onions Looking to add some cruciferous crunch to your meal? Look no further than this simple yet delicious recipe, which brings together three classic fall flavors into one vibrant dish. Plus, you cant go wrong with Brussels sprouts, which are loaded with cancer-fighting and heart-healthy antioxidants. What do you get when you cross mashed potatoes with a sizable serving of everyones favorite seasonal squash? Pumpkin mashed potatoes, of course! This healthy twist on one of the Thanksgivings most celebrated sides swaps out the cream for fat-free milk but maintains its rich, decadent texture thanks to the incorporation of reduced fat cream cheese. Served in miniature pumpkin bowls, this dish is as delicious to look at as it is to eat. 4. Oven-Roasted Squash with Garlic & Parsley Not a fan of squash? Youre like Continue reading >>

How To Have A Diabetes-friendly Thanksgiving

How To Have A Diabetes-friendly Thanksgiving

Lets face it: For many of us, Thanksgiving is all about food. The more, the better. But many traditional Thanksgiving dishesfrom sweet candied yams to creamy green bean casseroleare a nightmare for people with diabetes. Fortunately, there are lots of easy ways to make Thanksgiving healthier, says Paula S. Barry, MD , a physician at Penn Family and Internal Medicine Longwood. Tips for a Diabetes-Friendly Thanksgiving Here are a few tips for a diabetes-friendly Thanksgiving that everyone can enjoy. Many Thanksgiving dishes are carbohydrate-heavy, posing a danger for people with diabetes. Its not just sugary desserts to be wary of: Even side dishes like cranberry sauce are usually not diabetes-friendly. And, as Dr. Barry points out, people with diabetes might also have high blood pressure and high cholesterol. This can be problematic when a Thanksgiving meal has lots of high-fat and sodium-rich foods. Keep your consumption in moderation, Dr. Barry suggests. Try to have one plateand no seconds. Keep your portion sizes very low for these high-carb favorites: Or avoid them altogether, Dr. Barry suggests. The same goes for stuffing: If you have any, make it just a small amount, because its very high in carbohydrates. Opt for diabetic-friendly recipes and simple food substitutions If someone else is hosting Thanksgiving, Dr. Barry suggests you offer to bring a diabetes-friendly dish as a healthier option. There are plenty of ways to make simple substitutions to transform your Thanksgiving into a healthier eating experience. Most people think of turkey as a good foodand it can be. The big thing is to try to have it roasted instead of fried. And keep portion sizes appropriate, she explains. If you want to have appetizers, stick to basic vegetables like fresh celery and carrots. Continue reading >>

How Can I Manage My Diabetes During Thanksgiving?

How Can I Manage My Diabetes During Thanksgiving?

How can I manage my diabetes during Thanksgiving? Vandana R. Sheth on behalf of Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Thanksgiving can be an enjoyable celebration for everyone. If you have diabetes it is important that you remember to count carbs, monitor your blood sugar, enjoy all foods in moderation, take your medicines (if prescribed) on time and stay physically fit. Also, remember that alcohol does affect your blood sugar and adjust your food intake accordingly. Just because you are busy all day preparing for the big holiday meal does not mean that you skip other meals. Enjoy a good breakfast and eat throughout the day to keep your energy level up and avoid overeating Pace yourself through the holiday gatherings and focus on quality time spent with family/friends rather than on the food alone Use the "Choose My Plate" icon as a visual cue as to types of foods and portions everyday including the holidays. For instance, fill half your plate with colorful fall fruits and vegetables, 1/4 of your plate turkey/lean protein and 1/4 of your plate with carbohydrates (bread, potato, etc.) Be creative and tweak traditional recipes to make them healthier Plan an activity that is physically active such as a family walk after the holiday meal Remember that all foods can fit into a healthy diet. The key is enjoy a variety, balance and practice portion control Univ. of Nev. School of Medicine, Family Medicine You can manage your diabetes during Thanksgiving by planning ahead and managing portion sizes. Plan ahead by buying (or bringing) sugar-free deserts. Use small portion size to control your carbohydrate intake. Dedicate one third or less of your plate for carbs, with the other two-thirds for turkey and vegetables. Also try to limit your alcohol intake. Thanksgiving can be a time Continue reading >>

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