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Diabetes Canada's Position On Employment

Diabetes Canada's Position On Employment

About > Public Policy Position Statements > Diabetes Canada's Position on Employment A person with diabetes should be eligible for employment in any occupation for which he or she is individually qualified. In being considered for employment in safety-sensitive positions, a person with diabetes has the right to be assessed for specific job duties on his or her own merits based on reasonable standards applied consistently. Employers have the duty to accommodate employees with diabetes unless the employer can show it to cause undue hardship to the organization. Undue hardship arises as part of the legislative requirement that employers must change workplace policies, rules, practices and operations that result in discrimination, and provide individual accommodation unless it would lead to undue or unreasonable hardship on the part of the employer. The question of what constitutes undue hardship varies; however, courts have made it clear that employers must expect to experience some cost in eliminating barriers and providing accommodation. Questions arise over when the threshold of undue hardship has been reached. The Canadian Human Rights Act provides that undue hardship must be assessed considering health, safety and cost. The mere fact that some cost, financial or otherwise, will be incurred is insufficient to establish undue hardship. (Source: A Place for All: A Guide to Creating an Inclusive Workplace, The Canadian Human Rights Commission) People with diabetes may face discrimination in the workplace simply because they have diabetes. Most people with diabetes can perform their job duties with minimal accommodation by the employer, such as nutrition breaks, time for glucose level monitoring, appropriate area for glucose monitoring, and/or injection of insulin. Employ Continue reading >>

Glen Dale Resident Is A Pioneer In Diabetes Education

Glen Dale Resident Is A Pioneer In Diabetes Education

Glen Dale Resident Is a Pioneer in Diabetes Education Heather Leonard Is One of First Specialists in West Virginia Photo by Alan OlsonGlen Dale diabetes educator Heather Leonard works out of her office at the Marshall County Professional Building, assisting hundreds with managing their diabetes. One of the first specialists to assist with the treatment of diabetes in West Virginia laid down her roots in Glen Dale, where she grew from a small operation to working alongside 20 physicians over the span of the last four years. Heather Leonard was the first registered dietician-diabetes expert in the state, which allows her to work independently of hospitals out of the Marshall County Professional Building. Leonard has been working as a diabetes educator in the area for nearly 30 years, following in the medical field as her father, Dr. Carl Anderson, had done. I worked in the valley, Ive been here 27 years, I grew up here, so I knew a lot of doctors, Leonard said. Dr. Anderson worked here for 30 years of his life as a family practice doctor, until 1989. I was working with several hospitals over my career. Initially, Leonard said she was working with two endochrinologists in the area, over the past 10 years or so. After departing from working with area hospitals, she has expanded her operation to quintuple her reach, with patients up and down the Northern Panhandle, which typically sees her assisting 150 patients each month. Really, what inspired me to go on my own was the economic situations of the hospitals, she said. A lot of programs were getting cut, so I thought Id try out on my own. I started out with five physicians, and now I have about 20 who refer to me, from Wellsburg to Sistersville. Focusing on cardiovascular health, disease prevention, weight loss and diabetes Continue reading >>

What Kind Of Job Career Is Good For Managing Dia... | Diabetic Connect

What Kind Of Job Career Is Good For Managing Dia... | Diabetic Connect

It's not that you have to be in an exciting job, just one that you enjoy that puts you in a good frame of mind. If all you want to do when you get home is sit on the couch and watch TV and eat junk because you hate your job then it isn't going to matter how much exercise you did during the day. I don't know what the mail carriers around you do but I rarely see one out of their truck and when they do do it's usually no more than a few yards. They have the steering wheel on the opposite side of the truck so they don't have to get out, just lean far enough to reach the mailbox. You can enjoy your job and have a good frame of mind to go to a gym or a Pizza Hut; when people have a bad day, some will go to gym to hit some bags and some will go home and 'slump in front to the TV with comfort food and have a pity party'. Different people will react differently to the same situation, but I doubt they will get the same report card. I guess I forgot some people live in rural area. I was certainly referring to mail carriers that walk from house to houseI know a man in real life who lived as a type 1 diabetics for almost 70 years, he is now either 87 or 88before he retired, he was a mail carrier on long island It's mot just rural areas. My neighborhood is far from rural but the mailman pulls up to communal mailboxes, walks 2 yards, drops off the mail, walks 2 yards and starts back up again. He drives round the streets, stops at each mail box, leans out of the truck and delivers the mail. The only time ever really ever seen a mailman walk over the last 7 years is my old neighborhood were they would park and do blocks of houses. Even then it was only about 100 yards and 2 blocks of houses 23 houses each. I know of construction workers who are hugely active all day but have horrible b Continue reading >>

Diabetes 9 To 5: Tips To Help You Manage Your Diabetes At Work

Diabetes 9 To 5: Tips To Help You Manage Your Diabetes At Work

When television's perennially popular Mary Richards walked into WJM's Minneapolis newsroom in 1970, she did more than show the world a single girl could "make it on her own." The award-winning actress who portrayed her -- Mary Tyler Moore -- also showed us diabetes and a career could coexist. Moore was diagnosed with adult-onset type 1 diabetes in the 1960s, several years before her Emmy-winning show began. But that didn't stop Moore from pursuing her career or turning the world on with a smile. Today, millions of people afflicted with type 1 or type 2 diabetes are following in Moore's footsteps. They're refusing to let diabetes get in the way of their careers. "I made a decision early in my life to find a career where diabetes and success could coexist," says Paul Strumph, MD. Strumph is chief medical officer of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. He also has type 1 diabetes. "I don't wear it like a badge," he says. "But clearly my career has not suffered because of my diabetes." The same is true for San Diego resident Aaron Synder. Synder was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes when he was 20. Today, at age 30, he's a successful trader. "I have a job that requires me to be at work before 5:30 a.m., and I sometimes stay until 5:30 p.m.," Synder says. "I'm continuously surrounded by free candy, sodas, and chips on a daily basis. But I still manage to keep my blood sugar under control and not let my illness interfere with my job." In addition to his job, Synder, is a patient counselor and is also writing a book to help other people with diabetes gain control of their life and career. It isn't always easy to do what Synder and Strumph do. Both agree that having diabetes does present some workday challenges. But, says endocrinologist Lauren Golden, MD, knowledge is the k Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Employment - Getting A Job

Diabetes And Employment - Getting A Job

For a start, in almost all situations you should disclose your diabetes if your employment application requires you to. In all but a few rare cases, there is no reason why people with diabetes should not have equal access to jobs; the exceptions being when employers, for some positions, may be unwilling to accept employees who are at risk of hypoglycemia . I am diabetic and looking for a job, what problems could I face? Conditions such as diabetic retinopathy may inhibit chances of gaining positions that require good visual clarity. Some employers will perceive a job as being a danger to your condition, and this may further complicate an application. Are some jobs more suitable for people with diabetes? This depends entirely on each individual looking for a job. Some professions may be more suitable, depending on your diabetes control and also advice from your healthcare professionals. For instance, some people with diabetes may wish to do more physical exercise rather than be at a desk all day, but obviously there is a balance to be struck and good blood glucose control might be essential for a role like this. Similarly, many people with a good blood sugar routine may prefer fixed working hours in order to maintain their stability. Some people with diabetes seeking a job will also look for the freedom to inject insulin or test their blood glucose whilst at work. I am dependant on insulin; does this exclude me from some jobs? As an insulin user, the following jobs (under current legislation) are unavailable to you. This list does not cover every position, and an employer may use their own discretion, in some cases unfairly. Some of these jobs are exempt from the Disability Discrimination Act of 1995, meaning that employers can refuse an applicant who has diabetes. You Continue reading >>

Ici - Diabetes And Vocational Rehabilitation Employment Services And Outcomes

Ici - Diabetes And Vocational Rehabilitation Employment Services And Outcomes

Diabetes and Vocational Rehabilitation Employment Services and Outcomes The Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) system provides employment supports to a range of people with various disabilities. This brief report is part of a series examining select populations that fall under the rubric of the National Institute on Disability Rehabilitation and Research's concept of "emerging disability." Certain populations are exhibiting high or changing rates of disability, including people in poverty, single mothers receiving welfare, underserved communities of recent immigrants, and specific cultural and racial groups. Particular chronic health conditions are rising rapidly and differentially among cultural and racial groups. Diabetes is one of those conditions, with about 1.3 million people newly diagnosed each year (American Diabetes Association, 2005). According to the American Diabetes Association, approximately 18 million people in the U.S. have diabetes (see www.diabetes.org/diabetes-statistics/national-diabetes-fact-sheet.jsp ). The prevalence is higher among African-Americans, Latinos, and American Indians and Alaskan Natives, and among subpopulations, particularly Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and American Indians in the southeastern United States (American Diabetes Association, 2005). Having diabetes in and of itself does not necessarily qualify any given individual for disability services. However, for some individuals, diabetes can be serious enough or can lead to secondary conditions that would qualify a person for VR services. The leading complications of diabetes are heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, blindness, kidney disease, nervous system disease, and amputations (ADA, 2005). The American Diabetes Association reports that the cost of diabetes is approximately $ Continue reading >>

Three Companies Innovating For Diabetics

Three Companies Innovating For Diabetics

Imagine you’re looking for a new hot job, something you can brag about at parties. Working to build online communities and social networks? Not bad. Developing new smartphone apps backed by Tim Ferriss, author of The 4-Hour Workweek? Even better. Making gourmet chocolate? Ooh, baby. Developing products and services to help those suffering from diabetes? Umm, well, maybe. Probably not something you would come up with on your own. As reported by the American Diabetes Association, almost 26 million people suffer from diabetes, and that’s just in the United States alone. Worldwide the figured is estimated to be as high as 347 million. It is estimated that approximately 80 million people in the U.S. have prediabetes. The World Health Organization (WHO) has labeled the situation an epidemic. It’s a problem that isn’t going away anytime soon. What if you could get a job building the foremost social network for diabetics to help them access valuable information and find comfort and support? What if you could work on a new smartphone app that assists children to manage their condition? What if you were involved in manufacturing gourmet chocolates that not only tasted good enough for anyone to eat, but were completely safe for diabetics to eat as well? You’d not only be working with something interesting and perhaps cutting edge, you’d be changing lives and doing good in the world. That’s something to brag about. Here are three companies that are doing just these things. Online Community, Diabetic Connect The online community Diabetic Connect is a social network built for persons diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The website is an initiative of Alliance Health Networks and receives over 1.8 million visitors per month. By providing a forum where diabetics can communica Continue reading >>

Employment Discrimination & Your Rights

Employment Discrimination & Your Rights

What is Diabetes Canada’s position on employment? Diabetes Canada believes that a person with diabetes should be eligible for employment in any occupation for which he or she is individually qualified. In being considered for employment in safety-sensitive positions, a person with diabetes has the right to be assessed for specific job duties on his or her own merits based on reasonable standards applied consistently. Employers have the duty to accommodate employees with diabetes unless the employer can show it to cause undue hardship to the organization. Read the Diabetes Canada's full position statement on employment, including background and rationale. What is workplace discrimination for people living with diabetes? Discrimination can come in many forms. It is possible that an employer may refuse to hire you after an employment medical, limit your job responsibilities or promotions, or fire you. Sometimes an employer might simply not bother to find out what diabetes really involves and take the easy option of employing someone they don’t see as a risk. Examples of discrimination in the workplace: You inquire about applying to be an officer with the city police department and are told they do not hire people with diabetes. After experiencing a hypoglycemic reaction at your workplace, you are terminated from your job. Despite requesting a regularly scheduled morning coffee break to test your blood glucose and eat a snack, your employer makes you work through until lunchtime. After the employment medical, your job offer is rescinded because your have type 1 diabetes. “We do not hire people with diabetes.” “People with diabetes do not meet the medical requirements for this job.” “People with diabetes using insulin are unfit for employment in this job.” It Continue reading >>

Getting A Job: American Diabetes Association

Getting A Job: American Diabetes Association

If you are in the market for a new job, you may be concerned that your diabetes will stand in the way of getting the job you want. A common question is whether you have to tell potential employers about your diabetesor if you do tell them, how much do you share? You are not usually required to tell employers that you have diabetes. In some professions, there are specific legal rules regarding certification and physical qualification, and you must disclose your diabetes in order to meet the job standards. But for the most part, there is no legal requirement to disclose a disability and the decision whether to tell an employer or potential employer is up to the individual. Keep in mind, however, that anti-discrimination laws only provide protection from discrimination if the employer knows about the disability. Unless your employer has notice of your diabetes, you will not be able to prove that any discriminatory action was because of your disability. Blanket banslaws, regulations or policies that restrict a person from employment simply because of a disabilityare illegal and medically inappropriate because they do not take into consideration the individual's qualifications and abilities. Thanks to advances in law and medicine, there are no longer many jobs that are off-limits to people with diabetes. Commercial drivers who treat their diabetes with insulin are now able to obtain Department of Transportation medical certification through a diabetes exemption program. Fire fighters , police officers, and other law enforcement personnel now have the benefit of guidelines developed by diabetes health care professionals that assess whether the person is able to do the job, rather than automatically disqualify the person on the basis of a diabetes diagnosis. In addition to th Continue reading >>

Diabetes At Work: Healthy Diabetes Control On Shift Jobs

Diabetes At Work: Healthy Diabetes Control On Shift Jobs

Home Diabetes Care Diabetes at Work: Healthy Diabetes Control on Shift Jobs Diabetes at Work: Healthy Diabetes Control on Shift Jobs Posted on February 7, 2014 by DiabetesDigest.com Staff in Diabetes Care Managing shiftwork and diabetes does require planning ahead. There are several issues to be considered, particularly if you are using insulin. The person with Type 2 diabetes who is managing with diet and exercise should also be aware of potential problems with control. In the past, people with diabetes were often denied certain jobs. Now, with the use of blood glucose monitoring, various insulin regimens and with better awareness of how to control diabetes, there are more job opportunities, including those requiring working shifts. Our bodies are influenced by internal clocks called circadian rhythms. Among other functions, these clocks tell us when to sleep and when to be awake. Shiftwork disrupts this balance and can result in mental and physical stress affecting blood glucose control. Stress affects the body by causing the release of hormones that lead to increased levels of glucose in the blood. This, in addition to different patterns of eating and changes in activity/habits while working shifts, can result in unpredictable fluctuations in blood glucose control. Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) can be the most effective tool to help determine patterns of blood glucose control and identify problem areas. Understanding blood glucose can help you to anticipate situations where you may experience high or low blood glucose and allow you to plan ahead to prevent these situations from occurring. It is important to self-monitor on a regular basis so your usual pattern of control is known. When changing shifts, monitor at various times to assess your blood glucose Continue reading >>

Employment Considerations For People Who Have Diabetes

Employment Considerations For People Who Have Diabetes

W W W . H R T I P S . O R G 1A D V A N C I N G T H E W O R L D O F W O R K w w w . h r t i p s . o r g What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. Nearly 24 million people in the United States have diabetes, which means that 7.8% of the United States population has the disease. There are two major types of diabetes: Type 1 (formerly known as “juvenile diabetes†or “insulin-dependent diabetesâ€) – a disease in which the body produces very little or no insulin, often first diag- nosed in children and young adults. People with type 1 diabetes must receive insulin from an outside source (typically through injections or use of an insulin pump) to stay alive. Type 1 diabetes accounts for 5 to 10 percent of all cases of diabetes diagnosed in the United States. In type 2 diabetes (formerly known as “adult onset†diabetes) the body retains the ability to make insulin, but cannot make enough to meet its needs because cells cannot recognize insulin or use it as effectively as in people without diabe- tes. Type 2 accounts for 90 to 95 percent of diabetes cases in the United States. Some people with type 2 (particularly in the early stages of the disease) can con- trol their diabetes through diet and exercise. Others must take various types of oral medications, while still others use insulin, much as those with type 1 do. 2 Employment Considerations for People who have Diabetes Diabetes causes blood glucose (sugar) levels to be too high. This is known as hyperglycemia. In the short term, high blood glucose levels can cause hunger, thirst, headache, blurry vi- sion, frequent urinati Continue reading >>

Managing Type 2 Diabetes At Work

Managing Type 2 Diabetes At Work

Whether it's demanding bosses or meetings that run late, you probably deal with a variety of challenges in the workplace. Add in type 2 diabetes and you’ve got even more to juggle while you’re on the job, says Maria Elena Pena, MD, an assistant professor at Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine and an endocrinologist at North Shore- LIJ Hospital in Syosset, N.Y. The exact hurdles vary from person to person, depending on your health, your work schedule, and your type of employment. But there are effective measures everyone can take to successfully handle type 2 diabetes, no matter what type of work you do: 1. Get it out in the open. "Many people don’t understand diabetes and what it means to have and manage the condition,” says Shelley Wishnick, RD, CDE, a diabetes educator at the Friedman Diabetes Institute at Mount Sinai Beth Israel in New York City. “Ideally, everyone in the workplace should be educated on diabetes and how it is managed in order to promote a healthier, more productive, and supportive working environment.” That said, you might not feel comfortable discussing your diabetes at work. At the very least, consider confiding in at least one or two co-workers — tell them about the possibility of your having a low blood sugar episode, the symptoms to watch for, and what they can do to help you in a crisis, says Karen Kemmis, CDE, DPT, a certified diabetes educator, physical therapist, and exercise physiologist at SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, N.Y. and a spokesperson for the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Dr. Pena also suggests telling your supervisor about your need for designated mealtimes, something she says "is especially important if you have frequent episodes of low blood sugar.” 2. Plan to check blood sugar Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Jobs

Type 1 Diabetes Jobs

Sorry, we cannot save or unsave this job right now. Create an Account with CareerBuilder to save jobs & unlock these great features See similar job titles and skills to help you make your next move Upload a resume and become visible to Hiring Managers and Employers Compare Salary Information to see where you stand amongst your peers Easily Quick Apply to jobs with just one click! Maxim Healthcare Services makes all employment decisions, including recruitment, hiring, placement, promotion, discharge, retirement, compensation, benefits, transfer, corrective action, or any other decisions affecting the terms, conditions, or privileges... We are healthcare company in Fresno providing LVN staffing services for Central Valley school districts. We are contracted with a Fresno School District and with the school district, we have a job opening for an LVN to work within the Public School setting... Talk about meaningful work. Talk about an important role. Let's talk about your next career move. Due to our expanding business, UnitedHealth Group is seeking Clinical Administrative Coordinators who share our passion for helping others live healthier live... Responsible for diabetes management instruction, documentation and follow-up on patients identified through physician referral. Conducts quality and effective diabetes self-management education program classes. Accountable for ongoing evaluation of program... This position requires the ability to assess, instruct, and counsel diabetic patients. Knowledgeable in diabetes and its management, including nutritional and pharmaceutical aspects of care. We provide individual support for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, ges... Careers at UnitedHealthcare Community & State . Challenge brings out the best in us. It also attracts the best. That Continue reading >>

Patient Educator - Diabetes Services - Op Diabetes Program Monterey Job

Patient Educator - Diabetes Services - Op Diabetes Program Monterey Job

The Outpatient Patient Educator reports to the manager of the Outpatient Nutrition Diabetes Program. The Outpatient Patient Educator position is responsible for providing patient education to the outpatients in the Diabetes Program. The Outpatient Patient Educator is an active member of the health care team and participates in multi-disciplinary rounds, as needed (e.g., diabetes rounds). The Outpatient Patient Educator must be able to interact empathetically and compassionately with a variety of patients with chronic, acute and critical care medical needs. The Outpatient Patient Educator must be able to articulate the medical science related to diabetes and translate their knowledge into layman's terms in one-to-one counseling sessions, group classes, public speaking engagements, and while working with print, audio, and video media. The Patient Educator possesses a broad scope of knowledge and skills to provide patient education to facilitate patient self-care management. The Outpatient Patient Educator must be a graduate of an accredited School of Nursing or equivalent and currently licensed to practice in the State of California. Must have at least 3 years of broad clinical nursing experience. A focus in diabetes education is highly preferred. Certified Diabetes Education (CDE) certification must be obtained within 6 months after reaching eligibility to become certified . Health and Wellness coaching certification must be completed within 3 months after completing the Wellcoach training program. CPR Certification must be completed within 30 days of employment. Fluency; the ability to communicate orally, and the ability to read and write in English is required. Intermediate computer skills with MS Word, Excel and PowerPoint are required. The ability to project a posit Continue reading >>

Diabetes The Full-time Job Nobody Wants

Diabetes The Full-time Job Nobody Wants

Diabetes The Full-Time Job Nobody Wants The 'Dealing with Diabetes Burnout' author offers advice Ginger Vieira was 13 when she was diagnosed with diabetes . Her whole family had come down with the flu, but she didnt seem to recover. She was feverish, constantly thirsty and tired. Her vision blurred. Then her school had a health fair and she read about diabetes on a fellow seventh-graders poster. Vieira told her mom, I think I have diabetes. Soon after, she was officially diagnosed, and her life-long relationship with blood-sugar levels, finger pricks, carb counting, insulin injections and finger-wagging doctors began. Luckily, she was Type A the best kind of personality to manage the intricacies of the disease, she says. Vieira also had a good support system, and the grit to prove to a doctor who rolled his eyes at her that she could become a power weight lifter. (MORE: 9 Surprising Ways to Lower Your Diabetes Risk ) Still, Vieira struggled at times. She suffered scary blood sugar highs, like the time she had to be hospitalized after a day spent hanging Christmas lights at the movie theater where she worked as a teen. And lows, like the time she suddenly became so weak she barely had the strength to crawl to the kitchen and swallow some dry oatmeal before passing out. Now shes 28, a diabetes coach, a yogi, a personal trainer and the editorial director at DiabetesDaily.com . Even so, she says shes not a perfect patient. She makes mistakes like everyone else. And she suffers periods of burnout. Vieira's latest book, Dealing withDiabetes Burnout , acknowledges the inevitable frustration that comes with the disease. Its filled with friendly, doable and even funny advice on how to overcome it. Next Avenue: This is your third diabetes book, right? Viera: Yes, and Im working Continue reading >>

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