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Diabetic Foot Problems Pictures

Foot Gangrene: What Is It? What Does It Look Like?

Foot Gangrene: What Is It? What Does It Look Like?

Warning: The pictures you are going to view on this website are graphic and not for the faint of heart. Foot gangrene, as a part of diabetes and/or atherosclerosis management, has become a major medical problem. This website is intended to allow you to manage your own care, ask the right questions, insist on adequate management and information, and seek an optimal outcome for yourself as an informed patient. Perhaps it will even help the health professionals - vascular specialists and foot doctors (chiropodists, podiatrists) - who are giving care to better understand and, hopefully, incorporate into their practice the nutritional approach to gangrene - its prevention and treatment. Please note that this website is not intended for “most people." It is written for those who want to stand out in self-health care. If you are such a person, we strongly advise that you give serious thought to all of the suggestions about how to stop the progression of gangrene, dry foot gangrene in particular. If you are tempted to think the suggestions are too complicated or simplistic, or even biased, we assure you they are not. In most cases, foot gangrene is a result of the compromised blood circulation, an insufficient oxygen-rich and nutrient-dense blood supply usually caused by arterial - femoral, popliteal or tibial - obstruction (the human tissue dies from oxygen deficiency more rapidly than when deprived of any other nutrient). The lumen of the artery becomes progressively narrowed up to the point of complete occlusion (blockage), causing normal blood flow to stop. In other words, gangrene develops if the blood supply deteriorates to a stage where insufficient blood is available to keep the tissues alive. When gangrene develops dire calls for medical help often are too late as st Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Taking Care Of Your Feet

Diabetes: Taking Care Of Your Feet

Introduction When you have diabetes, your feet need extra care and attention. Diabetes can damage the nerve endings and blood vessels in your feet, making you less likely to notice when your feet are injured. Diabetes can also interfere with your body's ability to fight infection. If you develop a minor foot injury, it could become an ulcer or develop into a serious infection. Ulcers can be found on the bottom of your feet, or on the top or bottom of your toes. With good foot care, you can prevent most of these problems. Caring for your feet is easy. Most of the care can be done when you are bathing and getting ready for bed. Preventing injury to your feet is merely a matter of wearing properly fitted shoes and socks at all times. These steps can help keep your feet healthy: Examine your feet every day. And have your doctor examine your feet during every visit. Check your shoes for any loose objects or rough edges before you put them on. Look at foot care as part of your daily routine. Soon it will become as automatic as brushing your teeth. Don't use home remedies to treat foot problems. Home remedies can hurt your feet. Over-the-counter medicine designed to remove calluses could contain chemicals that could burn your skin. Also, trying to cut corns or calluses yourself could lead to infections. Get early treatment for any foot problem, even a minor one. How do you care for your feet? Here's how you can get started caring properly for your feet. Inspect your feet at least once a day. Look at all areas of your feet, including your toes. This is the most important part of your foot care. You can use a handheld mirror or magnifying mirror attached to the bathroom wall near the baseboard to inspect your feet. If you can't see well, have someone assist you. Wash your feet d Continue reading >>

What Happens When A Diabetic Stops Taking Their Insulin On Their Own?

What Happens When A Diabetic Stops Taking Their Insulin On Their Own?

7 Scary Things That Can Happen When You Don't Treat Your Diabetes Swallowing pills, checking your blood sugar all the time, or sticking yourself with needles full of insulin probably doesn't sound like your idea of a good time. But taking steps to keep your diabetes under control is your best shot at preventing a slew of frightening complications. If you don't take care of yourself, "diabetes complications typically start within 5 years; within 10 to 15 years, the majority of patients will progress to have multiple health issues," says Betul Hatipoglu, MD, an endocrinologist at Cleveland Clinic. Fortunately, eating a nutritious diet, exercising, and taking your medication may not only stop complications from progressing, but can also reverse them, she says. Need motivation to stick to your treatment plan? Here's what can happen when you slack off. Your cholesterol and blood pressure rise. With type 1 diabetes, your body stops producing insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar; with type 2 diabetes, your body can't properly use the insulin you do produce. In turn, your HDL (or "good") cholesterol lowers, and your levels of harmful blood fats called triglycerides rise. Insulin resistance also contributes to hardened, narrow arteries, which in turn increases your blood pressure. As a result, about 70% of people with either type of diabetes also have hypertension—a risk factor for stroke, heart disease, and trouble with thinking and memory. (Add these 13 power foods to your diet to help lower blood pressure naturally.) Failing to control high blood pressure and high cholesterol, either with diet and exercise alone or by adding medications, accelerates the rate at which all your other complications progress, says Robert Gabbay, MD, PhD, chief medical officer at Joslin Continue reading >>

Charcot Foot – Causes, Signs, Treatment, Pictures, Surgery

Charcot Foot – Causes, Signs, Treatment, Pictures, Surgery

What is Charcot Foot ? Charcot Foot is a very serious disease which causes significant damage to the nerves present in the foot. The disease was first described by Jean- Martin Charcot in 1868, after whom it is named. It is most commonly occurs in patients who have been suffering from acute diabetes for several years. Due to the damage to nerves, the bones in the foot weaken and over time, with continuous walking and running, more and more pressure is put on the already weakened bones because of which they move from their original positions, giving an abnormal shape to the foot. Mostly, the shape of the foot changes so badly that it becomes impossible to even stand on that foot, let alone walk or run. Causes Of Charcot Foot : The basic cause of this disease is a weakening or damaging of the nervous system which can be a result of many factors. The most common cause for damaging of nervous system is diabetes, but it can also be caused due to syphilis, leprosy, cerebral palsy and many other diseases. The Neurotraumatic theory states that Charcot Foot is caused when the foot suffers an extreme external injury, but due to weak nervous system, the person does not feel the pain in his foot, such that the injury is not treated on time and ultimately results in distortion of bones. Another theory called the Nervovascular theory states that due to damage to nerves, there is extreme blood flow to the feet which is not in proportion to bone density and synthesis, which ultimately also leads to Charcot Foot. Symptoms of Charcot Foot : Mild or severe swelling of the foot which does not recede for days. Noticeable deformity. Increased skin temperature around the joint (3-4 degree Celsius) Soreness or pain, especially while walking. Signs : Charcot Foot is a disease which is not exact Continue reading >>

The Shocking Images That Reveal What Diabetes Can Do To Your Feet In Just 10 Days

The Shocking Images That Reveal What Diabetes Can Do To Your Feet In Just 10 Days

50-year-old man developed lesions on his feet after new shoes rubbed The small lesions quickly escalated into a full-blown infection - within days his right foot was black, weeping pus and in urgent need of surgery Every 30 seconds, a diabetic person in the world has a lower limb amputated This means patients don't feel blisters and are more likely to get infections These gruesome pictures show the horrific damage diabetes can do to the body in just a matter of days. They were taken by a 50-year-old man who had developed lesions on his feet after his new shoes rubbed. The man, who was obese, had no idea he was suffering from diabetes, doctors said. The small lesions quickly escalated into a full-blown infection - within days his right foot was black, weeping pus and in urgent need of surgery. His story, reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, highlights the devastating impact diabetes can have on all parts of the body - especially the feet. Every 30 seconds, someone in the world with the condition has a lower limb amputated, according to the charity Diabetes UK. People with diabetes are more likely to be admitted to hospital with a foot ulcer than with any other complication. This is because the condition can lead to poor circulation and reduced feeling in the feet - meaning patients such as this man don't feel when their feet are sore or being rubbed by something, This means they might develop a blister or minor burn without realising it, increasing the likelihood of a wound developing and then becoming infected. Poor circulation also means that wounds don't heal as well - and are more likely to become infected. Reporting on the case, the doctors, from the University Hospitals of Geneva, Switzerland, said the patient arrived at hospital 10 days after the infec Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot – Symptoms, Causes, Pictures, Treatment, Care

Diabetic Foot – Symptoms, Causes, Pictures, Treatment, Care

What is Diabetic foot? This is a foot that has any problems that result directly from diabetes. There are many different things that can happen to a foot when a person has uncontrolled blood sugar levels. Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects approximately six percent of the population. When a person has diabetes their body is either producing less or no insulin, which is a hormone that helps your body to deal with sugar, also known as glucose, in your diet. This is considered Type 1 diabetes. If your body’s tissues are resistant to the effects of diabetes this is considered Type 2 diabetes. Diabetic Foot Symptoms When you have type 1 diabetes it can cause many different symptoms. This type of diabetes is also referred to as diabetes mellitus. Some of the symptoms associated with this type can include: Having a constant sensation of heat or a burning in your foot which also includes tingling or stabbing sensations. Redness and swelling of the foot or leg(s) because of an infection Weak, achy muscles in your thighs, shin, or feet If you have motor neuropathy, it can cause you to walk with a limp or feel unbalanced. If this happens you could cause your foot rub against the inside of your shoe repeatedly resulting in the formation of diabetic foot ulcers, calluses, and inflamed skin. When a diabetic has autonomic neuropathy it can cause a diabetic’s sweating mechanism to be altered resulting in cuticles and toenails to be dry and thick. You may have chills and a fever as the result of a bacterial or fungal infection. If you experience numbness in your foot it could be a sign of having damage to your nerves. Causes The main cause of having a diabetic foot is because of out of control blood glucose levels. When your blood glucose levels are too high for a longer per Continue reading >>

Enluxtra Helps Heal Diabetic Wounds Faster

Enluxtra Helps Heal Diabetic Wounds Faster

ENLUXTRA Smart Self-Adaptive Dressing is the first and only self-regulating superabsorbent fiber dressing with adaptive absorbencyand built-in adaptive hydration function. The dressing utilises patented smart polymers for sensing the underlying tissue conditions and adapting local functions accordingly, in order to reliably maintain sustainable moist healing environment and gently cleanse a wound when needed. PRESCRIBING U.S. PROFESSIONAL? ​For diabetic foot patients, Enluxtra clinical studies show outstanding results. Diabetes makes healing process much more sensitive to deviations from ideal healing conditions. Enluxtra makes healing easier by continuously adapting the dressing's function to every part of the wound individually, down to every square millimeter. ​ Enluxtra is the only dressing that controls what is going on in the wound and adjusts its properties on the fly: 1. If parts of the wound are exuding large amounts of fluid, Enluxtra absorbs and retains the fluid inside itself, preventing maceration. 2. At the same time, if any part of the wound becomes too dry, Enluxtra is able to provide moisture exactly to that part, preventing desiccation. 3. Sustainable moist wound environment, created by Enluxtra, supports effective natural autolysis of non-viable tissues. Autolytic process is gentle and selective, it affects ONLY non-viable tissues while they are present in a wound, and STOPS when the wound becomes clean, so viable tissues are protected. 4. Unlike any other dressing, Enluxtra is able to effectively evacuate microorganisms, disintegrated biofilms, and liquefied components of slough and necrotic tissue, as well as other pro-inflammatory components, from the wound. This fast non-traumatic natural cleansing process stops chronic inflammation and accele Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Care - Symptoms

Diabetic Foot Care - Symptoms

A A A Diabetic Foot Care (cont.) Persistent pain can be a symptom of sprain, strain, bruise, overuse, improperly fitting shoes, or underlying infection. Redness can be a sign of infection, especially when surrounding a wound, or of abnormal rubbing of shoes or socks. Swelling of the feet or legs can be a sign of underlying inflammation or infection, improperly fitting shoes, or poor venous circulation. Other signs of poor circulation include the following: Pain in the legs or buttocks that increases with walking but improves with rest (claudication) Hair no longer growing on the lower legs and feet Hard shiny skin on the legs Localized warmth can be a sign of infection or inflammation, perhaps from wounds that won't heal or that heal slowly. Any break in the skin is serious and can result from abnormal wear and tear, injury, or infection. Calluses and corns may be a sign of chronic trauma to the foot. Toenail fungus, athlete's foot, and ingrown toenails may lead to more serious bacterial infections. Drainage of pus from a wound is usually a sign of infection. Persistent bloody drainage is also a sign of a potentially serious foot problem. A limp or difficulty walking can be sign of joint problems, serious infection, or improperly fitting shoes. Fever or chills in association with a wound on the foot can be a sign of a limb-threatening or life-threatening infection. Red streaking away from a wound or redness spreading out from a wound is a sign of a progressively worsening infection. New or lasting numbness in the feet or legs can be a sign of nerve damage from diabetes, which increases a persons risk for leg and foot problems. Continue Reading A A A Diabetic Foot Care (cont.) Write down the patient's symptoms and be prepared to talk about them on the phone with a doctor Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Care - Symptoms

Diabetic Foot Care - Symptoms

A A A Diabetic Foot Care (cont.) Several risk factors increase a person with diabetes chances of developing foot problems and diabetic infections in the legs and feet. Footwear: Poorly fitting shoes are a common cause of diabetic foot problems. If the patient has red spots, sore spots, blisters, corns, calluses, or consistent pain associated with wearing shoes, new properly fitting footwear must be obtained as soon as possible. If the patient has common foot abnormalities such as flat feet, bunions, or hammertoes, prescription shoes or shoe inserts may be necessary. Nerve damage: People with long-standing or poorly controlled diabetes are at risk for having damage to the nerves in their feet. The medical term for this is peripheral neuropathy. Because of the nerve damage, the patient may be unable to feel their feet normally. Also, they may be unable to sense the position of their feet and toes while walking and balancing. With normal nerves, a person can usually sense if their shoes are rubbing on the feet or if one part of the foot is becoming strained while walking. A person with diabetes may not properly sense minor injuries (such as cuts, scrapes, blisters), signs of abnormal wear and tear (that turn into calluses and corns), and foot strain. Normally, people can feel if there is a stone in their shoe, then remove it immediately. A person who has diabetes may not be able to perceive a stone. Its constant rubbing can easily create a sore. Poor circulation: Especially when poorly controlled, diabetes can lead to accelerated hardening of the arteries or atherosclerosis. When blood flow to injured tissues is poor, healing does not occur properly. Trauma to the foot: Any trauma to the foot can increase the risk for a more serious problem to develop. Infections Athlete's Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

How can diabetes affect feet and skin? For people with diabetes, having too much glucose (sugar) in their blood for a long time can cause some serious complications, including foot and skin problems, as well as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, eye damage, and other problems. How can diabetes affect my feet? Diabetes can cause two problems that can affect your feet: Diabetic neuropathy — Uncontrolled diabetes can damage your nerves. If you have damaged nerves in your legs and feet, you might not feel heat, cold or pain. This lack of feeling is called diabetic neuropathy. If you do not feel a cut or sore on your foot because of neuropathy, the cut could get worse and become infected. Peripheral vascular disease — Diabetes also affects the flow of blood. Without good blood flow, it takes longer for a sore or cut to heal. Poor blood flow in the arms and legs is called peripheral vascular disease. (The word "peripheral" means "located away from a central point," and the word "vascular" refers to the blood vessels. Peripheral vascular disease is a circulation disorder that affects blood vessels away from the heart.) If you have an infection that will not heal because of poor blood flow, you are at risk for developing gangrene, which is the death of tissue due to a lack of blood. To keep gangrene from spreading, the doctor may have to remove a toe, foot, or part of a leg. This procedure is called amputation. Diabetes is the most common, non-traumatic cause of leg amputations. Each year, more than 56,000 people with diabetes have amputations. However, research suggests that more than half of these amputations can be prevented through proper foot care. What are some common foot problems of people with diabetes? Anyone can get the foot problems listed below. For people Continue reading >>

Diabetic Blisters: What You Need To Know

Diabetic Blisters: What You Need To Know

People with diabetes can sometimes experience blisters on their skin. These are known as diabetic blisters, bullosis diabeticorum, or diabetic bullae. Although more than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes, diabetic blisters are relatively rare, affecting just 0.5 percent of those with the condition. The blisters typically occur in people with uncontrolled diabetes. They are painless and tend to heal on their own without the need for medical intervention. This article looks at the causes and symptoms of diabetic blisters and lists several ways to treat and prevent them. Contents of this article: Causes The exact cause of diabetic blisters is not known, but several factors are thought to play a role in blister development. The blisters may result from: wearing shoes that do not fit properly reduced circulation a fungal infection called Candida albicans other injury or irritation to the feet or hands Furthermore, certain people with diabetes are more at risk of developing diabetic blisters than others. People at risk of developing diabetic blisters include: people whose blood sugar levels are not under control people with sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) light men, as research reveals men are twice as likely as women to have diabetic blisters Symptoms Diabetic blisters most commonly appear in people who have had uncontrolled diabetes for several years. In some cases, however, they may be the first indication of diabetes or even prediabetes. Blisters are usually clear bumps that typically appear on the legs, feet, and toes, as well as the arms, hands, and fingers. They may be: irregularly-shaped up to 6 inches across clustered or, less commonly, occurring as a single lesion filled with a clear fluid itchy The skin around diabetic blisters will usually look Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Causes Foot Problems

How Diabetes Causes Foot Problems

Topic Overview Many things work together to cause foot problems in people who have diabetes, especially poor circulation and nerve disease (neuropathy). Neuropathy significantly dulls awareness of your feet, making you more susceptible to extensive injury-related damage. Also, diabetes can impair your ability to heal by both damaging your immune system and decreasing the blood flow in your legs. If your vision has been affected by diabetic retinopathy or other eye problems, you may not see an injury or infection in your feet early. If you get a foot infection or injury, you may not notice it until your condition is so serious that you require surgery, possibly amputation. Who's at risk? Things that increase your risk for diabetic foot problems include: Poor blood glucose control. If your blood sugar levels are persistently above the target range, you are more likely to have foot problems. Age. The risk increases with age. Gender. Males are at higher risk. Race. African Americans, Hispanics, and Native Americans are at higher risk. Duration of diabetes. The longer you have the disease, the greater your risk. Other complications due to diabetes (small blood vessel disease, atherosclerosis of large vessels). If you already have other diabetic complications, you are more likely to have foot problems. Smoking. Smoking contributes to circulatory problems in your extremities, increasing your likelihood of developing foot problems. Peripheral neuropathy (damage to the nerves that control sensation and touch). Peripheral neuropathy results in poor sensation in your extremities, increasing your likelihood of having foot problems. Alcohol dependence. Long-term heavy drinking can cause numbness and tingling in your hands and feet. How do problems start? Because foot disease in diab Continue reading >>

Foot Ulcers

Foot Ulcers

What Is It? A foot ulcer is an open sore on the foot. A foot ulcer can be a shallow red crater that involves only the surface skin. A foot ulcer also can be very deep. A deep foot ulcer may be a crater that extends through the full thickness of the skin. It may involve tendons, bones and other deep structures. People with diabetes and people with poor circulation are more likely to develop foot ulcers. It can be difficult to heal a foot ulcer. In people with these conditions, even a small foot ulcer can become infected if it does not heal quickly. If an infection occurs in an ulcer and is not treated right away, it can develop into: An abscess (a pocket of pus) A spreading infection of the skin and underlying fat (cellulitis) A bone infection (osteomyelitis) Gangrene. Gangrene is an area of dead, darkened body tissue caused by poor blood flow. Among people with diabetes, most severe foot infections that ultimately require some part of the toe, foot or lower leg to be amputated start as a foot ulcer. Foot ulcers are especially common in people who have one or more of the following health problems: Peripheral neuropathy. This is nerve damage in the feet or lower legs. Diabetes is the most common cause of peripheral neuropathy. When nerves in the feet are damaged, they can no longer warn about pain or discomfort. When this happens, tight-fitting shoes can trigger a foot ulcer by rubbing on a part of the foot that has become numb. People with peripheral neuropathy may not be able to feel when they've stepped on something sharp or when they have an irritating pebble in their shoes. They can injure their feet significantly and never know it, unless they examine their feet routinely for injury. Many elderly people and diabetics with vision problems also can't see their feet we Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Feet Care Of The Diabetic Foot

Diabetes And Your Feet Care Of The Diabetic Foot

Diabetes has many effects on feet, and it is extremely important that any diabetic seek podiatric care. Diabetes is a syndrome (a set of symptoms which occur together) characterized mainly by an increase in sugar levels or a failure of the body to produce insulin to control its sugar levels. "It's essential that I take care of my feet." It is imperative that diabetics take special care of their feet. Bear in mind that, if you are diabetic, you need a doctor's care to protect your feet — and that this page is not intended as a substitute for a medical diagnosis or suggested course of treatment. Please see your doctor! Diabetes is a serious condition which can have many effects on the feet, including: (1) Nerve damage, resulting in numbness, extensive burning, pain, coldness, "pins and needles" or tingling while at rest. These nerves may actually affect the "position" sense, so that the joints or bones actually collapse with time. (2) Blocked blood vessels or decreased blood flow with fewer nutrients reaching the feet. Without proper nourishment, sores on the foot may not heal in the normal time period, or may be vulnerable to secondary problems such as infection. (3) Weakened bones, causing a shift in the foot, which may become deformed, changing the way the foot distributes pressure. (4) Collapsed joints, especially in the area of the arch. As a result, the arch can no longer absorb pressure. The surrounding skin may also begin to break down. (5) Blisters and Calluses. Diabetics are much more vulnerable to blister or callus formation, which generally stars as a warm or red spot caused by unrelieved skin pressure and the failure of the diabetic to feel the area. (6) Ulcers or sores more easily occur as a result of the breakdown of several layers of skin. These ulcers m Continue reading >>

How To Treat Diabetic Foot Problems

How To Treat Diabetic Foot Problems

Expert Reviewed Diabetes is a challenging condition that affects your entire body. Over time, you may develop nerve damage (neuropathy) that causes pain or loss of feeling in your limbs. Since your feet are usually affected before your hands or arms, you should be able to recognize problems before they worsen. If you think you're developing a diabetic foot problem, don't attempt to treat it at home. Instead, get immediate medical attention.[1] Continue reading >>

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