diabetestalk.net

Diabetic Dr

Diabetic Doctor Offers A New Treatment

Diabetic Doctor Offers A New Treatment

Archives |Diabetic Doctor Offers a New Treatment OVERLOOKING the harbor here is a small two-story office building. The Diabetes Center, run by Dr. Richard K. Bernstein, has been on the second floor there since 1983. Although there are 16 million people in the United States suffering from diabetes, the Diabetes Center, specializing in a new treatment of diabetes, is only fairly profitable. Thereby hangs a tale. Nine years ago, when he was 45 years old, Richard Bernstein, a successful industrial engineer, became the oldest freshman to be accepted by Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx. He had to depend on the earnings of his wife, Dr. Anne Bernstein, who had been practicing psychoanalytic medicine for 20 years, to put him through medical school. Yet when Dr. Bernstein was asked if he had been fulfilling a deferred dream by studying medicine, he replied: ''I never wanted to be a doctor. But I had to become one to gain credibility'' - for his theory. Explaining that he had been a diabetic since the age of 12, Dr. Bernstein, who is now 54, said: ''The treatment for diabetes hadn't improved dramatically in 30 years. From childhood on, I had assiduously followed the American Diabetes Association's prescribed treatment - a high-carbohydrate diet accompanied by a massive insulin shot once or twice a day. And yet I was getting worse.'' ''I had a wife and three young children,'' he said. ''And I felt I was dying. I tried everything. I was my doctor's star patient. I thought exercise might help. I joined a gym; it was useless. I couldn't build muscle. I was exhausted all the time. At one point, when I became very sick from complications of the disease - it affects almost every organ and nerve in the body - I knew I was facing the inevitable: an early, slow death.'' At Continue reading >>

Diabetes Doctors: Which Specialists Treat Diabetes?

Diabetes Doctors: Which Specialists Treat Diabetes?

Diabetes is a condition that affects a person's blood sugar levels and can require various treatments. Understanding which doctors help treat diabetes can simplify the process, making it less stressful. This article helps people with diabetes to understand the key differences between the various diabetes specialists. It also covers some common guidelines to follow for visiting each of these experts, to ensure you get the most out of your treatment. Which doctors help with treating diabetes? There are a number of diabetes specialists who may be involved in treating someone with this common condition. As each of these specialists has a slightly different role, there are some key things to be aware of before seeing each one. General care physicians A general care physician will often help in the treatment of people with diabetes. Regular check-ups will usually be carried out once every 3 to 4 months. If there is anything outside their area of expertise, a general care physician will frequently send an individual to an endocrinologist first of all. Endocrinologists The most common specialists in the field of diabetes are endocrinologists. Endocrinologists specialize in the glands of the body, and the hormones that are produced from those glands. The pancreas is a gland that comes under the spotlight when managing diabetes. It produces insulin that helps regulate blood sugar. In the case of people with diabetes, insulin is either not produced or does not work properly. People with type 1 diabetes are put under the care of an endocrinologist most of the time. People with type 2 diabetes, who have fluctuating blood sugar levels, will also need to see an endocrinologist. Visiting a doctor for diabetes When visiting a doctor about diabetes for the first time, it is important tha Continue reading >>

Diabetes Discovery – Via The Eyes

Diabetes Discovery – Via The Eyes

Did you know that an eye exam can be the first clue to detecting diabetes and other hidden health concerns? Finding health issues early can give patients a better chance at preventing damage through early treatment and management. A routine eye exam can show so many things. Some can be downright life changing – and life-saving – for that matter. One doctor found out first-hand when she did the same thing she does every day – she looked into a patient's eyes. But this was no ordinary exam. When Kathleen Clary, OD, peered into her 48-year-old patient’s eyes, she saw blood and other fluids seeping out of fragile and miniscule vessels in her retinas. The retina is the light and sight-sensing back part of the eye – and without it, you don't see. “As soon as I noticed the leaking fluids and the hemorrhaging, I suspected that they might be symptoms of diabetes,” recalls Dr. Clary, who practices in the Washington, D.C., suburb of Ashburn, Virginia. “In my 12 years of experience as an eye doctor, that kind of bleeding usually signals that a buildup of sugar in the patient’s bloodstream has begun to break down the capillaries that feed the retina. The result is often what we call diabetic retinopathy – a condition in which continuing damage to retinal tissue from diabetes can lead to impaired vision or even blindness, if left untreated.” The eye exam was the very first clue the patient had that she might have diabetes. Dr. Clary talked with her patient about what she saw and explained what it could mean. “I want you to have your blood sugar level checked right away by your family doctor,” she told her patient. “Tell the doctor you need to be evaluated for diabetes with a fasting blood sugar test, because your optometrist noticed some retinal bleeding. Continue reading >>

Your Diabetes Care Team

Your Diabetes Care Team

Your health care team helps you manage your diabetes and maintain your good health. According to the American Diabetes Association, your diabetes care team should include: You: You are the most important member of your diabetes care team! Only you know how you feel. Your diabetes care team will depend on you to talk to them honestly and supply information about your body. Monitoring your blood sugar tells your doctors whether your current treatment is controlling your diabetes well. By checking your blood sugar levels, you can also prevent or reduce the episodes of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) you have. Primary doctor: Your primary care doctor is who you see for general checkups and when you get sick. This person is usually an internist or family medicine doctor who has experience treating people with diabetes, too. Because your primary care doctor is your main source of care, he or she will most likely head up your diabetes care team. Endocrinologist: An endocrinologist is a doctor who has special training and experience in treating people with diabetes. You should see yours regularly. Dietitian: A registered dietitian (RD) is trained in the field of nutrition. Food is a key part of your diabetes treatment, so yours will help you figure out your food needs based on your weight, lifestyle, medication, and other health goals (like lowering blood fat levels or blood pressure). Nurse educator: A diabetes educator or diabetes nurse practitioner is a registered nurse (RN) with special training and background in caring for and teaching people with diabetes. Nurse educators often help you with the day-to-day aspects of living with diabetes. Eye doctor: Either an ophthalmologist (a doctor who can treat eye problems both medically and surgically) or an optometrist (someone who Continue reading >>

When Should You See A Diabetes Specialist?

When Should You See A Diabetes Specialist?

Many people who have diabetes also have an experienced primary care (or family practice) doctor or nurse practitioner who can help them manage their diabetes. For example, people with uncomplicated type 2 diabetes may never need to see a specialist because they can easily manage it with their primary care doctor’s help. Other people, however, might choose to see a specialist. Here are 10 reasons why you might want to see an endocrinologist or diabetes care team: 1) Your doctor recommends you have an evaluation with a specialist. After you have been diagnosed with diabetes, your doctor may recommend you see a specialist to confirm the diagnosis and make sure you know your options for managing the disease. 2) Your primary care physician has not treated many diabetes patients. If your doctor has not treated many patients with diabetes or you are unsure about their treatment, you can choose to see a specialist. 3) You are having problems communicating with your doctor. If you feel your doctor is not listening to you or understanding your symptoms, you could see a specialist who will focus primarily on your diabetes. 4) You cannot find the right educational material to help you. Treatment for diabetes starts with learning to manage your diabetes. If you can’t find the right information to help you manage your diabetes, you might want to see a diabetes care team to receive diabetes education. 5) You are having complications or difficulty managing your diabetes. You should definitely see a specialist if you have developed complications. Diabetes typically causes problems with the eyes, kidney, and nerves. In addition, it can cause deformity and open sores on the feet. Diabetes complications only get worse with time, and can cause you to miss out on quality of life. In addi Continue reading >>

Home

Home

CALL US TODAY AT202-506-3479 TO MAKE AN APPOINTMENT! Offices in Washington, DC and Arlington, VA Welcome to Diabetic Eye & Macular Disease Specialists LLC Diabetic Eye DC was established by Jeevan R. Mathura, Jr., M.D., to provide state of the art diagnostic and therapeutic technology in a competent, professional and caring setting. A retina specialist, Dr. Mathura's practice,"Diabetic Eye DC," focuses on the retina and the conditions and diseases that can affect its functioning. Lindsay Smithen, M.D., also a retina specialist, has extensive experience in the treatment of retinal disease with particular expertise in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, and retinal vascular occlusions. She joins Diabetic Eye after an active career in academic medicine at George Washington University. PATIENT TESTIMONIAL: Dr. Jeevan Mathura, Jr., has been my retina physician for over 2 years.When I first presented myself as a "walk-in", he immediately took charge of my retinal problem -- macular degeneration -- and actually SAVED my vision. Through several monthly visits during the first year, and later every 2-3 months, he's been OUTSTANDING in his consideration of me as a patient and individual. Very knowledgeable (yes, see his various credentials on the website); compassionate, caring, as well as informative and willing to discuss and answer ALL questions and concerns. He has an excellent staff and assistants each of whom isvery capable, helpful, and considerate. I will continue seeing Dr. Mathura as long as I need to and he's in the area. Coralie Farlee, Ph.D., retired from National Institutes of Health, DHHS, US Government When I first saw Dr. Mathura many years back, I was nearly blind and couldnt even read the letters on my license plate! Now I see quite we Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Information and resources provided courtesy of The Fred Hollows Foundation (FHF) and IAPB Vision Atlas 2016 Diabetes mellitus is becoming a global epidemic and is now one of the top causes of vision loss globally. In 2014, there were approximately 422 million people (8.5% of the world’s adult population) living with diabetes; compared to 108 million in 1980 (2016 WHO Global Report on Diabetes). Increased urbanisation, consumption of less – nutritious food, more sedentary lifestyles and resulting obesity have all contributed to the dramatic rise in the global prevalence of diabetis, particulrly in resource – poor countries. Low and middle income countries account for approximately 75% of the global diabetes burden yet many are ill equipped to properly identify, treat and manage the complex and varied consequences of this disease. Currently, South East Asia and the Western Pacific account for more than half of adults with diabetes worldwide. China, India, Indonesia and Bangladesh alone represent 45% of the global burden. Yet the highest prevalence of diabetes is found in the Eastern Mediterranean, where close to 14% of the population is afflicted. Efforts to reduce the prevalence of diabetes or to more effectively manage its health consequences are further undermined by the fact that approximately 50% of people with diabetes are currently undiagnosed. This is even more pronounced in Africa, where two thirds of people with diabetes remain undiagnosed and the greatest increase in disease burden (103%) is anticipated by 2040. Diabetes increases the risk of a range of eye diseases, but the main cause of blindness associated with diabetes is diabetic retinopathy (DR). DR damages blood vessels inside the retina at the back of the eye. It commonly affects both eyes and can Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

According to the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, over 30 million people living in the United States have diabetes. That’s almost 10 percent of the U.S. population. And diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, causing, at least in part, over 250,000 deaths in 2015. That’s why it’s so important to take steps to reverse diabetes and the diabetes epidemic in America. Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous disease that can lead to many other health conditions when it’s not managed properly, including kidney disease, blindness, leg and food amputations, nerve damage, and even death. (1) Type 2 diabetes is a completely preventable and reversible condition, and with diet and lifestyle changes, you can greatly reduce your chances of getting the disease or reverse the condition if you’ve already been diagnosed. If you are one of the millions of Americans struggling with diabetes symptoms, begin the steps to reverse diabetes naturally today. With my diabetic diet plan, suggested supplements and increased physical activity, you can quickly regain your health and reverse diabetes the natural way. The Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes has grown to “epidemic” proportions, and the latest statistics revealed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, including the 7.2 million people who weren’t even aware of it. Diabetes is affecting people of all ages, including 132,000 children and adolescents younger than 18 years old. (2) The prevalence of prediabetes is also on the rise, as it’s estimated that almost 34 million U.S. adults were prediabetic in 2015. People with prediabetes have blood glucose levels that are above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. Without proper int Continue reading >>

Dr. Phil: What I Know Now

Dr. Phil: What I Know Now

TV host, mental health professional, author, and person with type 2 diabetes After 25 years of living with type 2 diabetes, Dr. Phil McGraw has learned a thing or two about managing the emotional aspects of the disease. Now he has partnered with AstraZeneca to share his wisdom with others in the diabetes community through the ON IT Movement , a campaign to help people with type 2 overcome common psychological barriers to successfully manage their diabetes. We asked Dr. Phil about some of the challenges hes faced over the years. Heres what hes learned. So many people feel theyre to blame. Truth is, there are many contributing factors to this disease; youve just got to move forward. I was an athlete and worked outbut I had this on both sides of my genetic tree. So I knew I was predisposed. Im from the South, and my mother loved us with food. Id go home and thered be cakes and pies. Shed say, Come. Eat, eat, eat! I explained to her that stuff is poison for memy body doesnt handle it well when I eat a piece of coconut cream pie. Thats not in my best interest; thats not loving me. And she got it. She wouldnt tempt me with those things and redefined how she could love me. Id be caught up in my day and work right through lunch. Id get home just starving and Id overeat. Thats the worst thing for a type 2 diabetic and a bad habit I had to replace. You know how you do that? You program your life for it. My whole team knows I have type 2 diabetes. If a show runs long, theyll have a healthy snack so Ill sit down for five minutes and eat something. They know if I do that, Im a whole lot easier to work with for the next three hours. No one is going to be perfectly compliant. Im not; Ive never been. I dont know anybody who is. When you run off the path, dont beat yourself up; just ge Continue reading >>

Should I See A Diabetes Specialist?

Should I See A Diabetes Specialist?

I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes when I was in the hospital recently with pneumonia. My regular doctor has run several tests because of the diabetes, including a stress test, ultrasounds, and blood work. But he usually doesn't talk to me about diabetes. He asks me how my blood glucose readings are going, and that's about it. I've been seeing this doctor for nearly 12 years now, but do you think I should find someone who deals mostly with diabetes? — Robert, Alabama Before changing a doctor you have known for 12 years, ask him for a better explanation of your condition and how you can manage it. There is also quite a bit of information about diabetes on Web sites such as EverydayHealth.com. Start educating yourself by investigating in the Everyday Health Type 2 Diabetes Center. Then ask your doctor for specific advice about your diabetes during your next visit. For the most part, diabetes is managed by primary care doctors. Having said that, diabetes specialists can play a significant role in your care as well. If you develop complications or have difficulty managing your diabetes, you will benefit from a specialist's advice, but such treatment is usually not an either/or situation: Primary care doctors often coordinate care among various specialists, including diabetes specialists, for their patients. Receiving comprehensive care that includes nutrition and exercise advice is key to successfully preventing potential complications. Unfortunately, patient education often gets short shrift in today's hurried medical environment. Don't hesitate to seek the information you need, whether you ask your doctor directly or search for it online. Continue reading >>

My Doctor Is Trying To Make Me Diabetic

My Doctor Is Trying To Make Me Diabetic

I haven't gone on a rant in a while. All it takes is a trip to the docs office and here we go. A little over a year ago I was diagnosed prediabetic with an fbg of 104. Since that time I've joined this forum, read dozens of studies and articles, and mostly have taken the advice of the people on this forum, while totally ignoring all advice given by my doctor... and I'll tell you why. (If I'm wrong about any of this please let me know). The first thing I did after the diagnosis was to go on a VLC diet, 5 g carbs per meal... basically followed Dianne Kress's book "Metabolism Miracle", along with increased exercise. My weight went from 204 to 175 in about 3 months, and my fbg dropped down to the high 80s, but only if I continued to eat VLC. I read some articles about temporary insulin resistance from VLC on the Paleo forums, so I slowly brought back some carbs, maybe 20 to 30 per meal. I found that my post meal numbers would typically stay below 140 @ 1 hr., 120 @ 2 hrs and my fbgs were typically in the 90s. This worked for me, except I continued to lose weight. I went in for a 6 month follow up visit, at which time my fbg was 96. The doc basically told me I was cured of my blood sugar problem. She said I was getting too thin (6' 175 lbs.) and to stop restricting my diet.. to basically eat whatever I wanted, but just don't eat too much sugar. Well, I knew this was bullcrap so I continued my low carb diet, and my fbg continued to improve. This past May I went back for my annual physical... had a fbg of 86 and an A1C of 5.4. The doc was so pleased with the great improvement I had made, which of course resulted from her brilliant medical care. But I had lost another 5 pounds and walked in at 170, which is actually the ideal weight for my height with a bmi of 23... perfect. So Continue reading >>

#lchf The Genius Of Dr. Joseph R. Kraft - Exposing The True Extent Of #diabetes

#lchf The Genius Of Dr. Joseph R. Kraft - Exposing The True Extent Of #diabetes

Recently acquired Dr. Kraft's excellent book: 'Diabetes Epidemic & You' - (Kindle version)thanks to George Henderson and Grant Schofield for switching me on to this. What a guy - see his pedigree here. Essentially he has decoded the hyperinsulinemia mess in society, unveiling the true extent. As we know, Fasting Glucose, Fasting Insulin and general measures of hyperinsulinemia track with atherosclerotic vascular disease (and other types of heart disease to be honest) - but not as much as one would expect - they are noisy variables. Proinsulin (good predictor of Hyperinsulinemic physiology) and direct measures of hyperinsulinemia/diabetes like Kraft's, are the real trackers. This book indicates why that is. Measuring the WRONG metrics has its consequences. It has led to an almost-criminal underestimation of Insulin issues as the primary driver for Vascular Disease, bar none. Dr. Kraft properly measured people for Insulin/Diabetic issues - 14,384 of them, ages 3 to 90, over 20 years of proper/accurate '5 hour glucose with hourly insulin assays'. He accurately quantified essential Type 2 Diabetes (or not) in each person, and the prevalence was far higher than generally perceived from standard tests (the orthodox increase in T2D can be observed here). For these 16k people, he accurately measured their Insulin response to carbohydrate/glucose load, learning that there were 5 patterns of response. The first response 'Pattern I' is healthy or 'Euinsulin' as he called it - not many of the poor people achieved this however. Hidden diabetic phenomena far exceeded the levels that would be indicated by the glucose tests. These next 3 response types show different degress of hyperinsulinemia - but as Dr. Kraft realised, ALL of these three responses mean that you are essentially diab Continue reading >>

Diabetes Information Symptoms, Causes And Prevention

Diabetes Information Symptoms, Causes And Prevention

The Risks of Treating Diabetes with Drugs Are FAR Worse than the Disease There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes arent aware of their circumstances, either. The latest diabetes statistics 1 echo an increase in diabetes cases, both diagnosed and undiagnosed. By some estimates, diabetes has increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years! At least 29 million Americans are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and another 86 million are prediabetic . Whats hidden behind this medical smokescreen is that type 2 diabetes is completely preventable. The cure lies in a true understanding of the underlying cause (which is impaired insulin and leptin sensitivity) and implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle adjustments that spell phenomenal benefits to your health. Also known as diabetes mellitus, type 1 diabetes is a chronic health condition traditionally characterized by elevated levels of glucose in your blood, often simply called high blood sugar. Type 1 diabetes dubbed juvenile onset diabetes is the relatively uncommon type, affecting only about 1 in 250 Americans. Occurring in individuals younger than age 20, it has no known cure. Whats most concerning about juvenile diabetes is that, these numbers have been going up steadily right along with type 2 diabetes: for non-Hispanic white youths ages Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet Plan + Supplementation

Diabetic Diet Plan + Supplementation

[Below is my transcript of my video about the right kind of diabetic diet plan, along with supplemental information on the topic.] Today, I’m going to share with you my top tips for how to reverse diabetes naturally. I promise, if you follow the diet, supplement, essential oil and lifestyle tips I give you, you’re going to see results fast. In fact, I had a patient, Kirby, who was able to reverse his diabetes in just two weeks. I’ve had other patients reverse their diabetes in less time, some in just a few months.* You can see great results with this natural treatment. 6 Key Steps in the Diabetic Diet Plan 1. Eat Foods with Protein, Fiber and Healthy Fats to Balance Your Blood Sugar When it comes to diabetes natural treatment, we must start with diet. When it comes to diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, we really need to balance out blood sugar. Diet-wise, there are certain foods that help do that. First, let me kind of shape a meal for you. Ideally, your meals are going to be high in three things: protein, fiber and healthy fats. So protein foods like wild salmon and free-range eggs, high-fiber foods like split peas and figs, and healthy fats like coconut oil and MCT oil are going to help balance out those blood sugar levels. So include lots of protein in your new diabetic diet plan. After wild-caught salmon, go for grass-fed beef, organic chicken and turkey. Fiber-rich foods are even more important, including artichokes, green leafy vegetables, celery, nuts and seeds (like chia seeds, flaxseeds, pumpkin seeds, almonds, walnuts, celery. A high-fiber diet will support detoxification and healthy blood sugar levels. Also, start using coconut oil, which is great for burning fat. Coconut oil benefits blood glucose levels, too. Start cooking with coconut oil and usin Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Do you have type 2 diabetes, or are you at risk for diabetes? Do you worry about your blood sugar? Then you’ve come to the right place. The disease diabetes (any type) means that you have too much sugar in your blood. This page will show you how to best check this. You can normalize your blood sugar naturally as needed – without pills, calorie counting or hunger. Many people have already done so. As a bonus, a normalized blood sugar usually makes you healthier and leaner. Table of contents: A disastrous epidemic Two types of diabetes Normalize your blood sugar Become your own evidence A disastrous epidemic What’s wrong? Why do more and more people become diabetic? In the past, before our modern Western diet, diabetes was extremely rare. The disease is now becoming more and more common. Around the world, more and more people are becoming diabetic: The number of people with diabetes is increasing incredibly rapidly and is heading towards 500 million. This is a world epidemic. Will someone in your family be affected next? Your mother, father, cousin, your child? Or you? Is perhaps your blood already too sweet? Those affected by the most common form of diabetes (type 2) normally never regain their health. Instead, we take for granted that they’ll become a little sicker for every year that goes by. With time they need more and more drugs. Yet, sooner or later complications emerge. Blindness. Dialysis due to faulty kidneys. Dementia. Amputations. Death. Diabetes epidemic causes inconceivable suffering. Fortunately, there’s something that can be done. We just need to see through the mistake that has led to the explosion of disease – and correct it. This can normalize your blood sugar. Many have already succeeded in doing this. If you already know that you are diabe Continue reading >>

More in diabetes