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Diabetic Friendly Pizza Restaurants

6 Diabetes-friendly Fast-food Meals

6 Diabetes-friendly Fast-food Meals

Source: Web exclusive, August 2011 Eating healthy is easy’when you’re cooking at home, with access to a good grocery store. When you’re out, on the other hand, it can be hard to find the best choices. Restaurant meals are often laden with calories, fat, sugar and salt, and the most popular’and tempting’sides, such as fries or pop, have barely any nutritional value other than calories. Plus, says Janet von Weiler, a registered dietitian who specializes in pediatric diabetes at Saint John Regional Hospital in New Brunswick, ‘Restaurant portions can be so huge.’ But that doesn’t mean you have to give up on eating well when you’re eating out. The most important thing is to plan ahead. First, says von Weiler, know which restaurants will offer the healthiest choices, and plan to choose them rather than competitors in the same food court or on the same stretch of highway. Second, ‘do a bit of studying ahead of time’ to familiarize yourself with nutritional information online so you’re aware of the best picks. And third, know what to avoid: empty-calorie and sugary beverages; anything from the deep fryer, including any tortilla strips or croutons that are added to salads; and calorie-rich sauces, which can often be substituted or served on the side so you can control what you eat. All of the meals below have been chosen to hit between 45 and 60 grams of carbohydrates’a ‘not unreasonable’ goal, according to von Weiler’and 400 to 500 calories, with fat and sodium as low as possible for fast-food restaurants. Make sure you’re hitting your personal nutritional targets and balance them out with meals that are light on fat and salt the rest of the day, and speak to your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns on how these meals can Continue reading >>

Healthy Pizza Recipes: Tortilla Pizza Is Diabetic-friendly & Simple To Make

Healthy Pizza Recipes: Tortilla Pizza Is Diabetic-friendly & Simple To Make

Carbohydrates are the nemesis of all diabetics. Oh how we love them, and oh how they hate us! Giving up the majority of my daily bread is the hardest part of being a Type 2 Diabetic for me. When it comes to pizza… when was the last time you managed to eat just one slice of your favorite pizza? Stopping after just waking your taste buds up with those first few bites isn’t likely to happen, is it? As a way to cut back (and keep my blood glucose numbers in check), I started ordering a DeLITE pizza thin crust pizza at Papa Murphy’s. By reducing the quantity of crust, I hoped to maintain safe blood sugar numbers on my meter the following morning. Take heart all you fellow diabetics who struggle to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Here’s a simple way to satisfy a serious craving for pizza without pegging the scale on your blood glucose monitor! Following are lots of great tips and videos for making healthy pizza using tortilla shells… How To Make A Tortilla Pizza Anything whole wheat is lower on the Glycemic Index Food Chart and will have less affect on your blood sugar. This is good if you’re diabetic. It’s also good if you’re just trying to eat healthier! Using a whole wheat flour tortilla as your pizza crust reduces the crust size and also ensures the healthiest crust possible. The restrictions of a smaller overall pizza will help you contain your appetite while still providing a satisfying meal. That’s right, you can eat the whole thing without feeling guilty. Another interesting benefit is the fact that tortilla pizza is actually considered “diet food.” Yes, even those on Weight Watchers can still enjoy pizza without the guilt. By adding just a few everyday ingredients, you can enjoy a great tasting pizza that will satisfy that craving that hits us all Continue reading >>

Tips For Dining Out With Diabetes

Tips For Dining Out With Diabetes

Two of the best tips you can use at restaurants are to watch the salt and cut the portions. Experts recommend that people with diabetes get only 1,500 milligrams of sodium daily. That's less than a teaspoon. These course-by-course tips will help: Appetizers Choose fresh fruit or vegetables. Avoid soups and broths. Stay away from bread and rolls with salty, buttery crusts. Salads Avoid pickles, canned or marinated vegetables, cured meats, seasoned croutons, cheeses, and salted seeds. Order salad dressings on the side, and use small amounts of them. Main courses Choose plain foods including broiled, grilled, or roasted meat, poultry, fish, or shellfish. Select plain vegetables, potatoes, and noodles. Ask your server about the low-salt menu choices, and ask how the food is prepared. Ask for food to be cooked without salt or monosodium glutamate (MSG). Avoid restaurants that do not allow for special food preparation (such as buffet-style restaurants and diners). Avoid casseroles, mixed dishes, gravies, and sauces. At fast-food restaurants, skip the special sauces, condiments, and cheese. Avoid salted condiments and garnishes such as olives and pickles. Desserts Choose fresh fruits, ices, sherbet, gelatin, and plain cakes. Servings at many restaurants are often big enough to provide lunch for 2 days. When eating out: Ask for half or smaller portions. Eyeball your appropriate portion, set the rest aside, and ask for a doggie bag right away. If you have dessert, share. Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Eat Pizza & Chinese Food?

Can A Diabetic Eat Pizza & Chinese Food?

A person with diabetes can eat anything, so you can certainly include pizza and Chinese food on your menu. This doesn’t mean you can eat either type of fare with abandon or without consideration of other foods on your menu for the day. Careful planning and balanced nutrition play vital roles in managing symptoms of diabetes. Video of the Day A balanced diet for a person with diabetes includes essentially the same foods you’d find on a nutritionally sound diet for anyone – a combination of complex carbohydrates, lean protein, fruits, vegetables and dairy. A healthy diet also includes healthy fats such as those found in olive oil, oily fish, almonds and walnuts. A good balance includes obtaining 40 to 60 percent of your daily carbohydrates from carbohydrates, 20 to 35 percent from protein and 20 to 35 percent from fat. To help manage diabetes, you should limit refined carbohydrates and mix your consumption of both refined and complex carbohydrates with other foods. Pizza crust usually includes a crust made from white flour, a refined carbohydrate. To avoid causing sudden spikes in your blood sugar levels, limit the amount of pizza you eat at any one time. Order thin crust pizza and opt for whole wheat pizza crust when available. Your choice of toppings also proves important in managing diabetes. Cheese, a good source of calcium, contains some sugar. Order a pizza with light cheese. You also need to manage your weight and cholesterol to control symptoms of diabetes. If you want a meat topping, chicken makes a better choice than pepperoni. And if you add a lot of vegetables – tomatoes, broccoli, mushrooms, green peppers, spinach – these complex carbohydrates will help balance out the refined carbohydrates in the pizza crust. The Glycemic Index, a system that rates Continue reading >>

Diabetic-friendly Fast Food

Diabetic-friendly Fast Food

(Before you gulp down that coffee, read 9 surprising caffeine myths .) Avoid regular Frappuccinos (300 calories, 47 g carbs and 11 g fat for a tall Caramel Frappuccino with whipped cream) and stick to light Frappuccinos (a tall Light Caramel Frappuccino without whipped cream has 100 calories, 22 g carbs and less than 1 g fat). Egg sandwiches and breakfast platters can provide a healthy dose of carbs, protein, fat and fiber just make sure they dont have too much fat, sodium and cholesterol, Warshaw says. Beware of anything with Loaded or Extreme in its name, like the Loaded Breakfast Burrito from Carls Jr. or Jack in the Boxs Extreme Sausage Sandwich. Both pack more than 600 calories, 30 g carbs and 16 g of saturated fat. And avoid bacon and sausage. Four slices of bacon add 140 calories and 4 g saturated fat, while one patty or two links of sausages contain 370 calories and 13 g of saturated fat. Best diabetes-friendly options: Choose smaller breakfast sandwiches and platters with lean protein. At the Midwestern restaurant chain Bob Evans, the healthier option, Egg Lites has only 70 calories, 1 mg carbs and 0 g of saturated fat. Try Bob Evans' Garden Harvest Omelet with no-cholesterol Egg Lites, which boasts 245 calories, 12 g carbs and 7 grams of saturated fat. Healthful alternatives for egg sandwiches include the Dunkin Donuts Egg & Cheese Wake-Up Wrap (150 calories, 13 g carbs, 3.5 g saturated fat), Au Bon Pains 2 Egg Sandwich on a Skinny Wheat Bagel (230 calories, 22 g carbs, 4 g saturated fat), and McDonalds Egg White Delight McMuffin (250 calories, 8 g fat, 29 g carbs). Eating at home? Try one of these dietitian-approved breakfast ideas . Love your morning pastry? Those hefty muffins and gigantic bagels full of saturated fat, sugar, and calories can be a minefiel Continue reading >>

19 Places Where Diabetics Can Safely Eat Out

19 Places Where Diabetics Can Safely Eat Out

Diabetics know they should limit carbohydrates, fats, and sugar and up their intake of fiber. Meal plans created by the American Diabetes Association suggest that 45 percent of daily calories should come from carbohydrates, with 45 to 60 grams per meal, and most of those from whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. Additionally, New York nutritionist Laurie Simon suggests limiting any one meal to 10 grams of sugar or less. That's difficult enough eating at home; sticking to the rules at restaurants can be even harder -- but it can be done. Continue reading >>

28 Popular Restaurant Dishes That Are Great For Diabetics

28 Popular Restaurant Dishes That Are Great For Diabetics

Dining out with diabetes Contrary to popular belief, a diabetes diagnosis doesn't mean you have to spend your days eating flavorless fare. It's completely possible to enjoy delicious food—even at a restaurant, as long as you know exactly what to order, how it's prepared, and what an appropriately sized portion looks like. Since not everyone with diabetes has the same meal plan or health goals, we set out to create the most comprehensive list of diabetes-friendly restaurant dishes, whether you're cutting calories or keeping salt, carbs, or fats to a minimum. Read on for nutritionist-approved orders from Chinese and Italian restaurants, delis, smoothie shops, and other popular eateries. Plus, don't forget to be on the lookout for these menu words to avoid. At American restaurants: Turkey burger with steamed broccoli When you're dining at your local sports bar or diner, Isabel Smith, MS, RD, CDN, says that a turkey burger is the way to go. "Remove the top bun, which doesn't typically contain much fiber and swap fries for a green veggie. This will add fiber to your meal and help slow blood sugar spikes and promote satiety," she explains. Here's how to get more fiber in your diet. At American restaurants: Beef burger with a salad If you prefer a beef burger, Smith suggests pairing one with a salad (sorry, no fries) and a vinegar-based dressing on the side. Ditch the top bun to keep empty carbs off your plate and say "no thanks" to cheese to keep excess salt and fat to a minimum. At American restaurants: Filet mignon Feeling fancy? Order a filet with a sweet potato and side of non-starchy vegetables such as spinach or broccoli, suggests Miriam Jacobson, RD, CDN. "Sometimes a steak can be the healthiest item on the menu. Just beware of portion sizes. It should be the size of Continue reading >>

Eating At Restaurants With Diabetes

Eating At Restaurants With Diabetes

How to keep your blood sugar in check when dining out. By the dLife Editors Going out to eat is fraught with challenges for people who need to watch their blood sugar. There’s the giant portion size issue, the unknown ingredients, and the “special-occasion effect.” That’s the way we tell ourselves it’s ok to make unhealthy choices on special occasions. Our idea of what constitutes a special occasion is pretty subjective. Here are some tips on making d-friendly choices in restaurants, by type of cuisine. What to Order at Italian Restaurants Italian restaurants can be full of high-carbohydrate foods like bread, pasta, pizza, risotto, and gnocci. Many of these combine refined carbs with processed meats like sausage and pepperoni, and batters or breading (think eggplant Parmesan or fried mozzarella). Things you can do: Ask your server to skip the bread basket for your table. If you’re going to splurge and have pasta, ask for it as a side dish and don’t eat more than the size of your fist. That’s one cup of pasta, or about 45 grams of carbohydrate. Order unbreaded chicken or veal baked with sauces like piccata, marsala, puttanesca, francese, or cacciatore. Other good choices include: Caesar salad with grilled or baked fish, escarole and beans, and minestrone soup. What to Order at Mexican Restaurants Mexican food can be full of carbohydrates with large portions of rice, beans, and tortillas. Things you can do: At the very least, limit portion sizes. Ask to have half your plate wrapped to go before you even start eating. Skip the rice; ask for black beans or salad in its place. If you love chips and salsa, take a handful and then ask for the basket to be removed from the table. Order soft chicken or fish tacos and eat the fillings with a fork, skipping the tor Continue reading >>

8 Best Fast Food Options For Diabetics

8 Best Fast Food Options For Diabetics

When it comes to your diabetes care, you know the importance of eating to keep both your blood sugar and weight balanced. Since fast-food restaurants often serve products full of sugar and saturated fat, it is best to stay away from them. However, if you find yourself without many dining options, it is good to know what diabetic-friendly choices are offered by these chains. Check out this list of the best fast-food options for diabetics. Complete nutrition facts including carb counts for the recommended items are available in the restaurants themselves or on their websites. nutrition diet You Might Also Like Continue reading >>

The 14 Best Restaurant Meals For Diabetics

The 14 Best Restaurant Meals For Diabetics

The 14 Best Restaurant Meals For Diabetics Don't let your diabetes get in the way of dining out. The 14 Best Restaurant Meals For Diabetics Don't let your diabetes get in the way of dining out. Breaking news: you dont need to fret about your blood sugar spiking when you eat out! The team at Eat This, Not That! has got the 4-1-1 on the healthiest meals diabetics can order. If you have Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) or Type 2 DM, eating out can be a struggle. For example, you may not be as willing to sample an appetizer, or order that bowl of pasta because youre not sure how many grams of carbs are hidden between each twirl of noodles. And dessert? Forget about it. Theres probably way too much sugar for your pancreas to handle. Enough is enough. Youre allowed to indulge and order that carby dish youve been craving for since yesterday. All you need to do is a little bit of research before tackling the menu. The best news of all is youre not alone. According to the CDC, 29.1 million people have diabetes in the United Statesthats 10% of the entire population. Fortunately, Type 2 DM may be reversible if you eat a variety of fruits, vegetables, grains, and lean protein while avoiding processed foods. Until then, here are a handful of diabetic-friendly meals you can order from your favorite restaurants. And make sure to read up on the 15 Secret Diabetes Remedies for more helpful tips on how you can manage your Type 2 Diabetes. Noodles and Companys Med Salad with Chicken Nutrition: 370 calories, 15 g fat (5 g saturated fat), 1,460 mg sodium, 33 g carbs (4 g fiber, 6 g sugar), 27 g protein Full disclosure here: Above are the nutrition facts for the full size dish, and this salad contains both noodles and cheese for a total of only 33 grams of carbs. Shoutout to Noodles and Compan Continue reading >>

Diabetic-friendly Fast Food Lunch Ideas

Diabetic-friendly Fast Food Lunch Ideas

Lunchtime may be a welcome break from the daily grind for most people, but if you have diabetes, a quick lunch at the local burger joint can quickly turn into too many carbs and unwelcome blood sugar spikes. But it doesn’t have to be that way. By keeping some simple tips in mind, even fast food can be diabetes friendly. Learn some tips to navigate the menus at common fast food restaurants. Burger Restaurants When a burger is all that will soothe your midday craving, stick to a single patty to save on calories. Paying attention to condiments can also be a huge help. Since many fast food restaurants will automatically add mayonnaise to burgers, ask that they hold it on yours. “One tablespoon has around 100 calories,†says Amy Kimberlain, RDN, LDN, RYT, a registered dietitian at the Diabetes Research Institute in Miami. Request mustard or ketchup packets instead. That way, you’re saving calories and controlling the amount yourself. Also avoid other key carb and fat offenders, such as bacon, cheese, and fries. Opt for a lower-carb side salad instead. Chicken Restaurants Chicken may seem like a healthier choice overall. When compared to a higher-fat burger, it might be, but there’s still room to go overboard here, too. To keep carbs in line, watch the wording. “Crispy typically means more calories and carbohydrates, since the chicken has been battered,†says Alison Massey, MS, RD, LDN, CDE, director of diabetes education at the Center for Endocrinology at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. Order your sandwich grilled instead. For your side, choose a non-starchy vegetable such as steamed veggies or coleslaw instead of french fries. Of if you skip the bun, you can make room for healthy complex carbs like beans or fruit. Mexican Restaura Continue reading >>

If You Have Diabetes, Here's Exactly What To Order At 8 Types Of Restaurants​

If You Have Diabetes, Here's Exactly What To Order At 8 Types Of Restaurants​

When you have diabetes, eating out can seem more complicated than deciphering the new tax code. But it doesn’t have to be. “People with diabetes can enjoy most any kind of restaurant,” says Jill Weisenberger, RDN, CDE, author of Diabetes Weight Loss Week by Week. “The key is to stick as closely to your usual meal plan as possible.” Here’s how. (Find out how to stop the craving cycle before it starts and burn fat around the clock with the naturally sweet, salty, and satisfying meals in Eat Clean, Lose Weight & Love Every Bite.) Worried about all that crust? Go with one slice of thin crust pizza and you’ll lighten the carb count of your slice by a third compared to a regular slice. If a single slice sounds too skimpy, pump up the volume—and the fiber—by adding plenty of chopped veggies. And speaking of veggies, filling up on a salad before your pie arrives can also put the breaks on hunger. These pita pizzas will totally change the way you think about dinner: “Given that pasta is packed with carbohydrates, it’s probably not the best idea to make it the center of your meal,” says Weisenberger. Just one order of spaghetti and meatballs can easily pack 150 grams of carbs. That doesn’t mean you have to go 100% pasta-free though. Weisenberger recommends ordering pasta as a side dish and limiting your portion to a half-cup, or about the size of a tennis ball. Pair it with an order of mussels fra diavolo, chicken cacciatore, or grilled calamari. (And make sure you try these 6 ways to make Italian food flat belly-friendly!) We hope you enjoy the products we're recommending as much as we do! Just so you know, Prevention may get a share of sales from the links on this page. If you’re eating Chinese food, chances are there’s going to be rice on your pla Continue reading >>

How To Order Fast Food When You Have Diabetes

How To Order Fast Food When You Have Diabetes

Although anyone may develop type 2 diabetes, this kind of diabetes is often caused by poor lifestyle choices, such as being overweight and not being physically active. Controlling your diet by avoiding typical fast-food choices can play a large role in helping control your blood sugar levels — a must when managing type 2 diabetes. Taking this important step may even reduce the amount of medication you need to take each day. But there are many reasons that you might need to rely on fast-food restaurants. For instance, you may work late hours or be pressed for time, and fast food might be the most convenient, or even the only, option available to you. There's no denying that these quick-bite chains seem to be everywhere — the United States has about 7.52 fast-food restaurants per 100,000 residents, according to a study published in December 2011 in the journal Critical Public Health. If you do find yourself needing to order at the drive-thru, don't fret. The key is knowing what to order to get the nutrition you need without jeopardizing your health. Type 2 Diabetes: Better Fast-Food Choices Common sense says that fast food isn't likely to be on the preferred-foods list for people with diabetes. After all, a typical fast-food breakfast can put you at or over your daily limit for fat, cholesterol, and carbohydrates. But many fast-food restaurants offer smart choices that can help you get the nutrition you need with the convenience you desire. For starters, fast food doesn’t have to mean fat-laden fare. Planning ahead is key, says Jenny Dejesus, NP, CDE, a diabetes educator at Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City. Many fast-food chains now feature healthier choices, and these are the restaurants you want to go to. “If possible, look at the menu ahead of time Continue reading >>

Make Any Restaurant Diabetes-friendly

Make Any Restaurant Diabetes-friendly

While the world is, indeed, full of foods that do not mix all that well with diabetes management, there aremany things you can do to create a great meal at any restaurant. I say this because with both type 1 diabetes and celiac disease, my options appear to be pretty limited, but I guarantee you when I enter a restaurant, I can create a great meal anywhere (well, anywhere that servesreal whole food, which automatically eliminates any fast food restaurant). Here are 3 things to NOTdo when eating at a restaurant: Simply accept that whats on the menu is your only option. Use the excuse, Well, Im at a restaurant, so I might as well not bother watching what I eat. Decide that you dont want to be weird by asking your meal to be altered somehow which will inevitably sacrifice your health just because of what others might think. Believe me, Ive been at a crowded dinner table when, after I ordered, several people looked at me like I was an alien. You want your meatballs paired with broccoli, spaghetti sauce on the side, covered inparmesan? Gross!But I dont care. This ismy health,and therefore, when I sit down in a restaurant, I will create the best option I can for my diabetes. Tips for dining out at any restaurant, for the sake of your diabetes: Be very specific about every detail of your meal if you need to be. Get the pocket-sized book or app for CalorieKing to help estimate carb/calorie counts. Ask them tonotbring a bread basket, or if youre with a group, push the bread basket out of your arms reach. Ask the croutons to be left off your salad, the toast off your plate, bun off the burger, etc. Ask for the dressing of your salad or the gravy on your meal be set on the side in a separate dish. Request that your side of vegetables (which substitute for the potatoes or fries) b Continue reading >>

The 14 Best Restaurant Meals For Diabetics

The 14 Best Restaurant Meals For Diabetics

Breaking news: you don’t need to fret about your blood sugar spiking when you eat out! The team at Eat This, Not That! has got the 4-1-1 on the healthiest meals diabetics can order. If you have Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) or Type 2 DM, eating out can be a struggle. For example, you may not be as willing to sample an appetizer, or order that bowl of pasta because you’re not sure how many grams of carbs are hidden between each twirl of noodles. And dessert? Forget about it. There’s probably way too much sugar for your pancreas to handle. Enough is enough. You’re allowed to indulge and order that carby dish you’ve been craving for since yesterday. All you need to do is a little bit of research before tackling the menu. The best news of all is you’re not alone. According to the CDC, 29.1 million people have diabetes in the United States—that’s 10% of the entire population. Fortunately, Type 2 DM may be reversible if you eat a variety of fruits, vegetables, grains, and lean protein while avoiding processed foods. Until then, here are a handful of diabetic-friendly meals you can order from your favorite restaurants. And make sure to read up on the 15 Secret Diabetes Remedies for more helpful tips on how you can manage your Type 2 Diabetes. Nutrition: 370 calories, 15 g fat (5 g saturated fat), 1,460 mg sodium, 33 g carbs (4 g fiber, 6 g sugar), 27 g protein Full disclosure here: Above are the nutrition facts for the full size dish, and this salad contains both noodles and cheese for a total of only 33 grams of carbs. Shoutout to Noodles and Company for keeping this dish low carb! One thing that could be improved is the sodium content because it’s a bit high. If you’re feeling like going all out and having a bowl of pasta at Noodles (which we wouldn’t b Continue reading >>

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