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Fruit, Yoghurt And Cheese Among Foods On The Anti-diabetes Diet

Fruit, Yoghurt And Cheese Among Foods On The Anti-diabetes Diet

Fruit, yoghurt and cheese among foods on the anti-diabetes diet The new advice sets out which foods are associated with a higher and lower risk of diabetesCredit:Gustavo Ramirez An apple a day could help prevent diabetes, new health guidelines suggest. Yoghurt, cheese and regular cups of tea or coffee are among other foods and drinks which could help ward off the condition, the advice states. But too much meat and potatoes can raise your likelihood of diagnosis, according to the diet advice from It is the first time health guidelines have specified which foods could help fight off the disease, which is linked to obesity. Previously, people at high risk of developing diabetes were given advice like increase your fibre intake by 15 per cent or to lose 5 per cent of your body weight. But doctors have updated this guidance, saying it does not relate to how people live their lives. The difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes Dr Pamela Dyson, research dietician at Oxford University and co-chair of the guidelines, said: Weve made these dietary guidelines in terms of food and not nutrients because food is what people eat, they dont eat nutrients. And its a message thats far easier to communicate with people when youre talking about foods they actually eat. The new advice suggests eating more wholegrains and fruit and vegetables particularly apples, grapes, blueberries and green leafy vegetables. The guidelines also recommend eating dairy products, particularly yoghurt and cheese, and having regular cups of tea or coffee. Cheese also got the thumbs up from doctorsCredit:Getty Diets should be low in red and processed meat, sugary drinks, potatoes especially chips and refined carbohydrates like white bread and white rice. It is also recommended people at high risk of develo Continue reading >>

Check Service Availability In Your Area:

Check Service Availability In Your Area:

There are no foods that diabetics cannot eat; however, it is essential to reduce the amount of certain foods and to increase others. The dietary guidelines for people with diabetes are very similar to those recommended for everyone else - eating less sugar and fat, more fibre-rich, starchy foods, and more fruit and vegetables, with moderate amounts of meat and fish, as well as milk and dairy foods. There is no need to buy special diabetic foods - ordinary everyday foods in the right balance are the key to diabetic control. Choosing the right foods, however, can make a big difference. Eating regularly helps to ensure your blood sugar does not swing from one extreme to the other. People with diabetes need to base each meal on a starchy carbohydrate food for energy and to help maintain control over their blood-glucose level. It is a good idea to try to eat about the same amount of starchy foods each day, with plenty of vegetables, salad or fruit, and a smaller portion of meat or dairy foods. Starchy foods to try include: cereal, toast, rolls, bread, noodles, rice, pasta and potatoes, picking wholemeal versions where possible, since they are higher in fibre. Fibre can help to slow the rate at which carbohydrates are absorbed, for a steadier release of sugar into the bloodstream. As long as your everyday diet is healthy and generally low in sugar, some sweet food (in small portions) will do no harm, particularly if eaten as part of a meal. Sugary drinks can cause blood glucose levels to rise quickly, so choose sugar-free, diet or low-sugar squashes and fizzy drinks. Aim for at least five portions of fruit or vegetables a day, eating more vegetables than fruit for lower sugar consumption. Easy ideas to increase your fruit and vegetable intake are to add extra vegetables to yo Continue reading >>

Shop-bought Treats And Diabetes

Shop-bought Treats And Diabetes

The Great British Bake Off returns to our screens this August and many of us will be on a knife edge waiting to find out who'll be crowned top baker in October. But not all of us have ambitions to become the next Mary Berry or Paul Hollywood, some of us just don't have the time – or inclination – to bake. That doesn't stop us from looking lovingly at all the cakes and bakes that are available in the shops, though. Having diabetes doesn't mean you have to stop enjoying the occasional treat. But it does pay to know what's going into the treats you buy, and to think about how foods like this can fit into overall diabetes management. Being aware of how to read food labels and portion sizes can help you stay in control. 6 top tips for buying baked goods Top ways to buy a healthier bake and what to look out for in the bakery aisle. Tip 1: read the labels Most packaged foods now contain nutritional information on the front and back of the pack to help you make healthier choices. Find out more aboutinterpreting labels on food packaging. Tip 2: read the ingredients list On the back of the packaging, you’ll find more detailed nutritional information including carbs. The ingredients list is also here and will tell you the quantities of what’s in the product. Look for where sugar appears on this list – the ingredients are listed with the largest amount first – to help you compare products. Other words for ‘free’ or ‘added’ sugar include honey, syrup, fructose and glucose. Tip 3: what about food with no labels? Many baked goods from the bakery section often aren't labelled, but a quick google search at home will give you this information. At Enjoy Food, we carried out a little experiment. We looked online at the nutritional information for three unwrapped baked f Continue reading >>

Grocery Lists For Type 2 Diabetes: What To Buy And What To Avoid

Grocery Lists For Type 2 Diabetes: What To Buy And What To Avoid

Diabetes is best managed by being mindful of carbohydrate intake, eating smaller meals regularly, and choosing nutrient dense, healthful options. Knowing what food to eat can make a huge difference to controlling, and, potentially, reversing type 2 diabetes. Making informed food choices can be helped by writing out a grocery list of foods that improve overall health, and benefit someone who has type 2 diabetes. Contents of this article: Lists of good foods A person who has type 2 diabetes can make it easier to avoid buying unhealthful foods by going to the grocery store armed with a list. Choosing healthful, satisfying foods that meet individual nutrition requirements can help people with type 2 diabetes manage their condition. By making smart food choices and buying the right foods, a person can ensure they have enough diabetic-friendly ingredients on hand to take them from breakfast through to the last meal, or snack, of the day. Vegetables Vegetables are the base of a healthy diet. Not only do they offer excellent sources of vitamins and minerals, but they are fibrous, too, and help the body feel full and satisfied. This in turn can deter overeating, which may cause blood sugar issues. Some vegetables to add to the shopping list include: salad greens broccoli cauliflower squash green beans asparagus Brussel sprouts red, green, orange, or yellow peppers Beans and legumes Beans are an excellent source of dietary fiber and protein. They can often be used in place of a portion of the protein that is needed in a diet. Here are some examples of what beans to pick up in either their canned or dried forms: black beans lentils white beans chickpeas kidney beans pinto beans Fruits Despite their high sugar content, fresh or frozen fruits pack a powerful nutritional punch with t Continue reading >>

Nutritionists’ 9 Tricks For Grocery Shopping With Diabetes

Nutritionists’ 9 Tricks For Grocery Shopping With Diabetes

istock/anandaBGD Have a light snack, such as a string cheese and a small apple, before you leave for the grocery store. The fuel will help prevent excessive hunger pangs and keep your blood sugar steady, both of which can cut down on impulse buys. Don't leave home without a shopping list (another tactic to avoid buying unhealthy fare you didn't plan on purchasing). “This will ensure that you have healthful foods on hand at home all week long,” says Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, a certified diabetes educator and author of the Reader’s Digest book 2-Day Diabetes Diet. istock/bbostjan “The only ingredient listed on the label should be the name of the fruit you are buying,” says Alana Fiorentino, RDN, a certified diabetes educator in New York City. If you prefer canned fruit, make lower-sugar choices by selecting fruits in 100 percent fruit juice or water—and avoiding fruit canned in syrup. “Light syrup” may sound healthy, but it usually has added sugar. A ½ cup portion of Mandarin oranges canned in water, for instance, has 45 calories and 7 grams of sugar, while the light-syrup version has 90 calories and 18 grams of sugar. Here, compelling reasons fruit is healthy for diabetics. Opt for low-sodium soup istock/mrtom-uk If you have diabetes, you also have a higher risk of heart disease. So aim to cap your daily sodium intake at less than 2,300 milligrams and keep in mind that your doctor or dietitian may advise lowering this amount if you have other heart disease risk factors, such as hypertension. Canned soup tends to be high in sodium: A cup of chicken-noodle soup can contain 950 milligrams, a large proportion of your daily intake. A low-sodium version, on the other hand, has less than half that amount. Choose soup with less than 500 milligrams of sodium per se Continue reading >>

Diabetic Online Stores

Diabetic Online Stores

They offer handmade specialty treats made in small batches with high quality ingredients. They are proud to be family owned and operated since 1979. You'll taste the quality in every bite. They use the finest ingredients available- real butter, egg, vanilla extract, etc. You can see a complete list of ingredients on each of our product pages. They offer several products that are gluten-free, sugar free, and no sugar added for those on special diets. Their cookies are made in small batches and may vary in size or appearance, just as yours would at home! Many of the chocolates they sell are hand-dipped and will also vary. MagicKitchen.com'shealthy,chef-prepared mealsare created using top-quality fresh produce and ingredients to ensure you receive delicious, nutritious meals that are quick to prepare. The meals arrive on your doorstep frozen. All you have to do is defrost, heat and serve! Theirmeals are handmade in small batches without preservatives. All ingredients are sourced within the USA and all products are prepared 100% in the USA.No pots or pans! Our healthy premade meals heat up in the customer packages they come in- just microwave or bake in the oven for delicious perfection. Diet Direct is proud to offer you the same medical-gradeprotein diet foodsandweight loss supplementsused by hospitals, physicians and weight loss clinics combined with the highest level of care and customer service. Their high-protein diet foods and supplements meet the needs of Medically Supervised VLCD, LCD, and Modified Fasting Diets. They also carry numerous products that are ideal for high protein diets, liquid diets, diabetic diets and low-carb lifestyles. You can shop with confidence at Diet Direct. Jelly Belly jelly beans are gluten free, peanut free, dairy free, fat free and veget Continue reading >>

Diabetic Food Is A Waste Of Your Money

Diabetic Food Is A Waste Of Your Money

Every Tuesday, Britain's leading nutritionist, Jane Clarke, explains how to eat your way to health. This week, why diabetic food is a waste of your money and the benefits of hemp oil I've been recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and have been told that grapes and bananas are not good for me. Is that right, and do I need to buy the special diabetic products? Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes in the UK, and is caused by problems with the hormone insulin. Our bodies need insulin in order to use glucose, the basic fuel for the cells. Glucose comes from the food we eat and is absorbed through the digestive system into the bloodstream. Insulin then moves it from the blood to the cells, where it is converted into energy. If we don't have enough insulin - either because the body does not produce enough, or if it does, the cells don't respond to it as they should - glucose builds up in the blood. This can cause two problems. Your cells are starved of energy, which is why people with undiagnosed or uncontrolled diabetes can lose weight and feel exhausted. And over time, uncontrolled high blood glucose levels can damage your kidneys, nerves, heart - or eyes. In fact, some people discover they have type 2 diabetes only when they go to the optician. However, most people discover they're diabetic during a routine urine test. You may have been feeling more tired than usual, or needing to go to the toilet more often, or have an unquenchable thirst - the last two are signs that the body needs more water to produce urine, which is the way it gets rid of excess sugar. Type 2 diabetes can occur as we get older, but it is most common in overweight people. Unlike those who suffer from type 1 diabetes - they don't produce any insulin at all and have to inject themselve Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Health Food Store Uk

Diabetes - Health Food Store Uk

Diabetes is a disease that affects how the body uses food for energy. Because the bodys cells cannot use food properly, the blood glucose (sugar) becomes high. The blood glucose becomes high either because the body lacks insulin or because it cannot use the insulin it makes. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into the cells for energy. Type 1: Diabetes usually occurs in children and young adults. Its always treated with insulin. A healthy diet that controls starches and sugars (carbohydrates) is important. Regular exercise can reduce risk for heart disease and other complications. Symptoms include sudden weight loss, excessive thirst and hunger, frequent urination, nausea, vomiting, poor growth, and lack of energy. Type 2:Diabetes usually occurs in older adults. However, it is now becoming more common in children and teens. Those with type 2 diabetes often are overweight and unfit. They cannot make enough insulin to keep their blood glucose in control. A meal plan for weight control and regular exercise is the first treatment tried. If diet and exercise are not enough, medicine may be required. Various diabetes pills can be used. If diabetes pills dont work, insulin shots may be needed. The doctor decides what medicine works best. Symptoms for type 2 diabetes usually are not obvious. In fact, people vary from merely feeling tired to having symptoms similar to type 1 diabetes. If you have diabetes in the family, have your blood glucose checked yearly by the doctor. Finding diabetes early is the best way to prevent serious problems later. Natural remedies that may help diabetes is now available directly from www.nutrisun.co.uk Call us 0208 770 1156| Lines are open Monday Saturday| 10am to 4pm Continue reading >>

Shopping List For Diabetics

Shopping List For Diabetics

Control Type 2 Diabetes, Shed Fat Our Shopping List for Diabetics is based on the Pritikin Eating Plan, regarded worldwide as among the healthiest diets on earth. The Pritikin Program has been documented in more than 100 studies in peer-reviewed medical journals to prevent and control many of our nation’s leading killers – heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, metabolic syndrome, and obesity as well as type 2 diabetes. If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, pay special attention. Research on newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics coming to the Pritikin Longevity Center illustrate how profoundly beneficial early intervention can be. Scientists from UCLA followed 243 people in the early stages of diabetes (not yet on medications). Within three weeks of coming to Pritikin, their fasting blood sugar (glucose) plummeted on average from 160 to 124. Research has also found that the Pritikin Program reduces fasting insulin by 25 to 40%. Shopping List for Diabetics – More Features Here’s another big plus to our Shopping List for Diabetics. In addition to icons that are diabetes-focused like “sugar free,” this list uses icons like “low cholesterol” and “low sodium” because many people with diabetes are working to control not just diabetes but related conditions like high cholesterol levels and high blood pressure. This list can help you identify those foods most advantageous in helping you reach your personal health goals. Diabetic Food Taboos? Not Anymore! Have you been told you have to give up juicy watermelon or sweet grapes? What if we told you those foods really aren’t taboo? Watch the Video Our Healthy Shopping List for Diabetics also lists the top 10 things to put back on the shelf if you’re trying to: Lose Weight Lower Blood Pres Continue reading >>

How To Plan A Diabetes-friendly Grocery List

How To Plan A Diabetes-friendly Grocery List

Diabetes and diet: What’s the connection? » When you have diabetes, your body doesn’t break down food to use as energy the way it should. As of 2014, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that approximately 29 million Americans have diabetes. A vast majority of those people have type 2 diabetes. If not managed effectively, diabetes can cause health complications. Common health complications include: kidney disease which leads to kidney failure nerve and vessel disease which leads to limb amputation eye disease which leads to blindness The good news is that weight loss and exercise can have shown enormous potential for preventing, treating, and in some cases reversing type 2 diabetes. Maintaining a diabetes-friendly diet is more complex than just cutting carbs. Don’t let that scare you, though. It’s easy to follow a diabetes-friendly diet, especially if you get in the habit of meal planning. Plan ahead Planning your meals ahead of time may cost you more minutes in the short term, but you’ll reap the rewards later. If you’ve already decided what you’re making each night and have your refrigerator stocked, you’re that much closer to a healthy meal. Getting into a routine of meal planning can save your body from scary health complications and also save your wallet because you’ll be skipping that takeout and those impulse purchases at the grocery store. Not sure where to start? All it takes is a one-day commitment to get on the right path, says Toby Smithson, MS, RDN, LDN, CDE, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of “Diabetes Meal Planning and Nutrition for Dummies.” Pick one day where you can set aside a couple of hours for meal planning. This could be a weekend day or another non-working day. Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day 2017: The Best Sugar-free Treats

World Diabetes Day 2017: The Best Sugar-free Treats

Thinking of cutting back on sugar? It’s not as hard as you think, thanks to an impressive variety of treats made with natural sweeteners. Here’s our selection of guilt-free goodies. Sweet Virtues Halo Thins Gift Box Sweet Virtues is known for creating cocoa-rich treats that are free from added sweeteners, additives and preservatives. These refined disks of organic chocolate not only taste great, but are also seriously good for you. They come in a selection of restorative flavours including White Tea and Peppermint, Himalayan Pink Salt and Maqui. £15.95, Ocado, Buy it now Lola’s Cupcakes in Chocolate Sugar Free Thanks to this guilt-free creation from Lola's, the sugar-free gang can have their cake and eat it too. Sweetened with xylitol and agave nectar, this cocoa-flavoured sponge is topped with scrumptious buttercream frosting and finished with a sprinkle of chocolate flakes. £3.25, Lola's Cupcakes, Buy it now Goody Good Stuff Cheery Cherries If chewy sweets are your thing, then Goody Good Stuff has got you covered. These cherry-shaped treats are made with only natural ingredients and are also free from gluten, fat and dairy. £0.74, Holland & Barrrett, Buy it now Sweet Freedom Choc Shot One for chocoholics, this liquid treat can be enjoyed in hot milk, on toast, yoghurt and lots more. It has a low GI, so is ideal for diabetics, and contains half the calories of Nutella. £3.55, Waitrose, Buy it now Free’ist Choc Chip Cookies No sugar certainly doesn't have to mean no cookies. Loaded with delicious chocolate chips, these crunchy snacks are made with no added sugar, preservatives or colourings and go perfectly with a midday cuppa. £1.75, Holland & Barrett, Buy it now Perfect World Carrot Cake Ice Cream Perfect World has rustled up some nutritious ice cream for Continue reading >>

Diabetic Food - What Is Diabetic Food And Should I Buy It

Diabetic Food - What Is Diabetic Food And Should I Buy It

Get all of the recipes ever published on your phone or tablet Download a free chart of the IDF recommended blood glucose ranges. Discuss complications in the Diabetes Forum Country guides for people with diabetes travelling abroad Browse test strips and get online VAT relief Join 250,009 people in the Diabetes Forum Diabetic food is considered a gimmick to push food to people with diabetes Diabetic food is fast becoming an obsolete term. Yet, this doesn't stop thousands of diabetics believing they have to buy this food and countless manufacturers selling diabetic food products. The situation has reached the point at which Diabetes UK and the Food Standards Agency have issued a joint statement calling for an end to diabetic food and suitable for diabetics on food labels. This shift in dietary policy is largely down to changing diet advice, which recommends that any food is suitable for people with diabetes in sensible moderation. Concern has existed for some time that labelling a food as diabetic could mislead people with diabetes into thinking that the food was essential or at the least especially suitable. Often, diabetic foods are more expensive than standard products, with sugar-free and low-sugar versions also often misleading. Often, diabetic food labelling is applied to sweet food such as biscuits and chocolate. According to the joint statement - people who eat sugary food should do so sparingly, and only as part of a healthy and balanced diet. Effectively, healthy eating advice provided by the authorities is the same for people with diabetes as it is for those without. Essentially, specially designated diabetic foods should now become a thing of the past. I am diabetic, should I eat diabetic food? No, people with diabetes dont need to eat special diabetic food. Continue reading >>

How To Eat To Manage Diabetes - Top 10 Tips

How To Eat To Manage Diabetes - Top 10 Tips

Moderation is key when it comes to managing diabetes. Douglas Twenefour, clinical advisor at Diabetes UK, explains what to eat when and shares his top 10 tips for managing your diabetes... There is not a ‘one-size-fits-all’ eating pattern for people with diabetes, but Douglas Twenefour suggests tips that can be incorporated into individual healthy eating goals for people who have the condition... 1. Eat regular meals Spacing meals evenly throughout the day will help control your appetite and blood glucose levels – especially if you are on twice-daily insulin. 2. Opt for slowly absorbed carbohydrates All carbohydrates (carbs) affect blood glucose levels, so be conscious of how much you eat and opt for carbs that are more gradually absorbed. Try wholewheat pasta, basmati rice; granary, pumpernickel or rye bread; new potatoes in their skins, sweet potatoes and yams; oat-based cereals, such as porridge or natural (unsweetened) muesli. For more information, take a look at our Spotlight on... low-GI foods. 3. Cut the fat Eat less fat – particularly saturated fat. Try unsaturated fats and oils, especially monounsaturated fats like extra virgin olive oil and rapeseed oil, as these types of fat are better for your heart. Use lower fat dairy products including skimmed or semi-skimmed milk. Grill, steam or bake foods rather than frying. Remember that all fats contribute similar amounts of calories, so limit your overall intake if you are aiming to lose weight. 4. Five a day Aim for at least five portions of fruit and vegetables every day to give your body the vitamins, minerals and fibre it needs. A portion is: 1 medium-sized piece of fruit, like a banana or apple, 1 handful of grapes, 1 tablespoon (30g) dried fruit, 1 small glass (150ml) of unsweetened 100% fruit juice or Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat If You Have Diabetes

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat If You Have Diabetes

Most of us take it for granted that we can eat whatever we like, although it may have an unwanted effect on our waistline. But diabetics have to be much more careful with what they consume, as their inability to produce any, or enough, insulin, means their blood sugar levels can become dangerously high if they eat whatever they fancy. [Read more: 6 surprising cholesterol-busting foods] [Revealed: Why am I always hungry? 6 reasons you’re feeling starving] However, as World Diabetes Day is marked on November 14, Diabetes UK points out that no foods are totally off-limits for diabetics – they just need to eat carefully. Libby Dowling, senior clinical advisor at Diabetes UK, explains: “If you have diabetes – whatever the type – no food is out of bounds, but you should aim for a healthy, balanced diet, just as everyone should. This is a diet which is low in sugar, salt and saturated fats and includes plenty of fruit and vegetables. “It’s fine to have a treat now and again, but maintaining a healthy diet most of the time can help you to manage your diabetes, and is good for your general health too.” Here are some suggestions for the best and worst foods to eat when you're diabetic: Frozen grapes Instead of sweets, try these fruity little gems, which turn into a creamy sorbet-style healthy snack when frozen. Although there are fruit sugars in them, there's less sugar than there is in sweets, and fruit's packed with vitamins, minerals and fibre. Sweet potatoes Sweet potatoes have been shown to stabilise blood sugar levels in diabetics by lowering insulin resistance. They also contain high amounts of fibre, which helps reduce levels of 'bad' LDL cholesterol, which is linked to cardiovascular disease. Almonds Eating almonds can help people with type 2 diabetes to Continue reading >>

Special Diets | Oakhouse Foods

Special Diets | Oakhouse Foods

Weve tried to make sure as many people as possible can use our home meals service, whatever their diet. Our range includes lots of options for those with allergies or intolerances to certain ingredients all prepared with care to give you total peace of mind. Meal choices can be severely limited for coeliacs and people with gluten intolerance. Oakhouse Foods offers more than 70 ready meals and desserts that are free from gluten. Find out more about following a gluten free diet. Browse our full range of gluten free ready meals and sides . As recent NHS recommendations suggest diabetics should follow a diet that is low in fat, sugar and salt, we no longer have a specific diabetic category of meals. But you can instead find many low fat and salt options in our range, as well as almost 200 products that contain less than 5g of sugar per 100g. Read more about these meals, including the dietary symbols we use, in our nutritional information section . We have a number of products that are guaranteed nut free, including vegetable and potato sides, handy pre-cooked jacket potatoes and frozen fruit portions. As nut allergies can be so severe, we cannot guarantee that most of our main meals and desserts are nut free, as there may be traces in the environment theyre prepared in. You can read more about food labelling guidelines for nut free products, as well as tips on cooking safely and ordering food in restaurants, on Allergy UKs website . Allergies to milk and milk derivatives are quite rare, with many more people experiencing lactose intolerance. This means your body cant digest lactose (the naturally occurring sugar found in milk and dairy products), with common symptoms including discomfort and bloating. You can read more about living with milk allergies and intolerances on A Continue reading >>

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