diabetestalk.net

Diabetic Drugs That Cause Hypoglycemia

Drug-induced Hypoglycemia

Drug-induced Hypoglycemia

What are the other Names for this Condition? (Also known as/Synonyms) Drug-Induced Low Blood Glucose Medication-Induced Hypoglycemia Medication-Induced Low Blood Glucose What is Drug-Induced Hypoglycemia? (Definition/Background Information) Drug-Induced Hypoglycemia is a condition when blood glucose level drops below 70 mg/dL in response to certain types of medication Alcohol, excessive physical activity, and overdosing on diabetic medications are risk factors for Drug-Induced Hypoglycemia. The condition is caused by several types of drugs, including bactrim, beta-blockers, insulin, and MAO inhibitors The signs and symptoms of Drug-Induced Hypoglycemia may include anxiety, hunger, and irritability. In case of severe complications, it may lead to coma and brain damage Drug-Induced Hypoglycemia is treated by administering an individual with glucose, in order to raise their blood glucose levels. The prognosis is good, if the condition is treated in a prompt manner Drug-Induced Hypoglycemia can be prevented in non-diabetic individuals by avoiding drugs intended to reduce blood glucose levels, as well as through proper management of diet and exercise in individuals with diabetes Who gets Drug-Induced Hypoglycemia? (Age and Sex Distribution) Drug-Induced Hypoglycemia can occur in individuals of all age groups Both males and females can be affected The condition can occur in all races and ethnicities What are the Risk Factors for Drug-Induced Hypoglycemia? (Predisposing Factors) There are several risk factors that predispose individuals to Drug-Induced Hypoglycemia, and these include: Drinking alcohol Excess physical activity Overdosing on medications used to treat diabetes; the unregulated use of prescription medication without a medical indication (such as the use of sulfony Continue reading >>

Drug-induced Hypoglycemia: A Systematic Review

Drug-induced Hypoglycemia: A Systematic Review

Drug-Induced Hypoglycemia: A Systematic Review Division of Preventive Medicine (M.H.M.), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 Knowledge and Encounter Research Unit (M.H.M., F.C.-Y., A.T.W., N.S., R.J.M., M.B.E., P.J.E., V.M.M.), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 Department of Medicine (M.H.M., A.T.W., V.M.M.), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 Search for other works by this author on: Knowledge and Encounter Research Unit (M.H.M., F.C.-Y., A.T.W., N.S., R.J.M., M.B.E., P.J.E., V.M.M.), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 Hospital Nacional de Geriatria y Gerontologia (F.C.-Y.), Caja Costarricense Seguro Social, San Jose, Costa Rica Search for other works by this author on: Knowledge and Encounter Research Unit (M.H.M., F.C.-Y., A.T.W., N.S., R.J.M., M.B.E., P.J.E., V.M.M.), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 Department of Medicine (M.H.M., A.T.W., V.M.M.), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 Search for other works by this author on: Knowledge and Encounter Research Unit (M.H.M., F.C.-Y., A.T.W., N.S., R.J.M., M.B.E., P.J.E., V.M.M.), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 Search for other works by this author on: Knowledge and Encounter Research Unit (M.H.M., F.C.-Y., A.T.W., N.S., R.J.M., M.B.E., P.J.E., V.M.M.), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 Search for other works by this author on: Knowledge and Encounter Research Unit (M.H.M., F.C.-Y., A.T.W., N.S., R.J.M., M.B.E., P.J.E., V.M.M.), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 Search for other works by this author on: Knowledge and Encounter Research Unit (M.H.M., F.C.-Y., A.T.W., N.S., R.J.M., M.B.E., P.J.E., V.M.M.), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 Search for other works by this author on: Knowledge and Encounter Research Unit (M.H.M., F.C.-Y., A.T.W., N.S., R.J.M., M.B.E., Continue reading >>

Oral Diabetes Medications Fact Sheet

Oral Diabetes Medications Fact Sheet

Summa Health System developed this fact sheet for patients who need to take oral medicine to manage their diabetes. Care providers give it to patients during diabetes planned visits, and it is part of the Diabetes Planned Visit Notebook. Oral Diabetes Medications Family Medicine Center of Akron Copyright © 2006 American Diabetes Association Adapted from the ADA Patient Information The first treatment for type 2 diabetes is often meal planning for blood glucose (sugar) control, weight loss, and exercising. Sometimes these measures are not enough to bring blood glucose levels down near the normal range. The next step is taking a medicine that lowers blood glucose levels. How they work In people with diabetes, blood glucose levels are too high. These high levels occur because glucose remains in the blood rather than entering cells, where it belongs. But for glucose to pass into a cell, insulin must be present and the cell must be "hungry" for glucose. People with type 1 diabetes don't make insulin. For them, insulin shots are the only way to keep blood glucose levels down. People with type 2 diabetes tend to have two problems: they don't make quite enough insulin and the cells of their bodies don't seem to take in glucose as eagerly as they should. All diabetes pills sold today in the United States are members of five classes of drugs: sulfonylureas, meglitinides, biguanides, thiazolidinediones, and alpha-glucosidase inhibitors. These five classes of drugs work in different ways to lower blood glucose levels. Can diabetes pills help me? Only people with type 2 diabetes can use pills to manage their diabetes. These pills work best when used with meal planning and exercise. This way you have three therapies working together to lower your blood glucose levels. Diabetes pills Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drugs: Sulfonylureas

Diabetes Drugs: Sulfonylureas

Editors Note: This is the seventh post in our miniseries about diabetes drugs . Tune in on September 25 for the next installment. Sulfonylureas were among the first oral medicines available for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes . They were discovered by accident in France by a researcher who was working on drugs for typhoid fever. Animals that were given sulfonylureas displayed unusual behaviors and were found to have hypoglycemia (low blood glucose). It was quickly recognized that these drugs could be used for the treatment of diabetes. The first sulfonylurea became available in 1955. (Notably, metformin was also discovered in a French laboratory and became available in France in 1959, but as I mentioned in a previous post , it was not available in the United States until 1995.) Despite the many new diabetes therapies that have been discovered over the past 50 years, metformin and sulfonylureas are still two of the initial choices for treatment. (For further reading on the early development of these and other diabetes drugs, click here .) Medicines in the sulfonylurea class include chlorpropamide (brand name Diabinese), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase, Micronase), glipizide (Glucotrol), glipizide extended-release (Glucotrol XL), and glimepiride (Amaryl). Insulin is found in small packets inside the beta cells of the pancreas. The release of these packets is set off by rising calcium concentrations inside the cells. Sulfonylureas trigger a rise in calcium, and the subsequent release of insulin, by inhibiting the action of a protein that brings potassium molecules into the cells. The result of this inhibition is a change in the charge (or voltage) of the cells membranes, which allows calcium to enter the cells. Since sulfonylureas work by stimulating the pancreas to release Continue reading >>

Oral Diabetes Medications Summary Chart

Oral Diabetes Medications Summary Chart

What Oral Medications Are Available for Type 2 Diabetes? Type 2 diabetes results when the body is unable to produce the amount of insulin it needs to convert food into energy or when it is unable to use insulin appropriately. Sometimes the body is actually producing more insulin than is needed by a person to keep blood glucose in a normal range. Yet blood glucose remains high, because the body's cells are resistant to the effects of insulin. Physicians and scientists believe that type 2 diabetes is caused by many factors, including insufficient insulin and insulin resistance. They increasingly believe that the relative contribution each factor makes toward causing diabetes varies from person to person. It is important to know the name of your diabetes medicine (or medicines), how it is taken, the reasons for taking it and possible side-effects. Diabetes Pills How to Take How They Work Side Effects Of Note Biguanides Metformin (Glucophage) Metformin liquid ( Riomet) Metformin extended release (Glucophage XR, Fortamet, Glumetza) Metformin: usually taken twice a day with breakfast and evening meal. Metformin extended release: usually taken once a day in the morning. Decreases amount of glucose released from liver. Bloating, gas, diarrhea, upset stomach, loss of appetite (usually within the first few weeks of starting). Take with food to minimize symptoms. Metformin is not likely to cause low blood glucose. In rare cases, lactic acidosis may occur in people with abnormal kidney or liver function. Always tell healthcare providers that it may need to be stopped when you are having a dye study or surgical procedure. Sulfonylureas Glimepiride (Amaryl) Glyburide (Diabeta, Micronase) Glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL) Micronized glyburide (Glynase) Take with a meal once or twice Continue reading >>

Dealing With Hypoglycemia

Dealing With Hypoglycemia

If you have diabetes, your concern isn’t always that your blood sugar is too high. Your blood sugar can also dip too low, a condition known as hypoglycemia. This occurs when your blood sugar levels fall below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl). The only clinical way to detect hypoglycemia is to test your blood sugar. However, without blood tests it’s still possible to identify low blood sugar by its symptoms. Early recognition of these symptoms is critical because hypoglycemia can cause seizures or induce a coma if left untreated. If you have a history of low blood sugar episodes, you may not feel symptoms. This is known as hypoglycemic unawareness. By learning to control your blood sugar, you can prevent hypoglycemic episodes. You also should take steps to ensure you and others know how to treat low blood sugar. Managing your blood sugar is a constant balancing of: diet exercise medications A number of diabetes medications are associated with causing hypoglycemia. Only those medications that increase insulin production increase the risk for hypoglycemia. Medications that can cause hypoglycemia include: Combination pills that contain one of the medications above may also cause hypoglycemic episodes. This is a reason why it’s so important to test your blood sugar, especially when making changes to your treatment plan. Some of the most common causes of low blood sugar are: skipping a meal or eating less than usual exercising more than usual taking more medication than usual drinking alcohol, especially without food People with diabetes aren’t the only ones who experience low blood sugar. If you have any of the following conditions, you may also experience hypoglycemia: weight-loss surgery severe infection thyroid or cortisol hormone deficiency Hypoglycemia affect Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Print Overview Hypoglycemia is a condition characterized by an abnormally low level of blood sugar (glucose), your body's main energy source. Hypoglycemia is commonly associated with the treatment of diabetes. However, a variety of conditions, many of them rare, can cause low blood sugar in people without diabetes. Like fever, hypoglycemia isn't a disease itself — it's an indicator of a health problem. Immediate treatment of hypoglycemia involves quick steps to get your blood sugar level back into a normal range — about 70 to 110 milligrams per deciliter, or mg/dL (3.9 to 6.1 millimoles per liter, or mmol/L) — either with high-sugar foods or medications. Long-term treatment requires identifying and treating the underlying cause of hypoglycemia. Symptoms Similar to the way a car needs gas to run, your body and brain need a constant supply of sugar (glucose) to function properly. If glucose levels become too low, as occurs with hypoglycemia, it can cause these signs and symptoms: Heart palpitations Fatigue Pale skin Shakiness Anxiety Sweating Hunger Irritability Tingling sensation around the mouth Crying out during sleep As hypoglycemia worsens, signs and symptoms may include: Confusion, abnormal behavior or both, such as the inability to complete routine tasks Visual disturbances, such as blurred vision Seizures Loss of consciousness People with severe hypoglycemia may appear as if they're intoxicated. They may slur their words and move clumsily. Many conditions other than hypoglycemia may cause these signs and symptoms. A blood sample to test your blood sugar level at the time of these signs and symptoms is how to know for sure that hypoglycemia is the cause. When to see a doctor Seek a doctor's help immediately if: You have what may be symptoms of hypoglycemia an Continue reading >>

Which Diabetes Drugs Cause Hypoglycemia?

Which Diabetes Drugs Cause Hypoglycemia?

Hypoglycemia—aka low blood sugar—can kill you. The most common cause is medications taken by people with diabetes. DRUGS THAT RARELY, IF EVER, CAUSE HYPOGLYCEMIA Diabetics not being treated with pills or insulin rarely need to worry about hypoglycemia. That’s usually true also for prediabetics. Yes, some type 2 diabetics control their condition with diet and exercise alone, without drugs. Similarly, diabetics treated only with diet, metformin, colesevalam, sodium-glucose co-transport 2 inhibitor (SGLT2 inhibitor), and/or an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor (acarbose, miglitol) should not have much, if any, trouble with hypoglycemia. The DPP4-inhibitors (sitagliptan and saxagliptin) do not seem to cause low glucose levels, whether used alone or combined with metformin or a thiazoladinedione. Thiazolidinediones by themselves cause hypoglycemia in only 1 to 3% of users, but might cause a higher percentage in people on a reduced calorie diet. Bromocriptine may slightly increase the risk of hypoglycemia. GLP-1 analogues rarely cause hypoglycemia, but they can. DRUGS THAT CAUSE HYPOGLYCEMIA Regardless of diet, diabetics are at risk for hypoglycemia if they use any of the following drug classes. Also listed are a few of the individual drugs in some classes: insulins sulfonylureas: glipizide, glyburide, glimiperide, chlorpropamide, acetohexamide, tolbutamide meglitinides: repaglinide, nateglinide pramlintide plus insulin possibly GLP-1 analogues GLP-1 analogues (exanatide, liragultide, albiglutide, dulaglutide) when used with insulin, sufonylureas, or meglitinides possibly thiazolidinediones: pioglitazone, rosiglitazone possibly bromocriptine BECOME THE EXPERT ON YOUR OWN DRUGS If you take drugs for diabetes, you need to be your own pharmaceutical expert. Don’t depend solely Continue reading >>

Type 2 Oral Diabetes Medications Side Effects, Differences, And Effectiveness

Type 2 Oral Diabetes Medications Side Effects, Differences, And Effectiveness

What are the types of oral diabetes medications? Currently, there are nine drug classes of oral diabetes medications approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. α-glucosidase inhibitors Biguanides Sulfonylureas Meglitinides Thiazolidinediones DPP-4 inhibitors Sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT)-2 inhibitors These medications differ in the way they function in the body to reduce blood glucose. Metformin (Glucophage) is the only biguanide available in the United States and is generally the first choice for oral treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metformin improves Sulfonylureas are the oldest classes of oral diabetes medications. Sulfonylureas work primarily by stimulating the release of insulin. Insulin is the hormone responsible for regulating blood glucose by increasing the uptake of blood glucose by tissues and increasing storage of glucose in the liver. Meglitinides and sulfonylureas have a similar mechanism of action. Meglitinides are short acting glucose lowering medications. They stimulate the secretion of insulin from the pancreas. Thiazolidinediones enhance insulin sensitivity meaning that the effect of a given amount of insulin is greater. Thiazolidinediones also are referred to as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? or PPAR-? agonists. α-glucosidase inhibitors delay the digestion and absorption of starch or carbohydrates by inhibiting enzymes in the small intestine which help breakdown these molecules. The starches and carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which then is absorbed from the intestine and increases the level in the blood. DPP-4 inhibitors help lower blood glucose by increasing the production of insulin from the pancreas and reducing the release of glucose from the liver. SGLT2 inhibitors or sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 in Continue reading >>

390 Drugs That Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels

390 Drugs That Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels

Knowing the drugs that can affect blood glucose levels is essential in properly caring for your diabetes patients. Some medicines raise blood sugar in patients while others might lower their levels. However, not all drugs affect patients the same way. 390 Drugs that Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels is also available for purchase in ebook format. 390 Drugs that can affect blood glucose Level Table of Contents: Drugs that May Cause Hyper- or Hypoglycemia Drugs That May Cause Hyperglycemia (High Blood Sugar) (GENERIC NAME | BRAND NAME) Abacavir | (Ziagen®) Abacavir + lamivudine,zidovudine | (Trizivir®) Abacavir + dolutegravir + lamivudine | (Triumeq®) Abiraterone | (Zytiga®) Acetazolamide | (Diamox®) Acitretin | (Soriatane®) Aletinib | (Alecensa®) Albuterol | (Ventolin®, Proventil®) Albuterol + ipratropium | (Combivent®) Aliskiren + amlodipine + hydrochlorothiazide | (Amturnide®) Aliskiren + amlodipine | (Tekamlo®) Ammonium chloride Amphotericin B | (Amphocin®, Fungizone®) Amphotericin B lipid formulations IV | (Abelcet®) Amprenavir | (Agenerase®) Anidulafungin | (Eraxis®) Aripiprazole | (Abilify®) Arsenic trioxide | (Trisenox®) Asparaginase | (Elspar®, Erwinaze®) Atazanavir | (Reyataz ®) Atazanavir + cobistat | (Evotaz®) Atenolol + chlorthalidone | (Tenoretic®) Atorvastatin | (Lipitor®) Atovaquone | (Mepron®) Baclofen | (Lioresal®) Belatacept | (Nulojix®) Benazepril + hydrochlorothiazide | (Lotension®) Drugs That May Cause Hyperglycemia (High Blood Sugar) – Continued (GENERIC NAME | BRAND NAME) Betamethasone topical | (Alphatrex®, Betatrex®, Beta-Val®, Diprolene®, Diprolene® AF, Diprolene® Lotion, Luxiq®, Maxivate®) Betamethasone +clotrimazole | (Lotrisone® topical) Betaxolol Betoptic® eyedrops, | (Kerlone® oral) Bexarotene | (Targ Continue reading >>

Oral Diabetes Medications

Oral Diabetes Medications

A list of oral diabetes medications with advantages, disadvantages, and side effects. Click on the name of a drug for more information. Biguanides Glucophage (generic name: metformin) Glucophage XR (generic name: metformin hydrochloride) extended release Fortamet (generic name: metformin hydrochloride) extended release Glumetza (generic name: metformin hydrochloride) extended release Riomet (generic name: metformin hydrochloride liquid) What are Biguanides? Metformin is the only member of the biguanides family in use today. Metformin (met-FOR-min) helps lower blood glucose by making sure your liver does not put extra glucose into the system when it is not needed. The ADA Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes recommend the inclusion of metformin (along with diet and exercise) in initial diabetes treatment. A good thing about metformin is that it does not cause blood glucose to get too low (hypoglycemia) when it is the only diabetes medicine you take. Who can take this medicine? Adults with type 2 diabetes can take metformin with their doctor’s approval and supervision. You should avoid metformin if you have liver or kidney problems, lung or heart disease, or conditions that cause low blood oxygen levels. Who should not take this medicine? People with certain types of heart problems, such as congestive heart failure, should use caution with this medicine. People with reduced kidney function or kidney disease should probably not take metformin. It should be used with caution if you regularly consume more than two to three drinks daily, so check with your doctor about that. Advantages Metformin, when used alone, is unlikely to cause low blood sugar. It is one of those medicines that always seems to help even after people have had diabetes for a while, and, for this reason Continue reading >>

Oral Hypoglycemic Drugs

Oral Hypoglycemic Drugs

Oral hypoglycemic drugs are used only in the treatment of type 2 diabetes which is a disorder involving resistance to secreted insulin. Type 1 diabetes involves a lack of insulin and requires insulin for treatment. There are now four classes of hypoglycemic drugs: Sulfonylureas Metformin Thiazolidinediones Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors. These drugs are approved for use only in patients with type 2 diabetes and are used in patients who have not responded to diet, weight reduction, and exercise. They are not approved for the treatment of women who are pregnant with diabetes. SULFONYLUREAS – Sulfonylureas are the most widely used drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and appear to function by stimulating insulin secretion. The net effect is increased responsiveness of ß-cells (insulin secreting cells located in the pancreas) to both glucose and non-glucose secretagogues, resulting in more insulin being released at all blood glucose concentrations. Sulfonylureas may also have extra-pancreatic effects, one of which is to increase tissue sensitivity to insulin, but the clinical importance of these effects is minimal. Pharmacokinetics – Sulfonylureas differ mainly in their potency & their duration of action. Glipizide, glyburide (glibenclamide), and glimepiride are so-called second-generation sulfonylureas. They have a potency that allows them to be given in much lower doses. Those drugs with longer half-lives (particularly chlorpropamide, glyburide, and glimepiride) can be given once daily. This benefit may be counterbalanced by a substantially increased risk of hypoglycemia. Side effects – Sulfonylureas are usually well tolerated. Hypoglycemia is the most common side effect and is more common with long-acting sulfonylureas. Patients recently discharged from hospit Continue reading >>

Understanding Oral Diabetes Medications

Understanding Oral Diabetes Medications

by Gail Brashers-Krug Today, almost 21 million Americans have diabetes, and more than 90 percent of those have type 2, or insulin resistant diabetes. Doctors often prescribe oral medications to treat type 2 diabetes, either alone or combination with insulin therapy. This article provides a guide to those oral medications. Which Diabetics Use Pills? With a few exceptions, diabetes comes in two types. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin on its own. To treat type 1, you must restore the proper amount of insulin—either by taking insulin (through injection or inhalation), or by receiving a transplant, either of an entire pancreas or of specialized pancreas cells, called islet cells. Type 1 cannot be treated with oral medications. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body produces enough insulin, but gradually becomes insulin resistant—that is, loses the ability to process insulin. Type 2 is usually controlled first through diet and exercise, which improve your body’s ability to process its insulin. For most type 2 diabetics, however, diet and exercise changes are not enough. The next step is oral diabetes medication. Moreover, most type 2 diabetics eventually stop producing enough insulin, and often cease insulin production altogether. As a result, many type 2 diabetics will ultimately need insulin therapy in combination with their pills. How Do the Different Pills Work? Oral diabetes medications attack the problem in three ways. More insulin: Some pills stimulate your pancreas to produce more insulin. The first successful “diabetes pills” were the sulfonylureas (glyburide, glipizide, glimepiride, tolazamide, chlorpropamide, and tolbutamide). These are insulin secretagogues, that is, chemicals that cause your pancreas to produce more ins Continue reading >>

Metformin, Sulfonylureas, Or Other Antidiabetes Drugs And The Risk Of Lactic Acidosis Or Hypoglycemia

Metformin, Sulfonylureas, Or Other Antidiabetes Drugs And The Risk Of Lactic Acidosis Or Hypoglycemia

Metformin, Sulfonylureas, or Other Antidiabetes Drugs and the Risk of Lactic Acidosis or Hypoglycemia 3Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program, Boston University School of Medicine, Lexington, Massachusetts 4Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Boston University, Massachusetts 3Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program, Boston University School of Medicine, Lexington, Massachusetts 4Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Boston University, Massachusetts 5Basel Pharmacoepidemiology Unit, Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland 1Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland 2Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland 3Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program, Boston University School of Medicine, Lexington, Massachusetts 4Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Boston University, Massachusetts 5Basel Pharmacoepidemiology Unit, Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland Corresponding author: Christoph R. Meier, [email protected] Received 2008 Jun 27; Accepted 2008 Aug 10. Copyright 2008, American Diabetes Association Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. See for details. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. OBJECTIVELactic acidosis has been associated with use of metformin. Hypoglycemia is a major concern using sulfonylureas. The aim of this study was to compare the risk of lactic acidosis and hypoglycemia among patients with type 2 diabetes using oral antidiabetes drugs. RESEAR Continue reading >>

Drug-induced Low Blood Sugar

Drug-induced Low Blood Sugar

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is common in people with diabetes who are taking insulin or other medicines to control their diabetes. All of the following can cause blood sugar (glucose) level to drop: Drinking alcohol Getting too much activity Intentionally or unintentionally overdosing on the medicines used to treat diabetes Missing meals Even when diabetes is managed very carefully, the medicines used to treat diabetes can result in drug-induced low blood sugar. The condition may also occur when someone without diabetes takes a medicine used to treat diabetes. In rare cases, non-diabetes-related medicines can cause low blood sugar. Medicines that can cause drug-induced low blood sugar include: Bactrim (an antibiotic) Beta-blockers Haloperidol Insulin MAO inhibitors Metformin when used with sulfonylureas Pentamidine Quinidine Quinine SGLT2 inhibitors (such as dapagliflozin and empagliflozin) Sulfonylureas Thiazolidinediones (such as Actos and Avandia) Continue reading >>

More in diabetes