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Diabetic Fingernail Care

Nail Fungus & Diabetes

Nail Fungus & Diabetes

A common problem in diabetic patients is nail fungus. A third of all diabetics are estimated to have nail fungus, or onychomycosis, compared with approximately 10 percent of the general population. Male diabetics are three times as likely as female diabetics to have the disease, and the risk increases with age. People with other diseases that suppress the immune system, for example psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease or AIDS, are also more prone to nail fungus. Although a mild nail fungus infection can be considered mainly a cosmetic problem for a fully healthy person, the consequences of leaving it untreated can be serious for a person with diabetes. Diabetics are more likely than nondiabetics to suffer severe complications from the disease, such as gangrene, diabetic foot ulcers and other foot disorders that could lead to limb amputation. Diabetics with nail fungus also have a higher risk of contracting secondary skin infections like cellulitis and paronychia. As a diabetic, you need to watch carefully for any symptoms of nail fungus and contact your doctor immediately if your nails start to become discolored, brittle or thicker than normal. Why is There a Connection Between Nail Fungus and Diabetes? If you have diabetes you are more likely to have poor blood circulation and impaired nerve function in your hands and feet. This means that your ability to feel pain is reduced and you may be more prone to trauma, which can damage the toenails and the skin around them. Even tiny cuts and injuries can allow fungi to invade the nail, especially if you are diabetic and already have a weak immune system. Injuries that are due to the fungal infection may also go unnoticed and can cause serious diabetic foot infections. For example, thickened nails, a common symptom of onycho Continue reading >>

Caregiving: Fingernail Care

Caregiving: Fingernail Care

Nail care is important for health and appearance. Your loved one can accidentally scratch himself or herself (or you) if his or her fingernails are too long. Nails that are dirty or too long-especially in a person who usually cared for his or her nails-also can be a sign that a loved one needs more help with personal care. Try to take the person for manicures if that is what your loved one wants. It's a chance to get out and see people and continue a favorite activity. You can do basic nail care at home. Usually all you need to do is keep the nails clean and at a safe length. Try to trim the person's nails every week. Or check them each week to see if they need to be trimmed. It's easiest to trim nails after the person has had a shower or has washed his or her hands. It makes the nails softer and easier to trim. Before you start, wash and dry your hands. You don't need to wear gloves. Use nail polish remover to take off any polish. Hold the person's hand steady with one hand while you trim the nails with your other hand. Using fingernail clippers, trim the nails straight across . The nail length can vary depending on the person's taste. But in general, keep the nails even with-or not much longer than-the tip of the finger. Let the nails dry if they are still damp and soft. Use an emery board to gently smooth the edges of the nails, especially at the corners. They may be sharp after the nail is cut straight. Apply nail polish, if the person wants it. Don't trim or cut the cuticles. A minor cut in a cuticle could lead to an infection. If you're helping the person wash his or her hands, wash the underside of the nails with soap and water. This is easiest with a nail brush. Nails tend to get harder with age, and the skin on the hands can become thin and dry. Offer the pers Continue reading >>

How To Carry Out Fingernail Care?

How To Carry Out Fingernail Care?

Nails are the storehouse of dirt and infections, so they must be trimmed down and cleaned at regular intervals. Due to illness, patients are not able to take care of their hands and toe nails. It is the duty of CNAs to help them cut their nails from time to time. Due to big nails, patients can unconsciously scratch their own skin which can result in serious infections. If a person is under anti-coagulation therapy then nail cutting may lead to heavy bleeding. Therefore, such patients must never be provided with nail care. If a patient is diabetic, then only doctors must provide nail care because a slight scratch may lead to ulcer over the skin. Steps to be Taken while Providing Nail Care to the Patient Step 1 Before coming close to the patient, rinse your hands properly with antiseptic soap and lukewarm water. Step 3 Greet the patient and explain him/her the nail care activity that you are going to perform. Step 4 Ensure that the patient is in a comfortable position. If the patient is not able to sit on a chair, allow them to lie on the bed and adjust the bed to a comfortable level. Step 5 In order to prevent the danger of falling, place a foot mat on the floor before shifting the patient on chair. In case of bedridden patients, put a sheet or towel on the table near him/her and place the nail care equipment on this table. Step 6 Fill the basin with soapy warm water. Ask the patients to check the temperature of the water themselves. If the patient is unconscious or frail, check the temperature on your own and keep it normal. Step 7 Immerse the fingers of the patient in the soapy water for a few minutes. Step 8 After some time, take out the fingers from the water and gently clean the nails with an orange stick. Put the stick on the nails edge and move it slowly from the Continue reading >>

Fingernail Care After Losing Your Sight

Fingernail Care After Losing Your Sight

Appearance matters, and the care and condition of your fingernails is especially important. Here are some tips and techniques for fingernail care for men and women. Clean your fingernails daily with a nail brush, soap, and water. Use lemon juice and a pumice stone to clean nicotine stains on your fingertips. Use lemon juice daily and pumice once a week. Always use hand lotion after cleaning your fingernails. Emery boards and metal files usually have a rougher and a finer side. The rough side is for quick removal of excess nail length and gross shaping. The finer side is for smoothing and fine shaping. Metal files also have a tip that can clean under the nail. One way to maintain a consistent fingernail length is through periodic (twice a week) filing. Sometimes it can be easier to hold the file stationary and move your finger back and forth instead. Manicure scissors usually have curved blades for more precise trimming. To trim nails, nail clippers may be easier for some individuals to use initially. Use an orange stick and cuticle remover cream. An orange stick is usually made from wood, has a pointed end for cleaning under the nail, and a flat end for cuticle care. Orange sticks are available in most drugstores. Scrub your cuticles and fingertips with a nail brush, soap, and water. Apply cuticle remover cream around the base of each nail. Push the cuticle back gently on each finger with the flat end of the orange stick or with the fingernail of the opposite hand. Leave the cuticle cream on for three minutes. Wash the cream off with a nail brush, soap, and water. Dry your hands and push the cuticle back gently once again, this time with a hand towel or face cloth. Please note: Never use nail clippers or scissors to clip your cuticles. Clippers or scissors can cause cu Continue reading >>

Cna Skill: Performing Nail Care

Cna Skill: Performing Nail Care

Patients who are unable to care for their own finger or toe nails will require your assistance in keeping nails clean and trimmed. If your patient is unconcious or medicated, they can easily scratch their own skin, which can lead to infection. Nail beds host a variety of microorganisms that can cause infection in your patient, and proper care will preven the spread of infection. If your patient is undergoing anticoagulation therapy, do not perfom nail care as the medication can cause increased bleeding. Patients who are diabetic should have nail care performed by a doctor because diabetes causes a decrease in the ability of tissue to repair itself. Even a very tiny cut on the foot can lead to an ulcer. Before you care for any patients nails, check with your facility to be sure that cutting nails is within the scope of duties for a nurses aide. You will need training to properly cut nails, but the following guidelines will always need to be followed: Before you begin nail care, wash your hands and put gloves on. Ensure equipment such as scissors or trimmers are clean and sterile to prevent passing on infection. As you cut each nail, ensure there are no sharp or jagged edges. Sharp edges can cause cuts to the patients skin, increasing the risk of infection transmission through breakage in the skin. Inspect the patients nail beds as you work to look for signs of inflamation or fungal growth. If you observe discoloration or signs of infection, report it to the nurse. Proper nail care can reduce the transmission of disease because the hands and feet are often exposed to many microorganisms which can grow quickly in the nail beds. This procedure will also help the patient to remain comfortable and allow you to look for signs of infection that can lead to complications. 2) Wa Continue reading >>

How Routine Nail Care Can Prevent Complications In Patients With Diabetes

How Routine Nail Care Can Prevent Complications In Patients With Diabetes

How Routine Nail Care Can Prevent Complications In Patients With Diabetes Christopher R. Hood, Jr., DPM, and Rhonda Cornell, DPM Poor or neglected feet often lead patients down the path of ulceration, infection and amputation.1 People with diabetes are at higher risk for these sequelae. Up to 25 percent of the diabetic population will have at least one foot ulceration during their lifetime with 85 percent of lower-limb amputations being preceded by an ulcer.2,3 The latest Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Diabetes Statistics Report (2014) reported 29.1 million people (9.3 percent) in the United States have diabetes.4 The cost of treatment of diabetes and its complications in the United States in 2007 was approximately $116 million with 33 percent of that amount going toward ulcer treatment.3 This number is likely to increase as the diabetic population continues to grow with current estimates suggesting that diabetes will affect 366 million people worldwide by 2030.1 The purpose of this article is to remind us, as podiatric physicians, of the often underappreciated and perhaps sometimes forgotten importance of routine diabetic foot care. Although nail pathology may not be the most glamorous aspect of podiatry, it is our bread and butter and we need to be experts in providing this service to our patients. There are several pathways to ulceration in patients with diabetic neuropathy, ranging from biomechanical issues causing calluses to stepping on a foreign body. One pathway toward ulceration that we may overlook is the dystrophic, mycotic and neglected toenail. Dystrophy in the toenail can be a manifestation of hereditary, congenital or acquired conditions. In the patient with diabetes, the origins of ulcers lie in microtrauma or changes in the v Continue reading >>

Nail Fungus Treatment For Diabetes

Nail Fungus Treatment For Diabetes

Diabetes: An Overview 8.5% of adults aged 18 years old and above are currently suffering from a common lifestyle-related disease that is diabetes. A chronic lifelong disease, diabetes occurs when the pancreas is unable to produce any or enough of the glucose-regulating hormone, insulin. The result of unregulated sugar levels in the body results to an array of complications including impaired nerve function, kidney damage, and eye problems. Currently, the World Health Organization (WHO) has ranked diabetes to be the 7th leading cause of death. Diabetes is known for its 2 types. Type 1 Diabetes (also called insulin-dependent, juvenile, or childhood-onset diabetes) is characterized by a complete deficiency in insulin and require daily administration of the hormone. This type usually manifests with children or young adults. Type 2 Diabetes, alternatively, results from the body’s ineffective use of insulin. Excessive intake of sugary foods, obesity, and physical inactivity are the leading contributors to this type of diabetes. Nail Fungus in Diabetics Diabetes, like any other chronic disease, comes with a myriad of complications. High blood sugar levels, when unmanaged, can lead to diabetic neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease. Diabetic neuropathy causes nerve damage, making a person lose the ability to sense pain or temperature. Peripheral vascular disease refers to compromised blood flow in the arms and legs, causing a weakened immune system. These two complications jointly contribute to problems in a diabetic patient’s extremities. A person with diabetes and experiencing both diabetic neuropathy and/or peripheral vascular disease may be unaware of sores or cuts in their feet, which in turn can lead to different kinds of infections. At present, at least 50% of th Continue reading >>

Nail Abnormalities: Symptoms, Causes, And Prevention

Nail Abnormalities: Symptoms, Causes, And Prevention

Healthy nails appear smooth and have consistent coloring. As you age, you may develop vertical ridges, or your nails may be a bit more brittle. This is harmless. Spots due to injury should grow out with the nail. Abnormalities such as spots, discoloration, and nail separation can result from injuries to the fingers and hands, viral warts ( periungual warts ), infections ( onychomycosis ), and some medications, such as those used for chemotherapy . Certain medical conditions can also change the appearance of your fingernails. However, these changes can be difficult to interpret. Your fingernails appearance alone isnt enough to diagnose a specific illness. A doctor will use this information, along with your other symptoms and a physical exam, to make a diagnosis. You should always consult your doctor if you have any questions about changes in your nails. Some changes in your nails are due to medical conditions that need attention. See your doctor if you have any of these symptoms: discoloration (dark streaks, white streaks, or changes in nail color) changes in nail shape (curling or clubbing) changes in nail thickness (thickening or thinning) These are just some of the signs of abnormal fingernails. Having any of these signs isnt proof of any medical condition. Youll need to visit your doctor to determine if your condition is serious. In many cases, proper care of your nails is enough to correct their appearance. You can prevent many nail abnormalities by taking good care of your nails. Follow these general guidelines to keep your nails healthy: Dont bite or tear at your nails, or pull on hangnails. Always use nails clippers and trim them after you bathe, when nails are still soft. Using sharp manicure scissors, trim your nails straight across, rounding the tips gently. Continue reading >>

Nailing Down Nail Infections

Nailing Down Nail Infections

The condition of your nails may point directly toward the condition of your health. If you are in good health, your fingernails and toenails tend to be smooth, somewhat curved and slightly pink. Abnormalities in the color, shape or condition of your nails, however, may indicate medical problems of varying severity. Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation recently commissioned a survey of 1,017 adults, conducted by Roper Starch Audits and Surveys Worldwide. The survey revealed that only 48 percent of Americans know that unexpected physical changes in their nails can signal a significant medical problem including infection, anemia andin extreme circumstanceseven cancer or kidney problems. Furthermore, of those who noticed unexpected changes in the appearance of their nails, a mere 40 percent had them examined by a physician. The fungal infection known as onychomycosis is the most common nail infection, accounting for approximately 50 percent of all nail problems. Onychomycosis results in thick, brittle nails that can be sharp and pointed, causing injury to the surrounding skin. An estimated 30 million individuals in the United States suffer from onychomycosis. According to the November 2000 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, onychomycosis is also the most common nail disorder among people with diabetes, representing about 30 percent of cutaneous fungal infections. One study published in the October 1998 issue of the British Journal of Dermatology, involving 550 people with diabetes, found that 26 percent of patients had onychomycosis and 46 percent had abnormalities in their nails. Individuals with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who have sensory neuropathy and impaired circulation of the lower extremities are at additional risk for onychomycosis. A pers Continue reading >>

Nail Care For People With Diabetes

Nail Care For People With Diabetes

You are here: Home PPC Landing Page Nail Care for People With Diabetes Diabetes nail care is a very important topic. Many people think that the painted nails are a decoration for our feet and hands. However, nails help protect our toes and fingers from injury. It is also important to note that the way your nails look also give a pretty good indication of your overall health. People who have diabetes often develop a condition called diabetic neuropathy. This is a condition that reduces the feelings in the toes and fingers. If you have diabetes, then you may not know that you have injured your foot until the infection has developed. That is why diabetics are at an increased risk for developing a number of foot problems, including circulation problems that reduce the amount of oxygen and blood that flows to the feet. Cuts, sores and cracks may seem like minor problems. However, these problems can eventually lead to ulcers, which can warrant the need for an amputation. Fortunately, there are a number of things that diabetics can do to take care of their feet. Below are some essential foot care tips for diabetics: You want to make sure that you go to your doctor to get your feet checked a couple of times per year. Your primary care doctor will most likely refer you to a podiatrist, a doctor who has been trained to address foot problems. Another Important Diabetic Nail Care Tip-Check Your Feet Daily You will need to examine your own feet on a daily basis. Sores, bunions, cracked skin, wounds and cuts are examples of things that you should check for when you look at your feet. You also want to make sure that you look out for swelling and redness because those are signs of inflammation. Furthermore, pay close attention to coolness or warmness. If your feet are warm, then that Continue reading >>

How To Perform Nail Care Of A Patient

How To Perform Nail Care Of A Patient

Providing nail care to a patient also lies under the duties of a certified nursing assistant. These kinds of care treatments are provided to patients, who are quite weak to perform such daily activities. There are many patients available in the hospices or nursing facilities, who are not physically capable enough to give care to their toe and finger nails. Therefore, it becomes a CNAs responsibility to check whether their nails required immediate care or not. When a patient is going under some treatment or is unconscious, then he/she sometimes starts scratching his/her own skin. This can bring in dangerous infections in the patients nails, which can reach anywhere in the various parts of the body. The nail beds of the patients carry various kinds of injurious germs. Hence, this is a nursing aides responsibility to keep it clean and trimmed on a regular basis. This prevents the infections from further spreading. On the other hand, if you are treating a person, who is under the anticoagulation therapy, then do not give him/her nail care, as this may cause excessive bleeding. Similarly, patients, who are suffering from diabetes, are also given nail care by a specialist or a doctor specifically. This is due to the fact that the body tissues of a patient suffering from diabetes gradually lose the ability to repair it naturally. As a result, a minor scratch on the fingers or foot can stimulate an ulcer. Thus, the accountability of performing nail care is not given to every CNA. In many of the medical facilities, this job duty is not assigned to the CNAs. Before conducting any such duty, you must check with the medical facility you are working. A CNA must have undergone a proper training and practices, before providing nail care to any patient. Make a habit of washing your ha Continue reading >>

5 Diabetic Nail Care Tips For Keeping Nails Healthy

5 Diabetic Nail Care Tips For Keeping Nails Healthy

5 Diabetic Nail Care Tips for Keeping Nails Healthy Diabetic nail care is crucial to avoid nail deterioration and fungal infections. Specialists offer diabetic nail care tips for people diagnosed with diabetes to maintain their nails healthy. It is vital for people with diabetes to learn how to take care of their nails. Nails are important to protect your fingers and toes from trauma and injury. Unfortunately, people diagnosed with diabetes have decreased sensibility in their toes and fingers. Therefore, it is crucial for them to have healthy nails. Your nails condition can indicate some health problems that you may experience. Healthy toenails and fingernails are supposed to be smooth, a little pink and slightly curved. If your nails do not have a healthy look, then this might indicate some health problems which should draw your attention. Diabetics tend to develop certain fungal infections known as onychomycosis. This type of infection is the reason why about 50% of all nail infections appear. Onychomycosis causes the growth of brittle, thick nails which can develop sharp points, hurting the skin around. Small cuts which appear on toes and finger can constitute the perfect environment for bacteria. Therefore, this causes fungal infection to appear. To avoid developing fungal infections, all diabetics should learn how to take care of their nails properly. If you leave a fungal infection untreated, this might develop into a gangrene or foot ulcers. Unfortunately, many diabetics lost part of a foot because of diabetic foot ulcers. In what follows, we will look at some useful tips regarding diabetic nail care. Diabetic nail care tips help you maintain the health of your fingernails and toenails. The best way to keep fungus away from your nails is to maintain good hygiene Continue reading >>

How To Cut Your Nails If You Are Diabetic

How To Cut Your Nails If You Are Diabetic

We know you have a lotto to worry about when you are a diabetic. With your strict diet, medication and exercise routine, it can be very easy to forget about your feet. Here are some steps you should use as a guide when cutting your toenails if you are a diabetic: Ensure you are not in a rush and have enough time to do this activity correctly. A rushed job may lead to cuts and bruises ( which you don't want) Start with a warm bath for your feet.( This will soften the nails) Check the temperature of the water first with your elbow. Diabetics generally have lower sensations in their feet and may not realise if the water is too hot. Soak your feet for a period of time. Ensure you don’t soak your feet for too long,certainly for not more than 5 minutes. Than you need to dry your feet thoroughly. Ensure that you dry the area between your toes. Cut your nails straight across. ( rather than up & down) Cut your nails straight across. Do not try to cut your nails too short. Also you must avoid cutting into the corners of your toenails. This will help you avoid getting ingrown toenails.( In which are very painful) If you do notice an ingrown toenail, go directly to your GP as it could lead to infections. In very mild cases, you can heal an ingrown toenail by soaking your feet in a warm bath and then placing some cotton under the nail. If you notice redness, pain or swelling, get medical help. Use a nail file to smooth your nails after. But be careful not to irritate the skin around the toenails while filing. It may cause blisters. (which may lead to further complications.) Once you are done with the cutting and filing your nails, check each toe individually . If you've managed to cut or bruise yourself, you may need yo visit your GP to ensure that the wound does not get infected. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Nail Care

Diabetic Nail Care

The best way to keep nails free from fungus is to have good hygiene. Keep the fingernails and toenails clean and make sure to dry the feet thoroughly before putting on socks and shoes. If using a public shower facility or at a public pool, always wear shoes or sandals. A person with diabetes should only wear comfortable fitting shoes that are not too tight. Diabetics should only wear synthetic socks that will wick moisture away from the skin of the feet. Do not use artificial nails. Artificial nails trap water under the nails and this moisture will promote fungus growth. Nail care tools should be kept very clean and sterilized with alcohol before each use. Diabetics should learn diabetic nail care to not only preserve the integrity of the nails, but to also be able to determine the presence of other underlying diseases. When caring for the nails, take note if they look unusually pale or white. Pale looking nails could indicate anemia. If the nails are shaped like the back of a spoon, this could indicate lung disease, cancer or an infection. If any changes in the nails are noticed, it is critical to let your doctor know right away. Diabetics will also find that nail care of the lower extremities will also help to improve their health and well-being. Because diabetics often suffer from peripheral vascular compromise it is easier for them to suffer from infections which can lead to drastic measures – including amputation. By caring for the feet and nails carefully diabetics can often find problems early before such drastic measures must be taken. Continue reading >>

Nails - Fingernail And Toenail Problems

Nails - Fingernail And Toenail Problems

Nails support and protect the sensitive tips of our fingers and toes. Common causes of nail problems include injury, infection and skin diseases such as eczema and psoriasis. Some conditions need professional treatment from a doctor or a dermatologist. People with diabetes or compromised immune systems have a higher risk of fungal nail infections. Toenail problems tend to be more common among older people. On this page: Nails support and protect the sensitive tips of our fingers and toes. Fingernails also help us to pick up objects, scratch an itch or untie a knot. Fingernails grow about three times faster than toenails. Nail problems affect people of all ages. Diet is generally not responsible for abnormal nail changes, unless the person is suffering from severe malnutrition. Some nail conditions need professional treatment from either a doctor or a dermatologist, while others respond to simple self-help techniques and minor lifestyle changes. When in doubt, seek medical advice. Toenail problems can affect people of all ages, but tend to be more common in older people. Common causes of fingernail problems include injury, infection and skin diseases such as eczema and psoriasis. Causes of toenail problems include trauma, ill-fitting shoes, poor circulation, poor nerve supply and infection. Problems with toenails can be successfully treated by a podiatrist. Structure of the nail Nails are made from a protein called keratin. This is the same protein that makes up skin and hair. Nails grow from cells that multiply within the base of the nail, then layer on top of each other and harden. This is called keratinisation. The strength, thickness and growth rate of nails are characteristics that we inherit from our parents. The structures of the nail include: Nail matrix – wher Continue reading >>

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