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Diabetic Foot Swelling Pain

The Charcot Foot In Diabetes: Six Key Points

The Charcot Foot In Diabetes: Six Key Points

The Charcot foot commonly goes unrecognized, particularly in the acute phase, until severe complications occur. Early recognition and diagnosis, immediate immobilization and a lifelong program of preventive care can minimize the morbidity associated with this potentially devastating complication of diabetic neuropathy. If unrecognized or improperly managed, the Charcot foot can have disastrous consequences, including amputation. The acute Charcot foot is usually painless and may mimic cellulitis or deep venous thrombosis. Although the initial radiograph may be normal, making diagnosis difficult, immediate detection and immobilization of the foot are essential in the management of the Charcot foot. A lifelong program of patient education, protective footwear and routine foot care is required to prevent complications such as foot ulceration. Although initially described in patients with tertiary syphilis, the Charcot foot is now seen mostly in patients with diabetes mellitus. In a recent study,1 9 percent of patients with diabetic neuropathy had Charcot foot. It is a condition of acute or gradual onset and, in its most severe form, causes significant disruption of the bony architecture of the foot. It often results in foot deformities and causes abnormal pressure distribution on the plantar surface, foot ulcers and, in some cases, requires amputation. The exact pathogenesis is unknown, but underlying sensory neuropathy is nearly universal. Arteriovenous shunting due to autonomic neuropathy is also thought to play a role. Repeated unrecognized microtrauma or an identifiable injury may be the inciting factors of Charcot foot. Approximately 50 percent of patients with Charcot foot will remember a precipitating event such as a slip or a trip, or they may have had unrelated su Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic neuropathy can cause the following symptoms: Numbness (loss of feeling) or painful tingling and burning in parts of the body, especially your feet, legs, and toes. Muscle weakness and difficulty walking. Your feet heal slowly when you get cuts, sores, or blisters on them. Also, they don’t hurt as much as you would expect. Diabetes causes the level of sugar in your blood to be higher than normal. Over time, high blood sugar levels damage your blood vessels and nerves. That’s why people who don’t (or can’t) control their blood sugar very well seem more likely to get diabetic neuropathy. Men are more likely to have diabetic neuropathy than women. High cholesterol levels and smoking also increase your risk. The most important thing is to keep your blood sugar under control. Take your medicines and/or insulin exactly as your doctor prescribes. Eat a healthy diet. If you are overweight, ask your doctor to help you lose weight. Get plenty of exercise. What can I do to prevent foot problems from diabetic neuropathy? Keep your blood sugar level as close to normal as possible. Also, follow your doctor’s advice on diet and exercise. Take your insulin or medicine exactly as prescribed. Here are some other ways to protect your feet: Wash your feet every day with lukewarm (not hot) water and mild soap. Dry your feet well, especially between the toes. Use a soft towel and pat gently; don’t rub. Keep the skin of your feet smooth by applying a small amount of cream or lotion, especially on the heels. If the skin is cracked, talk to your doctor about how to treat it. Check your feet every day. You may need a mirror to look at the bottoms of your feet. Call your doctor if you have redness, swelling, pain that doesn’t go away, numbness, or tingling in any part of you Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Foot problems are common in people with diabetes. You might be afraid you’ll lose a toe, foot, or leg to diabetes, or know someone who has, but you can lower your chances of having diabetes-related foot problems by taking care of your feet every day. Managing your blood glucose levels, also called blood sugar, can also help keep your feet healthy. How can diabetes affect my feet? Over time, diabetes may cause nerve damage, also called diabetic neuropathy, that can cause tingling and pain, and can make you lose feeling in your feet. When you lose feeling in your feet, you may not feel a pebble inside your sock or a blister on your foot, which can lead to cuts and sores. Cuts and sores can become infected. Diabetes also can lower the amount of blood flow in your feet. Not having enough blood flowing to your legs and feet can make it hard for a sore or an infection to heal. Sometimes, a bad infection never heals. The infection might lead to gangrene. Gangrene and foot ulcers that do not get better with treatment can lead to an amputation of your toe, foot, or part of your leg. A surgeon may perform an amputation to prevent a bad infection from spreading to the rest of your body, and to save your life. Good foot care is very important to prevent serious infections and gangrene. Although rare, nerve damage from diabetes can lead to changes in the shape of your feet, such as Charcot’s foot. Charcot’s foot may start with redness, warmth, and swelling. Later, bones in your feet and toes can shift or break, which can cause your feet to have an odd shape, such as a “rocker bottom.” What can I do to keep my feet healthy? Work with your health care team to make a diabetes self-care plan, which is an action plan for how you will manage your diabetes. Your plan should inclu Continue reading >>

What Can I Do For Numb, Painful Feet And Legs?

What Can I Do For Numb, Painful Feet And Legs?

My husband was diagnosed with diabetes almost a year ago. At first he was experiencing numbness in his feet. Over the past few months, he began having pain as well, sometimes as far up his leg as his calf. What can we do to help these symptoms? I have read that vitamin E and even flaxseed oil are good for the circulation. Would those be helpful? Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

Print Overview Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that can occur if you have diabetes. High blood sugar (glucose) can injure nerve fibers throughout your body, but diabetic neuropathy most often damages nerves in your legs and feet. Depending on the affected nerves, symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can range from pain and numbness in your extremities to problems with your digestive system, urinary tract, blood vessels and heart. For some people, these symptoms are mild; for others, diabetic neuropathy can be painful, disabling and even fatal. Diabetic neuropathy is a common serious complication of diabetes. Yet you can often prevent diabetic neuropathy or slow its progress with tight blood sugar control and a healthy lifestyle. Symptoms There are four main types of diabetic neuropathy. You may have just one type or symptoms of several types. Most develop gradually, and you may not notice problems until considerable damage has occurred. The signs and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy vary, depending on the type of neuropathy and which nerves are affected. Peripheral neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Your feet and legs are often affected first, followed by your hands and arms. Signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are often worse at night, and may include: Numbness or reduced ability to feel pain or temperature changes A tingling or burning sensation Sharp pains or cramps Increased sensitivity to touch — for some people, even the weight of a bed sheet can be agonizing Muscle weakness Loss of reflexes, especially in the ankle Loss of balance and coordination Serious foot problems, such as ulcers, infections, deformities, and bone and joint pain Autonomic neuropathy The autonomic nervous system controls your hea Continue reading >>

Slideshow: What Your Feet Say About Your Health

Slideshow: What Your Feet Say About Your Health

Cold Feet, Many Culprits If your toes are always cold, one reason could be poor blood flow -- a circulatory problem sometimes linked to smoking, high blood pressure, or heart disease. The nerve damage of uncontrolled diabetes can also make your feet feel cold. Other possible causes include hypothyroidism and anemia. A doctor can look for any underlying problems -- or let you know that you simply have cold feet. When feet ache after a long day, you might just curse your shoes. After all, eight out of 10 women say their shoes hurt. But pain that’s not due to sky-high heels may come from a stress fracture, a small crack in a bone. One possible cause: Exercise that was too intense, particularly high-impact sports like basketball and distance running. Also, weakened bones due to osteoporosis increases the risk. Raynaud’s disease can cause toes to turn white, then bluish, and then redden again and return to their natural tone. The cause is a sudden narrowing of the arteries, called vasospasms. Stress or changes in temperature can trigger vasospasms, which usually don’t lead to other health concerns. Raynaud’s may also be related to rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren’s disease, or thyroid problems. The most common cause of heel pain is plantar fasciitis, inflammation where this long ligament attaches to the heel bone. The pain may be sharpest when you first wake up and put pressure on the foot. Arthritis, excessive exercise, and poorly fitting shoes also can cause heel pain, as can tendonitis. Less common causes include a bone spur on the bottom of the heel, a bone infection, tumor, or fracture. Sometimes the first sign of a problem is a change in the way you walk -- a wider gait or slight foot dragging. The cause may be the slow loss of normal sensation in your feet, br Continue reading >>

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

32 Home Remedies For Diabetes

32 Home Remedies For Diabetes

Even though it looks much the same as any other foot, the diabetic foot requires special attention. Why? Nerve damage is common with diabetes, especially in the lower extremities. Blood vessels are damaged as a result of the disease and circulation is decreased. When this happens, feet and legs tend to be cold and sores heal slowly, in some cases taking years to heal. This can easily lead to infection. Nerve damage can also decrease your ability to feel sensations in your feet, such as pain, heat, and cold. That means you may not notice a foot injury until you have a major infection. A common complaint from many people is, "My feet are killing me!" For a person with diabetes, that statement could be all too true. Loss of nerve function, especially on the soles of the feet, can reduce feeling and mask a sore or injury on the foot that, if left unattended, can turn into an ulcer or gangrene. Neuropathy, damage to the nerves, is a common problem for people with diabetes. It occurs most often in the feet and legs, and its signs include recurring burning, pain, or numbness. In addition to being painful, neuropathy can be harmful because if it causes a loss of feeling in the foot, even a minor foot injury may go undiscovered. In extreme cases, this can lead to serious infection, gangrene, or even amputation of the limb. Because of this, people with diabetes must be meticulous in caring for their feet. Moderate exercise, such as walking, cycling, or swimming, are best for people with diabetes. Because people with diabetes have to take some extra precautions while exercising, you will need to work with your health-care provider to design an exercise program that is right for you. For example, since exercise lowers blood glucose, you will need to learn how to maintain the correc Continue reading >>

Swollen Ankles And Feet

Swollen Ankles And Feet

5. Infection Swelling in the feet and ankles can be a sign of infection. People with diabetic neuropathy or other nerve problems of the feet are at greater risk of foot infections. If you have diabetes, it is important to inspect your feet daily for blisters and sores, because nerve damage can blunt the pain sensation and foot problems can progress quickly. If you notice a swollen foot or blister that appears to be infected, seek medical advice straight away. 6. Blood clot Blood clots that form in the veins of the legs can stop the return flow of blood from the legs back to the heart and cause swelling in the ankles and feet. Blood clots can be either superficial (occurring in the veins just beneath the skin), or deep (a condition known as deep vein thrombosis). Deep clots can block one or more of the major veins of the legs. These blood clots can be life-threatening if they break loose and travel to the heart and lungs. If you have swelling in one leg, along with pain, a slight fever and possibly a change in colour of the affected leg, seek medical advice immediately. Treatment with blood thinners may be necessary. 7. Heart, liver or kidney disease Sometimes swelling can indicate a problem such as heart, liver or kidney disease. Ankles that swell could be a sign of heart failure. Kidney disease can also cause foot and ankle swelling. When kidneys are not functioning properly, fluid can build up in the body. Liver disease can affect the liver's production of a protein called albumin, which keeps the blood from leaking out of the blood vessels into the surrounding tissues. Inadequate albumin production can lead to fluid leakage. Gravity causes fluid to accumulate more in the feet and ankles, but fluid can also accumulate in the abdomen and chest. If your swelling is acco Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot

Diabetic Foot

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find the Pre-diabetes (Impaired Glucose Tolerance) article more useful, or one of our other health articles. People with diabetes are at increased risk of peripheral arterial disease and neuropathy, as well as having a higher risk of developing infections and decreased ability to clear infections. Therefore, people with diabetes are prone to frequent and often severe foot problems and a relatively high risk of infection, gangrene and amputation[1]. Motor, sensory and autonomic fibres may all be affected in people with diabetes mellitus. Because of sensory deficits, there are no protective symptoms guarding against pressure and heat and so trauma can initiate the development of a leg ulcer. Absence of pain contributes to the development of Charcot foot (see below), which further impairs the ability to sustain pressure. Motor fibre abnormalities lead to undue physical stress and to the development of further anatomical deformities (arched foot, clawing of toes), and contribute to the development of infection. When infection complicates a foot ulcer, the combination can be limb-threatening or life-threatening. Detection and surveillance of diabetic neuropathy are an essential routine part of a diabetic annual review. Foot complications are common in people with diabetes. It is estimated that 10% of people with diabetes will have a diabetic foot ulcer at some point in their lives. An annual incidence of 2.2% was found in a large community survey in the UK and in up to 7.2% in patients with neuropathy. Painful diabetic neuropathy is estimated to affect between 16% an Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Leg Swelling: The Terrible Twosome

Diabetes And Leg Swelling: The Terrible Twosome

If you are diabetic, you need to worry about a lot more things like heart diseases and leg swelling. This causes peripheral edema in some cases and can be painful. If you see symptoms of swelling in your ankles, lower legs or feet, it is time to pay your physician an emergency visit. Diabetes expand blood circulation in an inappropriate way, which can cause swelling in the lower leg region. However, there could be other reasons as well that would cause the swelling. So a visit to the doctor is a must. Diabetes is a serious disease which gives rise to many further complications; swelling in the legs is one of them. Let’s discuss a few reasons that could be contributing to the swelling and its cure. What can lead to leg swelling? For any diabetic patient, it is a must to consult a doctor in case you notice any changes in the body. A patient who’s been living with diabetes for several years needs to be extra careful because this disease comes with so many attached risks. If you are diabetic and have noticed some leg swelling recently, the following could be a few reasons for it. The main reason for leg swelling in diabetes is peripheral edema. Fluids collect in the feet, ankles and leg and this condition can become quite severe if left untreated. A consultation with a doctor is a must. Sometimes, a diabetic may suffer from diabetic neuropathy. This is a condition that leads to numbness in legs and feet. As a result, the diabetic may not be able to feel an injury, maybe something even as severe as a sprain or a fracture and continue to use the limb. But the swelling caused by the injury is what will raise concern, which is why a consultation with the doctor becomes very important. Diabetics have low immunity towards infections and your swelling could very well be a sign Continue reading >>

13 Reasons Your Feet Are Swollen

13 Reasons Your Feet Are Swollen

What Causes Swollen Feet You’ve got to hand it to your feet—they might just be the hardest-working part of your body. They take a beating every day, supporting your body weight and letting you walk, run, jump, stand, and tip-toe. The 26 bones and more than 100 muscles, tendons, and ligaments in each foot and ankle work as a team, carrying you to your job, the gym, and home. All of this foot action adds up to a lot of wear and tear, so it isn’t a surprise that one of the biggest complaints people have is swollen feet. Feet often puff up a half-size or so because you’re not treating them with the TLC they deserve—say by standing all day or shoving them into too-tight pumps. But swollen feet have other causes too, some of which are serious and serve as red flags to a larger health issue. So what exactly happens when feet swell? Whether due to pressure, inactivity, injury, or some other cause, circulation to and from your feet slows down, and blood begins to pool in the many blood vessels spread out along your toes, heels, and ankles. Gravity helps this along too, says Dyane Tower, DPM, director of clinical affairs at the American Podiatric Medical Association. Tired of coming home with feet that feel like balloons and concerned about why they’re swollen? Our guide below covers every cause, then takes you through the next steps. You stand or sit for hours at a time Counter people, doctors, nurses, and others who work on their feet often end the day feeling like their shoes are too tight. Here’s why: when you don’t move much while standing, the muscles in your legs, ankles, your feet don’t have a chance to contract, causing blood flow to and from your feet to slow down. The same thing happens to people who sit for long stretches. Reduced blood flow triggers Continue reading >>

Diabetic (charcot) Foot

Diabetic (charcot) Foot

Diabetes is a condition of elevated blood sugar that affects about 6 percent of the population in the United States, or about 16 million people. Diabetic foot problems are a major health concern and are a common cause of hospitalization. Most foot problems that people with diabetes face arise from two serious complications of the disease: nerve damage and poor circulation. One of the more critical foot problems these complications can cause is Charcot arthropathy, which can deform the shape of the foot and lead to disability. There are treatment options for the wide range of diabetic foot problems. The most effective treatment, however, is prevention. For people with diabetes, careful, daily inspection of the feet is essential to overall health and the prevention of damaging foot problems. Description Nerve damage (neuropathy) is a complication of diabetes that leads to a loss of sensation in the feet. Some people with diabetes can no longer feel when something has irritated or even punctured the skin. A wound as small as a blister can progress to a serious infection in a matter of days. Diabetes also damages blood vessels, decreasing the blood flow to the feet. Poor circulation weakens bone, and can cause disintegration of the bones and joints in the foot and ankle. As a result, people with diabetes are at a high risk for breaking bones in the feet. When a diabetic fractures a bone in the foot, he or she may not realize it because of nerve damage. Continuing to walk on the injured foot results in more severe fractures and joint dislocations. Sharp edges of broken bone within the foot can point downward toward the ground, increasing the risk of chronic foot sores from the abnormal pressure. (Left) This patient with Charcot of the ankle has developed a deformity that pla Continue reading >>

5 Tips To Reduce Feet, Leg And Ankle Swelling

5 Tips To Reduce Feet, Leg And Ankle Swelling

Swollen ankles and feet can be painful, and are common for those with diabetes. Standing or walking for long periods of time can cause an abnormal fluid buildup in the ankles, feet and legs — especially among older adults. Here are some tips that may help. Continue reading >>

7 Tips For Diabetics To Reduce Swelling In The Feet

7 Tips For Diabetics To Reduce Swelling In The Feet

Most patients suffering from diabetes complain of swelling in the feet and legs. The main reason for this problem is improper blood circulation due to damaged blood capillaries as a result of increased pressure. Damaged capillaries cause peripheral oedema, leakage of fluids into surrounding tissues, which causes swelling. But, there can be several other reasons that could cause swelling in the feet. Therefore proper diagnosis is important. Poor circulation is also one of the reasons why wounds in diabetic patients don’t heal quickly. Mr Bhushan Hemade of Diaped, a chain of multi-disciplinary foot clinics says ‘Foot problems are common in people with diabetes and can quickly become serious.’ They increases the risk of infections and severe complications like foot ulcers and gangrene that can even lead to limb amputation. That’s why, you should not ignore even minor swelling in your feet. In most cases, when the swelling has just started, simple lifestyle changes can reduce swelling and provide relief to a great extent. 1. Exercise regularly: Mr Hemade says ‘Regular exercise will improve bone and joint health in your feet and legs, improve circulation to your legs, and will also help to stabilize your blood sugar levels. But you should consult your doctor prior to beginning any exercise program.’ Do not practice rigorous exercises as it can lead to exercise-induced oedema. 2. Elevate your legs: Elevation of feet (above the heart level) using a support or a pillow for 10-15 minutes every day can help to reduce swelling. Elevation drains out excess fluid from the surrounding tissues and improves circulation. 3. Use compression stockings and bandages: Compression products are now widely available for foot care in diabetics. They exert pressure on the affected are Continue reading >>

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