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Diabetic Drug Invokana

Diabetes Drug Invokana Found To Cause Amputations & Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetes Drug Invokana Found To Cause Amputations & Diabetic Ketoacidosis

INVOKANA or canagliflozin is an oral drug administered to patients with type 2 diabetes over the last four years to reduce blood sugar glucose levels. The drug works as a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor, increasing the release of sugar into the urine. Other brand names of the drug include Invokamet and Invokamet XR. Since its release in 2013, many diabetic patients switched over to using INVOKANA from other diabetes medications. According to one company’s estimation, approximately 4.5 million INVOKANA prescriptions were filled in 2016 in the U.S. alone. However, in May 2017, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a black box warning, concluding that the drug caused an increased risk of leg and foot amputations, and required new warnings be placed on all drugs containing canagliflozin, describing the risks. Other known side effects include kidney failure, heart attacks, diabetic ketoacidosis, and related injuries. Trials & Side Effects: Amputations & Ketoacidosis The FDA knew of the diabetic ketoacidosis risk, and required that Johnson & Johnson add warnings to INVOKANA, highlighting this especially dangerous risk, in December 2015. Diabetic ketoacidosis can be fatal if left untreated. In June 2016, the company was required to add additional warnings concerning other kidney injuries, including the risk of acute kidney injuries. It was recently reported that many doctors are deciding to take their patients entirely off INVOKANA after the industry-sponsored trials found that the drug specifically doubled the risk of lower limb amputations. In the trial, approximately half of the amputations occurring were of toes, while the rest were at the ankle, across the foot, below the knee, or right above the knee. Some hospital pharmacies are also now keeping canag Continue reading >>

Invokana Diabetic Drugs

Invokana Diabetic Drugs

Diabetic Drug Lawyers The Diabetic Drug lawyers at Bohrer Brady, LLC are evaluating cases of ketoacidosis for persons taking the diabetic medicines Invokana (FDA approved March 2013), Invokamet, Farxiga (FDA approved January 2014), Xigduo XR, Jardiance (FDA approved August 2014), and Glyxambi. What Is Invokana and the Other SGL T2 Inhibitors? The diabetic prescription medicines Invokana, Invokamet, Farxiga, Xigduo XR, Jardiance, and Glyxambi are a new type of drug used to treat Type 2 diabetes and are known as sodium glucose cotransporter-2 or SGLT 2 inhibitors. These medications are prescribed to treat adult Type 2 diabetes and are designed to lower blood sugar levels. SGLT 2 drugs lower sugar levels in the body by removing blood sugar through the kidneys. Side Effects Associated With Invokana I. Ketoacidosis Fruity smelling breath Fatigue, confusion, or wooziness Difficulty breathing Queasiness or nausea Vomiting for more than two hours Frequent urination or thirst that lasts for a day or more Headaches Muscle stiffness or aches Dry skin and mouth Possible complications of ketoacidosis include cerebral edema, or fluid buildup around the brain, heart attack, death of bowel tissue due to low blood pressure, and kidney failure. II. Heart Attack Heart attacks are caused by a blood clot that blocks one of the coronary arteries. The arteries bring blood and oxygen to the heart. If blood flow is blocked, the heart is deprived of oxygen and heart cells die. III. Kidney Failure Acute kidney failure is the loss of your kidneys’ ability to remove waste and help balance fluids and electrolytes in your body. Do You Have a Claim? If you or a loved one have experienced any of these side effects associated with your use of Invokana, Invokamet, Farxiga, Xigduo XR, Jardiance, or Glyx Continue reading >>

J&j’s Diabetes Drug Cuts Heart Risk But Amputations Are Hazard

J&j’s Diabetes Drug Cuts Heart Risk But Amputations Are Hazard

Heart attack, stroke, death 14 percent lower with Invokana Higher rate of amputations and fractures could limit use Johnson & Johnson’s pill Invokana reduced the risk of cardiovascular complications in diabetic patients, making it the second medication of its kind to help the heart, but the benefit came with an increased risk of amputations and perhaps broken bones, researchers said. Patients given Invokana were 14 percent less likely to suffer a heart attack, stroke or die from heart disease than those given a placebo, according to the combined data from two studies presented at the American Diabetes Association’s annual meeting. The improvement was similar to the results seen with Eli Lilly & Co.’s Jardiance, which was the first diabetes drug shown to protect the heart in 2015. The findings from the study known as Canvas may boost use of the medicines known as SGLT-2 inhibitors, which make up about 6 percent of the $40 billion spent annually to control diabetics’ blood sugar levels. The rate of amputations seen with Invokana, which doubled compared to the placebo to 6.3 per 1,000 patients treated, and the increase in fractures seen in one of the two studies released on Monday could limit the drug’s use. The study results are “good for the SGLT-2 class overall, in that it reconfirms the utility of this class of drugs in lowering cardiovascular risk,” said Tim Anderson, an analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. “But Invokana’s unique amputation risk leaves Jardiance looking better overall.” Lilly’s shares fell less than 1 percent to $80.63 at 9:48 a.m. in New York. Johnson & Johnson was down less than 1 percent to $131.66. Amputations, Fractures Diabetics are already at increased risk for amputations and fractures, and it’s unclear why Invokana se Continue reading >>

What Is Invokana Diabetes Drug Dosage?

What Is Invokana Diabetes Drug Dosage?

What is Invokana? Invokana (also known as canagliflozin) is an oral drug that is used to control blood sugar levels in people with Type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a group of medicines known as sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors or (SGLT2 inhibitors). People who have high levels of blood sugar can develop health complications in future. The drug is used with exercise and diet to help control high blood sugar levels, which can prevent health complications like kidney failure, loss of limbs and blindness. When diabetesis properly managed, it will reduce the risk of contracting cardiovascular disease such as heart attack and stroke. Canagliflozin works by increasing the removal of glucose by the kidney. It is important to note that this medicine cannot be used alone since it will not be as effective. Therefore, you should follow a diet and exercise program in addition to taking this drug. In case the diet or exercise is not adequate enough to control your blood glucose, this drug may be used to lower blood sugar in Type 2 diabetes. The drug is not used as a treatment for Type 1 diabetes. How does Canagliflozin work? This medication works by inhibiting SGLT2, which is a carrier that helps in the reabsorption of sugar into the bloodstream via the kidney. This occurs when blood is filtered out of the kidney into the urine. Invokana inhibits one of the transporters so that it can prevent sugar being reabsorbed back into the bloodstream. This will lead to excess sugar or glucose being excreted via urine. How to take this drug This medicine should be taken orally once every day. You can take the medication with food or on an empty stomach. However, Invokana is usually taken before the first meal of the day, since the drug effectively reduces blood sugar levels after meals. Continue reading >>

Invokana Side Effects

Invokana Side Effects

Generic Name: canagliflozin (KAN a gli FLOE zin) Brand Names: Invokana What is Invokana? Invokana (canagliflozin) is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. Canagliflozin works by helping the kidneys get rid of glucose from your bloodstream. Invokana is used together with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Invokana is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Important information You should not use Invokana if you have severe kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis). Invokana is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Before taking this medicine You should not use Invokana if you are allergic to canagliflozin, or if you have: severe kidney disease or if you are on dialysis. To make sure Invokana is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had: kidney disease; liver disease; bladder infections or other urination problems; blood circulation problems; nerve problems caused by diabetes; a diabetic foot ulcer or amputation; an electrolyte imbalance (such as high levels of potassium in your blood); high cholesterol levels; diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin); if you are on a low salt diet; or if you use insulin or other oral diabetes medicines. It is not known whether Invokana will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known whether canagliflozin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while using this medicine. Invokana is not approved for use by anyone younger than 18 years old. How should I take Invokana? Invokana is usually taken once per day. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the Continue reading >>

Invokana (canagliflozin) For The Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes

Invokana (canagliflozin) For The Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes

Invokana is available in 100mg and 300mg doses for oral administration. Image courtesy of Janssen Pharmaceuticals. Invokana is indicated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Image courtesy of Janssen Pharmaceuticals. Invokana (canagliflozin) is indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes, along with diet and exercise. It was first developed by Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation in Japan and later licensed to Janssen Pharmaceuticals. In March 2013, Invokana received approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes symptoms "In March 2013, Invokana received approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes." Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder in which the body does not produce enough insulin and / or the cells of the body do not respond adequately to it. It is characterised by high levels of sugar in the blood. Some of the symptoms of the disease include frequent urination, constant appetite and excess thirst. According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 26m people in the US are affected by diabetes. It is also found that about 60% of type 2 diabetes patients are obese and about 30% are overweight. Obesity can make body cells resist the action of insulin. Invokana mechanism of action Invokana is the first in a new class of drugs, called sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, to be approved in the United States. SGLT2 reabsorbs glucose filtered from the blood into the kidneys. By inhibiting SGLT2, Invokana acts as a ‘glucuretic’, promoting the emission of glucose in the urine and reducing blood glucose levels. The drug is available in 100mg and 300mg dose tablets f Continue reading >>

Invokana Side Effects Center

Invokana Side Effects Center

Invokana (canagliflozin) is a sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor used to control blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus, in addition to diet and exercise. Common side effects of Invokana include: urinary tract infections, increased urination, yeast infections, vaginal itching, thirst, constipation, nausea, fatigue, weakness, skin sensitivity to sunlight, hypersensitivity reactions (including skin redness, rash, itching, hives, and swelling), bone fractures, and kidney problems. The recommended starting dose of Invokana is 100 mg once daily, taken before the first meal of the day. Doses may be increased to 300 mg in patients who are able to tolerate Invokana at 100 mg doses. Invokana may interact with rifampin or digoxin. Tell your doctor all medications you use. Invokana should only be given to a pregnant woman if the benefit of the drug justifies the risk of harm to the fetus. Breastfeeding women should decide with their doctors whether to breastfeed or to discontinue taking Invokana. Our Invokana (canagliflozin) Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Invokana Caused Life-threatening Diabetic Ketoacidosis, Lawsuit Alleges

Diabetes Drug Invokana Caused Life-threatening Diabetic Ketoacidosis, Lawsuit Alleges

Janssen Pharmaceuticals and Johnson & Johnson knew or should have known that side effects of the diabetes drug Invokana could result in the development of diabetic ketoacidosis, according to allegations raised in a recently-filed product liability lawsuit. Late last month, Kathleen and William Ciccotti filed a complaint (PDF) against the drug manufacturers in the U.S. District Court for the District of New Jersey, indicating that the diabetes drug caused Kathleen Ciccotti to suffer diabetic ketoacidosis, which is a dangerous medical emergency involving the buildup of acid levels in the blood. According to the lawsuit, Ciccotti was prescribed Invokana in September 2014. However, she was hospitalized in January 2016 due to diabetic ketoacidosis, which resulted in severe pain and substantial expenses for medical care and treatment. The complaint indicates that the drug makers failed to provide adequate warnings for the medical community and patients about the link between diabetic ketoacidosis and Invokana, as well as other health risks associated with the controversial new-generation diabetes drug, which was just introduced in March 2013. “Kathleen Ciccotti’s injuries were preventable and resulted directly from Defendants’ failure and refusal to conduct proper safety studies, failure to properly assess and publicize alarming safety signals, suppression of information revealing serious and life threatening risks, willful and wanton failure to provide adequate instructions, and willful misrepresentations concerning the nature and safety of Invokana,” the lawsuit states. “The conduct and the product defects were substantial factor in bringing about Plaintiff’s injuries.” Nearly 1,000 other similar Invokana lawsuits have been filed at the federal level in the U. Continue reading >>

Invokana (canagliflozin)

Invokana (canagliflozin)

Tweet Invokana is an oral medication for type 2 diabetes that helps to lower blood glucose levels by encouraging the body to filter out more glucose from the blood and excrete it via the urine. The drug helps patients to reduce blood sugars without increasing the likelihood of gaining weight as long as a healthy, balanced diet is followed and regular exercise taken. Invokana is a relatively new drug and the effects on patients taking the drug for several years are not yet known. About Invokana Trade name: Invokana Generic name: Canagliflozin Drug class: SGLT2 inhibitors Manufacturer: Janssen Pharmaceuticals How does Invokana help in diabetes? Invokana is effective in reducing blood glucose levels and has lowered blood glucose levels more significantly than DPP-4 inhibitors in clinical trials. The antidiabetic drug causes the body to pass out glucose from the blood via the urine, which means that calories in the glucose are excreted. This action helps support weight loss when the drug is used in combination with a healthy diet and regular physical activity. Invokana has also been shown to help lower blood pressure levels. Mechanism of action Invokana is in a class of drugs called sodium-glucose transport protein 2 (or SGLT2) inhibitors, which drugs work by increasing the amount of glucose that gets passed out in the urine. When blood passes through the kidneys, the kidneys filter glucose out of the blood and the SGLT proteins then help reabsorb glucose back into the blood. SGLT2 proteins are responsible for 90% of the glucose that is reabsorbed, so by blocking the action these proteins, less glucose is reabsorbed and so more glucose is excreted via the urine. Who is canagliflozin suitable for? Canagliflozin is suitable for adults with type 2 diabetes. Invokana was launch Continue reading >>

Fda Warns Of Foot, Leg Amputations With J&j Diabetes Drug

Fda Warns Of Foot, Leg Amputations With J&j Diabetes Drug

(Reuters) - Johnson & Johnson (JNJ.N) is required to add new warnings to its diabetes drug, Invokana, about the risk of foot and leg amputations, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said on Tuesday. Final results from two clinical trials showed leg and foot amputations occurred about twice as often in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with Invokana, known also as canagliflozin, as those given a placebo, the FDA said in an announcement posted on its website. The warnings include a boxed warning, reserved for the most serious possible adverse events, the FDA said. Invokana belongs to a relatively new class of type 2 diabetes drugs called SGLT-2 inhibitors, which help remove excess blood sugar through urine. Others in the class include Eli Lilly and Co’s (LLY.N) Jardiance and AstraZeneca Plc’s (AZN.L) Farxiga. The FDA noted that results of one clinical trial showed that over the course of a year the risk of amputation in patients treated with Invokana was equivalent to 5.9 out of 1,000, compared with 2.8 out of 1,000 for patients given a placebo. A second trial showed the risk of amputation was equivalent to 7.5 out of every 1,000 patients treated with Invokana compared with 4.2 out of every 1,000 patients given a placebo. The agency said amputations of the toe and middle of the foot were the most common but that amputations involving the leg, below and above the knee, also occurred. Untreated type 2 diabetes can cause blindness, nerve and kidney damage and heart disease. Continue reading >>

Fda Warnings And Lawsuits: Diabetes Medications Cause Leg Amputations, Kidney Damage, Ketoacidosis And Serious Urinary Tract Infections - Invokana, Invokamet, Invokamet Xr (canagliflozin)

Fda Warnings And Lawsuits: Diabetes Medications Cause Leg Amputations, Kidney Damage, Ketoacidosis And Serious Urinary Tract Infections - Invokana, Invokamet, Invokamet Xr (canagliflozin)

The Arnold Law Firm is accepting cases and vigorously representing clients injured by diabetes medications containing the drug canagliflozin. This includes the brand names Invokana, Invokamet and Invokamet XR. The drug can cause circulation problems leading to leg amputations, kidney failure and a life-threatening change in the blood known as ketoacidosis. In May of 2017, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) confirmed that Invokana (canagliflozin) “causes an increased risk of leg and foot amputations.” A year before, the FDA had warned the medical community that it saw links between the medication and amputations. It has now made that finding formal and ordered that the medication include a black-box warning. Even before this warning on leg amputations, Invokana drugs were found to be linked to kidney damage and ketoacidosis. This has resulted in a wave of lawsuits by patients who suffered life-changing injuries from a medicine that was supposed to control their diabetic symptoms – not make them worse. What is Invokana (Canagliflozin) and How Does it Work? Invokana is a medication used to treat type 2 diabetes over the long-term. In diabetes, a patient’s blood sugar rises to unhealthy levels. Many medications that treat diabetes work by pushing the sugar out of the blood. Traditional insulin therapy works by pushing sugar from the blood into cells. This lowers blood sugar, which is good for the short term. However, over time, cells can die or malfunction due to having been forced to take in so much sugar. The body tries to prevent this from happening by becoming more resistant to the effects of insulin, leading to a cycle of increasing doses of insulin, increased resistance and increased storage of sugar in cells where it does not belong. This cy Continue reading >>

Studies Show Diabetes Drug Invokana Increases Amputation Risk

Studies Show Diabetes Drug Invokana Increases Amputation Risk

People with diabetes who take a class of drugs known as sodium–glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors will now need to weigh benefits against risks after studies showed the medications significantly reduce heart problems in subjects, but, surprisingly, also increase the risk of amputation. The results of the studies on the Johnson & Johnson drug canagliflozin, marketed under the name Invokana, confirm cardiovascular benefits not only for that particular medication, but also for others in its class. Those same results, however, call into question whether other drugs in the class also contribute to increased amputation. “Drugs to treat diabetes have been undergoing a positive transformation in the last three or four years,” says Dr. Bruce Neal, lead investigator in the study and professor of medicine for University of New South Wales Sydney, and senior director, the George Institute for Global Health in Sydney, Australia. “It used to be we would test diabetes drugs to see if they lowered glucose levels and did not cause heart problems. Now, we test drugs and expect to see them not only lower glucose but improve cardiovascular health. It’s been extraordinary. But, now we might be finding out that there are glitches along the way.” Neal led a team of six other academic researchers combining data from two studies, the first a clinical trial before the drug was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2013 and the second a post-marketing study designed to detect any cardiovascular risks from the drug. Such studies are a recent requirement of the FDA to ensure safety of new medications across a wider population than may have been tested in clinical trials for the drug’s initial approval. The studies, one called Canagliflozin Cardiovascular Assessment S Continue reading >>

Sglt2 Inhibitors, Farxiga, Invokana, Jardiance. Dangerous New Drugs

Sglt2 Inhibitors, Farxiga, Invokana, Jardiance. Dangerous New Drugs

The FDA recently gave its approval to several new drugs that are part of a new class of diabetes drugs, the SGLT2 inhibitors. All have very troubling side effects. More are awaiting approval. The first of these was Johnson & Johnson's drug canagliflozin, which is marketed in the U.S. as Invokana. It is also sold in a combination pill containing metformin as Invokamet. These sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors lower blood sugar by blocking reabsorption of glucose by the kidney and increasing its excretion in urine. However, recent findings suggest that though these drugs increase excretion of glucose, they simultaneously increase the production of glucose by stimulating the secretion of glucagon. More about that can be read HERE. The manufacturers also claim that they cause weight loss--always a potent selling point for a diabetes drug. Most recently, a questionable research study has been the basis of the claim that one of these drugs actually prevents heart attacks. The facts are quite different, but drug company flacks are saturation bombing family physicians with materials that make it sound like they should put every patient with Type 2 on this wonderful, new drug, which is priced at $8.77 a pill or $263.10 for a monthly supply. They shouldn't. When the first of these drugs, Invokana (canagliflozin), came up for approval, the committee of "experts" who reviewed it were ambivalent about it because the company's own, [most likely, statistically manipulated], clinical study of patients at especially high risk of cardiovascular disease showed that within the first 30 days, 13 patients taking canagliflozin suffered a major cardiovascular event [mainly strokes and some heart attacks] compared with just one patient taking a placebo. After that, the imbalanc Continue reading >>

Fda Drug Safety Communication: Fda Confirms Increased Risk Of Leg And Foot Amputations With The Diabetes Medicine Canagliflozin (invokana, Invokamet, Invokamet Xr)

Fda Drug Safety Communication: Fda Confirms Increased Risk Of Leg And Foot Amputations With The Diabetes Medicine Canagliflozin (invokana, Invokamet, Invokamet Xr)

[ 5-16-2017 ] Based on new data from two large clinical trials, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has concluded that the type 2 diabetes medicine canagliflozin (Invokana, Invokamet, Invokamet XR) causes an increased risk of leg and foot amputations. We are requiring new warnings, including our most prominent Boxed Warning, to be added to the canagliflozin drug labels to describe this risk. Patients taking canagliflozin should notify your health care professionals right away if you develop new pain or tenderness, sores or ulcers, or infections in your legs or feet. Talk to your health care professional if you have questions or concerns. Do not stop taking your diabetes medicine without first talking to your health care professional. Health care professionals should, before starting canagliflozin, consider factors that may predispose patients to the need for amputations. These factors include a history of prior amputation, peripheral vascular disease, neuropathy, and diabetic foot ulcers. Monitor patients receiving canagliflozin for the signs and symptoms described above and discontinue canagliflozin if these complications occur. Untreated, type 2 diabetes can lead to serious problems, including blindness, nerve and kidney damage, and heart disease. Canagliflozin is a prescription medicine used with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a class of drugs called sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. Canagliflozin lowers blood sugar by causing the kidneys to remove sugar from the body through the urine. Final results from two clinical trials – the CANVAS (Canagliflozin Cardiovascular Assessment Study) and CANVAS-R (A Study of the Effects of Canagliflozin on Renal Endpoints in Adult Participants With Type Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Invokana Makes Promising Progress

Diabetes Drug Invokana Makes Promising Progress

ST. LOUIS (KMOX) – A new drug shows promise in treating heart disease in diabetic patients. Type 2 diabetes drug Invokana significantly reduced the risk of serious heart problems in diabetics with heart disease, according to two new large studies. “Maybe we’re on the horizon of being able to not just treat blood sugars and help people kind of limp along, but maybe we’re on the horizon of actually really not having diabetes being such a devastating problem,” says SLU Care cardiologist Dr. Michael Lim at SSM Health SLU Hospital. Invokana reduced the combined risk of heart-related death, nonfatal heart attack and nonfatal stroke by 14 percent in diabetic patients and led to a reduced risk of hospitalization for heart failure and protected against kidney function decline. Continue reading >>

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