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Diabetic Eye Doctor Near Me

Types Of Eye Doctors

Types Of Eye Doctors

There are several different types of eye doctors, a fact that is sometimes confusing to both patients and other health care professionals alike. This diversity is, in my view, advantageous for patients because each kind of eye care provider has unique strengths which, when use in a spirit of professional cooperation, combine to give all patients better care than the separate parts could on their own. Here is brief description of the various kinds of eye doctors: Optometrist - Optometrists are, most often, the eye care equivalent of the "family doctor." They are trained and licensed to diagnose and treat disorders and diseases of the eyes and visual system through non-surgical means, including the use of prescription eye drops (and oral medications in most states), as well as to detect the ocular manifestations of systemic disease (for example, diabetes) and refer patients to other health care specialists for eye surgery and/or further medical evaluation. Optometrists perform the majority of routine eye examinations in the United States. Optometrists are not medical doctors (M.D. degree), but doctors of optometry (O.D. degree). Becoming an optometrist requires four years of pre-medical undergraduate education (identical to medical doctors) and then an additional four years of optometry school. Optometry school education consists of courses in geometric, physical and physiological optics, ocular anatomy and physiology, general anatomy and physiology, general and ocular pathology, general and ocular pharmacology, ocular manifestations of systemic disease, binocular vision, vision therapy, pediatric vision, geriatric vision, refraction, cosmetic and medical contact lens applications, and specialized electrodiagnostic testing. The final two of four years is spent seeing pati Continue reading >>

Annual Eye Exams Can Detect Diabetic Eye Disease

Annual Eye Exams Can Detect Diabetic Eye Disease

Having an eye exam each year is important for people with diabetes. Diabetes that is not well managed can lead to diabetic retinopathy and other eye-related problems. An annual eye exam can help detect diabetic eye diseases so they can be treated early. A description of diabetes Diabetes causes people to have too much sugar in their blood. This happens when people aren’t producing insulin in their bodies (Type 1) or when the body is resistant to insulin (Type 2). Insulin is a hormone that helps reduce sugar (also called glucose) in the blood stream. Too much glucose can lead to serious health issues, affecting the heart, kidneys and eyes. Diabetic eye diseases Diabetic retinopathy is a serious concern for people with diabetes and the number-one cause of vision loss. If a person’s blood sugar level is not in control and remains chronically high, blood vessels in the eye can be damaged and impair vision, potentially resulting in blindness. Another concern is diabetic macular edema, which can occur when high blood sugar causes fluid to seep into the retina. Get annual eye exams Doctors recommend that adults with diabetes get an annual dilated eye exam to check for micro-vascular issues that affect people with diabetes. The eye doctor checks the retina (back of the eye) for signs of retinopathy, as well as the macula (center of the retina) for diabetic macular edema. At an annual eye exam, the eye doctor will: Dilate your eyes to look at the retinas See if you need corrective lenses Check your eye pressure for signs of glaucoma Identify other concerns unrelated to diabetes, such as cataracts and dry eye Manage your diabetes To stay healthy, it is important to: Test your blood sugar regularly Take the medicines prescribed by your doctor to help manage your blood sugar Ea Continue reading >>

Diabetic Eye Care

Diabetic Eye Care

Several diseases affect the eye, either directly or as part of a system-wide problem. Often serious, these conditions require immediate professional Colorado eye care to preserve your vision. Thanks to modern advances in eye care knowledge and technologies, most eye conditions and diseases are treatable by a Vision Care Specialists’ eye doctor. “I have seen Dr. Ridder for many years and would never change doctors! He is so knowledgeable and uses the latest technology on my eyes. I am diabetic and he watches for any changes and shows me what every test means. The staff has always been very helpful with all questions during check-in and check-out and during the eye tests. ” — Monroe J., Highlands Ranch Location What is it? Diabetes can cause new blood vessel growth on the retina, which can then bleed and cause damage to our vision. This type of damage is called diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy affects a large percentage of individuals with long-standing diabetes. Having diabetes can also increase one’s risk of developing glaucoma and cataracts. Therefore, it is critical to be proactive and preventive by having diabetic eye care needs examined at the minimum of once a year by a Colorado eye care professional. Signs & Symptoms Often, there can be signs of these problems before you notice symptoms. The signs include vision becoming more dim, hazy, or blurry. You may also notice blind spots in your vision, new floaters in your vision or reduced peripheral vision. Treatments Control blood sugar levels, control blood pressure, and do not smoke. Prevention is the best way to limit diabetic complications in the eye. Regular visits for diabetic eye care; with a Colorado eye care professional is very important for your eye health. An eye care professional looks Continue reading >>

Diabetic Eye Disease

Diabetic Eye Disease

Home >> Conditions We Treat >> Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetic eye disease refers to a group of eye problems that people with diabetes may face as a complication of their disease. All forms of diabetic eye disease have the potential to cause severe vision loss and blindness. Additionally, because diabetic eye disease often goes unnoticed until vision loss occurs, people with diabetes should get a comprehensive dilated eye exam at least once a year as recommended by the American Diabetes Association, The Centers For Disease Control, Medicare and every major insurance company in the country. Even if patients are having their eyes checked by the primary care physician monitoring their diabetes, an annual dilated eye exam should be performed by an Ophthalmologist who treats patients with diabetes. Unlike Primary Care Physicians, Ophthalmologists have specialized equipment that can better assist them in a detailed evaluation of the entire eye. This is necessary to ensure the earliest possible diagnosis and treatment which will help to preserve the visual acuity of every patient with diabetes. Damage to the eye can occur before pain, vision blurring, or other symptoms. Early detection and treatment can reduce the risk of blindness by 95 percent. When caught early, excellent treatments for diabetic eye disease are available. If diabetic changes are found in the eye, it is likely changes are happening throughout the body where they are more difficult to detect. Controlling diabetes by taking medications as prescribed, staying physically active, and maintaining a healthy diet can prevent or delay vision loss. Early detection, timely treatment, and appropriate follow-up care of diabetic eye disease can protect against vision loss. Get the facts about Diabetic Eye Disease from the Continue reading >>

Diabetic Eye Care | San Antonio Eye Specialists

Diabetic Eye Care | San Antonio Eye Specialists

Diabetes Mellitus is a systemic disease that affects the small blood vessels of the body. Your primary care doctor may recommend a yearly eye examination. The eye is the only organ in the body where the small blood vessels can be seen directly by examination and without invasive testing. The status of the blood vessels of the eye may indicate the status of the blood vessels to the rest of the body. This information is important in the management of diabetes. The eye may also be affected by diabetes. Diabetes can cause bleeding and swelling of the retina (the receptive layer that lines the back of the eye). Diabetic eye disease needs careful attention, as serious cases may lead to significant vision loss and even complete blindness. Yearly dilated eye examinations have become a standard of care for diabetic patients. More frequent exams are needed for patients with existing diabetic eye disease. Early diagnosis is critical in management of diabetic eye disease. We use the Carl Zeiss Visucam pro fundus camera, with fluorescein angiography capability, to aid in the diagnosis and management of diabetic eye disease. We also employ the Cirrus OCT (Optical Coherence Tomography) which provides a higher level of diagnostic insight. Using near-infrared frequency light, it reveals a cross-sectional view of the retinal layers with very high resolution, thus detecting and localizing early lesions. Many patients with early diabetic eye disease may be able to stop or slow the progression of their condition with tight control of their blood sugar. Some patients may require laser retinal therapy or surgical intervention to stop the progression of advanced diabetic eye disease. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

What is diabetic retinopathy? Diabetic retinopathy is a very common eye disease associated with diabetes. Diabetic retinopathy is considered a leading cause of blindness in American adults. The sad thing about diabetic retinopathy leading the blindness charge is that in a majority of cases, blindness could have been completely preventable If you are diabetic you will need to work closely with the Carter Eye Center diabetic retina eye doctors to monitor and treat this disease. The use of medications and daily blood sugar monitoring can make a major impact on containing the worsening of diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic Retinopathy Symptoms - Treating Dallas Diabetic Retinopathy If you are a diabetic patient it is suggested by the RRC that you have regular eye exams to look for symptoms. Diabetic retinopathy does not really have any initial warning signs. Retinal swelling may cause blurred vision and distortion. Objects may look smaller or larger than normal. Floaters may appear due to the bleeding of the blood vessels. Diabetic retinopathy is an eye disease caused by complications of diabetes. After 10 or 15 years most diabetic people have signs of mild damage to the back of the eye that we call retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy is a common cause of vision loss but that vision loss can be minimized by early diagnosis and carefully designed treatments. Diabetes causes damage to the blood vessels that nourish the retina, the seeing part at the back of the eye. Damage to the retina caused when blood vessels: Expand and begin to leak Develop brush-like branches Break and cause bleeding Once the leaking blood damages or scars the retina, the image sent to the brain becomes blurry. Successful Treatment Dr. Carter can do several things to repair the ongoing damage, such as: Focus Continue reading >>

Diabetic Eye Disease

Diabetic Eye Disease

Wagner Macula & Retina Center Our Services Diabetic Eye Disease Dr. Alan Wagner and Dr. Kapil Kapoor at the Wagner Macula & Retina Center serve the residents of the Hampton Roads region of Virginia & North Carolina. The doctors are board-certified ophthalmologists who specialize in both diabetic eye disease and surgeries used to correct many eye disorders. Diabetic eye disease is any condition that affects the eye that is directly linked to diabetes. These conditions worsen as blood sugar levels in the body fluctuate. This places stress on various parts of the eye, such as the retina, the optic nerve and the blood vessels that are located within the eye and the surrounding tissues. Diabetic eye disease can result in blurred vision, cataracts, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and a host of other health conditions that may eventually lead to total blindness if the diabetes is not kept under control. The sooner the diabetes is treated and fluctuations in blood sugar are brought under control, the easier it is to treat any eye issues that become apparent. Diabetic eye disease may not be able to be completely prevented, but it can be controlled. As soon as a person is diagnosed with diabetes, his or her eye health should be closely monitored to ensure that the blood vessels in the retina and the surrounding tissues remain healthy and viable. If a person begins to have blurred vision or any other symptoms associated with certain types of eye disease, he or she should report them to their doctor immediately. Treating eye disease early is the best way to prevent vision loss. Regular eye examinations are an important tool in preventing blindness brought on by diabetic conditions. Laser surgery and the use of anti-inflammatory medications are the most common treatment options. Con Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

What You Should Know About Diabetic Retinopathy If you have been diagnosed with diabetes and are afraid of losing your vision, you are not alone. Diabetes has many facesit affects people of all ages, races, and nationalities. Of the almost 20 million people in the United States with diabetes, almost half of those will eventually develop some sort of diabetic eye disease. Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of new cases of legal blindness among working-age Americans. Typically, changes begin to take place in the retina after a patient has been living with diabetes for 10 to 15 years. Diabetes primarily affects the blood vessels in the retina, the light-sensing tissue at the back of the eye. These vessels work like tubes, bringing oxygen and other nutrients into and out of the eye. Damage to these vessels is called diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy develops gradually and painlessly. Although good control of your blood sugar and blood pressure can help prevent diabetic eye disease, significant problems can still occur. Regular dilated eye examinations are therefore the only way to diagnose problems early before vision loss occurs. Diabetic vision loss is often preventable with early detection and treatment. At the Eye Center of Texas, we specialize in all aspects of diabetic eye disease. The advanced diagnostic and treatment techniques we use often keep you seeing normally, allowing you to enjoy life to its fullest. Video of Dr. Suarez discussing Diabetic Retinopathy: Diabetes mellitus is a disease causing the blood sugar (glucose) to become elevated. There are two basic kinds of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is diagnosed early in life and requires insulin to bring the glucose level down to normal. Type 2 diabetes occurs later in life and can be controlled with Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy In Marietta

Diabetic Retinopathy In Marietta

There are two types of diabetic retinopathy: Nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) or background retinopathy NPDR is an early stage of diabetic retinopathy. Many people with diabetes have mild NPDR, which usually does not affect vision. However, there are two forms of NPDR that can cause vision loss: Macular edema: swelling of the macula, a small area in the center of the retina that allows us to see fine details clearly in the center of our vision. The swelling is caused by fluid leaking from retinal blood vessels. It is the most common cause of visual loss in diabetes. Vision loss may be mild to severe, but even in the worst cases peripheral vision continues to function. Macular ischemia: occurs when small blood vessels in the macula close. Central vision blurs because the macula no longer receives sufficient blood supply to work properly. PDR is present when abnormal new vessels (neovascularization) begin growing on the surface of the retina. PDR may cause more severe vision loss than NPDR because it can affect both central and peripheral vision. The new, abnormal blood vessels do not resupply the retina with normal blood flow. The new vessels can bleed and cause scar tissue which can adversely affect retinal function. Proliferative diabetic retinopathy causes visual loss in the following ways: Vitreous hemorrhage: The fragile new vessels may bleed into the vitreous, a clear, gel-like substance that fills the center of the eye. If the vitreous hemorrhage is small, a person might see only a few new dark floaters. A very large vitreous hemorrhage might block out all vision. It may take days, months or even years to resorb the blood, depending on the amount of blood present. Traction retinal detachment: When PDR is present, scar tissue associated with neovascula Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Diabetes And Eye Exams

What You Should Know About Diabetes And Eye Exams

Overview Diabetes is a disease that profoundly affects many areas of your body, including your eyes. It increases your risk for eye conditions, such as glaucoma and cataracts. The primary concern for eye health in people with diabetes is the development of diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy is a condition that develops when the blood vessels in your retina become damaged. The retina is the light-sensitive portion of the back of your eye. As the damage worsens, you may begin losing your vision. Your eyesight may become blurry, less intense, and begin to disappear. This condition can affect people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The longer you live with diabetes, the more likely you are to develop complications like diabetic retinopathy. This is why adopting lifestyle changes and learning to manage diabetes is so important. In its earliest stages, diabetic retinopathy may cause no symptoms. The initial symptoms may be barely noticeable or mild. Over time, the condition can worsen and lead to partial and then complete blindness. You should see your doctor if you experience any of these symptoms: floaters, or dots and dark strings, in your field of vision dark or empty areas in your field of vision blurry vision difficulty focusing vision changes that seem to fluctuate altered color vision partial or total vision loss Diabetic retinopathy most often affects both eyes at the same time and in equal measure. If you’re experiencing issues with only one eye, it doesn’t mean you don’t have diabetic retinopathy. However, it might indicate another eye issue. Make an appointment to see your doctor to find an appropriate treatment plan. The buildup of excess sugar in your blood can lead to a number of health issues. In your eyes, too much glucose can damage the tiny ves Continue reading >>

Eye Exams For Diabetic Retinopathy

Eye Exams For Diabetic Retinopathy

About Eye Exams and Diabetic Retinopathy By working together with patients and their primary care physicians, the eye doctors at Baltimore Washington Eye Center can help to slow or even prevent vision loss from diabetic eye problems and diabetic retinopathy. While there is no cure for diabetic retinopathy, annual dilated eye exams for patients with diabetes are essential for early detection, diagnosis and treatment of diabetic retinopathy. Recent data from the Centers for Disease Control shows that diabetes affects approximately 26 million people in the United States with almost 8 million people ages 40 and older suffering from diabetic retinopathy and that diabetes is now the leading cause of new blindness in adults 20-74 years of age. Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes characterized by a weakening of blood vessels in the retina so that they leak, causing the retina to swell, bleed, and become deprived of oxygen and nutrients, ultimately leading to vision loss. It is well documented that tight blood sugar control delays the onset and slows the progression of diabetic retinopathy. It is also important for patients with diabetes to help reduce their risk of developing diabetic eye disease by not smoking, lowering their cholesterol and lipid profile, and controlling blood pressure, as well as working to eat a heart-healthy diet rich in fish, fruit and green leafy vegetables, and exercising. With early diagnosis and treatment, progression of diabetic eye disease and its associated vision loss can at a minimum be slowed, and in many cases vision loss from diabetic retinopathy can be prevented. About Diabetic Retinopathy Diabetic Retinopathy occurs and progresses in stages. The earliest stage of diabetic retinopathy is called Mild Nonproliferative Retinopathy Continue reading >>

Diabetic Eye Care - St. Paul, Eagan, Maplewood, Roseville, Stillwater, Woodbury, Mn And Osceola, Grantsburg, Wi

Diabetic Eye Care - St. Paul, Eagan, Maplewood, Roseville, Stillwater, Woodbury, Mn And Osceola, Grantsburg, Wi

Diabetics may develop an eye condition called diabetic retinopathy . This damages small blood vessels in the retina, the part of the eye that captures images and sends the information to your brain. Diabetic retinopathy can reduce vision or even cause blindness. By keeping blood sugar and blood pressure levels near normal, diabetics can slow the progress of retinopathy and help prevent their own vision loss. Diabetic retinopathy is progressive. It begins when the tiny blood vessels in the eye weaken. The blood vessels later develop small bulges that may burst and leak into the retina and the natural fluid inside the eye known as vitreous gel. New weak blood vessels grow on the retinal surface and may break easily and bleed into the eye. This is called proliferative retinopathy. The bleeding can cloud your vision and cause scar tissue to form. This can cause swelling or force the retina to detach from the eye wall. Most often, there are no early symptoms of diabetic retinopathy. Unfortunately, most people do not notice symptoms until significant damage has occurred and complications have developed. If the disease is allowed to progress without treatment, permanent retinal damage can develop, leading to severe vision loss or even blindness. Thats why St. Paul Eye Clinic strongly recommends regular exams to identify diabetic retinopathy in its earliest stages and help prevent vision loss. Regular checkups can detect retinopathy before it does severe damage to vision. The American Diabetes Association recommends that screening begin at age 10 or within three to five years after the diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes, immediately after diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes, and during the first three months of pregnancy for a woman who has diabetes. St. Paul Eye Clinic recommends an eye e Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy - Exams And Tests

Diabetic Retinopathy - Exams And Tests

Diabetic retinopathy can be detected during a dilated eye exam by an ophthalmologist or optometrist. An exam by your primary doctor, during which your eyes are not dilated, is not an adequate substitute for a full exam done by an ophthalmologist. Eye exams for people with diabetes can include: Visual acuity testing. Visual acuity testing measures the eye's ability to focus and to see details at near and far distances. It can help detect vision loss and other problems. Ophthalmoscopy and slit lamp exam. These tests allow your doctor to see the back of the eye and other structures within the eye. They may be used to detect clouding of the lens (cataract), changes in the retina, and other problems. Gonioscopy. Gonioscopy is used to find out whether the area where fluid drains out of your eye (called the drainage angle) is open or closed. This test is done if your doctor thinks you may have glaucoma, a group of eye diseases that can cause blindness by damaging the optic nerve. Tonometry. This test measures the pressure inside the eye, which is called intraocular pressure (IOP). It is used to help detect glaucoma. Diabetes can increase your risk of glaucoma. Your doctor may also do a test called an optical coherence tomography (OCT) to check for fluid in your retina. Sometimes a fluorescein angiogram is done to check for and locate leaking blood vessels in the retina, especially if you have symptoms, such as blurred or distorted vision, that suggest damage to or swelling of the retina. Fundus photography can track changes in the eye over time in people who have diabetic retinopathy and especially in those who have been treated for it. Fundus photography produces accurate pictures of the back of the eye (the fundus). An eye doctor can compare photographs taken at different ti Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is the most common eye disease that people with diabetes suffer from. With highly trained and experienced ophthalmologists , Eye Clinic of Austin takes the time to diagnose the disease properly and understands the best ways to treat it. Diabetic retinopathy is a disease caused by the deterioration of the blood vessels nourishing the retina. These vessels weaken, leak fluid, and fail to provide the nutrients necessary for a healthy retina. The disease diabetes is the cause of diabetic retinopathy. Approximately 25% of diabetics have some form of the disease, but only a small percentage of those who develop diabetic retinopathy have serious vision problems; an even smaller percentage go blind. The longer a person has diabetes, and the worse the diabetic control, the greater the chance of developing diabetic retinopathy or any other complication of this disease. Everyone with diabetes should have a dilated eye exam every year to detect the disease. Diabetic retinopathy typically affects both eyes, and many patients do not notice any change in vision in early stages of the disease. However, over time the disease worsens and can cause vision loss. When patients notice symptoms of diabetic retinopathy, they typically experience blurred vision or distortion, objects looking smaller or larger than normal, and floaters may appear. The most important treatment is prevention by maintaining excellent diabetic control.Treatment of diabetic retinopathy depends on the location of the disease and the degree of damage to the retina. If retinopathy occurs only in the peripheral retina, careful monitoring of the disease may be all that is necessary. When retinopathy affects the central vision, laser treatment or injections of special medications inside the eye are us Continue reading >>

Diabetes Eye Exams

Diabetes Eye Exams

Diabetes can harm your eyes. It can damage the small blood vessels in your retina, or the back of your eye. This condition is called diabetic retinopathy. Diabetes also increases your risk of glaucoma and other eye problems. You may not know your eyes are harmed until the problem is very bad. Your doctor can catch problems early if you get regular eye exams. This is very important. The early stages of diabetic retinopathy don't cause changes in vision and you won't have symptoms. Only an eye exam can detect the problem, so that steps can be taken to prevent the retinopathy from getting worse. Even if the doctor who takes care of your diabetes checks your eyes, you need an eye exam every 1 to 2 years by an eye doctor who takes care of people with diabetes. An eye doctor has equipment that can check the back of your eye much better than your regular doctor can. If you have eye problems because of diabetes, you will probably see your eye doctor more often. You may need special treatment to prevent your eye problems from getting worse. You may see two different types of eye doctors: An ophthalmologist is a medical doctor who is an eye specialist trained to diagnose and treat eye problems. An optometrist is a health care provider trained to diagnose and treat problems with your vision. Many can do screening exams for damage from diabetes. Once you have eye disease caused by diabetes, you need to see an ophthalmologist. The doctor will check your vision using a chart of random letters of different sizes. This is called the Snellen chart. You will then be given eye drops to widen (dilate) the pupils of your eyes so that the doctor can better see the back of the eye. You may feel stinging when the drops are first placed. You may have a metallic taste in your mouth. To see the b Continue reading >>

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