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Diabetic Remission In Cats

Diabetic Remission In Cats

To grasp diabetic remission in cats, it helps to have an understanding of feline diabetes, so here is a quick review. Diabetes is a complex disease involving a hormone called insulin. When a cat does not make enough insulin or cannot properly use the insulin it does make, diabetes results. Why is insulin important? Insulin keeps the body’s engine working properly. The body is like a well-tuned machine and needs fuel to run properly. The fuel for a cat is food that contains fats, carbohydrates, and proteins. But this fuel needs to be broken down into smaller parts that the body can utilize. One of these usable fuel components is glucose. Without glucose, the body’s engine stalls. Glucose must enter the body’s individual cells to keep the engine running. That is where insulin comes in to play. Insulin regulates the flow of glucose from the blood stream into the cells where it is needed to sustain life. When there is not enough insulin produced by the pancreas, or the cat does not use it effectively, glucose cannot enter the cells and high levels of glucose build up in the bloodstream. This condition is called diabetes. "The common signs of diabetes include increases in appetite, water consumption, and urination, along with weight loss." Without insulin to steer glucose into the cells, the cat's body looks for alternative sources of fuel and breaks down reserves of fat and protein stored in the body. Fueling the body is not efficient without the insulin/glucose team, so the cat loses weight despite eating more. Meanwhile, the accumulation of glucose in the blood stream is eliminated in the urine. The cat urinates more which makes him thirsty and he drinks more water. The common signs of diabetes include increases in appetite, water consumption, and urination, along w Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dwarf Hamsters

Diabetes In Dwarf Hamsters

Disclaimer: This is simply based on my opinion and experience treating diabetic dwarf hamsters. My sample size is small and I do not pretend to be a medical professional. If your hamster has diabetes then the best thing you can do is to see a veterinarian immediately! Let’s start with the basics. So, What is diabetes? So, here’s a greatly simplified answer. Diabetes is a condition that causes high blood sugar levels in the body. It’s supposed to work like this: when you eat your body turns food into sugars, or glucose. Then, your pancreas is supposed to produce insulin to allow your cells to use those sugars. Insulin essentially works like a key that opens your cells to allow glucose to enter so that your body can use that glucose for energy. However, for some people, and some hamsters, that system does not work. There are two primary types of diabetes in humans: Type 1 and Type 2. In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas does not produce insulin and therefore the body is unable to use the glucose from the food you eat. When this happens the glucose builds up in the blood causing high blood sugar. If that high blood sugar isn’t treated it can damage eyes, kidneys, nerves, the heart, and even lead to death. Generally Type 1 diabetes is thought to be caused by an autoimmune disease where the body attacks its own insulin producing cells. This is often strongly linked to genetics, but sometimes can be triggered by other causes. In Type 2 diabetes people generally are able to produce at least some of their own insulin. However, their pancreas may not be able to produce enough insulin or their body may be insulin resistant. This means that their body will not be able to efficiently use the glucose in their blood and therefore will end up with high blood sugar. Type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Arsenic Induces Diabetic Effects Through Beta-cell Dysfunction And Increased Gluconeogenesis In Mice

Arsenic Induces Diabetic Effects Through Beta-cell Dysfunction And Increased Gluconeogenesis In Mice

Arsenic induces diabetic effects through beta-cell dysfunction and increased gluconeogenesis in mice Scientific Reports volume 4, Articlenumber:6894 (2014) Arsenic as a potential risk factor for type 2 diabetes has been received attention recently. However, the roles of arsenic on development of diabetes are unclear. In this study, we compared the influences of inorganic arsenic (iAs) on normal and diabetic mice by systems toxicology approaches. Although iAs exposure did not change glucose tolerance in normal mice, it caused the pancreatic -cell dysfunction and increased gluconeogenesis and oxidative damages in liver. However, iAs exposure worsened the glucose tolerance in diabetic mice, which might be due to increased gluconeogenesis and impairment of pancreatic -cell function. It is interesting that iAs exposure could improve the insulin sensitivity based on the insulin tolerance testing by the activation of glucose uptake-related genes and enzymes in normal and diabetic individuals. Our data suggested that iAs exposure could cause pre-diabetic effects by altering the lipid metabolism, gluconeogenesis and insulin secretion in normal individual, and worsen diabetic effects in diabetes individual by these processes. Insulin resistance might be not the reason of diabetic effects caused by iAs, indicating that mechanism of the diabetogenic effects of iAs exposure is different from the mechanism associated with traditional risk factors (such as obesity)-reduced type 2 diabetes. Diabetes mellitus characterized by hyperglycemia is an increasing worldwide health problem 1 . It is largely classified into insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (type 1 diabetes) and noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (type 2 diabetes). The type 2 diabetes (T2D) makes up more than 90% of all di Continue reading >>

Feline Diabetes | Cornell University College Of Veterinary Medicine

Feline Diabetes | Cornell University College Of Veterinary Medicine

Avoiding inducing inappropriately low blood glucose levels with therapy Cats with diabetes are most often treated with injectable insulin. Oral drugs for humans (hypoglycemic medications) such as glipizide rarely work in controlling diabetes in cats. Insulin injection (see Figure 1) can be taught to most owners and, with a bit of experience, both owners and cats usually adapt to these injections very well. There are a variety of insulin preparations available, and each works for a different duration and has different effects on the ups and downs of blood glucose. Ideally, your veterinarian will perform a 12-24 hour glucose curve, during which insulin is administered intermittently and blood glucose is measured to establish the type of insulin and dosing frequency that best controls blood glucose while avoiding inappropriately low blood glucose levels (hypoglycemia). Your veterinarian may recommend feeding your cat a diet restricted in carbohydrates, which has been shown to improve control of blood glucose levels. When it comes to diet, its important to help your cat combat the weight loss that often occurs as a result of this disease. In diabetic cats that are underweight, this often means feeding multiple meals per day or allowing access to food at all times. If your cat is overweight, however, work with your veterinarian to institute a weight loss program, as managed weight loss in overweight diabetic cats will likely help the cat maintain steadier glucose levels. The optimal timing of meals for diabetic cats is controversial. Many veterinarians recommend feeding at the time of insulin injection to avoid a dangerous drop in blood glucose levels. However, there is no definitive evidence that the timing or frequency of meals in diabetic cats protects them from insulin- Continue reading >>

Can I Drink Alcohol If I Have Type 2 Diabetes?

Can I Drink Alcohol If I Have Type 2 Diabetes?

Studies have shown that moderate alcohol consumption may have favorable effects, such as raising good cholesterol (HDL) and lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease. Some studies suggest that moderate alcohol consumption may even reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The most important rule is to keep consumption moderate. The American Heart Association defines moderate alcohol consumption as one drink per day for women and two drinks per day for men. One alcoholic beverage is measured as a 12-ounce beer, 5-ounce glass of wine, or 1.5-ounce distilled spirits (vodka, whiskey, gin, etc.). On the other hand, excessive alcohol consumption or binge drinking, defined as more than five alcoholic beverages in a two-hour time span for men and four for women, can increase the risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Excessive consumption can also make glucose control a challenge by increasing weight and insulin resistance. If you do decide to drink alcohol, some options are better than others. In addition, if you have diabetes there are certain considerations you must take in order to stay safe. Alcohol consumption can result in increased insulin production, which can lower blood sugars. The American Diabetes Association recommends that persons with diabetes be educated on the recognition and management of delayed hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) when drinking alcohol, especially if those persons are using insulin or other medications that can cause blood sugars to drop. What types of alcohol should I avoid and what should I choose instead:It’s wise to avoid sugary drinks made with juice mixers, added sugar, and syrups, because they can add excess calories and sugar. These types of beverages can spike blood glucose levels and can cause weight ga Continue reading >>

6 Reasons You're Always Thirsty

6 Reasons You're Always Thirsty

On a hot summer day, or after a long workout, it’s normal to be really thirsty. After all, you’ve just lost a lot of water through sweat, so your body is telling you to replenish it ASAP. If you’re always thirsty, though, for no apparent reason, that’s not quite so normal. As long as you’re drinking (and eating) water throughout the day, and making sure to hydrate during and after exercise, you shouldn’t ever feel excessively thirsty. If you are, it can be a sign of a few medical conditions—some simple, others a bit more serious. Natasha Bhuyan, M.D., a family doctor at One Medical in Phoenix, Arizona, tells SELF that you should try to drink enough water throughout the day so that you never feel super thirsty. “When you get to the point that you’re thirsty, you’re already behind the ball,” she says. “The reality is we shouldn’t feel thirsty, and the reason why is we should stay ahead of water intake.” That means not waiting to drink water until your mouth feels like the Sahara, but rather, slowly sipping it throughout the day. You probably don’t ever have to worry that you’re drinking too much: Overhydrating is a medical possibility, and can come with serious side effects, but you’d have to try exceptionally hard to overpower your body’s way of dealing with excess water (e.g. peeing) and ignoring cues it’s sending you that it’s had its fill. “Our bodies are pretty good at regulating our intake,” Bhuyan adds. If you experience that thirsty feeling more often than not, here are some potential reasons why. 1. You’re simply not drinking enough, so you’re dehydrated. “The main reason people feel thirsty is because they’re dehydrated, they’re not drinking enough water,” Bhuyan says. Simple enough. The standard recommenda Continue reading >>

Carbonated Water: Is It A Good Drink For Diabetes?

Carbonated Water: Is It A Good Drink For Diabetes?

Carbonated water—also called sparkling or effervescent water, club soda, seltzer water, tonic water, fizzy water—is water that contains carbon dioxide gas dissolved under pressure—the bubbles are the carbon dioxide (CO2) escaping the liquid once the pressure has been released by opening the bottle or container. There are some differences between these types of carbonated water—club soda, for example, tends to contain added minerals while tonic water contains quinine and a small amount of sugar, usually high fructose corn syrup. Flavors can be added to any of these forms of carbonated water.[1] There are many different makers of carbonated water, but read the labels, especially if you are on a sodium-restricted diet, to see how much if any sodium may be in the carbonated water. You also want to be certain that the water is pure without any additional sugars, flavorings or color agents. I recommend reading the following articles too: Is Carbonated Water Healthy? Maybe the question should be—if you want a “YES!” answer—is carbonated water healthier than other beverages? In this case, the answer is definitely yes! Carbonated water is healthier than diet or regular soda, healthier than alcoholic drinks, healthier in general than coffee, healthier in some ways than juices and possibly healthier than some teas, particularly in some circumstances. Carbonated water is healthier than diet or regular soda because it contains nothing but CO2 and water—carbonated mineral water will have extra minerals in it as well, but diet and regular soda contains sugars, sugar substitutes, concentrated sugars like High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS), phosphates and phosphoric acid, caffeine, added colors and preservatives, artificial and natural flavors, and other substances. On to Continue reading >>

30 Days To Eliminate Diabetes No Matter How Long You’ve Had It

30 Days To Eliminate Diabetes No Matter How Long You’ve Had It

Good day! Another dose of truth is what I have for you: the diabetes diet. If you are diabetic or pre-diabetic, there is a simple and easy fix to cure (not treat) your “disease”. If you are pre-diabetic, your condition can go away in 3 days. If you have full-blown diabetes mellitus (type 1 or 2), your condition can be reversed in 7 days. If you are in the final degenerative stages of diabetes, this same regiment will take about 2 weeks to a month until you are fully and completely cured (not treated). Now, don’t come back to blame me if you don’t follow all the steps. I’m NOT a doctor, and am not giving you medical advice, but the sh*t works! I only provide information I’ve done extensive research on, talked to real-life case studies, or things I’ve tried on myself. Cleanse your colon FIRST! There are a couple of healthy methods you can use to cleanse the colon. The colon is vital to our blood levels. This may also be responsible for a 5 to 10 pound weight loss…maybe more. Method #1: Saline wash. WARNING: THIS MUST BE DONE ON AN EMPTY STOMACH! Prepare 1 liter of very warm water. With purified water, heat on the stove just until bubbles start to appear…THAT’S ENOUGH. Add 1 heaping tablespoon of uniodized sea salt (sold at Walmart). Stir the mixture until the salt is completely dissolved, then drink whole. EFFECT: Immediate. Don’t leave the house for a couple hours, you’ll make a “mess” in public! WARNING: Drinking this solution in sections will not cleanse your colon. You must drink the entire salty mixture all at once! This step is NOT completely necessary, but it get’s your liver jump started without all the “gunk” in the way.] Method #2: Use natural roughage to pull “gunk” out of your system. This will remove the bits of heavy tra Continue reading >>

Simple Steps To Preventing Diabetes

Simple Steps To Preventing Diabetes

Table of Contents Simple Steps to Lower Your Risk Introduction If type 2 diabetes was an infectious disease, passed from one person to another, public health officials would say we’re in the midst of an epidemic. This difficult disease, once called adult-onset diabetes, is striking an ever-growing number of adults. Even more alarming, it’s now beginning to show up in teenagers and children. More than 24 million Americans have diabetes; of those, about 6 million don’t know they have the disease. (1) In 2007, diabetes cost the U.S. an estimated $116 billion in excess medical spending, and an additional $58 billion in reduced productivity. (1) If the spread of type 2 diabetes continues at its present rate, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the United States will increase from about 16 million in 2005 to 48 million in 2050. (2) Worldwide, the number of adults with diabetes will rise from 285 million in 2010 to 439 million in the year 2030. (3) The problems behind the numbers are even more alarming. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness and kidney failure among adults. It causes mild to severe nerve damage that, coupled with diabetes-related circulation problems, often leads to the loss of a leg or foot. Diabetes significantly increases the risk of heart disease. And it’s the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S., directly causing almost 70,000 deaths each year and contributing to thousands more. (4) The good news is that type 2 diabetes is largely preventable. About 9 cases in 10 could be avoided by taking several simple steps: keeping weight under control, exercising more, eating a healthy diet, and not smoking. What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Our cells depend on a single simple sugar, glucose, for most of their energy needs. That’s why the body Continue reading >>

8 Drinks That Help Fight Diabetes

8 Drinks That Help Fight Diabetes

So one great addition to a healthier lifestyle for people who are living with diabetes is to include more water in your diet. The problem here? Plain water every day can taste kind of boring, and people with diabetes may already feel that their diets are restricted. So what are some good ways to up your water intake while not completely boring your palate? One simple solution is to incorporate spa water into your diet. With a name like that, it sounds indulgent, and fortunately, it can taste that way, too, while still being very good for you. Spa water is a delicious combination of fresh fruits, and sometimes herbs, that you can infuse into cold water. It's great to keep a pitcher in your fridge running, and you can mix up a variety of different combinations with whatever ingredients you like so that you don't get tired of the same tastes every day. We recommend a combination of diabetes-fighting lemon and lime wheels with some anti-oxidant-packed fresh berries. You can slice up just one or two strawberries and they'll infuse a whole pitcher of water with their bright, berry sweetness. Peppermint, which is thought to potentially help both nerve and digestive disorders associated with diabetes, can be added to spa water as well, for a fresh, invigorating, and healthful taste. Eating and drinking well is something everyone should enjoy, and having diabetes should never prevent you from doing that. But learning how to make healthy (and tasty) drink choices when you have diabetes may take some getting used to. Take a look at our suggestions to find out more about healthful drink options you should feel great about enjoying. Chamomile Tea No calories, big flavor, and a boatload of antioxidants have made chamomile tea trendy for health reasons, especially for diabetics. Resea Continue reading >>

Water Can Heal - Water And Diabetes | Apec Water

Water Can Heal - Water And Diabetes | Apec Water

Have you ever been dying of thirst and a coworker or friend said, "You know, you may have diabetes?" Sounds like a stretch, but in reality, thirst can be a signal of this disease that is taking America by storm. So why is thirst linked to diabetes? According to a 1995 CNN.com article, with diabetes, excess blood sugar, or glucose, in your body draws water from your tissues, making you feel dehydrated. To quench your thirst, you drink a lot of water and other beverages which leads to more frequent urination. If you notice unexplained increases in your thirst and urination, see your doctor. It may not necessarily mean you have diabetes. It could be something else. If you already have diabetes, then you know that you already have to make some changes to your diet. As mentioned above, drinking water in place of the sugary options is crucial. Water is, according to diabetes-specialists, important for everybody, but especially for diabetes-patients, because even a small decrease of the hydration-level could cause serious health problems for diabetics. One of the best warning signs that glucose levels are high is thirst. And, water is the best way to quench that thirst, and to break down those sugars. Also, in order to keep the body functioning normally, water should be a constant. But, water can be lost through exercise and normal exposure to high temps. With that, being hydrated will help prevent fatigue and help physical performance. A study presented at the annual meeting of American diabetes association included 3,615 men and women with normal blood sugar levels at the beginning of the study. Those who reported they drank more than 36 ounces of water a day (4.5 cups) were 21% less likely to develop hyperglycemia over the next 9 years than those who said they drank 16 oun Continue reading >>

Drink More Water

Drink More Water

Last month I was taken to the emergency room because my blood pressure dropped. It turned out I had gone low because of dehydration. I’m really embarrassed because I hadn’t realized how important hydration is. It was scary. I could sit up, but only for about a minute. Then I’d have to lie down again. Couldn’t even think about standing (which is hard enough for me on a good day). I was in the ER for about 12 hours getting IV fluids before I was strong enough to go home. Lord knows what it will cost, and all because I didn’t drink enough. I didn’t know I had a viral infection. They found that on a white blood count in the ER. But I did know I was eating lots of fiber, which absorbs water, and not drinking much. I just didn’t know I could get in so much physical trouble from a little dryness. For people with diabetes, the risk of dehydration is greater, because higher than normal blood glucose depletes fluids. To get rid of the glucose, the kidneys will try to pass it out in the urine, but that takes water. So the higher your blood glucose, the more fluids you should drink, which is why thirst is one of the main symptoms of diabetes. According to the British diabetes site diabetes.co.uk, other causative factors for dehydration include insufficient fluid intake, sweating because of hot weather or exercise, alcohol, diarrhea, or vomiting. The symptoms of mild dehydration include thirst, headache, dry mouth and eyes, dizziness, fatigue, and dark-colored urine. Severe dehydration causes all those symptoms plus low blood pressure, sunken eyes, weak pulse and/or rapid heartbeat, confusion, and lethargy. But many people, especially older people, don’t get these symptoms. It seems that thirst signals become weaker as we age. Diabetes may get people used to thirst s Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dehydration: A Dangerous Combination

Diabetes And Dehydration: A Dangerous Combination

When you experience vomiting, nausea, fever, diarrhea, or any form of infection, you should immediately contact your physician. I can’t really emphasize enough the importance of getting treatment and getting it fast. To drive home this point, I’ll share the following experience. Some years ago, I got a call from a woman at about four o’clock on a Sunday afternoon. She wasn’t my patient, but her diabetologist was out of town for the weekend with no backup for emergencies. He had never taught her what I teach my patients — the contents of this chapter. She found my Diabetes Center in the white pages of the phone book. She was alone with her toddler son and had been vomiting continuously since 9:00 a.m. She asked me what she could do. I told her that she must be so dehydrated that her only choice was to get to a hospital emergency room as fast as possible for intravenous fluid replacement. While she dropped off her son with her mother, I called the hospital and told them to expect her. I got a call 5 hours later from an attending physician. He had admitted her to the hospital because the emergency room couldn’t help her. Why not? Her kidneys had failed from dehydration. Fortunately, the hospital had a dialysis center, so they put her on dialysis and gave her intravenous fluids. Had dialysis not been available, she would likely have died. As it turned out, she spent five days in the hospital. Clearly, a dehydrating illness is not something to take lightly, not a reason to assume your doctor is going to think you’re a hypochondriac if you call every time you have one of the problems discussed in this chapter. This is something that could kill you, and you need prompt treatment. Why is it, then, that diabetics have a more serious time with dehydrating illness th Continue reading >>

Diagnosing Diabetes

Diagnosing Diabetes

In diagnosing diabetes, physicians primarily depend upon the results of specific glucose tests. However, test results are just part of the information that goes into the diagnosis of type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Doctors also take into account your physical exam, presence or absence of symptoms, and medical history. Some people who are significantly ill will have transient problems with elevated blood sugars, which will then return to normal after the illness has resolved. Also, some medications may alter your blood glucose levels (most commonly steroids and certain diuretics, such as water pills). The 2 main tests used to measure the presence of blood sugar problems are the direct measurement of glucose levels in the blood during an overnight fast and measurement of the body's ability to appropriately handle the excess sugar presented after drinking a high glucose drink. Fasting Blood Glucose (Blood Sugar) Level A value above 126 mg/dL on at least 2 occasions typically means a person has diabetes. The Oral Glucose Tolerance Test An oral glucose tolerance test is one that can be performed in a doctor's office or a lab. The person being tested starts the test in a fasting state (having no food or drink except water for at least 10 hours but not greater than 16 hours). An initial blood sugar is drawn and then the person is given a "glucola" bottle with a high amount of sugar in it (75 grams of glucose or 100 grams for pregnant women). The person then has their blood tested again 30 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours, and 3 hours after drinking the high glucose drink. For the test to give reliable results, you must be in good health (not have any other illnesses, not even a cold). Also, you should be normally active (for example, not lying down or confined to a bed like a patient in a Continue reading >>

The Scary Experience Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

The Scary Experience Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Today, we’re excited to share with you another guest blog from Katie Janowiak, who works for the Medtronic Foundation, our company’s philanthropic arm. When she first told me her story about food poisoning and Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), I knew others could benefit from hearing it as well. Thanks Katie for your openness and allowing us to share your scary story so that the LOOP community can learn from it. Throughout this past year, I’ve had the honor of sharing with you, the amazing LOOP community, my personal journey and the often humorous sequence of events that is my life with T1. Humor is, after all, the best (and cheapest) therapy. Allow me to pause today to share with you the down and dirty of what it feels like to have something that is not the slightest bit humorous: diabetic ketoacidosis.You are hot. You are freezing. You are confused. You are blacked out but coherent. You go to talk but words fail you. Time flies and goes in slow motion simultaneously. You will likely smell and look like death. In my instance, this was brought on by the combination of excessive vomiting and dehydration caused by food poisoning and the diabetic ketoacidosis that followed after my body had gone through so much. In hindsight, I was lucky, my husband knew that I had food poisoning because I began vomiting after our meal. But I had never prepped him on diabetic ketoacidosis and the symptoms (because DKA was for those other diabetics.) Upon finding me in our living room with a bowl of blood and bile by my side (no, I am not exaggerating), he got me into the car and took me to emergency care. It was 5:30 p.m. – and I thought it was 11:00 a.m. The series of events that led up to my stay in the ICU began innocently enough. It was a warm summer night and my husband and I walke Continue reading >>

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