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Diabetic Foot Ulcer Home Treatment

Common Vitamins And Supplements To Treat Diabetic Foot Ulcers.aspx

Common Vitamins And Supplements To Treat Diabetic Foot Ulcers.aspx

Learn about User Reviews and read IMPORTANT information about user generated content Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you. This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Wounds: Caring For Sores

Diabetes And Wounds: Caring For Sores

When you have diabetes, it's vital to treat foot injuries right away. Even minor wounds can turn into serious foot ulcers, which can cost you a foot -- or an entire leg -- if you don’t care for them quickly and thoroughly. These easy steps can prevent problems down the road. Common Causes What you put on your feet matters. "You can get a foot ulcer from something as simple as walking in new or tight-fitting shoes or getting a small pebble stuck in the shoe,” says Raul Guzman, MD, a vascular surgeon at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. If you have diabetes, you may get a kind of nerve damage that stops the feeling in your feet. Doctors call this neuropathy. If you can’t feel your feet, you may not know you’re hurt, and a small cut or sore can turn into something bigger. Or you might have poor blood flow to your feet, which makes it hard for even minor cuts to heal. Your doctor can tell you whether you have nerve damage or blood-flow problems. Guzman says he can do a test that shows how blood moves through your body. If the results are normal, you can have standard wound-care treatments. “If the results of this blood-flow test are abnormal, that means you have poor circulation that needs to be repaired,” he says. Surgery can help. “We can use a balloon and stent,” Guzman says, “or we can do a bypass procedure, where we connect the artery above the blockage to one of the arteries in the calf or foot.” Wound Treatment Options If you do injure your foot, don't try to take care of it at home. Go to a wound-care center or your doctor, even for blisters, calluses, and scratches. “Put on some antibiotic ointment and see a wound center or your doctor, at the latest, the next day,” says Harold Brem, MD, chief of the wound healing and regenerative medici Continue reading >>

Treating Foot Ulcers

Treating Foot Ulcers

How a Wound Care Center Can Help No one wants to get a foot ulcer, but unfortunately, according to the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons, people with diabetes have a 15% chance of developing one at some point in their lives. Ulcers and other wounds are often the by-product of sensory neuropathy, a complication of diabetes that causes people to lose sensation on the bottoms of their feet. Without this protective sensation, the feet are vulnerable to repeated pressure or trauma that can cause injury. Peripheral vascular disease, in which blood vessels that serve outlying parts of the body narrow, is another potential complication of diabetes that can contribute to foot ulceration. By reducing the flow of blood to the feet, peripheral vascular disease decreases their supply of oxygen and nutrients, making it harder for wounds on the feet to heal. Foot ulcers that are left untreated or are treated improperly can develop debilitating infections and put people at risk for lower-limb amputations. If you develop a foot ulcer, getting prompt and aggressive treatment is the best way to help the ulcer heal and avoid further complications. For this reason, a specialized wound care center may be a good option for treatment. Multiple scientific studies have shown that people with diabetic foot ulcers achieve better outcomes when treated by a multidisciplinary team of health-care providers. A wound care center not only concentrates a variety of specialists in one place, but it can also provide a range of advanced wound care therapies, one or more of which may be the right choice for treating your wound. Since the mid-1980’s, wound care centers have been developing throughout the United States. Initially, each of these programs focused on a specific type of therapy and did Continue reading >>

The Efficacy And Safety Of Natural Honey On The Healing Of Foot Ulcers: A Case Series

The Efficacy And Safety Of Natural Honey On The Healing Of Foot Ulcers: A Case Series

Abstract: This clinical observation investigated the efficacy, cost-effectiveness, and acceptability of natural honey on the healing of a variety of chronic foot ulcers at the primary care level. Materials and Methods. A total of 12 patients with foot ulcers utilizing natural honey as an effective alternative to more expensive, advanced wound products were followed. Cases were referred to Umgwailinah Primary Health Care Center, Doha, Qatar from different health centers and from Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar. There were also self-referred cases. After rinsing the site with normal saline, natural honey was applied and the wound was covered by glycerin-impregnated gauze (Adaptic Non-Adhering Dressing, Systagenix, San Antonio, TX) to prevent the absorption of honey into the cotton gauze and away from the wound site. Patients were followed on a daily basis for an average of 4 weeks. Results. All ulcers healed with no contractures or scars with a mean healing time of 3 weeks. There was a 75% reduction in the dressing budget of the health center and a high level of satisfaction among both health professionals and patients. Patients’ pain levels were reduced significantly after using natural honey, as evidenced by the use of the Visual Analog Scale. Conclusion. The use of natural honey in the management of chronic foot ulcers proved to be efficacious, cost-effective, and acceptable by both clinicians and patients. Introduction Natural honey dressings have been used to treat wounds throughout the ages.1 This case series describes the use of natural honey in patients with a variety of chronic foot ulcers. A wound assessment was carried out daily and used to decide upon the continuation of treatment with natural honey. Numerous preparations of honey have been previously st Continue reading >>

10 Effective Remedies For Diabetic Foot Infections

10 Effective Remedies For Diabetic Foot Infections

flexitrinol.com/offici... Visit Site Diabetic foot infections can be dangerous and deadly for those who suffer from them, but there are a number of home remedies, including the use of American ginseng, astragalus, honey, Aloe vera, rhubarb root, psyllium, caffeine, and many more. What is Diabetic Foot Infections? Diabetic foot infections are painful and problematic conditions that affect thousands of diabetic patients every year, and is the leading cause behind nontraumatic lower extremity amputations. When the tissues or skin of the extremities become infected in diabetic patients, the results can be serious, due to the nature of the diabetic condition. Microvascular circulation in people with diabetes is impaired, which means that it is difficult or even impossible, in some cases, for phagocytic and other immune system compounds to reach and combat the foreign pathogen. An ulcer can form, and if the infection is not treated properly, it can stimulate the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. At this point, the body is no longer taking care of the infected region of the extremity, and amputation is often the only solution. Diabetic foot infections can be deadly, particularly if they are not addressed quickly and effectively. Formal treatments for diabetic foot infections include the use of antibiotics and localized approaches, but again, the success of these formal treatments is not always guaranteed, since the delivery system is essentially compromised. Many people have turned to more natural remedies and treatment strategies, which have less side effects than pharmaceuticals and have proven to be quite successful. Remedies for Diabetic Foot Infections Natural remedies contain combination of antioxidants, vitamins and organic compounds that help stimulate healing a Continue reading >>

Top 7 Special Foot Care For Diabetes Patient

Top 7 Special Foot Care For Diabetes Patient

In recent times, diabetes, also known as diabetes mellitus has become one of the largest harmful chronic diseases across the world. The main causes of diabetes are the modern day sedentary lifestyle, genetic susceptibility, overdependence on harmful processed and packed foods, obesity and lack of physical activity. The feet of diabetic patients are at risk because diabetes can cause harm to the blood supply and nerves. According to researchers, approximately 383 million people throughout the world were suffering from diabetes in 2013. Diabetes increases the risks of stroke, heart attack, foot ulcers, eye damage and kidney failure. Types of Foot Complications Related to Diabetes There are mainly six types of diabetic foot complications like skin changes, neuropathy, calluses, foot ulcers, poor circulation and amputation. Skin Changes Diabetes can cause dry and cracked skin. It generates changes in the colour of the feet. When the levels of blood glucose become high, the body starts to lose fluid. This happens because the body is transforming the water into urine to surpass additional glucose from the body. The skin becomes dry when the damaged nerves of legs and feet don’t receive a signal to sweat. Sweating aids in keeping skin moist and soft. Broken skin increases the chances of infection as germs can easily enter the skin through the cracked area. Neuropathy Neuropathy is widely known as peripheral neuropathy. The main causes of neuropathy are repetitive injury, metabolic problems, physical trauma, and infection. Several drugs and toxins can also be the causes of neuropathy. It damages the walls of the tiny blood vessels of the nerves of the legs. It lowers the ability to feel cold, pain and heat. Various other medical conditions that can lead to neuropathy include Continue reading >>

What Does A Foot Ulcer Look Like? An Indianapolis Podiatrist Answers

What Does A Foot Ulcer Look Like? An Indianapolis Podiatrist Answers

As a Indianapolis podiatrist that specializes in diabetic foot care and wound care, I often get asked by patients as well as by family & friends, what does a foot ulcer look like? And why do people with diabetes develop foot ulcers? A foot ulcer is an open sore. These can be superficial such as a blister that has opened with underlying pink raw tissue exposed or an ulcer can be deep and extend down to the bone. Some ulcers are infected and drain heavily while some have very little or no drainage. An ulcer may or may not be painful. People develop foot ulcers for many different reasons and you don’t need to have diabetes to develop a foot ulcer. Pressure, trauma, and poor circulation can all lead to foot ulcers. A diabetic with a red open sore on the bottom of their foot generally surrounded by a callus has a diabetic foot ulcer. A diabetic foot ulcer, also called a neuropathic ulcer, occur most often on the bottom of the foot over a bony prominence. Ulcers can also develop on the sides of the foot or tops of the toes from friction and pressure of shoes or from poor circulation. For example, a person with diabetes develops a callus on the bottom of their foot. A callus is a build-up of skin due to increased pressure on the foot. Left untreated or, often when self-treated, the callus becomes infected or breaks down into an ulcer. The callus and the eventual ulcer many times go left untreated because a diabetic patient lacks feeling called neuropathy and is unaware that the ulcer is present. This is why you often hear that diabetics should check their feet daily and see a foot doctor routinely. Or the person may be aware of the ulcer but because it is not painful they do not seek immediate treatment. Once an ulcer is discovered it is imperative that professional treatmen Continue reading >>

When Diabetic Foot Ulcers Can Be Managed At Home

When Diabetic Foot Ulcers Can Be Managed At Home

When Diabetic Foot Ulcers Can Be Managed At Home Approximately 15 percent of all patients with diabetes can be expected to develop ulceration in their lifetime, thus putting them at risk for lower extremity amputation. Treatment for infected diabetic foot wounds accounts for one quarter of all diabetic hospital admissions in the United States and Great Britain.1-3 Patient education, proper footgear and regular foot examination can decrease the frequency and severity of ulceration. However, when ulceration does occur, home care may be a cost-effective intervention that can either avoid or shorten hospital admissions in appropriate cases. Obviously, severe, limb-threatening infection or ulceration requires hospital care. This is especially true in cases complicated by vascular disease that may require angiography and bypass surgery. However, if acute infection has been stabilized and the patient has adequate vascular perfusion (or it has been restored during hospitalization), proper wound care at home can facilitate the completion of wound closure. Such care does require administration of necessary antibiotics, debridement and dressing changes, offloading the ulcerated part, and optimal diabetes management. Evaluating Ulcerations For The Possibility Of Treatment At Home The first step in determining suitability for home care is to establish whether the ulceration is limb threatening or not. A useful system for evaluating the severity of diabetic ulcerations was developed at the University of Texas (see University Of Texas Wound Classification System below).4 The classification is based on the depth of the ulceration, presence of infection and degree of ischemia. One will see ischemic ulcers in pulseless feet with thin atrophic skin. These ulcers are usually fibrous or pr Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ulcer – Natural Care And Regimen

Diabetic Ulcer – Natural Care And Regimen

Nearly 15% of diabetics will develop diabetic sores. These skin ulcers are also known as “diabetic foot ulcers” because they most often appear on the feet; however, they can develop anywhere on the lower body. These sores usually appear due to poor circulation or improper and slow function of the veins, a condition also known as venous stasis. [1] If untreated, sores can give rise to complications that can be as serious as an infection. This infection can lead to amputation of the afflicted toes or foot. Proper care and attention is vital to help avoid complications. When diabetes is present, so is high blood sugar, and this is a problem that weakens the heart and vascular system, leading to poor circulation in the feet and legs. The skin on the feet and legs become weak and susceptible to injury — especially open wounds, aka ulcers. What Causes Diabetic Ulcers? Alcohol, tobacco use, obesity, heart disease, and kidney disease are just a few factors that increase the risk of these ulcers. Poor-fitting shoes can also cause blisters on the toes and sole of the foot that can worsen quickly. High blood sugar suppresses immune response, so infection can create complications. Preventative Measures for Diabetic Foot and Leg Ulcers For a person who has diabetes, checking their feet and legs every day for new or developing ulcers is critical. Early detection and daily care are absolutely mandatory to ensure quick healing and avoiding serious problems. Many people also report that washing and moisturizing their feet daily, giving their feet air and changing their socks regularly, wearing comfortable shoes, changing bandages often, and using products that cleanse the skin and deter bacterial and fungal growth are excellent measures for daily preventative care. Diabetes and Na Continue reading >>

Wheatgrass Heals Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Wheatgrass Heals Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Wheatgrass can heal diabetic foot ulcers (7 Cases) Diabetic foot ulcers are common in both Type 1 (insulin-dependent) and Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent diabetes) and can lead to considerable disability. Because of the absence of suitable treatments, these ulcers tend to recur and often lead to amputation to part of the affected leg or even to the death of the patient. Healing, if it occurs, can take months to years, but many never heal at all. Diabetic ulcers occur mainly due to reduced oxygen and nutrients reaching the skin (ischemia) causing breakdown of overlying tissue. Also, the nerves controlling the blood supply may be damaged (peripheral neuropathy) which further reduces blood supply. The affected skin then becomes vulnerable to even minor trauma which breaks the skin surface. This is the beginning of an ulcer, and often considerable associated pain and mental stress ensues. Like leprosy ulcers , diabetic ulcers can respond well, and often quickly to wheatgrass therapy as shown by the cases below. Medical research and clinical observation suggest that wheatgrasscontains bioactive molecules that stimulate production of growth factors. These factors help to repair the tiny nervesthat control the calibre of the microscopicalblood vesselssupplying the skin. ( View this video on You Tube that shows howquickly wheatgrass caninfluence the micro-circulation in a positive way). Prevention is better than cure, sowheatgrass should be applied to the ulcer(s) to maintain the blood circulationandprevent such ulcers forming. In the photos below, some cases were treated with wheatgrass extract daily, however, experience has shown that twice weekly application only is preferable.Daily application may in fact slow recovery by increasing exudate production (the natural fluid that Continue reading >>

Common Vitamins And Supplements To Treat Diabetic Foot Ulcers.aspx

Common Vitamins And Supplements To Treat Diabetic Foot Ulcers.aspx

Learn about User Reviews and read IMPORTANT information about user generated content Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you. This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Pain And Ulcers: Causes And Treatment

Diabetic Foot Pain And Ulcers: Causes And Treatment

Foot ulcers are a common complication of poorly controlled diabetes, forming as a result of skin tissue breaking down and exposing the layers underneath. They’re most common under your big toes and the balls of your feet, and they can affect your feet down to the bones. All people with diabetes can develop foot ulcers and foot pain, but good foot care can help prevent them. Treatment for diabetic foot ulcers and foot pain varies depending on their causes. Discuss any foot pain or discomfort with your doctor to ensure it’s not a serious problem, as infected ulcers can result in amputation if neglected. One of the first signs of a foot ulcer is drainage from your foot that might stain your socks or leak out in your shoe. Unusual swelling, irritation, redness, and odors from one or both feet are also common early symptoms of a foot ulcer. The most visible sign of a serious foot ulcer is black tissue (called eschar) surrounding the ulcer. This forms because of an absence of healthy blood flow to the area around the ulcer. Partial or complete gangrene, which refers to tissue death due to infections, can appear around the ulcer. In this case, odorous discharge, pain, and numbness can occur. Signs of foot ulcers are not always obvious. Sometimes, you won’t even show symptoms of ulcers until the ulcer has become infected. Talk to your doctor if you begin to see any skin discoloration, especially tissue that has turned black, or feel any pain around an area that appears callused or irritated. Your doctor will likely identify the seriousness of your ulcer on a scale of 0 to 3 using the following criteria: 0: no ulcer but foot at risk 1: ulcer present but no infection 2: ulcer deep, exposing joints and tendons 3: extensive ulcers or abscesses from infection Diabetic ulcers a Continue reading >>

4 Natural Ways To Treat Diabetic Foot Ulcers

4 Natural Ways To Treat Diabetic Foot Ulcers

4 NATURAL WAYS TO TREAT DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS Diabetes is a disease that occurs due to the fluctuation in the blood glucose levels above normal due to the inability of insulin to utilize the glucose in the body. Insulin rise can cause a lot of problems. Hypertension, high blood pressure, and weight gain are the major consequences of diabetes. The feet are those part of the body which are in contact with the dirt and dust most of the time. You have to make sure that you wash your feet daily with warm water and regularly check for any rash or injury. Toe your nails on a regular basis. A broken nail can cause an infection loaded with pus. It is a nightmare for a diabetic patient since his high glucose is only helping the microbes to increase their action. Foot ulcers can lead to amputation of the limb since blood flow at the peripheries especially limbs is reduced in diabetes. Four natural ways to treat foot ulcers in diabetes: The normal healing process requires the reproduction, proliferation, and remodeling of the cells. This is possible if the cells are given a proper amount of oxygen to heal. Olive oil has a rubefacient effect, thus increasing the blood supply to the injured area by relaxing the nerves and vessels. It produces a soothing effect whenever it is applied to the affected area. The massage using olive oil helps a lot in the healing of the foot ulcers. Honey has antiseptic properties. It is considered as one of the best remedies for the foot ulcers since it kills all the microbes at the site of infection. Clean the wound and apply a lot of honey and then place a bandage. The wound will heal faster due to the inactivity of the microbes. Unpasteurized honey is considered the best in this regard. Chinese herbal medications suggest that using Radix Astragali can Continue reading >>

How To Spot And Treat Common Diabetic Foot Ulcer Symptoms

How To Spot And Treat Common Diabetic Foot Ulcer Symptoms

If left untreated, diabetic foot ulcers can cause permanent damage that affects your mobility. Approximately 15% of people with diabetes suffer from foot ulcers, according to the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA). Knowing how to recognize diabetic foot ulcer symptoms is crucial, because untreated ulcers can lead to permanent disfigurement. APMA reports that diabetic wounds are the leading cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputations in the United States. However, proper wound care can help reduce the chances of surgical intervention, infection, and foot deformation. The following information will help you recognize wound symptoms and find an effective diabetic foot ulcer treatment. Causes Neuropathy occurs when blood vessels supplying nerves with oxygen and nutrients are damaged. The feet of a person with diabetes are particularly susceptible to neuropathy because of insufficient blood flow and unchecked blood sugar. These conditions can destroy nerve cells and cause pain, tingling, and numbness. People with diabetic neuropathy may lose enough sensation in their feet that they cannot feel the pain or the intense itching of foot injuries. Foot issues like ingrown toenails or dry skin cuts may go unnoticed unless you check your feet at least once a day for open wounds or other trauma. Diabetes also interferes with normal wound healing. Skin breaks on the feet are affected by diminished blood flow and the restriction of white blood cells that are needed to initiate the wound healing process. Symptoms Diabetic foot ulcers almost always form on the soles of the feet, where skin is subject to constant pressure. Under the weight of the body, skin deteriorates and eventually becomes an open sore. These ulcers frequently form underneath calluses and cannot be f Continue reading >>

6 Key Factors In Treating A Diabetic Wound

6 Key Factors In Treating A Diabetic Wound

Diabetic wound treatment methods require high attention to achieve healing. By 2030, it is estimated that more than 550 million people around the world will have diabetes. Approximately 25% of these diabetic patients will develop foot ulcers during their lifetime, which often require advanced diabetic wound treatment to prevent complications. To help achieve the optimal healing environment and protect against problems, there are six key factors to consider when treating diabetic wounds. 1. Wound Assessment Diabetic wounds fall into three categories: neuropathic, ischemic, and neuroischemic. Knowing the distinct features of each wound category is essential to identifying wound progression, infection, and healing. Failure to properly identify the type of wound that exists can lead to an ineffective diabetic wound treatment plan, causing long-term complications or amputation. 2. Tissue Debridement Wound debridement, or the removal of necrotic tissue from a wound, will reduce pressure, stimulate wound healing, allow for the inspection of underlying tissue, help with secretion or wound drainage, and optimize a wound dressing’s effectiveness. Clinicians typically recommend sharp debridement by scalpel or scissors, but there are other tissue-removal treatments they may recommend, including larval, autolytic, and ultrasonic. Only an experienced practitioner who knows which section of the tissue to remove without damaging blood vessels, nerves, or tendons should perform a debridement procedure. Understanding the importance of debridement to your diabetic wound treatment plan is often essential with advanced diabetic wounds. 3. Infection Control Infections are the top concern in any diabetic wound treatment plan. Due to the high morbidity and mortality rates associated with dia Continue reading >>

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