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Diabetic Foot Itch

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes can affect many parts of your body, including your skin. When diabetes affects the skin, it’s often a sign that your blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high. This could mean that: You have undiagnosed diabetes, or pre-diabetes Your treatment for diabetes needs to be adjusted If you notice any of the following warning signs on your skin, it’s time to talk with your doctor. This skin condition often begins as small raised solid bumps that look like pimples. As it progresses, these bumps turn into patches of swollen and hard skin. The patches can be yellow, reddish, or brown. You may also notice: The surrounding skin has a shiny porcelain-like appearance You can see blood vessels The skin is itchy and painful The skin disease goes through cycles where it is active, inactive, and then active again The medical name for this condition is necrobiosis lipodica (neck-row-by-oh-sis lee-poi-dee-ka). TAKE ACTION Get tested for diabetes if you have not been diagnosed. Work with your doctor to better control your diabetes. See a dermatologist about your skin. Necorbiosis lipodica is harmless, but it can lead to complications. A dark patch (or band) of velvety skin on the back of your neck, armpit, groin, or elsewhere could mean that you have too much insulin in your blood. AN is often a sign of prediabetes. The medical name for this skin condition is acanthosis nigricans (ay-can-THOE-sis NIE-gri-cans). TAKE ACTION: Get tested for diabetes. 3. Hard, thickening skin When this develops on the fingers, toes, or both, the medical name for this condition is digital sclerosis (sclear-row-sis). On the hands, you’ll notice tight, waxy skin on the backs of your hands. The fingers can become stiff and difficult to move. If diabetes has been poorly controlled for years, it can f Continue reading >>

Why Do My Hands And Feet Itch?

Why Do My Hands And Feet Itch?

When your hands and feet itch, the right treatment can bring you some relief. How you treat the itching, though, depends a lot on the cause of the problem. It may just be dry skin, which can be brought on by winter weather or too much scrubbing. But sometimes, itchy hands and feet can signal another health condition. Could It Be Psoriasis? Psoriasis happens when skin cells grow too fast and then pile up on the skin’s surface. It’s a long-lasting condition that usually runs in families. There are a few different types, and itchiness of the palms and soles is a common symptom. If you have psoriasis, you may also have: Patches of red skin, bumps filled with puss, or silver scales Painful, swollen, or stiff joints Soreness of the affected area Itchiness in other places like your elbows, knees, lower back, and face Could It Be Eczema? Eczema is a term for a group of conditions that inflame the skin. There are several different types that can show up anywhere on the body. But one type, called dyshidrotic dermatitis, affects only the hands and feet. Besides the urge to scratch, symptoms of dyshidrotic dermatitis include: Red, cracked skin Scaly skin Could It Be Scabies? An eight-legged bug, called the human itch mite, is the source of this common skin condition. The tiny pest digs into the top layer of your skin and lays eggs there, causing scabies. The condition tends to spread in very crowded areas, where people have a lot of skin-to-skin contact that happens over a long time. You usually can’t get scabies from quick touching, like a handshake or a hug. Itchy hands and feet are common in infants and young kids with scabies, but not adults. It also causes: Itchiness, especially at night, of the entire body or specific areas, like the wrist, elbow, armpit, and the webbin Continue reading >>

Feet Itching On The Bottom | Diabetic Connect

Feet Itching On The Bottom | Diabetic Connect

By Jhanese Latest Reply2011-10-05 23:36:46 -0500 i get this itching on the bottom of my feet and no matter how hard i scratch my feet the itch does not go away. does anyone else suffer with that? Have the same itching & burning .Try using either hot (hot as you can stand without burning or blistering) or ice pack with cover on it ,as so not to frost bite the soles of your feet .Also you can use itch relief gel (extra strength) . May give only temporay relief .But any relief helps. I did at one time when my #'s where high I got my #s down and soked my feet in epson salt cool water .It worked for me. Another thing that works is using a nice rich heel balm. I don't use anything with perfume or fragrance in it, that burns. But I use Flexitol and that seems to calm my feet. That itching could be a couple of things. It could be athletes foot and if you go barefoot a lot or in public places, that could be bugging you. The more likely thing is neuropathy. It is when the nerves are damaged and they send confusing signals to your brain. It can be a feeling of cold or itch. It can be a burning feeling or a numbness or tingle. The better BG control you have the better this can be, but it also depends on how damaged the nerves are. I would schedule an appointment with your doctor or podiatrist and have them help you out. Continue reading >>

Itchy Feet And Diabetes

Itchy Feet And Diabetes

Itchy feet and Diabetes often accompany one another. Even though there are plenty of other symptoms that disturb a diabetic, many people will tell you that the itchy feet — particularly at night — are simply intolerable! According to Diabetes.org, as many as 33 percent of diabetics suffer from a skin disorder. What Skin Conditions Cause Itchy Feet In Diabetics? If your feet are itching to high heaven, you may be suffering from one of the following conditions… Bacterial Infections – Usually a bacterial infection of the foot will be evidenced by liquid-filled boils. Inflamed tissue is red, hot, swollen and sometimes itchy. It is especially important that people do their best to avoid a diabetes foot infection, as unchecked infections can lead to amputations. Fungal Infections – Fungal infections like Athlete’s Foot usually starts with an intensely itchy red rash between the toes. Germs can enter cracks in the skin and cause a more widespread infection. Toenail fungus is also common in diabetics, which can be identified by a thickening and yellowing of the nail that results in crumbly edges. Yeast Infections – A common side effect of a yeast infection can be itchy skin — not just in the genital region, but also on the hands, feet, ears and scalp — where candida tends to accumulate. Doctors prescribe antibiotics for this. Peripheral Neuropathy – One of the most common causes of itchy feet for people with diabetes is a dysfunction of the nerves called “peripheral neuropathy.” Numbness, tremors, tingling, pain, pins-and-needles, itching — these are all words used to describe what diabetics face. Some people are prescribed drugs like morphine or oxycodone to deal with these symptoms. Liver Failure – According to Livestrong, “Liver diseases with bi Continue reading >>

Everything You Should Know About Diabetic Blisters

Everything You Should Know About Diabetic Blisters

If you have diabetes and experience the spontaneous eruption of blisters on your skin, they may well be diabetic blisters. These are also called bullosis diabeticorum or diabetic bullae. Although the blisters may be alarming when you first spot them, they’re painless and normally heal on their own without leaving scars. A number of skin conditions are associated with diabetes. Diabetic blisters are fairly rare. An article in the International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries notes that in the United States, the disorder occurs in only 0.5 percent of people with diabetes. Diabetic blisters are twice as likely to be found in men than in women. Diabetic blisters most often appear on your legs, feet, and toes. Less frequently, they show up on hands, fingers, and arms. Diabetic blisters can be as large as 6 inches, though they’re normally smaller. They’re often described as looking like blisters that occur when you get a burn, only without the pain. Diabetic blisters seldom appear as a single lesion. Rather, they are bilateral or occur in clusters. The skin surrounding the blisters isn’t normally red or swollen. If it is, see your doctor promptly. Diabetic blisters contain a clear, sterile fluid, and they’re usually itchy. Read about the eight best remedies for itching. Given the risk of infection and ulceration when you have diabetes, you may want to see a dermatologist to rule out more serious skin conditions. Diabetic blisters usually heal in two to five weeks without intervention, according to an article in Clinical Diabetes. The fluid in the blisters is sterile. To prevent infection, you shouldn’t puncture the blisters yourself, though if the lesion is large, your doctor may want to drain the fluid. This will keep the skin intact as a covering for Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Make You Itch?

Does Diabetes Make You Itch?

Diabetes can affect your skin in itchy ways. It can change your nervous system to sense itching you otherwise wouldn’t. How does this happen, and what can you do about it? Itching should not be ignored. It can lead to excessive scratching, which can cause discomfort, pain, and infection. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the higher-than-normal blood sugar levels common in diabetes promote skin infections. The causes can be ordinary fungi, yeast, or bacterial rashes like anyone can get. Some other skin diseases only happen to people with diabetes or happen mostly to people with diabetes. These tend to have long names such as diabetic dermopathy and eruptive xanthomatosis. WebMD says as many as one out of three people with diabetes will have some kind of skin condition. Diabetes increases skin dryness and damages circulation. “Localized itching can be caused by a yeast infection, dry skin, or poor circulation,” says WebMD. “When itching is caused by poor blood flow, you’ll likely feel it in your lower legs and feet.” Genital itching Diabetes can itch more than your skin. Diabetes.co.uk highlights genital yeast infections as a major problem in diabetes. This is because high glucose levels “provide ideal conditions for naturally present yeast to grow and diminishes the body’s ability to fight infection.” Diabetes can also deposit glucose in the urine, helping yeast to grow. Other causes of genital itching include lice, scabies, herpes, various skin diseases, chemical irritants, and allergies. These can affect anyone, but may be felt more strongly in people with diabetes. According to an article on Everyday Health, “diabetes affects the nervous system and alters the perception of sensation in the body.” A piece by Rachel Nall, RN, BS Continue reading >>

Learn The Symptoms Of Painful Diabetic Neuropathy In Phoenixville

Learn The Symptoms Of Painful Diabetic Neuropathy In Phoenixville

If you are suffering from diabetes, your doctor has probably warned you about possible diabetic neuropathy foot problems. After all, if you cannot feel your feet, you are much more likely to suffer an injury that could develop into a serious infection—and possibly cause you to lose the foot. But what you may not know is that there is another type of nerve damage that does not just cause you to lose feeling, but to feel pain and other unpleasant sensations in your feet. This is called painful neuropathy, and can cause as many as 10% of diabetic patients to suffer chronic foot pain issues. There are a number of diabetic neuropathy symptoms. Most often, they are felt in the feet, but you may also experience sensations in the legs and hands, including: Burning sensations on the soles of the feet Freezing or cold sensations in the feet and toes Stabbing pains like knives or glass in the feet Stinging, or a feeling of electric shocks Tingling, such as pins and needles or itching In most cases, the painful symptoms of neuropathy are short lived and last 12 months or less. They are usually experienced during periods of high blood glucose levels or when the blood glucose level fluctuates rapidly. Once the blood sugar has remained stable for a few months, the symptoms will often ease and may even disappear altogether. The causes of painful neuropathy are not fully understood. However, many doctors believe that if symptoms have persisted for more than 12 months, they are unlikely to disappear on their own—even with vigilant blood glucose control. To find out the best course of treatment for your diabetic foot problems, call the trusted Philadelphia podiatrists at HealthMark Foot & Ankle Associates today to set up your first consultation. We are ready to serve you in two locati Continue reading >>

How To Stop Itching From Diabetes

How To Stop Itching From Diabetes

Edit Article Three Methods:Stopping the Itch with Lifestyle ChangesStopping the Itch with Home RemediesStopping the Itch with MedicationCommunity Q&A Diabetics frequently experience horrible itching. It is a common side effect of elevated blood glucose levels, which is the defining factor of diabetes. If you suffer from unbearable itchiness, this wikiHow article explains ways that you can soothe your irritated skin. 1 Prevent skin from getting dry. Keep your skin moist and healthy by using moisturizers and skin creams. Avoid scented creams and lotions, BECAUSE you could have a reaction to them, causing more itching. Moisturize twice a day. Every time you shower, use one ounce or two tablespoons to moisturize your whole body, or use as needed.[1] You should also avoid using scented soaps BECAUSE the chemicals in it can cause skin to get dry and irritated. Use mild, unscented soaps instead. 2 Change your bathing style. Too frequent bathing can cause itching to get worse. Limit baths to once every 2 days. Bathing frequency can vary depending on climate, weather and your activities. However, once in two days should suffice. Avoid using very hot water; it tends to make the skin more irritated. Use water at room temperature or lower. Hot water dilates vessels speeding up metabolism of insulin, which can trigger hypoglycemia.[2] Another reason why diabetics should not use hot water is diabetics suffering from nerve damage lose sensitivity to pain and temperature and may unknowingly burn themselves with hot water. 3 Care for your skin in the summer. Summer is a time of sun and fun, but sun can also seriously irritate skin. To lessen itching in the summer, wear clothes made from light materials like cotton, chiffon or linen. Certain cloths like wool and silk can cause irritation Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

How can diabetes affect feet and skin? For people with diabetes, having too much glucose (sugar) in their blood for a long time can cause some serious complications, including foot and skin problems, as well as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, eye damage, and other problems. How can diabetes affect my feet? Diabetes can cause two problems that can affect your feet: Diabetic neuropathy — Uncontrolled diabetes can damage your nerves. If you have damaged nerves in your legs and feet, you might not feel heat, cold or pain. This lack of feeling is called diabetic neuropathy. If you do not feel a cut or sore on your foot because of neuropathy, the cut could get worse and become infected. Peripheral vascular disease — Diabetes also affects the flow of blood. Without good blood flow, it takes longer for a sore or cut to heal. Poor blood flow in the arms and legs is called peripheral vascular disease. (The word "peripheral" means "located away from a central point," and the word "vascular" refers to the blood vessels. Peripheral vascular disease is a circulation disorder that affects blood vessels away from the heart.) If you have an infection that will not heal because of poor blood flow, you are at risk for developing gangrene, which is the death of tissue due to a lack of blood. To keep gangrene from spreading, the doctor may have to remove a toe, foot, or part of a leg. This procedure is called amputation. Diabetes is the most common, non-traumatic cause of leg amputations. Each year, more than 56,000 people with diabetes have amputations. However, research suggests that more than half of these amputations can be prevented through proper foot care. What are some common foot problems of people with diabetes? Anyone can get the foot problems listed below. For people Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Problems Treatment And Complications

Diabetes And Foot Problems Treatment And Complications

Diabetes and foot problems facts Two main conditions, peripheral artery disease (PAD) and peripheral neuropathy, are responsible for the increased risk of foot problems in people with diabetes. Symptoms and signs of diabetic foot problems arise due to the decreased sensation from nerve damage as well as the lack of oxygen delivery to the feet caused by vascular disease. Diabetic foot problems also include bunions, corns, calluses, hammertoes, fungal infections, dryness of the skin, and ingrown toenails. These problems are not specific to diabetes, but may occur more commonly due to the nerve and vascular damage caused by diabetes. Treatment depends on the exact type of foot problem. Surgery or even amputation may be required for some cases. Gangrene (dry gangrene) is tissue death due to absence of blood circulation. It can be life threatening if bacterial infection develops (wet gangrene). Many diabetes-related foot problems can be prevented by good control of blood sugar levels combined with appropriate care of the feet. How can diabetes cause foot problems? Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes cause damage to blood vessels and peripheral nerves that can result in problems in the legs and feet. Two main conditions, 1) peripheral artery disease (PAD), and 2) peripheral neuropathy are responsible for the increased risk of foot problems in people with diabetes. Peripheral artery disease (PAD), sometimes referred to as peripheral vascular disease (PVD), means that there is narrowing or occlusion by atherosclerotic plaques of arteries outside of the heart and brain. This is sometimes referred to as "hardening" of the arteries. Diabetes is a known risk factor for developing peripheral artery disease. In addition to pain in the calves during exercise (medically known as intermitte Continue reading >>

Itchy Feet Information & Treatment Products For Feet That Itch :: Footsmart

Itchy Feet Information & Treatment Products For Feet That Itch :: Footsmart

If your feet itch, you're most likely suffering from either athlete's foot or dry skin. While these two conditions both result in some serious scratching, and can produce red, flaky patches as well as peeling, cracked skin, treatment options drastically differ. Sufferers must therefore learn to distinguish between these two ailments to find relief. As the name suggests, the most common cause of athlete's foot is perspiration, meaning everyone not just athletes are susceptible. Wet feet trapped in closed-in shoes, socks and hosiery provide the perfect environment for the athlete's foot fungus, which thrives in warm, dark, moist climates. If you're displaying any of the above mentioned symptoms, yet also show signs of blistering, you most likely have the fungal infection commonly referred to as athlete's foot. Commonly found between the fourth and fifth toes, athlete's foot can appear anywhere on the foot, and is contagious. Also called tinea pedis, athlete's foot can result in red, burning, scaly, itchy feet, and usually appears as a scaling rash, making your feet feel like they're "on fire." The best way to prevent against athlete's foot is to keep your feet dry. If you do get athlete's foot, however, careful hygiene and the regular use of anti-fungal creams and powders should alleviate symptoms. Practice the following to guard against athlete's foot: Dry feet well after showering or bathing. Apply anti-fungal powders and creams to absorb Change your socks often, especially after exercising Household heat that reduces humidity and dries out the skin Dry skin, usually the culprit behind cracked heels, commonly appears on such areas of the feet as the souls and heels. As explained above, you most likely have dry skin if your feet display the following symptoms: The best Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Skin Problems - How To Deal With Dry Itchy Skin

Diabetes And Skin Problems - How To Deal With Dry Itchy Skin

If you have diabetic skin problems, like itchy skin, it's important to care for your skin properly – read on for tips to add to your skin care regime! If you have diabetes then you’re more likely to have dry skin, which can lead to itchiness. Are you one of those who suffer with diabetes and itchy skin? Itchy skin and diabetes often go together. The good news is that by taking care of your skin, you may be able to help reduce the risk of developing skin problems due to dryness and maintain healthy-looking, smooth skin. 1 Itchy skin, diabetes related or not, can often be made worse by washing with the wrong skin care products that increase skin dryness. Although you might think you’re doing the right thing by keeping your skin clean, if you’re using the wrong products, or washing too frequently, then you can actually aggravate the problem. Try to use mild and gentle soaps that are free from harsh chemicals and heavy perfumes. Unless it’s necessary, don’t wash your skin more than twice a day – washing too often, especially with hot water, can actually dry the skin out more. Avoiding these triggers may help to minimize itchiness. 2 If you’ve got diabetes, itchy skin due to dryness can be a concern. A good moisturizer like Vaseline® Intensive Care™ Advanced Repair Unscented Lotion may help to soothe and relieve itchiness. With micro-droplets of Vaseline® Jelly and glycerin, this lotion locks in essential moisture to help facilitate the skin’s natural recovery process. It’s fast absorbing and gentle on skin. Moisturizing can help to calm your dry skin and may reduce the urge to scratch. Remember, even though dry, itchy skin can be uncomfortable, always try your best to avoid scratching as this can lead to skin becoming damaged. If you have diabetes an Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Cause Itching?

Does Diabetes Cause Itching?

People with diabetes experience skin itching at higher rates than those without the condition. Ultimately, itching can lead to excessive scratching, which can cause discomfort and pain. A study of nearly 2,700 people with diabetes and 499 without diabetes found that itching was a common diabetes symptom. An estimated 11.3 percent of those with diabetes reported skin itching versus 2.9 percent of people without diabetes. A person with diabetes should not ignore itchy skin. Dry, irritated, or itchy skin is more likely to become infected, and someone with diabetes may not be able to fight off infections as well as someone who does not have diabetes. There are a variety of treatments available that can help to reduce diabetes-related skin itching so that a person can be more comfortable and avoid other skin complications. Causes of diabetes itching There are many reasons why a person with diabetes might experience itching more often than someone else. Sometimes itching can result from damaged nerve fibers located in the outer layers of skin. Often, the cause of diabetes-related itching is diabetic polyneuropathy or peripheral neuropathy. This condition occurs when high blood glucose levels damage nerve fibers, particularly those in the feet and hands. Before the nerve damage occurs, the body experiences high levels of cytokines. These are inflammatory substances that can lead to a person's skin itching. Sometimes, persistent itchiness may indicate that someone with diabetes is at risk of nerve damage, so the itchiness should never be ignored. Also, people with diabetes can experience associated disorders that include kidney or liver failure. These conditions may also cause itching. A person with diabetes can experience skin itching related to a new medication they are takin Continue reading >>

Itchy Skin And Diabetes

Itchy Skin And Diabetes

Tweet Itchy skin can be a sign of diabetes, particularly if other diabetes symptoms are also present. High blood sugar levels over a prolong period of time is one cause of itchy skin. In some cases, itchy skin may be caused by complications of diabetes such as nerve damage or kidney disease. Itching of the feet, legs or ankles is a common complaint in people with diabetes that may occur as a result of a period of too high sugar levels. Itching can range from being annoying to severe. Itching can be relieved through treatment, and may be eliminated if the underlying cause is treated. Causes of itchy skin Itchiness of the lower limbs can result from a number of causes including: Dry skin Poor circulation Dermatitis (eczema) Psoriasis Allergies Diabetic neuropathy Diabetic nephropathy Athletes foot Urticaria (hives) Chillblains A number of medications, such as antibiotics, antifungal drugs or opiate painkillers, may also lead to itchy skin. Diagnosis of the underlying problem It is advisable to see your doctor if itching is severe or persistent. You should also see your doctor if itching affects your whole body or if other symptoms accompany the itching. Diagnosis of the reason behind itching may be identified through taking a skin sample or through taking a blood sample to check for signs of an underlying cause. Itch, scratch cycle The itch, scratch cycle describes a process in which responding to an itch by scratching can damage or break the skin causing inflammatory chemicals to be released from the body which further intensify the need to itch. Itching may be relieved through avoiding chemicals with perfumes which may irritate the skin and avoiding exposure of your skin to hot water. Moisturising cream can be used to moisturise dry skin or as a preventative measure aga Continue reading >>

Causes Of Diabetic Itching

Causes Of Diabetic Itching

According to the Cleveland Clinic, itching skin, also known as pruritus, can have many causes in people with diabetes. Examples include yeast infections, dry skin and poor circulation. Most skin issues can be prevented or easily treated if caught early. If left untreated, however, some skin issues can lead to infection and other serious complications including amputation. Keeping diabetes under control is key to preventing skin-related complications. Video of the Day Candida albicans, a yeast-like fungus, is often responsible for itchy rashes with tiny blisters and scales. Fungal infections usually occur in warm, moist areas such as under the breasts, between fingers and toes, around the nails, in the corners of the mouth, the armpits and the groin. Three common forms of fungal infections include jock itch, athlete’s foot and ringworm. Medication may be necessary to treat fungal infections. According to the American Diabetes Association, eruptive xanthamatosis is often seen in individuals with uncontrolled blood glucose and high blood triglyceride levels. In this condition, itchy, yellow, firm, pea-like formations with a red halo develop on the skin, usually on the backs of hands, feet, arms, legs and buttocks. Once diabetes control has been restored, these bumps will disappear. Poor circulation, a result of the hardening and narrowing of blood vessels, often causes itching of the lower legs and feet. Lotion may aid in preventing itching from dry skin. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, keeping blood glucose levels under control, eliminating tobacco use and being physically active can help increase circulation and protect your legs and feet. Necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum (NLD), a condition that can be itchy and painful, is caused by bloo Continue reading >>

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