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Diabetic Drinking Water

Can Drinking Lots Of Water Lower My Blood Sugar?

Can Drinking Lots Of Water Lower My Blood Sugar?

The answer is yes, indirectly it will reduce insulin resistance and help a person reduce their hunger. Drinking 8 glasses of water a day appears to bring down one's blood sugars by reducing insulin resistance due to proper hydration. While at the same time the more water you drink the less hungry a person is so they tend to eat less during the day, similar to drinking a glass of water prior to eating fills the stomach causing a person who is dieting to reach satiation (fullness) sooner. If your blood sugars are very high and your kidney is not able to process all the sugar, water will help remove the excess sugar and ketones out of your system. Drinking water is important for everyone but for diabetics, especially type 1 diabetics, it is crucial to remove excess ketones from the blood stream and reduce dehydration when blood sugars are high. Continue reading >>

Your Cat And Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

Your Cat And Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetes is a very serious issue – and not just in people either. That’s right, this chronic and potentially debilitating condition also affects cats (and dogs). And while it’s difficult to know the exact incidence of diabetes in cats, best estimates put it somewhere in the range of 1 cat in every 100-200 cats will become diabetic. What’s even sadder is that this incidence seems to be on the increase. Fortunately, armed with some good information, important tips, and a good working relationship with your veterinarian, you can give your cats the best chance at avoiding this frustrating condition. And if they’ve already developed it, know that these same tools can help you best manage your cat’s diabetic state; avoiding the potential complications and perhaps even getting them into diabetic remission. What is diabetes? In the most basic sense, diabetes mellitus is a disorder where blood sugar, or glucose, cannot be effectively utilized and regulated within the body. There are several hormones within the body that play important roles in glucose metabolism. Insulin is one of the most important, if not the most important, and it’s the hormone most central to the development and control of the diabetic state. Glucose fuels the body and insulin is the hormone that helps to get it into most cells within the body. Diabetes is often easily diagnosed and controllable. However, when undiagnosed or poorly managed, diabetes can be devastating. Diabetes can absolutely be managed and your cat can still lead a long and happy life. Routine veterinary care and evaluation are important, as is achieving and maintaining an appropriate weight in your cat and feeding him an appropriate diet. There are two types of diabetes – Type I and Type II. In Type I diabetes, the pancreas Continue reading >>

Water And Diabetes

Water And Diabetes

Tweet As water contains no carbohydrate or calories, it is the perfect drink for people with diabetes. Studies have also shown that drinking water could help control blood glucose levels. Lowering blood glucose levels The bodies of people with diabetes require more fluid when blood glucose levels are high. This can lead to the kidneys attempting to excrete excess sugar through urine. Water will not raise blood glucose levels, which is why it is so beneficial to drink when people with diabetes have high blood sugar, as it enables more glucose to be flushed out of the blood. Dehydration and diabetes Having high blood glucose levels can also increase the risk of dehydration, which is a risk for people with diabetes mellitus. People with diabetes insipidus also have a heightened dehydration risk, but this is not linked to high blood glucose levels. Diabetes mellitus Drinking water helps to rehydrate the blood when the body tries to remove excess glucose through urine. Otherwise, the body may draw on other sources of available water, such as saliva and tears. If water access is limited, glucose may not be passed out of the urine, leading to further dehydration. Diabetes insipidus Diabetes inspidus is not associated with high blood glucose levels, but leads to the body producing a large amount of urine. This can leave people regularly feeling thirsty, and at a higher risk of dehydration. Increasing how much water you drink can ease these symptoms, and you may be advised to drink a specific amount of water a day by your doctor. Read more on dehydration and diabetes How much water should we drink? The European Food Safety Authority advises that we take in the following quantities of water on average each day: Women: 1.6 litres - around eight 200ml glasses per day Men: 2 litres Continue reading >>

The Best Liquids To Drink If You Are Diabetic

The Best Liquids To Drink If You Are Diabetic

When you're diabetic, you need to be careful about not only the foods you consume but also about what you drink. A wide range of beverages are safe for diabetics, but many others are not. Pick the wrong type of drink, and you're apt to experience complications as a result of your elevated blood glucose. To stay healthy, keep a list of the best liquids to drink when you're at home, at work and even while traveling. Video of the Day Quench Your Thirst The American Diabetes Association suggests that diabetics commit to consuming drinks that have either no calories or that have a very low number of calories per serving. The healthiest choice is water, which does not have any calories and is also an ideal source of hydration. Other healthy drinks to consider adding to your meal plan include unsweetened tea, unsweetened coffee, diet soft drinks and low-calorie beverages such as club soda and vegetable juice. Low-fat milk and 100 percent fruit juice are also safe, but note each beverage's calories and carbs, and track this information in your meal plan. Spice Up Your Water If you primarily drink water but seek variety, make a subtle change to your choice of beverage. Instead of plain water, add a few squirts of fresh lemon or lime. This changes the flavor without significantly boosting the drink's caloric value. Consider other alternatives such as a few pieces of peeled, fresh ginger, a slice of cucumber or even a few, diced mint leaves. If you have an intense craving for a sweet, flavorful drink, don't give in to your urge to consume a soft drink. Instead, opt for a diet version that's sweetened with an artificial sweetener such as acesulfame potassium, aspartame or sucralose. A long list of sodas and fruit juices contain this type of sweetener and, as a result, have either n Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pets

Diabetes In Pets

Diabetes is more common in older pets, but it can also occur in younger or pregnant pets. The disease is more manageable if it is detected early and managed with the help of your veterinarian. The good news is that with proper monitoring, treatment, and diet and exercise, diabetic pets can lead long and happy lives. Diabetes mellitus, or diabetes, is a condition that occurs when the body can not use glucose (a type of sugar) normally. Glucose is the main source of energy for the body’s cells. The levels of glucose in the blood are primarily controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is made by the pancreas. As food passes through the intestines during digestion, sugars are one of the nutrients absorbed from the food. The sugars are transported into the cells that line the intestines and are converted into simple sugars (including) glucose. The simple sugars are then absorbed into the bloodstream for circulation and delivery to the whole body’s tissues and cells. Insulin is required for the transfer of glucose from the bloodstream to the cells. If there is not enough insulin or the body is unable to use the insulin, glucose accumulates in high levels in the blood – a condition called hyperglycemia. When the blood glucose reaches a certain level, the glucose overflows into the urine (this is called glucosuria) and draws large volumes of water with it. This is why diabetic pets often drink more water and urinate more frequently and in larger amounts. In diabetics, regardless of the source of the sugar or the amount of sugar in the blood, there is not enough glucose transported into the body’s cells. As a result, there is not enough energy for the cells to function normally, and, the tissues become starved for energy. This state of metabolic “starvation” caus Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes symptoms are often subtle. Here's what to look for — and when to consult your doctor. Early symptoms of diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, can be subtle or seemingly harmless — that is, if you even have symptoms at all. Over time, however, you may develop diabetes complications, even if you haven't had diabetes symptoms. In the United States alone, more than 8 million people have undiagnosed diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. But you don't need to become a statistic. Understanding possible diabetes symptoms can lead to early diagnosis and treatment — and a lifetime of better health. If you're experiencing any of the following diabetes signs and symptoms, see your doctor. Excessive thirst and increased urination Excessive thirst (also called polydipsia) and increased urination (also known as polyuria) are classic diabetes symptoms. When you have diabetes, excess sugar (glucose) builds up in your blood. Your kidneys are forced to work overtime to filter and absorb the excess sugar. If your kidneys can't keep up, the excess sugar is excreted into your urine, dragging along fluids from your tissues. This triggers more frequent urination, which may leave you dehydrated. As you drink more fluids to quench your thirst, you'll urinate even more. Fatigue You may feel fatigued. Many factors can contribute to this. They include dehydration from increased urination and your body's inability to function properly, since it's less able to use sugar for energy needs. Weight loss Weight fluctuations also fall under the umbrella of possible diabetes signs and symptoms. When you lose sugar through frequent urination, you also lose calories. At the same time, diabetes may keep the sugar from your food from reaching your cells — leading to constant Continue reading >>

How To Make Okra Water To Support Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

How To Make Okra Water To Support Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

Okra is a comfort food in some parts of the world – often served battered and fried, it nevertheless has numerous health benefits when prepared properly. Also known as lady fingers, bhindi, or bamia, okra is a pod vegetable, filled with seeds and is often added to soups like gumbo for extra texture and flavor. What many people may not know about this often underrated veggie is that there is a well established connection between okra and diabetes treatment. Although all studies in this area to date have been done in animal models the evidence is hard to deny. Managing Blood Sugar Levels One study, published in the Journal of Pharmacy and Bioallied Sciences, found that diabetic rats given a solution of water with okra soaked in it had lower blood sugar levels than the control group of rats, who were given a cellulose gum instead. The study concluded that the seeds and peel of the okra plant have anti-diabetic properties: “The present study, for the first time, confirms that A. Exculentus peel and seed possess blood glucose normalization and lipid profiles lowering action in diabetic condition.”(1) Preparing Okra Water For Diabetes Treatment Although there is, so far, only anecdotal evidence of okra water being used to treat diabetes in humans, there’s no reason why you can’t give it a try yourself. Some people claim that okra water can help stave off the development of type 2 diabetes, and help individuals maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Preparing okra water is an easy step by step process: Wash 4 or 5 medium-sized okra pods. Clip both ends off the pods, then split the pods in half or pierce each side of the pods with a knife. Place the pods in a large mason jar, then cover them with water. Soak the pods overnight, at least eight hours (up to 24 hours). In Continue reading >>

Diagnosing Diabetes

Diagnosing Diabetes

In diagnosing diabetes, physicians primarily depend upon the results of specific glucose tests. However, test results are just part of the information that goes into the diagnosis of type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Doctors also take into account your physical exam, presence or absence of symptoms, and medical history. Some people who are significantly ill will have transient problems with elevated blood sugars, which will then return to normal after the illness has resolved. Also, some medications may alter your blood glucose levels (most commonly steroids and certain diuretics, such as water pills). The 2 main tests used to measure the presence of blood sugar problems are the direct measurement of glucose levels in the blood during an overnight fast and measurement of the body's ability to appropriately handle the excess sugar presented after drinking a high glucose drink. Fasting Blood Glucose (Blood Sugar) Level A value above 126 mg/dL on at least 2 occasions typically means a person has diabetes. The Oral Glucose Tolerance Test An oral glucose tolerance test is one that can be performed in a doctor's office or a lab. The person being tested starts the test in a fasting state (having no food or drink except water for at least 10 hours but not greater than 16 hours). An initial blood sugar is drawn and then the person is given a "glucola" bottle with a high amount of sugar in it (75 grams of glucose or 100 grams for pregnant women). The person then has their blood tested again 30 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours, and 3 hours after drinking the high glucose drink. For the test to give reliable results, you must be in good health (not have any other illnesses, not even a cold). Also, you should be normally active (for example, not lying down or confined to a bed like a patient in a Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And The Diet That Cured Me

Type 2 Diabetes And The Diet That Cured Me

Why me? At 59 I was 10st 7lb, 5ft 7in, and had never been overweight. I ran and played cricket regularly and didn't drink alcohol excessively. Yet at a routine check-up I was told that I had type 2 diabetes. In 10 years I could be dependent on insulin, it could affect my sight, feet, ears, heart and I had a 36% greater chance of dying early. In type 1 diabetes, the body produces none of the insulin that regulates our blood sugar levels. Very high glucose levels can damage the body's organs. Patients with type 2 diabetes, however, do produce insulin - just not enough to keep their glucose levels normal. Because I was fit and not overweight (obesity is a major risk factor in type 2 diabetes; however, a number of non-obese people, particularly members of south Asian communities, are also prone to it), my doctor told me I could control my condition with diet alone. Desperate for information, I headed to the web, where I found a report about a research trial at Newcastle University led by Professor Roy Taylor. His research suggested type 2 diabetes could be reversed by following a daily 800-calorie diet for eight weeks. When our bodies are deprived of normal amounts of food they consume their own fat reserves, with the fat inside organs used up first. The idea of Taylor's diet is to use up the fat that is clogging up the pancreas and preventing it from creating insulin, until normal glucose levels return. With my GP's blessing and a home glucose-testing kit, I began my experiment. The diet was strict: three litres of water a day, three 200-calorie food supplements (soups and shakes) and 200 calories of green vegetables. Thanks to my doctor's dietary guidance, and running three times a week, I had already lost a stone. Yet my glucose levels were still above 6mmol/L (millimols Continue reading >>

Diabetes Or Just Normal Thirst?

Diabetes Or Just Normal Thirst?

Dr. Greene, my 2-year-old daughter drinks a lot during the day. It could be water, juice, milk, or whatever. I am concerned. Is this normal for kids to drink 5-8 bottles of liquid during the day? Or this is a sign of diabetes? Should I bring her in for a test? Are there any other signs I should be looking for? I am really concerned. Thank you. Irina Eilen – The Gap Dr. Greene’s Answer: Irina, just last week on Monday morning, I picked up the top chart from my inbox and began walking to Exam Room 1 (the Safari Room). Before opening the door, I paused to open the chart and glance at the nurse’s notes. I was about to meet a 7-year-old boy whose mother had brought him in because he had been drinking much more than usual for about 2 weeks — especially over the preceding weekend. Could it be diabetes? I stepped in the room and greeted the mother and son. They confirmed what had been written in the chart, adding that he had also been urinating much more than usual, and perhaps had lost some weight. As they spoke I could tell that the mom felt a little guilty about bringing him in unnecessarily, but at the same time she was worried that something might be seriously wrong. Parents often experience this dilemma. Whenever you are battling inside about whether to contact your doctor, do it. The boy’s clothes were indeed loose fitting, but he otherwise appeared healthy. We did a simple urine test in the office, and two minutes later found that he had a huge amount of sugar and ketones in his urine. He had diabetes. Even though the mom suspected the diagnosis, she was totally stunned. She couldn’t believe it was true. I sent them across the parking lot to the hospital lab for some bloodwork. His blood sugar level was 645 mg/dL! A fasting blood sugar over 126 mg/dL or a ra Continue reading >>

Effect Of Jeju Water On Blood Glucose Levels In Diabetic Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Effect Of Jeju Water On Blood Glucose Levels In Diabetic Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Copyright © 2013 Gwanpyo Koh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Jeju water is the groundwater of Jeju Island, a volcanic island located in Republic of Korea. We investigated whether Jeju water improved glycemic control in patients with diabetes. This was a 12-week single-center, double-blind, randomized, and controlled trial. The subjects daily drank a liter of one of three kinds of water: two Jeju waters (S1 and S2) and Seoul tap water (SS). The primary outcome was the proportion of patients in the per-protocol (PP) population achieving glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) 7.0% at week 12. In total, 196 patients were randomized and analyzed in the intention-to-treat (ITT) population (66 consuming S1, 63 consuming S2, and 67 consuming SS); 146 patients were considered in the PP population. There were no significant differences in the primary outcomes of the groups consuming S1, S2, or SS. However, the percentage of patients achieving HbA1c 8% was significantly higher in the S2 group than in the SS group. In the ITT population, the 12-week HbA1c and fructosamine levels were lower in the S1 group than in the SS group and the 4-, 8-, and 12-week fructosamine levels were lower in the S2 group than in the SS group. Although we failed to achieve the primary outcome, it is possible that the Jeju waters improve glycemic control compared with the Seoul tap water in diabetic patients. 1. Introduction Jeju water is the groundwater of Jeju Island, a volcanic island located in the southernmost part of Korea. It contains a high concentration of vanadium because Jeju Island is made up largely of basalt, an ex Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Drink Recommendations

Diabetes-friendly Drink Recommendations

Food and eating can be a stressful thing when you have diabetes. If you're living with type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes, meal times can be a cause of stress; but another source of worry is what to drink when you have diabetes. If you're controlling your diabetes and blood sugar by diet and exercise or with medications and insulin, you still need to be cautious of the food and drinks that enter your body. Living with type 1 diabetes myself, I know first hand how much one wrong drink choice can affect my blood sugar levels. A type 1 diabetic does not produce insulin themselves so they must inject insulin with each meal. Making sure what you consume including drinks in between meals is important. In fact, drinking just one sweetened drink a day can raise your risk of type 2 diabetes by 25 percent. People tend to think that fruit juice is a good choice, but with a high concentration of fructose, diabetics should only consume fruit in its whole form. When fruit is juiced it is stripped of all its fiber, and fiber is what helps to slow down the blood sugar spike. Consuming fruit juice will set you up for a roller coaster of blood sugar levels all day. Fruit juice should be reserved only when you're dealing with hypoglycemia - in this case you are drinking it to increase your already too low blood sugar. Read more about foods that naturally lower blood sugar levels Alcohol is another beverage that diabetics should be wary of. Alcohol is a contributing factor to hypoglycemia. You will first experience an increase in your blood sugar levels due to the sugar content, then a reactive drop in blood sugar, resulting in cravings, headaches, dizziness, fainting and more. Avoid alcohol altogether, or minimize to one low-sugar drink once or twice a week. I don't think I really hav Continue reading >>

How Much Water Should A Type 2 Diabetic Drink?

How Much Water Should A Type 2 Diabetic Drink?

The Mayo Clinic has reported that recommended daily water intake is influenced by climate, exercise and health factors. The best way to know the specific amount of water that a diabetic should consume is by consulting a doctor. Nevertheless, there are a few guidelines all people can follow concerning hydration. Benefits of Water Water supports all of your body's functions. If your body is not properly hydrated, it is not able to work at full capacity. Being fully hydrated will boost energy and help raise your metabolic rate. A diabetic's body does not always work at its full potential, and fatigue can be a common ailment. Drinking plenty of water can help prevent fatigue and improve your body's physical performance. Water is especially useful for hydration for a diabetic because water has no calories, no fat and no cholesterol, things a diabetic needs to avoid. Required Water Consumption According to the American Diabetic Association, unless otherwise specified by a personal physician, a diabetic's daily water intake requirement is the same as a that of a healthy person. The Institute of Medicine suggests that men drink about 13 cups, or 3 liters, of liquid a day; women should drink about 9 cups, or 2.2 liters. This amount includes water and other beverages. However, carbonated drinks and caffeinated drinks should be kept at a minimum. Opt instead for herbal teas or water to help keep the body hydrated. Herbal teas and water are always the best choice for the diabetic. Ways to Stay Hydrated Begin by drinking eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day. An 8-ounce glass is equal to a cup, and 8 cups is about 1.9 liters. Remember that this is only a starting point for meeting your daily fluid requirements. When tracking daily water consumption, keep in mind that many common hous Continue reading >>

Drinking Water May Cut Risk Of High Blood Sugar

Drinking Water May Cut Risk Of High Blood Sugar

June 30, 2011 (San Diego) -- Drinking about four or more 8-ounce glasses of water a day may protect against the development of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia), French researchers report. In a study of 3,615 men and women with normal blood sugar levels at the start of the study, those who reported that they drank more than 34 ounces of water a day were 21% less likely to develop hyperglycemia over the next nine years than those who said they drank 16 ounces or less daily. The analysis took into account other factors that can affect the risk of high blood sugar, including sex, age, weight, and physical activity, as well as consumption of beer, sugary drinks, and wine. Still, the study doesn't prove cause and effect. People who drink more water could share some unmeasured factor that accounts for the association between drinking more water and lower risk of high blood sugar, says researcher Ronan Roussel, MD, PhD, professor of medicine at the Hospital Bichat in Paris. "But if confirmed, this is another good reason to drink plenty of water," he tells WebMD. The findings were presented here at the annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association. About 79 million Americans have prediabetes, a condition in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to result in a diagnosis of diabetes, according to the CDC. It raises the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. An additional 26 million have diabetes, the CDC says. Roussel notes that recent research indicates an association between the hormone vasopressin, which regulates water in the body, and diabetes. Despite the known influence of water intake on vasopressin secretion, no study has investigated a possible association between drinking water and risk of high blood sugar, he Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Drinking Water

Type 2 Diabetes And Drinking Water

Adopting good eating and drinking habits is important to manage diabetes. Drinking water is a healthy solution to reduce sugar impact in a diabetic diet. The number of types 2 diabetes cases will increase by 50% in 2015 as compared to 2005, according to the WHO. Moreover, type 2 diabetes, which used to be diagnosed in middle-aged individuals a few decades ago, is now reaching the paediatric population. If someone has diabetes symptoms he has to see a doctor without waiting more. Though there are a variety of factors that lead to type 2 diabetes, the trend is highly correlated to an increase in calorie intake, especially from added sugars. No sugar for a better blood glucose In case of diabetes, decrease quantity of calories related to sugars in drinking habits is highly recommended. According to the American Heart Association, added sugars shouldn’t exceed : 100 calories for a woman 150 calories for a man Pure water contains no calories and no sugar. That is why drinking water should be considered as the main source of hydration. ​ Continue reading >>

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