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Diabetic Drunkenness

Diabetes Symptoms To Never Ignore

Diabetes Symptoms To Never Ignore

One of the keys to leading a healthy life with diabetes is to keep your glucose levels, or blood sugar, in check. As your main source of energy, glucose plays a big role in keeping your body working like it should. If you have either type of diabetes, you need to be aware of symptoms that may mean your glucose is out of balance. If your blood sugar is too low: Symptom: Acting Drunk or Losing Consciousness Your brain can be affected if your sugar level drops too low. Low glucose can cause you to stagger, slur words, or even pass out. What to do: It's smart to wear a medical bracelet or necklace that lets people know you have diabetes. If your blood sugar gets too low, taking in about 15 to 20 grams of a simple carb may help. Some examples are a half a cup of orange juice, 2 tablespoons of raisins, or a tablespoon of sugar. Glucose tablets and gel tubes are also available. Some people keep an injectable hormone called glucagon on hand and tell their friends how to give them the shot in case they faint or can’t swallow. Ask your doctor if keeping glucagon on hand is right for you. If you can, check your fingerstick 15 minutes after 15 grams of sugar. If you are still low (less than 70 or less than 100 with symptoms), eat another round of carbs. When your blood sugar returns to your target range, eat a meal or snack to prevent if from dropping again. If you've gone 3 rounds and your sugar is still low, or your symptoms persist, call 911. Always let your doctor know if you've had an episode of low blood sugar. Your treatment plan may have to be adjusted. If Your Blood Sugar Is Too High: High blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, usually causes its damage slowly over time. But there are some instances when more urgent care is needed. If you have any of the following symptoms, chec Continue reading >>

Drunk Versus Diabetes: How Can You Tell?

Drunk Versus Diabetes: How Can You Tell?

Dispatch calls your EMS unit to the side of a roadway, where police officers have detained a driver on suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol intoxication. You find the female driver handcuffed in the back seat of a police cruiser. She is screaming profanities and hitting her head against the side window. An officer tells you that she was weaving in and out of traffic at highway speed, and it took several minutes to pull her over. She was noncooperative and it took several officers to subdue her. She sustained a laceration to her head, which the officers want you to evaluate. The woman continues to swear at you as you open the car door. You note that she is diaphoretic and breathing heavily. You can smell what appears to be the sour, boozy smell of alcohol, even though you are not close to her. You can see that the small laceration near the hairline on her right forehead has already stopped bleeding. Her speech is slurred and she appears to be in no mood to be evaluated. The police officers are ready to take her down to the station to be processed for driving under the influence. Sound familiar? It should — this is a scene that is played out often in EMS systems. While it may seem initially that these incidents are not medical in nature, they really deserve close attention by the EMS personnel. In this article we will focus on the challenges of evaluating a patient who is intoxicated versus a patient who is experiencing an acute diabetic emergency. There have been numerous instances where EMS providers have exposed themselves to serious liability secondary to medical negligence. Let's take a closer look. Diabetes Diabetes is a serious disease that affects nearly 29 million people in the United States [1]. Advances in diabetic care have resulted in an impr Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia And

Hypoglycemia And "insulin Shock"

Significantly, the most common problem diabetics experience today is not "high blood sugar" but "low blood sugar!" Diabetes medications are powerful but imprecise, and today's blood glucose testing cannot always guarantee you'll stay out of "too low." The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, completed in 1993, proved that the major diabetes complications: retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, and diabetic heart disease, all follow elevated blood glucose. Diabetics who keep their numbers down cut the risk of complications. But in the rush to cut blood glucose, and keep it down, sometimes we fall too far. Why is immaterial: missed meals, improper medication dosage, departure from scheduling, abnormal exercise, consumption of alcohol, stress, or even "no reason in particular." Sometimes the numbers just drop too far. What happens next? A person going into a "low" can appear to be drunk. They can sweat, talk confused, become disoriented, stumble, lose their bearings, become aggressive, even "feisty," sometimes obscene, or pass out... But they're NOT drunk— and it is no fun they're having. The brain isn't getting the nourishment it needs, and the person can't function. Depending on severity, and depending on the individual, the person can be light-headed, unconscious, comatose... or dead. A hypoglycemic event is an emergency, and intervention is necessary. When You're Low: You have two lines of defense. One is your schedule. Know what your body needs, and keep to it! Take your medications on time, eat the right amount on time, and get the appropriate exercise—on time. The second line is your blood glucose monitor. The more you test, the better idea you have about where your sugars are. If your numbers are dropping dangerously, your monitor will reveal it. This means Continue reading >>

It Mimics Being Drunk

It Mimics Being Drunk

Paul Clark seems to be unaware of a condition affecting many diabetics (usually those who have had the disease for a number of years and who strive for tight control of their blood-sugar levels) called hypoglycemic unawareness {"Responsible Behavior for Diabetics," letters, July 8}. This causes the person with diabetes to have no physical symptoms of impending low blood-sugar reactions. For this reason, diabetics are urged to carry with them at all times not just the fast-acting carbohydrates Mr. Clark mentions, but also glucagon, a hormone that can be injected into an unconscious patient by family, friends or emergency workers in the case of a severe hypoglycemic reaction, as well as medical identification, so that their condition will not be mistaken for drunkenness. Many ID cards say: "I am not drunk -- I am suffering from a diabetic reaction." An insulin-dependent diabetic is forced to use his or her brain as a substitute for a non-functioning pancreas. If one considers the challenges of trying to balance insulin injections (most diabetics now take these four or more times a day to more closely mimic the action of a functioning pancreas), food eaten and exercise levels when these bodily functions are normally automatic, the difficulties the diabetic faces becomes understandable. Mr. Clark says that any diabetic who drives or has a job that endangers others should be responsible enough to carry a supply of sugar. It is for just this reason that insulin-dependent diabetics are barred from being pilots, bus drivers and other such occupations. Because the motorist Mr. Clark cites had just eaten dinner, had not consumed any alcohol (which can lower blood sugar levels) and was carrying proper medical identification, I am sure that he believed he could drive safely {"Motor Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Makes Me Act Drunk.

Hypoglycemia Makes Me Act Drunk.

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Is feeling and acting drunk a normal symptom of hypoglycemia? (Goofy, gitty, laughing, slurred speech, blabbling, rambling, hyperactivity, feelings of invincibility and aggression) Sometimes I feel that way when my blood glucose levels are in the 50's and 60's. I felt that way when I started writing this post. I feel this way right now. I hope this post makes sense because I feel that it does not. I find i'm much more quick-tempered and nervous when my blood sugar goes lower that what i'm accustomed to. Sometimes i'm not aware of it, but hubs will on occasion say "check your blood sugar, you're getting gripy," or "somebody needs to eat!." Usually I don't appreciate the remark, but a quick check lets me know he's usually right. Is feeling and acting drunk a normal symptom of hypoglycemia? (Goofy, gitty, laughing, slurred speech, blabbling, rambling, hyperactivity, feelings of invincibility and aggression) Sometimes I feel that way when my blood glucose levels are in the 50's and 60's. I felt that way when I started writing this post. I feel this way right now. I hope this post makes sense because I feel that it does not. Yup, only I don't get quite that way until I'm in the low 30s/20s range. The inability to focus though and lose myself halfway thru a sentence and zone out, that's the biggest indicator for my hubby now that I'm low (as opposed to me being kinda sweaty or extra tired since those aren't real indicators anymore). Also know that your symptoms can change with time. When you feel 'off' test, don't guess. Fawn, my meter reading was 65. I feel better now after I ate. Before I felt li Continue reading >>

And Diabetes

And Diabetes

Diabetes is a common, life-long condition that occurs when the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin, or the insulin it does produce doesn’t work properly. Insulin is a hormone that transfers glucose from the bloodstream into the cells to be used for energy. If you have diabetes, your body cannot make proper use of this glucose so it builds up in the blood instead of moving into your cells. The chances of developing diabetes may depend on a mix of your genes and your lifestyle. Drinking to excess, for example, can contribute to individuals becoming diabetic. Diabetes is a manageable condition. But when it’s not well managed, it is associated with serious health complications including heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease, nerve damage and amputations2. There are two main types of diabetes3 Type 1 diabetes develops if the body can’t produce enough insulin, because insulin-producing cells in the pancreas have been destroyed. It can happen: Because of genetic factors When a virus or infection triggers an autoimmune response (where the body starts attacking itself). People who have this type of diabetes are usually diagnosed before they’re 40 and there’s currently no way to prevent it. It’s the least common type of diabetes – only 10% of all cases are type 14. Type 2 diabetes. Develops when the body can still make some insulin, but not enough, or when the body becomes resistant to insulin. It can happen: When people are overweight and inactive. People who are an ‘apple-shape’ (with lots of fat around the abdomen) have a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes Because of genetic factors. People who have this type of diabetes are usually diagnosed when they’re over 40, and it’s more common in men. However, more overweight children and Continue reading >>

Officer, I’m Not Drunk: Diseases And Illnesses That Mimic Intoxication

Officer, I’m Not Drunk: Diseases And Illnesses That Mimic Intoxication

It’s not fair. There are times when you feel a little “off,” but you haven’t had anything to drink. What could it be? People don’t believe you when you say you’re not drunk, but it’s the truth. Fortunately, you’re not crazy. There are very specific illnesses that can mimic intoxication. Get to the doctor immediately to get tested and to rule out other possibilities: Diabetes Diabetes is a condition in which you have trouble controlling your blood sugar. A person who has diabetes may look fine, but may also not look fine. In fact, when blood sugar drops, the person may feel very different – may even feel drunk or slightly intoxicated. The signs and symptoms range from mild to severe. Takakjian & Sitkoff, LLP, LA criminal defense lawyers, can help you if you’ve been accused of driving while intoxicated even when you weren’t. If you have diabetes, you may not be guilty of any crime, even if you were swerving on the road. Generally, the warning signs include: A smell of acetone on your breath Fruity body odor, which some police mistake as a mixed drink Dizziness and trouble keeping balance Altered state of consciousness Disorientation, especially concerning time or place Epilepsy Epilepsy and related seizures occur without warning and are pretty scary. But, they, in and of themselves, are not life-threatening. It happens because of an abnormal electrical activity in the brain. A seizure can be either partial or generalized. It will usually be accompanied by these symptoms: Unresponsiveness to words or environment Traumatic Brain Injury A brain injury is accompanied by symptoms correlating with the part of the brain that was injured. For example: Brain injuries occur during moments of stress or during physical activities. For example, if you play sports Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia, Diabetes, And Blood Alcohol Tests

Hypoglycemia, Diabetes, And Blood Alcohol Tests

It has been found that diabetes and hypoglycemia can be related to accidents and errors on today's road. Even more common, are unjustified DWI and DUI arrests concerning patterns normally associated with a drunk driver. In a healthy individual, blood glucose (blood sugar) will be from 70 to 120 mg/dl. When blood glucose rises above 120 mg/dl and there is no insulin present, diabetes occurs. Insulin is a hormone controlled by your pancreas that is required to digest and keep a blood sugar balance. If blood glucose decreases to 60 mg/dl or lower, hypoglycemia will occur. Four different forms of diabetes exist, each with its own treatment. The first, Type 1, is typically diagnosed in children with juvenile onset diabetes. Although less common, it is possible for adults to be diagnosed (refer to www.diabetes.org). With Type 1, insulin must be injected into the body because the pancreas fails to produce any insulin at all; leaving it to be the most dangerous of the four types. With Type 2 diabetes, the body can create insulin, but not enough. The body is also resistant to the insulin and does not make use of it in the right way. For Type 2, the treatments include a new diet, exercise, and, on occasion, insulin tablets. Gestational Diabetes and Pre-diabetes are the last of the four types. Gestational Diabetes is most commonly temporary, and is diagnosed during pregnancy. Pre-diabetes occurs when the blood sugar is higher than usual, but still not at the level of Type 2 diabetes. The reason this is all very pertinent is because the symptoms caused by diabetes or hypoglycemia can all too easily be confused with an intoxicated individual. And, while these symptoms are typically seen in a diabetic or hypoglycemic, they can also be seen in a non-diabetic individual. If a person is Continue reading >>

A Diabetic's Crusade Pays Off : Woman's Arrest For Drunk Driving Spurs Lapd Plan

A Diabetic's Crusade Pays Off : Woman's Arrest For Drunk Driving Spurs Lapd Plan

A Diabetic's Crusade Pays Off : Woman's Arrest for Drunk Driving Spurs LAPD Plan April 28, 1987 |GARRY ABRAMS | Times Staff Writer First her doctor told her she had a tumor. Obviously, this is a pretty good recipe for depression. But for Herst, a diabetic for more than 20 years, the arrest was a turning point, not a bitter nightcap to a day of horrors. After she was released, the 50-year-old, socially well-connected and financially independent Herst began a more than year-long effort that changed the way the Los Angeles Police Department treats some drunk-driving suspects. Because of her initiative, police department spokesmen say, officers have been taught to recognize that some symptoms of diabetes, including sweating and shaking, mimic the effects of alcohol. More importantly, in Herst's opinion, policemen have been told--through the three-minute training film that she was instrumental in having made--that medical treatment for diabetics, drunk or not, should take precedence over police business. Some police officers also are carrying wallet-sized cards describing symptoms of diabetic attacks that Herst had printed. For Herst and the Los Angeles chapter of the American Diabetes Assn., both the training tape and the cards are important because about 11 million people in this country, or nearly 1 in 20, suffer from diabetes and some are inevitably going to find themselves in police custody. (The disease is caused by the body's failure to use or produce insulin, a hormone that controls the metabolism of blood sugar. It is the third leading cause of death in this country and is responsible for 25% of all kidney failure and 15% of all blindness.) Among other things, the police tape warns that some symptoms of diabetes "can falsely give the person the appearance of drunke Continue reading >>

“i Think She’s Drunk.” I Wasn’t, I Was In Severe Hypoglycemia

“i Think She’s Drunk.” I Wasn’t, I Was In Severe Hypoglycemia

It was 10 PM and I was weaving on the boardwalk. “Are you okay? Are you okay,” my acquaintance Susan asked several times. I couldn’t respond. My brain wasn’t working. Like a firefly it was flitting on, off, on, off, refusing to hold its light. I was still looking at google maps on my phone. I’d been leading us back from a fireworks display in a neighboring seaside town to our mutual friend Carol’s house. We’d been walking twenty-five minutes and I knew we were practically there. Yet even after having done this walk three times earlier that day nothing looked familiar. The street names on my phone no longer made any sense. I had enough mindshare to register that Susan was frightened. But not enough to explain anything. Then I heard her talking on her phone and almost instantly out of the darkness Carol stood before us. We’d been only 100 meters from her house. She said to Susan, “It’s her blood sugar.” I remember little except walking into the house and then bouncing my way to the back bedroom to check my blood sugar. Carol followed me with a cookie in her outstretched hand. “Wait,” I said, “Let me check.” Sure enough, 32 mg/dl. “No, not a cookie,” I said, “These” as I took out three glucose tablets and began chewing. Within minutes I got a text from Livongo, my glucose meter company. “You’re low. Can you manage your low blood sugar?” “Yes” I wrote back. Another text came, “After you treat it, make sure to check again in 15 minutes. Keep me posted.” As you’ve surmised, I came through my episode of severe hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). It took: two friends, my meter, four strips, my Livongo coach, three glucose tablets, a second slice of rhubarb pie with ice cream, half a banana, and the warmth and safety of the other Continue reading >>

Drinking And Diabetes: Seven Facts To Know

Drinking And Diabetes: Seven Facts To Know

April is a time for showers, taxes, and the Boston Marathon. It’s also Alcohol Awareness Month. Given this, I thought it would be appropriate to review a few facts about alcohol and how people with diabetes may be affected by its use. 1. Alcohol is not carbohydrate, protein, or fat. Most of us know that calories come from the three main nutrients (called macronutrients) in the food that we eat: carbohydrate (carb), protein, and fat. Carb and protein contain 4 calories per gram, while fat contains 9 calories per gram. These nutrients are also called essential nutrients because we must take them in from food and they serve vital roles in the body. So where does alcohol fall into the mix? Alcohol isn’t an essential nutrient, nor, as I’ve mentioned, is it classified as carb, protein, or fat. But it does contain calories — 7 calories per gram, to be exact. If you’re watching your weight, you need to keep an eye on how much alcohol you drink. Additionally, alcohol contains little, if any, vitamins and minerals, unlike carb, protein, and fat foods. Technically, alcohol is considered to be a drug, as it can have potentially harmful effects. 2. Alcohol is metabolized, or processed, by the liver. If you drink alcohol, your body kicks into gear to metabolize it because, unlike carb, protein, and fat, the body has no way to store alcohol. Once the alcohol hits your stomach, about 20% of it is absorbed into the bloodstream, and the rest enters your intestines where it’s digested. A small amount is excreted through the urine, sweat, skin, and your breath. The liver is a key organ for alcohol metabolism; it detoxifies alcohol through a process called oxidation, oxidizing alcohol at a rate of about 1/4 to 1/3 of an ounce per hour. 3. Alcohol can lower blood sugar levels. Yo Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Alcohol

Diabetes And Alcohol

Tweet There is no need for people with diabetes to give up alcohol simply because of their diabetes. Although alcohol does have an effect on blood sugar levels, with a few precautions and careful management, people with diabetes can also enjoy a drink. There are also alcohol substitutes for those who abstain. In fact, diabetes alcohol guidelines are the same as for the general population. Read about alcohol's effect on blood sugar What are the recommended alcohol guidelines for people with diabetes? The guidelines are two units for women and three units for men. However, it is worth being aware how many units a drink contains. In some cases, a glass of wine will constitute two units, and a pint of beer can even reach three units. How much alcohol do drinks usually contain? If you have diabetes and are wondering how much alcohol you should drink, it is worth reading the following list to see how much alcohol is contained in each type of drink. One unit (approximate measure): 1/2 pint of standard strength beer, lager or cider 1 pub shot/optic/measure (50ml) of sherry or vermouth 1 pub shot/optic/measure of spirit (25 ml), eg gin, vodka or whisky. So if I have diabetes I can drink as usual? Not quite. People with diabetes need to be extra careful with alcohol. Alcohol intake significantly increases the risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar levels). If your diabetes is already well under control, a moderate amount of alcohol may be fine either before, during or soon after a meal. Even if you have a drink, this may not influence short-term blood glucose levels. However, there are some precautions to be taken care of. What do I need to be careful of when it comes to diabetes and alcohol? Avoid drinking on an empty stomach, as this will quickly increase the amount of alcohol i Continue reading >>

Effects Of Alcohol On Diabetes

Effects Of Alcohol On Diabetes

Alcohol, which is made from fermented yeast, sugars, and starches is a very commonly used substance. In fact, 87.6% of adults aged 18 and over have consumed it at some point in their lifetime. It is also known as a depressant due to its capability to depress the central nervous system. About 71% have drank in the past year. When enjoyed in moderation, alcohol does not pose a risk, and actually has some health benefits to it. However, for those with diabetes, it can be a struggle to maintain a safe blood sugar while drinking. It is very easy to become hypoglycemic (low blood sugar) or hyperglycemic (high blood sugar), depending on which type of diabetes you have and the medications that you take. Understanding the effects drinking has on diabetes is very important. This article discusses the risks and benefits of drinking. It also explains what drinks are best for individuals with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Can I drink if I have diabetes? You can most certainly drink alcohol with diabetes. The key, just like many other things, is to do so in moderation. Also, if your blood sugar is not under good control, you should not drink because it can cause it to become too high or too low. Your doctor should be aware of your drinking habits so that they can make sure that you are not experiencing any complications related to it. I recommend reading the following articles: How does alcohol affect diabetes and my blood sugar levels? Normally, the liver is the organ that stores and secretes glucose to the cells in the body to fuel them when you are not eating. The liver is also responsible for cleansing the body of toxins. The liver does not recognize alcohol as food. Instead, it sees it as a drug and a toxin. When alcohol is in the system, the liver changes gears and begins to deto Continue reading >>

The Most Important Things To Know About Diabetes And Alcohol

The Most Important Things To Know About Diabetes And Alcohol

back to Overview Tips & Tricks We recently held our annual mySugr holiday celebration. What a good opportunity to talk about drinking alcohol with diabetes and the effect on blood sugar, right? Reviewed for accuracy and updated December 18, 2017 — SKJ Party time! You can probably imagine it. Some snacks to nibble on, a live DJ spinning the (digital) wheels of steel, and some tasty adult beverages. In a situation like that, It’s all too easy to get caught up in the atmosphere and not think about your blood sugar. That’s totally natural – who wants to think about diabetes when you’re having a good time? I certainly don’t. But does drinking alcohol affect your diabetes and blood sugar? Is it something to be concerned about? Pay Respect! Here’s the deal. If you don’t pay some attention to alcohol and learn how it interacts with your diabetes, it will stop your party in one way or another, either during the dance-off or perhaps more commonly, hours later when you’re sound asleep and dreaming about your fancy moves. Cruelly, that’s when you’re least expecting it and when you’re at your most vulnerable. Having diabetes is no reason to avoid drinking if it’s something you’d like to do. But you should understand how it works so you can do so safely. I’m not personally a big drinker, but I’ve done some digging and hope to share a few bits of useful information to help keep you safe. We’re all different, but basics are basic… One of the most important things I can share is that we’re all different, especially when it comes to our diabetes. Many people also differ in how they respond to alcohol. So like everything – your mileage may vary. In any case, there’s no harm in talking about some of the basic ways alcohol affects metabolism, and wh Continue reading >>

Dui Or Diabetes?

Dui Or Diabetes?

Was that person arrested for drunk driving truly under the influence of alcohol—or could it be that he was simply a diabetic having a low? The similarity in symptoms caused by alcohol intoxication and low blood glucose levels is striking and commonly leads to easy—but false—conclusions by law enforcement officers. Diabetes is a very common disease in America. Fifteen to 20 percent of all drivers on the road are diabetics. The reactions of a person in the early stages of a low blood glucose attack include dizziness, blurred vision, slurred speech, weakness, loss of coordination and confusion. Coincidentally, these are the symptoms and signs that the patrol officer is looking for in a person who is driving under the influence of alcohol. And the officer’s observations are quickly followed by a failing performance on DUI field sobriety tests. But a Breathalyzer Will Clear a Diabetic, Right? Wrong. Ignoring for the moment the inherent inaccuracy of these breath-alcohol machines, most suffer from a little-known design defect—they do not actually measure the alcohol in the blood. Rather, they use infrared beams of light. The light beams are absorbed by any chemical compound in the breath sample (including ethyl alcohol) that contains the “methyl group” in its molecular structure. The more absorption, the higher the blood-alcohol reading. The machine is programmed to assume that the compound is “probably” alcohol. Unfortunately, thousands of compounds containing the methyl group can register as alcohol. One of these is acetone. And a well-documented byproduct of hyperglycemia is a state called ketoacidosis, which causes the production of acetones in the breath. In other words, the Breathalyzer will read significant levels of alcohol on a diabetic’s breath, Continue reading >>

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