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Diabetic Foot Swelling Pain

7 Tips To Treat Swollen Feet In Diabetics

7 Tips To Treat Swollen Feet In Diabetics

Diabetics often complain of swelling in the feet and legs. It happens due to improper blood circulation because an increased pressure damages blood capillaries. Damaged capillaries cause peripheral oedema, leakage of fluids into surrounding tissues, which causes swelling. However, several other reasons can play a role in causing swollen feet in diabetics. The risk of infections and severe complications like foot ulcers and gangrene that can even lead to limb amputation can increase in diabetics with swollen feet. That’s why, you should not ignore even minor swelling in your feet. In most cases, when the swelling has just started, simple lifestyle changes can reduce swelling and provide relief to a great extent. Here are 7 tips for diabetics to reduce swelling in the feet. Image: Getty Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Care - Symptoms

Diabetic Foot Care - Symptoms

A A A Diabetic Foot Care (cont.) Write down the patient's symptoms and be prepared to talk about them on the phone with a doctor. Following is a list of common reasons to call a doctor if a person with diabetes has a diabetic foot or leg problem. For most of these problems, a doctor visit within about 72 hours is appropriate. Any significant trauma to the feet or legs, no matter how minor, needs medical attention. Even minor injuries can result in serious infections. Persistent mild-to-moderate pain in the feet or legs is a signal that something is wrong. Constant pain is never normal. Any new blister, wound, or ulcer less than 1 inch across can become a more serious problem. The patient will need to develop a plan with a doctor on how to treat these wounds. Any new areas of warmth, redness, or swelling on the feet or legs are frequently early signs of infection or inflammation. Addressing them early may prevent more serious problems. Pain, redness, or swelling around a toenail could mean the patient has an ingrown toenail - a leading cause of diabetic foot infections and amputations. Prompt and early treatment is essential. New or constant numbness in the feet or legs can be a sign of diabetic nerve damage (neuropathy) or of impaired circulation in the legs. Both conditions put the patient at risk for serious problems such as infections and amputations. Difficulty walking can result from diabetic arthritis (Charcot's joints), often a sign of abnormal strain or pressure on the foot or of poorly fitting shoes, as well as the inability to perceive pain. Early intervention is key to preventing more serious problems including falls as well as lower extremity skin breakdown and infections. Constant itching in the feet can be a sign of fungal infection or dry skin, both of wh Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Pain

Diabetic Foot Pain

by Kenneth B. Rehm, DPM Includes photo of Dr. Kenneth B. Rehm, DPM Diabetes is one of the most common reasons people seek relief for painful feet. With diabetes, four types of foot problems may arise in the feet. Nerve Problems due to Diabetes The most common contributor to diabetic foot pain is a nerve problem called Peripheral Neuropathy. This is where the nerves are directly affected by the disease process. There are basically three types of peripheral neuropathy: sensory, motor, and autonomic neuropathy. A large percentage of pain diabetic patients complain of is due to sensory neuropathy. This can show up as "sensitive pain," where the amount of pain is not proportional to the amount of insult that is causing it. For instance, just touching the skin or putting a sheet over your feet in bed could be painful. This can be present at the same time as numbness in the feet. Sensory neuropathy symptoms can include burning, tingling or a stabbing pain. Relief is foremost on someone's mind when painful neuropathy has raised its ugly head. The first thing to do is to check your blood sugar for the past several weeks to see if there has been a trend toward high blood sugar (Editor's Note: The A1c test is traditionally employed to determine this, and should be repeated about every three months.) Persistent high blood sugar can contribute to this type of pain. Massaging your feet with a diabetic foot cream, or using a foot roller, often takes the edge off the pain. Vitamin B preparations are often recommended; and there are a variety of prescription medications that do work. Using cushioned, supportive shoes and foot support inserts is always needed to protect the feet from the pounding, rubbing and irritating pressures that contribute to neuropathic pain. Motor neuropathy can Continue reading >>

7 Tips For Diabetics To Reduce Swelling In The Feet

7 Tips For Diabetics To Reduce Swelling In The Feet

Most patients suffering from diabetes complain of swelling in the feet and legs. The main reason for this problem is improper blood circulation due to damaged blood capillaries as a result of increased pressure. Damaged capillaries cause peripheral oedema, leakage of fluids into surrounding tissues, which causes swelling. But, there can be several other reasons that could cause swelling in the feet. Therefore proper diagnosis is important. Poor circulation is also one of the reasons why wounds in diabetic patients don’t heal quickly. Mr Bhushan Hemade of Diaped, a chain of multi-disciplinary foot clinics says ‘Foot problems are common in people with diabetes and can quickly become serious.’ They increases the risk of infections and severe complications like foot ulcers and gangrene that can even lead to limb amputation. That’s why, you should not ignore even minor swelling in your feet. In most cases, when the swelling has just started, simple lifestyle changes can reduce swelling and provide relief to a great extent. 1. Exercise regularly: Mr Hemade says ‘Regular exercise will improve bone and joint health in your feet and legs, improve circulation to your legs, and will also help to stabilize your blood sugar levels. But you should consult your doctor prior to beginning any exercise program.’ Do not practice rigorous exercises as it can lead to exercise-induced oedema. 2. Elevate your legs: Elevation of feet (above the heart level) using a support or a pillow for 10-15 minutes every day can help to reduce swelling. Elevation drains out excess fluid from the surrounding tissues and improves circulation. 3. Use compression stockings and bandages: Compression products are now widely available for foot care in diabetics. They exert pressure on the affected are Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

Print Overview Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that can occur if you have diabetes. High blood sugar (glucose) can injure nerve fibers throughout your body, but diabetic neuropathy most often damages nerves in your legs and feet. Depending on the affected nerves, symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can range from pain and numbness in your extremities to problems with your digestive system, urinary tract, blood vessels and heart. For some people, these symptoms are mild; for others, diabetic neuropathy can be painful, disabling and even fatal. Diabetic neuropathy is a common serious complication of diabetes. Yet you can often prevent diabetic neuropathy or slow its progress with tight blood sugar control and a healthy lifestyle. Symptoms There are four main types of diabetic neuropathy. You may have just one type or symptoms of several types. Most develop gradually, and you may not notice problems until considerable damage has occurred. The signs and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy vary, depending on the type of neuropathy and which nerves are affected. Peripheral neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Your feet and legs are often affected first, followed by your hands and arms. Signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are often worse at night, and may include: Numbness or reduced ability to feel pain or temperature changes A tingling or burning sensation Sharp pains or cramps Increased sensitivity to touch — for some people, even the weight of a bed sheet can be agonizing Muscle weakness Loss of reflexes, especially in the ankle Loss of balance and coordination Serious foot problems, such as ulcers, infections, deformities, and bone and joint pain Autonomic neuropathy The autonomic nervous system controls your hea Continue reading >>

5 Tips To Reduce Feet, Leg And Ankle Swelling

5 Tips To Reduce Feet, Leg And Ankle Swelling

Swollen ankles and feet can be painful, and are common for those with diabetes. Standing or walking for long periods of time can cause an abnormal fluid buildup in the ankles, feet and legs — especially among older adults. Here are some tips that may help. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Problems

Diabetic Foot Problems

What foot problems can be caused by diabetes? Diabetes mellitus can cause serious foot problems. These conditions include diabetic neuropathy (loss of normal nerve function) and peripheral vascular disease (loss of normal circulation). These two conditions can lead to: Diabetic foot ulcers: wounds that do not heal or become infected Infections: skin infections (cellulitis), bone infections (osteomyelitis) and pus collections (abscesses) Gangrene: dead tissue resulting from complete loss of circulation Charcot arthropathy: fractures and dislocations that may result in severe deformities Amputation: partial foot, whole foot or below-knee amputation What are the symptoms of a diabetic foot problem? ​Symptoms of neuropathy may include the loss of protective sensation or pain and tingling sensations. Patients may develop a blister, abrasion or wound but may not feel any pain. Decreased circulation may cause skin discoloration, skin temperature changes or pain. Depending on the specific problem that develops, patients may notice swelling, discoloration (red, blue, gray or white skin), red streaks, increased warmth or coolness, injury with no or minimal pain, a wound with or without drainage, staining on socks, tingling pain or deformity. Patients with infection may have fever, chills, shakes, redness, drainage, loss of blood sugar control or shock (unstable blood pressure, confusion and delirium). How do some of these complications develop? ​Neuropathy is associated with the metabolic abnormalities of diabetes. Vascular disease is present in many patients at the time of diagnosis of diabetes. Ulcers may be caused by external pressure or rubbing from a poorly fitting shoe, an injury from walking barefoot, or a foreign object in the shoe (rough seam, stone or tack). Infecti Continue reading >>

Home Remedies For Diabetic Foot Pain

Home Remedies For Diabetic Foot Pain

My husband's feet are getting painful, swollen, and numb due to his diabetes. Even if he gets medicine for diabetes this pain never stops. Please tell me if someone knows of or has experience with some home remedies for this pain and numbness. Your suggestions would be highly appreciated. By smile Answers No please, stop! Do not use ice on diabetic numb or swollen feet! If his blood sugars are uncontrolled and running too high, that in itself can cause severe neurological pain & numbness in the extremities! There's no home remedy for that EXCEPT tight blood sugar control! 1) Get him to the doc! Have his Ha1C checked! Have swelling & pain & numbness thoroughly evaluated! Don't treat this lightly, this could be life threatening! Does he have hardening of the arteries? CHF? Any other heart conditions? Kidney disease? Has he had his brachial BP checked in his ankles lately? There could be many reasons for the swollen feet too! Edema can be due to many causes. I have been Type 1 diabetic for 30 years, and used to get neuropathy pains in both feet and legs, hands & arms too. I was put on prescription Neurontin (generic version tho, Gabapentin) for about 10 years & increased up to 300mg twice a day. That worked great, but since I have cut out all white carbs, eat lots of fatfree salads, fresh veggies & fruits (at least 5 servings a day), lean meats--follow the American Heart Association diet basically - extra light olive oil, all antioxidant & anti-inflammatory foods, no junk foods, no fast foods, no sat fats or trans fats, no processed foods, no nitrates. For over 2 years now, I have stopped the Neurontin altogether within the past year, and lowered my HA1C to 7, but being on an insulin pump, I want to get it lower, 6.5%. I feel the best now than I have in 30 yrs! The neuropa Continue reading >>

The Charcot Foot In Diabetes: Six Key Points

The Charcot Foot In Diabetes: Six Key Points

The Charcot foot commonly goes unrecognized, particularly in the acute phase, until severe complications occur. Early recognition and diagnosis, immediate immobilization and a lifelong program of preventive care can minimize the morbidity associated with this potentially devastating complication of diabetic neuropathy. If unrecognized or improperly managed, the Charcot foot can have disastrous consequences, including amputation. The acute Charcot foot is usually painless and may mimic cellulitis or deep venous thrombosis. Although the initial radiograph may be normal, making diagnosis difficult, immediate detection and immobilization of the foot are essential in the management of the Charcot foot. A lifelong program of patient education, protective footwear and routine foot care is required to prevent complications such as foot ulceration. Although initially described in patients with tertiary syphilis, the Charcot foot is now seen mostly in patients with diabetes mellitus. In a recent study,1 9 percent of patients with diabetic neuropathy had Charcot foot. It is a condition of acute or gradual onset and, in its most severe form, causes significant disruption of the bony architecture of the foot. It often results in foot deformities and causes abnormal pressure distribution on the plantar surface, foot ulcers and, in some cases, requires amputation. The exact pathogenesis is unknown, but underlying sensory neuropathy is nearly universal. Arteriovenous shunting due to autonomic neuropathy is also thought to play a role. Repeated unrecognized microtrauma or an identifiable injury may be the inciting factors of Charcot foot. Approximately 50 percent of patients with Charcot foot will remember a precipitating event such as a slip or a trip, or they may have had unrelated su Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Leg Swelling: The Terrible Twosome

Diabetes And Leg Swelling: The Terrible Twosome

If you are diabetic, you need to worry about a lot more things like heart diseases and leg swelling. This causes peripheral edema in some cases and can be painful. If you see symptoms of swelling in your ankles, lower legs or feet, it is time to pay your physician an emergency visit. Diabetes expand blood circulation in an inappropriate way, which can cause swelling in the lower leg region. However, there could be other reasons as well that would cause the swelling. So a visit to the doctor is a must. Diabetes is a serious disease which gives rise to many further complications; swelling in the legs is one of them. Let’s discuss a few reasons that could be contributing to the swelling and its cure. What can lead to leg swelling? For any diabetic patient, it is a must to consult a doctor in case you notice any changes in the body. A patient who’s been living with diabetes for several years needs to be extra careful because this disease comes with so many attached risks. If you are diabetic and have noticed some leg swelling recently, the following could be a few reasons for it. The main reason for leg swelling in diabetes is peripheral edema. Fluids collect in the feet, ankles and leg and this condition can become quite severe if left untreated. A consultation with a doctor is a must. Sometimes, a diabetic may suffer from diabetic neuropathy. This is a condition that leads to numbness in legs and feet. As a result, the diabetic may not be able to feel an injury, maybe something even as severe as a sprain or a fracture and continue to use the limb. But the swelling caused by the injury is what will raise concern, which is why a consultation with the doctor becomes very important. Diabetics have low immunity towards infections and your swelling could very well be a sign Continue reading >>

Swollen Ankles And Feet

Swollen Ankles And Feet

5. Infection Swelling in the feet and ankles can be a sign of infection. People with diabetic neuropathy or other nerve problems of the feet are at greater risk of foot infections. If you have diabetes, it is important to inspect your feet daily for blisters and sores, because nerve damage can blunt the pain sensation and foot problems can progress quickly. If you notice a swollen foot or blister that appears to be infected, seek medical advice straight away. 6. Blood clot Blood clots that form in the veins of the legs can stop the return flow of blood from the legs back to the heart and cause swelling in the ankles and feet. Blood clots can be either superficial (occurring in the veins just beneath the skin), or deep (a condition known as deep vein thrombosis). Deep clots can block one or more of the major veins of the legs. These blood clots can be life-threatening if they break loose and travel to the heart and lungs. If you have swelling in one leg, along with pain, a slight fever and possibly a change in colour of the affected leg, seek medical advice immediately. Treatment with blood thinners may be necessary. 7. Heart, liver or kidney disease Sometimes swelling can indicate a problem such as heart, liver or kidney disease. Ankles that swell could be a sign of heart failure. Kidney disease can also cause foot and ankle swelling. When kidneys are not functioning properly, fluid can build up in the body. Liver disease can affect the liver's production of a protein called albumin, which keeps the blood from leaking out of the blood vessels into the surrounding tissues. Inadequate albumin production can lead to fluid leakage. Gravity causes fluid to accumulate more in the feet and ankles, but fluid can also accumulate in the abdomen and chest. If your swelling is acco Continue reading >>

How Can Diabetes Affect My Feet?

How Can Diabetes Affect My Feet?

Chronically high blood sugar (glucose) levels can be associated with serious complications in people who have diabetes. The feet are especially at risk. Two conditions called diabetic neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease can damage the feet (and other areas of the body) in people who have diabetes. What is diabetic neuropathy? Chronically high sugar levels associated with uncontrolled diabetes can cause nerve damage that interferes with the ability to sense pain and temperature. This so-called "sensory diabetic neuropathy" increases the risk a person with diabetes will not notice problems with his or her feet. Nearly 10% of people with diabetes develop foot ulcers due to peripheral vascular disease and nerve damage. People with diabetes may not notice sores or cuts on the feet, which in turn can lead to an infection. Nerve damage can also affect the function of foot muscles, leading to improper alignment and injury. What is peripheral vascular disease? Diabetes is associated with poor circulation (blood flow). Inadequate blood flow increases the healing time for cuts and sores. Peripheral vascular disease refers to compromised blood flow in the arms and legs. Poor blood flow increases the risk that infections will not heal. This, in turn, increases the risk of ulcers and gangrene, which is tissue death that occurs in a localized area when there is an inadequate blood supply. What are common foot problems of people with diabetes? The following images show common foot problems that anyone can get; however, those with diabetes are at increased risk for serious complications associated with these conditions, including infection and even amputation. Athlete's foot Fungal infection of the feet is called athlete's foot. Cracked skin, itching, and redness are associated w Continue reading >>

6 Best Fixes For Pain And Swelling In Your Feet And Ankles

6 Best Fixes For Pain And Swelling In Your Feet And Ankles

Have you ever looked down at your ankles and feet, first not recognizing them as your own, then, realizing they are swollen? Whether from long days on your feet, travel or surgery, it happens. For pregnant women, it is almost inevitable. Swelling in your ankles and feet is uncomfortable, and sometimes it keeps you from moving freely. But, there are several ways to relieve swelling from everyday causes — and sometimes you can even prevent it, says podiatric physician and surgeon Georgeanne Botek, DPM, Head of the Section of Podiatry and Medical Director of the Diabetic Foot Clinic at Cleveland Clinic. She says swelling (or what doctors refer to as edema) happens when your body retains fluid in the lower legs, ankles and feet. It most often occurs on both sides of the body, and it’s not an emergency situation. “When it comes to swelling, it’s about management and getting through the day,” she says. “There’s nothing that’s necessarily curative.” RELATED: Lymphedema: What You Should Know About Your Risk, Treatment Options How to relieve swollen, painful feet and ankles You can often treat the symptoms of swelling that occurs on both sides of your body yourself, Dr. Botek says. Here are some ideas that can help: 1. Compression socks. Available at your local drug or grocery store, compression socks provide pain relief and prevent fluid collection in your legs, ankles and feet. They come in light, medium and heavy weights, so be sure you select a pair that isn’t too tight for your body. Dr. Botek suggests starting with lightweight ones that measure between 12-15 mm or 15-20 mm of mercury. 2. Elevation. Prop your legs up on an ottoman to help decrease swelling. Various yoga poses, such as lying on the floor with your legs raised and pressed against the wall, Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Problems Treatment And Complications

Diabetes And Foot Problems Treatment And Complications

Diabetes and foot problems facts Two main conditions, peripheral artery disease (PAD) and peripheral neuropathy, are responsible for the increased risk of foot problems in people with diabetes. Symptoms and signs of diabetic foot problems arise due to the decreased sensation from nerve damage as well as the lack of oxygen delivery to the feet caused by vascular disease. Diabetic foot problems also include bunions, corns, calluses, hammertoes, fungal infections, dryness of the skin, and ingrown toenails. These problems are not specific to diabetes, but may occur more commonly due to the nerve and vascular damage caused by diabetes. Treatment depends on the exact type of foot problem. Surgery or even amputation may be required for some cases. Gangrene (dry gangrene) is tissue death due to absence of blood circulation. It can be life threatening if bacterial infection develops (wet gangrene). Many diabetes-related foot problems can be prevented by good control of blood sugar levels combined with appropriate care of the feet. How can diabetes cause foot problems? Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes cause damage to blood vessels and peripheral nerves that can result in problems in the legs and feet. Two main conditions, 1) peripheral artery disease (PAD), and 2) peripheral neuropathy are responsible for the increased risk of foot problems in people with diabetes. Peripheral artery disease (PAD), sometimes referred to as peripheral vascular disease (PVD), means that there is narrowing or occlusion by atherosclerotic plaques of arteries outside of the heart and brain. This is sometimes referred to as "hardening" of the arteries. Diabetes is a known risk factor for developing peripheral artery disease. In addition to pain in the calves during exercise (medically known as intermitte Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Feet Care Of The Diabetic Foot

Diabetes And Your Feet Care Of The Diabetic Foot

Diabetes has many effects on feet, and it is extremely important that any diabetic seek podiatric care. Diabetes is a syndrome (a set of symptoms which occur together) characterized mainly by an increase in sugar levels or a failure of the body to produce insulin to control its sugar levels. "It's essential that I take care of my feet." It is imperative that diabetics take special care of their feet. Bear in mind that, if you are diabetic, you need a doctor's care to protect your feet — and that this page is not intended as a substitute for a medical diagnosis or suggested course of treatment. Please see your doctor! Diabetes is a serious condition which can have many effects on the feet, including: (1) Nerve damage, resulting in numbness, extensive burning, pain, coldness, "pins and needles" or tingling while at rest. These nerves may actually affect the "position" sense, so that the joints or bones actually collapse with time. (2) Blocked blood vessels or decreased blood flow with fewer nutrients reaching the feet. Without proper nourishment, sores on the foot may not heal in the normal time period, or may be vulnerable to secondary problems such as infection. (3) Weakened bones, causing a shift in the foot, which may become deformed, changing the way the foot distributes pressure. (4) Collapsed joints, especially in the area of the arch. As a result, the arch can no longer absorb pressure. The surrounding skin may also begin to break down. (5) Blisters and Calluses. Diabetics are much more vulnerable to blister or callus formation, which generally stars as a warm or red spot caused by unrelieved skin pressure and the failure of the diabetic to feel the area. (6) Ulcers or sores more easily occur as a result of the breakdown of several layers of skin. These ulcers m Continue reading >>

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