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Diabetic Dog With Diarrhea

What's The Connection Between Diabetes And Diarrhea?

What's The Connection Between Diabetes And Diarrhea?

No one wants to talk about diarrhea. More so, no one wants to experience it. Unfortunately, diarrhea is often the body's natural way of expelling waste in liquid form when a bacterial or viral infection, or parasite is present. However, there are other things that can cause diarrhea for everyone, and some things that can cause diarrhea specifically in those with diabetes. Diabetes and diarrhea There are various things that can cause diarrhea. These include: Large amounts of sugar alcohols, such as sorbitol, that are often used in sugar-free products Some medications, such as metformin, a common medication used to treat diabetes In some cases, such as with illness or the use of sugar alcohols, diarrhea does not last for long. It tends to stop once the illness is over or the person stops using sugar alcohols. With metformin, the symptoms can go away with time. Some people in whom the diarrhea does not resolve may need to stop taking the medication, however. Bowel diseases may cause lasting problems for people with these conditions. Diarrhea and other symptoms can be managed or controlled with lifestyle changes such as stress reduction, and medications as needed. People with type 1 diabetes are at higher risk of celiac disease, and should check for this if long-term diarrhea is a problem for them. A long-term complication associated with diabetes that can lead to long-term diarrhea (and constipation) is called autonomic neuropathy. Autonomic neuropathy occurs when there is damage to the nerves that control how the body works. Autonomic neuropathy can affect the nerves that control all automatic bodily functions such as heart rate, sweating, and bowel function. Since diabetes is the most common cause of autonomic neuropathy, people with long-term diabetes complications stru Continue reading >>

10 Leading Causes Of Diarrhea In Dogs

10 Leading Causes Of Diarrhea In Dogs

Diarrhea in dogs is a common issue that almost everyone with a canine companion will experience sooner or later. This condition occurs when there is too much fluid in the feces. It usually involves increased frequency of defecation. When diarrhea strikes your dog, you may have some clean-up to do in your home, but you will also most certainly be worried about your furry friend, and will probably be asking yourself what caused your dog . Below we dive into the most common causes of diarrhea in dogs so you can know what to do to help your dog: The most common cause of diarrhea in dogs is what veterinarians call dietary indiscretion. This means that the dog has eaten something other than normal dog food. Leftovers, food that is partly rotten, grease from the barbecue grill, and more: many dogs love to get into and eat what they shouldnt, and it often leaves them with diarrhea. Parasites are frequently diagnosed in dogs with diarrhea, especially puppies. Hookworms, roundworms, tapeworms and whipworms are all parasites that cause dog diarrhea. Coccidia and giardia are single-celled organisms that are common causes of diarrhea in dogs as well. Viral infections of the gastrointestinal system can cause diarrhea in dogs. The most common of these are parvovirus, distemper virus, and coronavirus. These illnesses are all more common in very young puppies or, in the cases of parvovirus and distemper, unvaccinated dogs. Traveling with your pet Part 2 Keeping your Pet Healthy BM Tone-Up Gold - Dog Diarrhea Support Salmonella, E.coli, Clostridia, and Campylobacter are among the most common of the bacteria that cause intestinal infections and diarrhea in dogs. They are most often diagnosed in very young dogs and those that have conditions that cause immunosuppression. Dogs on raw food Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Your Dog

Diabetes In Your Dog

Ron Hines DVM PhD............................................ Might A Diet Change Be In Order ? Lots of my articles are plagiarized and altered on the web to market products and services. There are never ads running or anything for sale with my real articles. Try to stay with the ones with in the URL box or find all my articles at ACC.htm . Some Information About Your Dogs Pancreas Your dogs pancreas is a small, light-pinkish organ that is nestled in the folds of its small intestine. It is not very striking one might mistake it for ordinary abdominal fat. You can see it if you enlarge the fanciful image I put at the top of this page. Although it is quite small, the pancreas has two very important functions. One is to produce enzymes that allow your pet to digest food. The other is to produce a hormone (insulin) that regulates how your dogs body utilizes sugar (glucose). Glucose is the main fuel of all animal cells. Most of the bodys glucose manufactured in the pets liver or released from recent carbohydrate meals. The process by which the pancreas regulates your dogs blood sugar level is actually much more complicated than my explanation and not yet fully understood. But my explanation should do for this article. Should you wish to know more, go here . Many types of cells form the pets pancreas. The ones that are important in understanding diabetes occur in small islands scattered throughout the pancreas ( islets of Langerhans ). These particular insulin-secreting cells are called ( beta ) cells. There are pitfalls in trying to make the diabetes we see in dogs conform to the terminology invented to describe diabetes in humans or in assuming that the causes and treatments for the two should be the same. In some ways, diabetes in dogs and humans are similar. But in many Continue reading >>

Canine Diabetes Mellitus

Canine Diabetes Mellitus

To receive this document by e-mail, clickhere . When the mail window opens, click send. You do not have to entera message or subject. Diabetes Mellitus is a group of conditions in which there is a deficiencyof the hormone insulin or an insensitivity to it. Insulin is produced inthe islet cells of the pancreas and is normally responsible for controllingblood concentrations of the body's main fuel, glucose. In normal animals,insulin does this by preventing glucose production by the liver and ensuringthat excess glucose derived from food which is not needed for energy isput into body stores. In a diabetic animal there is insufficient insulin to switch off glucoseproduction by the liver or to efficiently store excess glucose derivedfrom energy giving foods. This means that the blood concentration of glucoserises and eventually exceeds a level beyond which the kidneys let glucoseleak into the urine. This loss of glucose in urine takes water with itby a process called osmosis and causes larger volumes of urine to be producedthan normal. The excessive loss of water in urine is compensated for bythirstiness and increased water consumption. The principal clinical signsof an animal with diabetes mellitus are therefore polyuria (excessive urination)and polydipsia (excessive water consumption). In addition, diabetic animalstend to lose weight because they breakdown stores of fat and protein (muscle)to make glucose and ketones (an alternative fuel) in the liver. Other clinicalsigns diabetics may include: cataracts, polyphagia (increased appetite),exercise intolerance and recurrent infections. If the production of ketonesby the liver is excessive a condition called ketoacidosis occurs whichmakes the animal very unwell. Oral hypoglycemics are tablets used in the treatment of human di Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes In Dogs

Managing Diabetes In Dogs

Dogs can have diabetes just like humans - both Type 1 and Type 2. Diabetic dogs are increasingly common, but the disease is entirely manageable unless left untreated. MY DOG HAS DIABETES: OVERVIEW 1. If your dog shows symptoms of diabetes (described below), seek veterinary care at once. 2. Work with your vet to determine the right type of insulin and the right dose for your individual dog. 3. Take your dog for frequent veterinary checkups. 4. Learn how to give insulin injections and reward your dog for accepting them. 5. Consistently feed your diabetic dog the same type of food at the same time of day. 6. Report any unusual symptoms or reactions to your vet. For years public health officials have reported a diabetes epidemic among America’s children and adults. At the same time, the rate of canine diabetes in America has more than tripled since 1970, so that today it affects about 1 in every 160 dogs. But while many human cases are caused and can be treated by diet, for dogs, diabetes is a lifelong condition that requires careful blood sugar monitoring and daily insulin injections. The medical term for the illness is diabetes mellitus (mellitus is a Latin term that means “honey sweet,” reflecting the elevated sugar levels the condition produces in urine and blood). Diabetes occurs when the body is unable to produce sufficient insulin to metabolize food for energy, or when the body’s cells fail to utilize insulin properly. The pancreas’s inability to produce insulin is known in humans as type 1 (formerly called juvenile or insulin-dependent) diabetes. This is analogous to the type that affects virtually all dogs. Dogs can also develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy. Type 2 (formerly adult onset) diabetes, which is the result of insulin resistance often l Continue reading >>

How To Handle Dog Diarrhea: The #1 Guide For Diarrhea In Dogs

How To Handle Dog Diarrhea: The #1 Guide For Diarrhea In Dogs

Emotional Support Animal Letters Blog How to Handle Dog Diarrhea: The #1 Guide for Diarrhea in Dogs How to Handle Dog Diarrhea: The #1 Guide for Diarrhea in Dogs Does your pup have chronic dog diarrhea? Dont know how your dog has diarrhea or keeps getting it? Its never a fun experience for anyone when your dog has got diarrhea. So, in this article, well cover all you need to know about diarrhea in dogs so that youre kept prepared when youre faced with some stinky, loose stool. A Prepared Pet Parent, is a Good Pet Parent Many veterinarians dont recommend self-diagnosing your pet. However, the one thing veterinarians do recommend is learning the four Cs of dog poop. Learning and memorizing these 4 Cs will help you as a dog owner, recognize the health status of your dogs digestive health. Color!Your dogs stool should always be a chocolatey brown color. The color of your dogs stool will give you a picture of whats going on in your dogs digestive tract. If your dogs stool happens to be black or tarry, then that could indicate gastric ulcers. If your dogs stool is red or has little blood droplets, then this could indicate colitis and other problems Green stool can just be a sign that your dog is eating a lot of grass. But, if you dont have access to a lot of grass- then green stool may be caused ingestion of poisonous substances. If your dogs stool is purple or slightly pink then this is a medical emergency as it can be a sign of hemorrhagic gastroenteritis Coating!Your dogs stool should be free from any kind of unusual coating. For example; stool should not have a thick mucus coat thats slimy. Dog stool should be free from white speckled coating and blood. Contents!Now, as strange and gross as this might sound going through your dogs stool and analyzing the contents of his Continue reading >>

How To Alleviate Your Dogs Diarrhea In 24 Hours

How To Alleviate Your Dogs Diarrhea In 24 Hours

I may receive a commission if you purchase something mentioned in this post. Full disclosure here. If youre a dog owner, youve no doubt dealt with a bout of doggie diarrhea at one point or another. Vets usually recommend a bland dietboiled chicken and ricebut this may not be suitable for or even the best remedy for all pets. A quick internet search will probably yield you a million confusing suggestions, so Ill keep it simple for you by sharing my tried and true 24 hour cure for occasional dog diarrhea. Before we begin, a couple of caveats: I am NOT a vet. I have been studying and successfully applying holistic animal care to my dogs and horses for more than half my life, but that doesnt make me a vet, if that matters to you. Secondly, the recommendations in this article apply to the canine species only, not cats. Sorry cat people, Im more of a dog lady. Thirdly, the recommendations in this post are applicable for occasional diarrhea, not chronic and continuing. If your dogs diarrhea persists longer than 2 days or comes in frequent bouts, consult a holistic vet. My dog Shaia, the adorable labradoodle pictured with me in the right sidebar there, suffered repeated bouts of diarrhea as a puppy, and although the longterm treatment involved my finding her ideal diet + repairing her digestive tract, I learned a lot about diarrhea along the way. Lucky me! ( Click here for my recommendations about what to feed your dog ). Shaia had a few food allergies (probably a result of taking multiple rounds of antibiotics as a puppy) coupled with the tendency to eat anything and everything in site. And junk is plentiful in city parks and on sidewalks where she grew up, let me tell you. Leave it! is my most often used command. Shed get the runs anytime she ate chicken, other dogs food, ca Continue reading >>

10 Human Foods Good For Dogs With Diarrhea Or Upset Stomach

10 Human Foods Good For Dogs With Diarrhea Or Upset Stomach

10 Human Foods Good for Dogs With Diarrhea or Upset Stomach Diarrhea is a common issue for canines and may vary in frequency, extent, and intensity. Usually, dogs that experience sudden diarrhea may be going through a change in diet or might have eaten something they were not supposed to consume, such as garbage. There are, however, more serious causes of diarrhea, so please see a vet to rule out the possibility of a chronic illness. If it turns out the problem is only temporary, the following are 10 foods that can help alleviate an upset stomach and help your dog feel better. Foods to Give Dogs With Diarrhea or Upset Stomach Vets often recommend white rice as the most ideal option for curing diarrhea caused by dehydration because it is easily digestible. Rice contains soluble fibers that absorb water passing through the GI track, which helps to stabilize the stool. Boil a cup of white rice in 4 cups of water for 20-30 minutes (or until it becomes creamy white). Do not add salt or sugar. You can add a tablespoon of chicken powder to make it tasty. Dont serve the rice warm. Serve at room temperature instead. You can serve the rice with plain chicken, or mix it with a little yoghurt or pumpkin. Pumpkin is another good food option to cure an upset stomach. Pumpkin is a rich source of soluble fiber and water, which helps to delay gastric emptying and slow down GI transit times (and the number of episodes of diarrhea). It is also easily digestible and delivers instant energy. Give 1-2 cups of canned pumpkin. This will provide about 80 calories and 7 grams of soluble fiber per cup. Mash the pumpkin into a pure and serve at room temperature. You can mix it with a little bit of rice, too. Potatoes are a good source of vitamins C, B6, potassium, magnesium, and fiber. It is safe Continue reading >>

4 Signs Of An Impending Diabetic Pet Emergency

4 Signs Of An Impending Diabetic Pet Emergency

Caring for a diabetic pet can be challenging, but there are certain precautions pet owners can take to prevent a diabetic emergency like hypoglycemia. Preventing a health crisis in a dog or cat with diabetes involves employing a consistent daily routine involving diet, exercise, insulin therapy, and supplementation. It also involves avoiding any and all unnecessary vaccinations. Even the most diligent pet parent can find himself facing a diabetic emergency with a dog or cat. Hypoglycemia is the most common health crisis, and is usually the result of an inadvertent overdose of insulin. Symptoms of hypoglycemia can appear suddenly and include lethargy or restlessness, anxiety or other behavioral changes, muscle weakness or twitching, seizures, coma, and death. At-home treatment for a diabetic pet with hypoglycemia is determined by whether or not the animal is alert. Signs of other potential impending diabetic emergencies include ketones in the urine; straining to urinate or bloody urine; vomiting or diarrhea; or a complete loss of appetite or reduced appetite for several days. By Dr. Becker Caring for a diabetic pet can be quite complex and time consuming. It involves regular monitoring of blood glucose levels, making necessary dietary adjustments, giving insulin injections or oral medications, and keeping a careful eye on your pet at all times. Frequent veterinary visits are the norm for dogs and cats with diabetes, as are the costs associated with checkups, tests, medical procedures, and insulin therapy. And unlike humans with the disease, our pets can’t tell us how they’re feeling or help in their own treatment and recovery. Preventing Diabetic Emergencies The key to preventing diabetic emergencies with a pet involves implementing a consistent daily routine and sti Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs

Diabetes In Dogs

Diabetes-Related Emergencies Diabetes in dogs is treated with insulin, much the same way as it is in humans. But if too much or too little insulin is administered, it can be very dangerous for the animal. What To Watch For Diabetes causes high blood sugar levels and is signaled primarily by excessive urination, excessive drinking, increased appetite and weight loss. In cases where the diabetes is not treated promptly and allowed to progress to the point of a crisis, symptoms may include a loss of appetite, weakness, seizures, twitching, and intestinal problems (diarrhea or constipation). Primary Cause Diabetic emergencies can be caused by either injecting too much or too little insulin, or not treating the diabetes in the first place. Both cases are equally dangerous for the dog and can cause coma or death. In cases where the diabetes is not treated, it can progress to diabetic ketoacidosis, a very serious condition that can cause death of your pet. Diabetic ketoacidosis can also be seen in dogs where the diabetes had been regulated and yet in which another condition has developed affecting the body's ability to regulate the diabetes. Immediate Care If signs of an insulin dosage problem are noticed, it should be treated as an extreme emergency. The following steps may provide aid to your dog until you are able to bring her to a veterinarian (which should be as quickly as possible): Syringe liquid glucose into the dog’s mouth. This can be in the form of corn syrup, maple syrup, honey, etc. If the dog is having a seizure, lift its lips and rub glucose syrup on the gums. Be careful not to get bit. Veterinary Care Depending on the cause of the crisis, dogs suffering from diabetic emergencies may need to be given glucose or insulin intravenously. In cases of diabetic ketoa Continue reading >>

Diabetes Complications In Dogs And Cats: Diabetes Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetes Complications In Dogs And Cats: Diabetes Ketoacidosis (dka)

Unfortunately, we veterinarians are seeing an increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus in dogs and cats. This is likely due to the growing prevalence of obesity (secondary to inactive lifestyle, a high carbohydrate diet, lack of exercise, etc.). So, if you just had a dog or cat diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, what do you do? First, we encourage you to take a look at these articles for an explanation of the disease: Diabetes Mellitus (Sugar Diabetes) in Dogs Once you have a basic understanding of diabetes mellitus (or if you already had one), this article will teach you about life-threatening complications that can occur as a result of the disease; specifically, I discuss a life-threatening condition called diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA) so that you know how to help prevent it! What is DKA? When diabetes goes undiagnosed, or when it is difficult to control or regulate, the complication of DKA can occur. DKA develops because the body is so lacking in insulin that the sugar can’t get into the cells -- resulting in cell starvation. Cell starvation causes the body to start breaking down fat in an attempt to provide energy (or a fuel source) to the body. Unfortunately, these fat breakdown products, called “ketones,” are also poisonous to the body. Symptoms of DKA Clinical signs of DKA include the following: Weakness Not moving (in cats, hanging out by the water bowl) Not eating to complete anorexia Large urinary clumps in the litter box (my guideline? If it’s bigger than a tennis ball, it’s abnormal) Weight loss (most commonly over the back), despite an overweight body condition Excessively dry or oily skin coat Abnormal breath (typically a sweet “ketotic” odor) In severe cases DKA can also result in more significant signs: Abnormal breathing pattern Jaundice Ab Continue reading >>

What To Do With Insulin When Your Diabetic Pet Is Vomiting Or Not Eating

What To Do With Insulin When Your Diabetic Pet Is Vomiting Or Not Eating

Once you have your diabetic pet regulated on insulin it’s smooth sailing, right? Well, not necessarily. Even a well-regulated diabetic doggie may mischievously get into the trash and subsequently vomit. Or Fluffy might toss up a random hair ball. Just because your pet is diabetic doesn’t mean it can’t have a dietary indiscretion or gastroenteritis the same as non-diabetic pets! Even if you are new to having a diabetic pet, if you understand the basics of diabetes (most importantly that insulin drops the blood sugar levels) you can work your way through a short-term treatment plan. You know that insulin allows sugar (from the food we eat) to enter our cells. Without food, giving the usual dose of insulin could drop the blood glucose to dangerously low levels. However, if the blood glucose is still quite elevated, you might consider giving a lesser dose of insulin even if a diabetic won’t eat. You know your pet… Some have a sensitive stomach whereas others might have the constitution as sturdy as a goat. Some have ravenous appetites whereas other pets may be finicky. None of us have a crystal ball when it comes to predicting if a pet will vomit more. Not eating and vomiting are both situations that put us in the same boat in regards to insulin dosing. No food in the tummy means there is nothing for the insulin to utilize. Of course, vomiting is worse than simply not eating because we don’t know why the pet is nauseous nor if there will be more vomiting to follow. Not eating may simply be that a pet isn’t hungry. Obviously you need a good relationship with your veterinarian to help you work through contingency plans for these situations, but I want you to understand in general what we might do. Of course making choices to alter the insulin dose mandates that Continue reading >>

What To Do About A Sick Diabetic Dog?

What To Do About A Sick Diabetic Dog?

Last Friday Bender woke up barfing all over the place. He ate his morning food but about an hour later barfed it back up. He continued to barf through out the day. I fed him a little at night, he kept that down but barfed a few hours later. This raises the question of what to do when your diabetic dog is sick. What to feed? What about their shots? I can’t give Bender his full shot if he throws up his food. But he needs some thing… In Bender’s case of being sick he was still active, energetic, but you could tell he wasn’t feeling the best. He was barfing but his behavior hadn’t changed so I didn’t take him to the vet. If I saw a major change in behavior I would have taken him to the vet. That is a sure sign there are problems. I guessed Bender had an upset tummy, he probably ate some thing in the yard while I wasn’t looking. For his food I wanted some thing bland and easy to digest. I fed him small amounts of just his rice, chicken and eggs. A few veggies slipped in there but not many. All part of his regular meal. You could also try unseasoned, cooked ground beef, fat drained, washed with water, green beans, and rice. All of this in small portions. Remember you dog has an upset stomach. If Bender kept his food down. I would feed him some more in a hour or so. The next thing is to check blood sugar levels. Bender was around 150. Excellent but he just ate. Not a lot though. So I waited a hour. He kept his food down so I gave him a bit more food, he has had about half of what he normally eats now. I also gave him an insulin shot of 10 units. A few hours later, check his blood sugar levels, gave food, shot, etc. By noon Bender had his all his food for his usual morning meal and two shots at 10-11 units. He had kept all his food down and was doing good. When di Continue reading >>

Diarrhea

Diarrhea

Diarrhea in cats and dogs can be a symptom of many different conditions, and if it persists, should be diagnosed by a vet. Home remedies are not recommended until a vet has definitively diagnosed the problem. Some possibilities include Food sensitivity and Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Diabetic cats tend toward gastrointestinal problems, most commonly vomiting and diarrhea. This study shows 30% of cats with diabetes also have some GI problems along with it. In 50% of the GI-troubled cats, the problem was vomiting[1]. When diarrhea is a problem, the possibilities for both dehydration and hypoglycemia increase[2]. The insulin dose you give depends partly on the meal being digested at a normal rate. When the food passing through the system speeds up in this manner, the insulin is still being absorbed at its usual rate[3]. It could mean that there's not enough food to match the insulin dose and a hypo could occur. You and your vet may want to temporarily decrease the insulin dose until you are both satisfied the diarrhea is under control. See also Constipation. Continue reading >>

My Diabetic Mini Pin Has Bloody Diarrhea And No Appetite.

My Diabetic Mini Pin Has Bloody Diarrhea And No Appetite.

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