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Diabetic Food Menu

Understanding How Food Affects Your Blood Sugar

Understanding How Food Affects Your Blood Sugar

Carbohydrates Blood glucose is affected most by carbohydrates. And insulin dosing is typically based on food intake, especially carbohydrates. Knowing what foods contain carbohydrates and the amount of carbohydrates in a meal is helpful for blood glucose control. You should aim to include carbohydrates in each meal. Carbohydrate sources like vegetables, fruits and whole grains (high fiber) are preferred over carbohydrate sources with added fats, sugars and salt. Proteins are a necessary part of a balanced diet and can keep you from feeling hungry. They also do not raise your blood glucose like carbohydrates. However, to prevent weight gain, use portion control with proteins. In people with Type 2 diabetes, protein makes insulin work faster, so it may not be a good idea to treat low blood sugar with protein shakes or mixes. Fats Fats are a necessary part of a balanced diet, especially healthy fats like olive oil and fatty fish. The five food groups Some people believe that a diabetes diagnosis means “goodbye” to good food. Not so. Having diabetes does not mean that you can no longer enjoy good food, or that you have to give up your favorite foods. Living with diabetes means eating regular, healthy meals from the following five food groups: Grains and starches Vegetables Fruits Milk & alternatives Meat & alternatives Making healthy food choices Your dietitian or diabetes educator can help you to develop an eating plan that is right for you and fits into your lifestyle. Here are some guidelines for healthy eating: Healthy eating for diabetes is healthy eating for the whole family. Enjoy having regular meals, starting with breakfast first, then lunch and dinner. Space meals no more than 6 hours apart. Eat a variety of foods in each meal, including healthy fats, lean mea Continue reading >>

The Best 7-day Diabetes Meal Plan

The Best 7-day Diabetes Meal Plan

This 1,200-calorie meal plan makes it easy to follow a diabetes diet with healthy and delicious foods that help to balance blood sugar. The simple meals and snacks in this 7-day plan feature complex carbohydrates (think whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables), lean protein and healthy fats. We limited refined carbohydrates (like white bread, white pasta and white rice) as well as added sugars, which can spike your blood sugar quickly. We've also cut back on saturated fats and sodium, as they can negatively impact your health if you eat too much. The carbohydrates are balanced throughout the day with each meal containing 2-3 carb servings (30-45 grams of carbohydrates) and each snack containing around 1 carb serving (15 grams of carbohydrates). The calorie and carbohydrate totals are listed next to each meal and snack so you can swap foods with similar nutrition in and out as you like. Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be difficult—choose a variety of nutritious foods, as we do in this meal plan, and add in daily exercise for a healthy and sustainable approach to managing diabetes. Day 1 Breakfast (294 calories, 41 g carbohydrates) • 1/2 cup oats cooked in 1/2 cup each 2% milk and water • 1 medium plum, chopped • 4 walnut halves, chopped Top oats with plum and walnuts. A.M. Snack (96 calories, 18 g carbohydrates) • 3/4 cup blueberries • 1/4 nonfat plain Greek yogurt Top blueberries with yogurt. Lunch (319 calories, 37 g carbohydrates) Turkey & Apple Cheddar Melt • 2 slices whole-wheat bread • 2 tsp. whole-grain mustard, divided • 1/2 medium apple, sliced • 2 oz. low-sodium deli turkey • 2 Tbsp. shredded Cheddar cheese, divided • 1 cup mixed greens Top one slice of bread with 1 tsp. mustard, apple, turkey and 1 Tbsp. cheese. Top the other Continue reading >>

Diabetes Menu Plan

Diabetes Menu Plan

This menu plan includes seven days of meals and snacks, and a tip sheet to help build the plan to suit your tastes. Use this plan to help prevent or manage type 2 diabetes. For help with using the Diabetes Menu Plan speak to an EatRight Ontario Registered Dietitian at 1-877-510-510-2 or send an email. Download the Diabetes Menu Plan for women (PDF) Download the Diabetes Menu Plan for men (PDF) Please note: This meal plan is for general informational purposes only and is not meant to replace personalized advice given to you by your healthcare team. To find out about the amount of carbohydrate that’s right for you, ask your doctor for a referral to a Registered Dietitian. An EatRight Ontario Registered Dietitian can also help you find a Diabetes Education Program in your neighbourhood. In the meantime, this meal plan can help you get started on planning healthy meals to help prevent or manage diabetes. Continue reading >>

Your Diabetes Menu Plan

Your Diabetes Menu Plan

How do you get all the nutrition you need in a day while still being mindful of calories and carbs? The secret is to plan ahead. Meal planning depends on lots of things, like your taste preferences, medications, and activity level, says Jill Weisenberger, RDN, CDE, author of Diabetes Weight Loss -- Week by Week. But good general advice to follow is to keep your carbs consistent -- eat the same amount at breakfast, lunch, and dinner to keep blood sugar from spiking or dipping too low. Weisenberger recommends 45 grams as a target for the three main meals of the day. "If you go lower than 30 grams at a meal, it's going to be really hard to get all the nutrients you need, such as fiber and phytochemicals," the health-boosting nutrients in fruits and vegetables. This sample meal plan provides 1,400 calories. Supplement with healthy snacks to reach your personal calorie goals. If you're rushed in the mornings, make breakfast a snap with mix-and-match prepared items such as hardboiled eggs, nuts or seeds, a part-skim cheese stick, peanut butter, or yogurt for protein; toast, crispbread, or unsweetened instant oatmeal for whole grains; plus any kind of fruit -- dried fruit, a banana, an apple. Menu Avocado Toast and Egg Café au lait made with a half cup 1% milk Medium orange Avocado Toast and Egg This has to be one of the most satisfying, easy breakfasts around, thanks to a helping of fiber from the avocado and whole-grain bread. For an extra flavor kick, sprinkle with Cajun seasoning or smoked paprika. Makes 1 serving. Ingredients: 1 slice 100% whole grain bread 1/5 avocado 1 egg salt and pepper Directions: 1. Toast bread. Scoop out avocado and mash onto toast. Top with a poached or soft-boiled egg and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Per serving: 235 calories, 10 g protein, 19 Continue reading >>

7 Easy Lunches For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Lunches For Type 2 Diabetes

If breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day, lunch can often be the most hurried. A recent survey found that 62 percent of Americans rush through lunch at their desks, and even when we manage to leave the office, fast-food restaurants and food courts often prevail over more healthy options. But they don't have to be your only option — and, in fact, they shouldn't be your first choice if you have type 2 diabetes. In general, try to pack your own lunch whenever possible — the health benefits, not to mention the cost-savings, can be enormous. Short on prep time? Put these quick and nutritious lunch ideas on your menu to fill you up and keep your blood sugar in check. 1. Salads Salad should be in regular rotation for lunch. You can create a different salad every day of the week by varying your toppings. Try grilled chicken, shrimp, or fish, but avoid heaping on a lot of fattening ingredients, such as bacon bits and heavy cheeses. Salads with lots of raw vegetables are best, including carrots, cucumbers, radishes, celery, and spinach. Sprinkle nuts or seeds on top, add a few dried cranberries, and garnish with some avocado chunks to give it zip. Choose a salad dressing made with vinegar and olive oil to avoid added sugars found in fat-free and low-fat versions, and limit the serving to one tablespoon for a side salad and two tablespoons for an entrée-sized salad. 2. Sandwiches As with salads, there are many ways to spice up a sandwich. Start with whole-grain bread or a whole-wheat tortilla. Pick a lean meat, such as turkey, ham, or grilled chicken; layer on your choice of veggies; add mustard, low-fat mayonnaise, or hummus to the mix — and you have a filling and tasty lunch. Stay away from greasy chips, French fries, and other fattening sides. Instead choose fr Continue reading >>

Seven-day Type 2 Diabetes Meal Plan

Seven-day Type 2 Diabetes Meal Plan

Eating a diabetes-friendly diet can help keep your blood sugar levels under control. But it can be difficult to stick to a regular meal plan — unless you have a plan in place. Check out these 21 delicious, diabetes-friendly recipes to use for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Remember to stay within your carbohydrate allowance by noting the carb content and serving size of the recipes. Also, be sure to balance your meals with lean protein and healthy plant fats. Breakfast: Cream Cheese-Stuffed French Toast This may sound too decadent for breakfast, but paired with scrambled egg whites, it can fit into a diabetes-friendly meal plan. Whole grain toast will help ensure you get your daily fiber too. Lunch: Salmon Salad with White Beans Salmon is one of the best sources of omega-3 fatty acids, and is also a delicious topper to workday salad. Dinner: Cuban-Marinated Sirloin Kabobs with Grilled Asparagus Spice things up with this flavorful skewer. Dried herbs and spices are a great way to pack a punch of flavor without adding unnecessary calories and fat. Breakfast: Apple Pie Oatmeal with Greek Yogurt Who wouldn’t like a slice of pie for breakfast? This oatmeal will leave your kitchen smelling like the flavors of fall, and your stomach happy and satisfied. Add some extra plain Greek yogurt on top for more protein. Lunch: Turkey-Cranberry Wraps Turkey and cranberry sauce isn’t just for Thanksgiving! This is an easy grab-and-go lunch that even your kids will enjoy. Note: This recipe may not be appropriate for all people with type 2 diabetes, because it contains 60 grams of carbs per serving. You can adjust the amount of cranberry sauce to lower the carb count. Dinner: Cilantro-Lime Tilapia with Spinach and Tomatoes Take a trip to the tropics with this fast fish dish. Breakfast Continue reading >>

Dtd Super Meal Planning Reverses Type 2 Diabetes

Dtd Super Meal Planning Reverses Type 2 Diabetes

Author Sidebar: When I was diabetic, meal planning was not easy for me. It was a lot easier to just stop by McDonald's, KFC or Pizza Hut than it was to go to a grocery store and then have to go home and cook something. :-) But, after my recovery from the coma, I learned the critical importance of proper meal planning. If I had not learned this, I believe that I would still be diabetic and on medications today or possibly even dead. Proper meal planning is truly one of the key enablers for diabetics to eat healthy and be successful with controlling and reversing their Type 2 diabetes. So, why don't many diabetics (and non-diabetics for that matter) do a better job at meal planning and following a healthy diet? There are 10 major reasons why most people (including diabetics) don't do a better job at planning their meals and following a healthy diet: 1. Time/Convenience: Most people feel that they don't have the time to go grocery-shopping and prepare healthy meals every day for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Also, it's a lot more convenient to just stop by McDonald's or KFC on the way home from work or just call and order a pizza. 2. Motivation: Most of us are not motivated to eat healthy --- until one day we find ourselves diagnosed with a disease such as diabetes, or, we become severely overweight or obese; or, we have a wake-up call due to a heart attack or a diabetic coma (like I did). 3. Nutrient Absorption: We all metabolize and absorb food and its nutrients differently. A a result, our bodies react differently and respond differently to blood glucose control. 4. Cost: Some people tend to believe that it cost more to eat healthy foods. Nothing could be further from the truth! Especially if you take into account the amount of money that is saved from prescription drug Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet Plan: Guidelines, Tips & Sample Menu

Diabetes Diet Plan: Guidelines, Tips & Sample Menu

Living with type 2 diabetes is not an easy feat. Add to that the hype around ‘Clean Eating’ which can easily overwhelm any diabetic with all the restrictions it poses. It’s true that living well with diabetes type 2 starts with the right diet plan. However, it doesn’t have to be an everyday challenge to figure out what to eat to keep your blood sugar levels balanced. Let’s look at what should be a good diet plan for diabetics. The Basics Of A Good Diabetes Diet Plan A Mix of Nutritious & Natural Foods Let me simplify this. A good type 2 diabetes diet plan ensures that you get: Adequate amount of fiber-rich whole grains Fresh fruits and vegetables Organic lean cuts of organic meats, and A good amount of healthy fats from sources like fatty fish, avocados, coconut oil and grass-fed butter The basics of a diabetes diet plan are simple. Smoke out all hidden sugars from your diet, cut back on carbohydrates, add more fiber to your diet and choose the fats you eat wisely. Minimum Carbohydrates It’s imperative that you understand it’s not just sugars that are responsible for elevated blood sugar. All carbohydrates get broken down into sugars. For this reason, choosing the right source of carb is an essential part of your diabetes diet plan. Vegetables and fruits are the right sources of carbs for any diabetic. Refined carbohydrates with a high glycemic index are best avoided, as the body readily transforms them into simple sugars. When choosing grains, complex carbohydrates are better choices. Brown rice, quinoa, barley, steel-cut oats, whole-wheat breads, buckwheat, and millets are some examples of complex carbohydrates. Here at Sepalika, we highly recommend a LCHF or Low Carb-High Fat diet to reverse diabetes, coupled with intermittent fasting. Together, these h Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Foods You Eat

Diabetes And The Foods You Eat

The foods you eat are made of 3 basic nutrients: carbohydrates, fat, and protein. All of these nutrients provide calories (energy) that allow your body cells to function properly. Why do I need a meal plan? A balanced meal plan is important for everyone. If you have diabetes, eating properly balanced meals and snacks is even more important. Food is an important tool that you can use to control diabetes and stay healthy. Carbohydrate counting adds variety to your meals and still allows you to control your blood glucose. Ask a registered dietitian how carbohydrate counting can be incorporated into your lifestyle. Eating a balanced meal plan can help you: Control blood glucose (sugar) levels. Control blood pressure. Maintain a healthy weight or reduce your weight, if you are overweight. Prevent low blood glucose reactions. Reduce the risk of health problems caused by diabetes. How do I get a meal plan? To plan the amount of foods that you eat, you should meet with a registered dietitian who will help you develop a meal plan that is right for you. This plan will be based on your individual health goals. Do I have to count every bite? No. But you will need to be aware of what and how much you are eating and the right portions of foods. The number one goal of the meal plan is to control blood glucose levels with an even distribution of carbohydrates at meals and snacks. Here are some basic guidelines: Follow the meal plan set with your dietitian. Eat a variety of foods every day to get all the nutrients you need. Eat only the amount of food in your meal plan. Eat about the same amount of food each day. Be aware of portion sizes. Do not skip meals. Eat meals and snacks at regular times every day. Distribute meals 4 to 5 hours apart, with snacks in between. If you are taking a Continue reading >>

Fast Food Menu For Diabetics

Fast Food Menu For Diabetics

Fast food dining is a convenience that many take for granted. The menu has variety, although it is usually designed for the general population with hamburgers, chicken and other fried foods. If you are diabetic you also want convenient dining options, but you have to eat well-balanced meals and a low-fat diet to keep your blood sugar levels from becoming too low or high. Video of the Day Many hamburger restaurants offer different meal sizes with regular or large portions. Do not order the largest size because it has more carbs, calories, fat and salt. Instead, order the smallest meal and ask for mustard on the bun instead of mayonnaise, ketchup or other sauce. Do not order the double or triple hamburger patty. Remember that cheese adds extra calories and fat -- 100 calories per slice. Most chains let you pick a side order with your hamburger meal and drink. Skip the French fries and ask for a small salad with low-fat dressing. Drinks with sugar, including milkshakes and soda, can add unwanted calories and carbohydrates to the meal. Some restaurants even let you refill your drink from a dispenser. The best choice for a diabetic is diet soda, water or unsweetened tea. Fried chicken fast food restaurants offer chicken pieces, chicken nuggets, wraps, salads and sandwiches. There are also side dishes and desserts. Some restaurants have grilled chicken, which is the best choice for you, unless you have an appetite for fried chicken. Avoid overloading your plate with chicken pieces, especially if the restaurant sells it in a large bucket or a variety package. The drumstick is a good choice since it has fewer calories and carbs than the fried chicken breast. Also, save calories and fat by removing the crunchy fried skin from the chicken to make it healthier. Enjoy side dishes l Continue reading >>

Enjoy A Delicious, Balanced Diet For Diabetes Management With The Myfoodmyhealth Meal Planner And Diet For Diabetes

Enjoy A Delicious, Balanced Diet For Diabetes Management With The Myfoodmyhealth Meal Planner And Diet For Diabetes

What to Expect Congratulations! You're taking the first step on a new and exciting journey that uses food and diet to help address your health conditions. That means you'll be making some positive, but necessary changes to how and what you eat to improve your health. In your meal planner you'll no doubt see recipes and ingredients that may seem unfamiliar and new. That is the point and intentional. If you have serious health conditions, it is very likely that you should not keep doing - or eating - everything you did in the past in the same way. You will need to expand your culinary palette and learn to embrace the changes as you journey to better health. Get nutritional support for diabetes by following the MyFoodMyHealth diet for diabetes. Sign up for MyFoodMyHealth and for as little as $7.50 per month, you'll get: Unlimited access to 100's of delicious, healthy recipes for diabetes - most you can prepare in less than 30 minutes Personalized weekly meal planner tailored for diabetes, plus other health conditions, allergies and, food dislikes All recipes include a nutritional value table You can substitute and add additional recipes, such as side dishes, desserts and snacks PLUS... Time-saving weekly shopping lists, pantry basics, and online shopping resources. Expert information on food and nutrition for diabetes as well as other health conditions and allergies. Exclusive online access to cooking, nutrition and health tips, videos, articles, and more... Get Dietary Support for Diabetes with the Delicious MyFoodMyHealth Diabetes Diet For less than the cost of one cookbook you'll gain immediate access to our meal planner, diabetes diet recipes, shopping lists, and more... Sign up today for a subscription to MyFoodMyHealth or view a Free Demo of the MyFoodMyHealth meal p Continue reading >>

Your 5-week Diabetic Diet Meal Plan

Your 5-week Diabetic Diet Meal Plan

The Outsmart Diabetes Diet is based on new research that found four specific nutrients—fiber, vitamin D, omega-3s, and calcium—work together to help balance blood sugar and encourage weight loss. Build your daily diabetic diet meal plan by choosing one breakfast, one lunch and one dinner, plus two snacks—any combination gets you approximately 1,400 calories a day and a healthy dose of the "Fat-Fighting 4." Remember to eat about every 3 hours and practice portion control. Prevention Premium: What Every Woman Knows About Erectile Dysfunction Follow this mix and match diabetic diet meal plan—adapted from The Outsmart Diabetes Diet—for the next five weeks to help fight fat, maintain healthy blood sugar levels, boost energy, and reduce your diabetes risk. BREAKFAST Fruity bagel breakfast: Spread 1 Tbsp light cream cheese and 1 tsp 100% fruit spread on ½ of a whole grain bagel. Serve with 1 c fat-free milk. Crunchy yogurt: Combine 6 oz fat-free light yogurt, ¼ c granola cereal, 1 Tbsp ground flax seed, and 1 Tbsp chopped nuts. Add ground cinnamon and/or sugar substitute to taste. Eggs and English muffin: Scramble 1 egg in a pan coated with 1 tsp canola or olive oil; top with ¼ c chopped tomato, onion, and chile salsa. Serve with toasted 100% whole grain English muffin, spread with 2 Tbsp low-fat (1%) cottage cheese, and 1 c fat-free milk. Instead of scrambled eggs, try poaching an egg: Good Morning Blend: Stir together 6 ounces fat-free yogurt, 2 Tbsp dried mixed fruit, 2 Tbsp ground flax seed and 2 Tbsp chopped almonds, walnuts, or pecans. Nutty Oatmeal: Top ½ c cooked oatmeal with ¼ c walnuts or other nuts; add ground cinnamon and/or sugar substitute to taste. Serve with 1 c fat-free milk or calcium-enriched soy or rice beverage. Bagel and cream cheese: Sprea Continue reading >>

#1 Food For A Heart Healthy Diabetic Diet (plus 1-day Menu Sample)

#1 Food For A Heart Healthy Diabetic Diet (plus 1-day Menu Sample)

You can see that a few servings of green leafy veggies on your plate every day can provide you with enough potassium to begin improving your blood pressure. Vegetable Fibers Feed Gut Bacteria with Heart-Healthy Benefits You probably dont think about the bacteria in your intestines affecting your cardiovascular health, but there is a huge link between the two. Several studies have examined the relationship between gut microflora (the ratio of good bugs to bad bugs in your gastrointestinal tract) and the risk for cardiovascular disease. A review of multiple studies proposed that individuals who have a poor variety of gut bacteria are at higher risk for metabolic disease, obesity, high blood lipid levels, and low-grade systemic inflammation all of which increase your risk for cardiovascular problems. second review on gut health and cardiovascular risk determined that a disrupted gut microbiome likely increases a persons risk of developing or worsening high blood pressure and metabolic diseases. another study has linked lower fiber intakes to an increased risk of cardiovascular events like heart attack and stroke, which can be driven by inflammation and high blood pressure. Overall these studies conclude that having an unhealthy gut leads to systemic inflammation. You can't see this inflammation but it's occurring in your cells, thereby increasing your risk for cardiovascular issues. Eat ample amounts of dietary fiber from vegetables! Eating a variety of nutritious vegetables on a regular basis is a great way to feed those healthy gut bacteria and improve your heart health at the same time. Vegetables Provide Potent Anti-inflammatory and Antioxidant Powers A lot of brightly colored vegetables are rich in vitamins C, E, and a form of vitamin A called beta-carotene. These nu Continue reading >>

20 Tasty Diabetic-friendly Recipes

20 Tasty Diabetic-friendly Recipes

Indulge in these diabetic-friendly dishes Not all low-carb, low-sugar meals have to be tasteless. Check out this collection of recipes to find a dish perfect for every course. Applesauce Pancakes Trading butter for applesauce is a healthy way to cut out excess fat and still enjoy the sweetness of pancakes. Try this recipe: Applesauce Pancakes Continue reading >>

28 Popular Restaurant Dishes That Are Great For Diabetics

28 Popular Restaurant Dishes That Are Great For Diabetics

Dining out with diabetes Contrary to popular belief, a diabetes diagnosis doesn't mean you have to spend your days eating flavorless fare. It's completely possible to enjoy delicious food—even at a restaurant, as long as you know exactly what to order, how it's prepared, and what an appropriately sized portion looks like. Since not everyone with diabetes has the same meal plan or health goals, we set out to create the most comprehensive list of diabetes-friendly restaurant dishes, whether you're cutting calories or keeping salt, carbs, or fats to a minimum. Read on for nutritionist-approved orders from Chinese and Italian restaurants, delis, smoothie shops, and other popular eateries. Plus, don't forget to be on the lookout for these menu words to avoid. At American restaurants: Turkey burger with steamed broccoli When you're dining at your local sports bar or diner, Isabel Smith, MS, RD, CDN, says that a turkey burger is the way to go. "Remove the top bun, which doesn't typically contain much fiber and swap fries for a green veggie. This will add fiber to your meal and help slow blood sugar spikes and promote satiety," she explains. Here's how to get more fiber in your diet. At American restaurants: Beef burger with a salad If you prefer a beef burger, Smith suggests pairing one with a salad (sorry, no fries) and a vinegar-based dressing on the side. Ditch the top bun to keep empty carbs off your plate and say "no thanks" to cheese to keep excess salt and fat to a minimum. At American restaurants: Filet mignon Feeling fancy? Order a filet with a sweet potato and side of non-starchy vegetables such as spinach or broccoli, suggests Miriam Jacobson, RD, CDN. "Sometimes a steak can be the healthiest item on the menu. Just beware of portion sizes. It should be the size of Continue reading >>

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