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Diabetic Dog Diet Homemade

Homemade Diet Is Ok For Diabetic Dog

Homemade Diet Is Ok For Diabetic Dog

Mix of ground turkey, green beans, and rice works well for diabetic dogs. Q. I have a 6-year-old Bassett Hound with diabetes. She is now on 15 units of vetsulin twice a day. She is a very finicky eater, and I cannot get her to eat her Purina DCO dog food. Every day I make a mixture of ground turkey, beef, or chicken and chopped green beans, plus brown rice or bulgur wheat. Do you have any suggestions as to how I can get her to eat her regular dog food? It is a great source of stress for me, and I am trying everything I know to remedy this. A. Not surprisingly, your dog prefers the homemade diet to the commercial one. It sounded quite appetizing to me, in fact. Gradually transition her over to her prescription diet by adding a small amount of the DCO to her homemade diet, and gradually adding more each day, over a period of two weeks. You may have to add at least a small amount of the ground turkey diet for a while, but hopefully after several months you can stop it completely. Alternatively, the homemade diet would not necessarily be bad for her to eat long term, if you dont mind preparing it. Continue reading >>

Droogs Diabetic Dog Food With Vitamin Therapy

Droogs Diabetic Dog Food With Vitamin Therapy

Please refrain from commenting unless you have read the directions and full intent of the recipe and have a firm grasp of canine diabetes and insulin dependent dogs. COMMENT on COMMENTS: This mixture is ADDED to prescription dog food diet as stated in the directions. It is not meant to replace dog food. It was developed by our VETERINARIAN and NUTRITIONIST as an additive to the prescription food that is not specifically formulated for a diabetic. It makes NUMEROUS servings - it is not meant for a whole meal!!!!!!Your dog has been diagnosed with diabetes; you are scared, frustrated and overwhelmed. I can relate. If your faithful pet has been in the hospital with Ketoacidosis and has just returned home you may find yourself frantic as your pet refuses to eat. The refusal to eat is normal, they just don't feel good. If you cannot get your pet to eat please DO NOT administer insulin. Your pet needs to be enticed to eat, try feeding from your hand. The prescription food may be another problem. Pets usually hate it and it really is not the healthiest food. Follow the guidelines below (along with your vet) to come up with a meal and vitamin therapy plan to fit your dogs new needs. The vitamins mentioned are particularly needed for diabetics, there are certainly more vitamins than listed in the food source. This meal plan was designed by a NUTRITIONIST and VETERINARIAN for a 90 pound DIABETIC dog, if your dog is smaller you will have to decrease the vitamins and food allotment by weight. Feel free to zmail me with any questions or for more information. This meal plan is designed for dogs RECEIVING INSULIN along with its meals TWICE a day. My dogs insulin requirements drastically reduced and he is active, beautiful, happy and healthy! Please check blood regularly when switching Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dog Treats Recipe - Allrecipes.com

Diabetic Dog Treats Recipe - Allrecipes.com

Dogs love these! I substitute the liver for 2 jars of baby food; any meat flavor. Thank you! Our diabetic dog is enthusiastic about getting his insulin shots because he knows he gets one of these treats immediately after! He loves them! We had never seen him act this way over a treat.... I tried three different animal treat recipes today and this one was the best. I made them for my cat and these are the only ones he'll eat. I used two jars of beef baby food insead of the live... Great Recipe! However; whole wheat flour has gluten. Gluten can raise blood sugar. I used whole grain brown rice wheat flour. It's gluten free. My dog loves them just the same. Other gluten fr... BLANCH -Blanch the Liver!! Much easier on the eyes and nose when preparing. I used beef liver and chicken liver. I blanched both in hot water for a minute prior to food processor. Much nicer, MU... Well, I can't believe that I finally found a treat that all 3 of my dogs love! (2 Chihuahua's & 1 rat terrier) I just know this has to be good for them too, because it is loaded with liver. No ... Made these today for my mom's dog who is very particular about what she eats and she loved them. I added the eggs (shell included)and the flour to the food processor and it blended well. Thank... This was so easy to make. Any meat will work and so does the baby food. Pup loves these. I used the scraps to hide her pills in and now have no trouble giving them to her. This was very plya... All 4 of my girls LOVE these treats. They set in the kitchen while I make them waiting for them to be done. Absolutely wonderful recipe! Healthy for any dog. Continue reading >>

Healthy Homemade Dog Food

Healthy Homemade Dog Food

Our Tasty Low Carb family not only consists of Joanie and Chris, but also two Havanese Sisters Lulu and Kiki! If you have pets you know how they become part of the family and an integral part of your life. Our dogs are dependent upon us for virtually everything in return they offer unconditional love and lots of fun. For that reason, we only make them Healthy Homemade Dog Food! We use only the best ingredients with no fillers or added sugars or spices.We also make all of their dog treats at home. Their food is very low carb! Our furry family members are Chocolate Havanese. Often called silk dogs, most in this breed are white with brown or black markings. Many are brindle in color. Lulu and Kiki are 9 1/2 and 9 pounds in weight, although they look heavier with all their fur. They do require frequent brushing, but they are hypoallergenic and they do not shed. As you can tell, they are very much a part of our low-carb family you do get attached to your pets! Why Homemade Instead of Purchased Dog Food? Myths and misconceptions abound on the Internet regarding homemade dog food. Also, there are a myriad of conflicting nutritional recommendations ranging from the 30-70% carbs found in commercial dog food to raw frozen foods that contains no carbs. Some owners feed raw meat and bones and say their dogs thrive. However, many raw materials that are unfit for humans are legal for dog food. These may include spoiled supermarket food, slaughter house waste such as organs, heads, hooves, beaks, feet and other appalling ingredients. Ingredients often have vague names such as animal by-product meal and meat by-product meal. Read the article, The Shocking Truth About Commercial Dog Food by Dog Food Advisor. It will convince you that making homemade food is a safer alternative to much Continue reading >>

How Diet Can Reduce The Cost Of Treating Diabetes In Dogs

How Diet Can Reduce The Cost Of Treating Diabetes In Dogs

Almost overnight, your dog’s pupils turn white, she walks more carefully around the house and bumps into the furniture. She acts like she’s blind. The vet confirms that she is blind because of cataracts in the lens of her eyes. He asks to perform some blood and urine tests. The tests reveal very high levels of glucose or sugar in both the blood and the urine. The vet kindly breaks the bad news, “Your dog has diabetes.” He assures you that with insulin injections and diet changes, diabetes can be managed. What about the cataracts and blindness? What is Diabetes? Diabetes mellitus or “sugar diabetes” is a disease that causes increased sugar or glucose in the blood. In dogs, this happens because the pancreas does not produce enough insulin. In order to remove sugar or glucose from the blood, cells need insulin to attach to certain areas (receptors) of their cell walls. This “opens” the cell wall to the glucose so it can be used inside the cell for energy, making other chemicals and supporting important cell functions. Without enough insulin to attach to cell walls, the glucose builds up in the blood stream and spills into the urine. Increased glucose in the blood causes: Frequent urination Increased thirst and water intake Weight loss Increased appetite Decreased appetite later in the disease Unable to use sugar for energy, diabetic dogs use protein and fat. The use of protein and fat for energy causes: Accelerated weight loss Acid production Excessive panting even at rest Weakness and decreased activity Diabetes is most common in middle-aged dogs (6-9 years old), especially those that are overweight or obese. Females are at higher risk of becoming diabetic than males. Some breeds of dogs (below) may develop diabetes at much younger ages at healthy weights. Continue reading >>

Homemade Diabetic Dog Food Recipe

Homemade Diabetic Dog Food Recipe

If your dog has been diagnosed with diabetes, youve probably already had an in-depth conversation with your veterinarian about changing his activity level, diet and possibly even adding daily medication to his routine. Making your own dog food is the absolute best way to cater to your dogs individual health needs. Ask your veterinarian if thishomemade diabetic dog food recipe is right for your pooch. Its important to consult an expert before changing your dogs diet, especially if youre making adjustments to his food to help treat a medical condition such as canine diabetes . Homemade dog food is a great option to help pets with health issues, but if you dont feed a balanced diet youll be doing more harm than good. Diabetes can lead to many other health issues if not cared for properly. Some of these complications include: and many other health problems. In fact, life threatening conditions like thyroid problems and Cushings Disease have been linked to Diabetes. Its important to work with your veterinarian and/or a canine nutritionist to find the right treatment for your dog. The treatment chosen will depend on the severity of the disease, your dogs weight, his age and other factors that your vet will take into account. Perhaps this homemade diabetic dog food recipe will fit into his treatment plan. LISTEN: Podcast on Dealing With Canine Diabetes ft. Rachel Poulin, RVT As I explain in the video guide above, this homemade diabetic dog food is extremely easy to make. There isnt much prep work involved, and its a limited ingredient recipe. First, bring the water to a boil. Add the rice, salt and corn oil. Let this mixture simmer for about 15 minutes. Add the rest of the ingredients and mix it all together until completely blended. Simmer for another 10 minutes. Once the fo Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dog Food: Diet Change As A Treatment Option

Diabetic Dog Food: Diet Change As A Treatment Option

“Your dog has diabetes.” Hearing those words can be devastating for any dog owner. Worst-case scenarios run through your mind, with visions of insulin shots and cataracts … and even the possibility that the Big D diagnosis equals a shorter life span. Unfortunately, more and more people are hearing just this diagnosis lately. According to the State of Pet Health 2016 Report by the research team at Banfield Pet Hospital, the prevalence of diabetes in U.S. dogs has increased by nearly 80 percent since 2006. Even though the numbers are rising, the news isn’t all bad. Small measures can go a long way toward preventing and treating the disease — and simple dietary changes are a large part of that. “Diabetes doesn’t have to be scary,” says Laurie Coger, D.V.M., a holistic veterinarian and author. “The first thing I tell people after a diabetes diagnosis is to switch to fresh food, and they are intrigued by that.” Diabetes in Dogs: What Is It? Even though we hear the word often, diabetes can be a confusing and frequently misunderstood disease. You probably know it’s something about sugar, but the rest of the details may be fuzzy. Having a solid understanding of what the disease entails can help you understand how diet can help your diabetic dog. Diabetes occurs when the pancreas decreases the production of the hormone insulin, or has a decreased response to the insulin that is released, according to Judy Morgan, D.V.M., and author of “From Needles to Natural: Learning Holistic Pet Healing.” Insulin’s role is to help your body utilize sugar into energy, so when its role is impaired or halted, it results in high blood sugar (also known as high blood glucose). Type 1 diabetes, which is more typically found in dogs, occurs when the body cannot produce in Continue reading >>

Dog Food For Normal, Fussy, Fat, Thin And Diabetic Dogs Recipe - Genius Kitchen

Dog Food For Normal, Fussy, Fat, Thin And Diabetic Dogs Recipe - Genius Kitchen

I have been making this recipe since the 1990s. It has been successfully served to at least 20 different dogs. It seems to appeal to them all. Fat ones lose weight. Thin ones gain weight. Even fussy and diabetic dogs will usually eat it. The recipe, when made as shown, is enough to feed about 30 kilos (or 66 pounds) of dog for a week. I serve this recipe once a day (in the evening) and add one large handful of hard food per 10 kilos (22 pounds) of dog. The morning feed is one handful of hard food per 10 kilos of dog.This recipe is based on a core approach given to me by a Chinese friend, Pamela, who always said tinned dog food was hard on a dog's kidneysespecially true, she said, for male dogs. The first dogs to enjoy this recipe each lived to 15 years of age. It's okay to leave out, short-change or substitute ingredients, but don't give dogs onions.The recipe form insists on an indication of servings, so I said 14 ( a serve a day for two dogs). This is the first recipe I ever submitted to Zaar. Hey, don't we all put our kids and dogs first? 12 bunch celery (can sub zucchini when it's plentiful) 2 -3 lbs beef (cheap cuts of hamburger, mince, chuck or the like) If you are making the recipe as shown, before you start to prepare it, make sure you have a pot large enough to hold all the ingredients. A very large stock pot is great and essential. Chop or slice the carrots, potatoes, celery and meat (other than minced meat) to a size that suits your dog. Add the drippings, or soy sauce and stock cubes to the pot. If you don't make roasts, see if your neighbours will save their drippings. This recipe can be made without the drippings or soy sauce/stock cubes, but I think the doggies deserve this luxury. You can freeze drippings. Add the water to the pot. You may need to reduc Continue reading >>

How To Make Homemade Dog Food: 10 Simple Recipes To Follow

How To Make Homemade Dog Food: 10 Simple Recipes To Follow

How to Make Homemade Dog Food: 10 Simple Recipes to Follow Dog owners are willing to do anything for their pets, including making their meals from scratch. Making a homemade dog food may appear to be a task for a pet owner, but you would realize that it isnt that tall a task at all given the numerous homemade dog food recipes that you can try. Makers of commercial dog food products may want you to believe otherwise, but feeding your dog with homemade food is actually good for him. Perhaps the most obvious benefit is that you can personally choose the ingredients to be used in the dog food. This is very critical if your dog has allergies, or you just want to spare him from consuming certain ingredients. You can also be assured that the food you are giving him is 100% safe. In times when dog food recalls due to possible contamination have become a very common occurrence, you will have peace of mind knowing that the food your dog is eating wont make him sick. It is also possible to save time and effort when you prepare your dogs food. Preparing foods in large branches would let you do so, as you would be able to freeze smaller portions which you can feed to your dog later on. Of course, you get to benefit from preparing your dogs food, too. While preparation may take up time, you can save a lot of money in the long run especially if you buy ingredients in bulk. What nutrition guidelines should you follow? While there are many benefits that you can get from preparing your dogs food, this doesnt mean that you just give him whatever food that you have at home. And please, dont even think of giving him table scraps particularly oily and fatty foods. Doing so can increase his risks of health problems like diarrhea and pancreatitis. Worse, he might end up eating toxic foods lik Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes In Dogs

Managing Diabetes In Dogs

Dogs can have diabetes just like humans - both Type 1 and Type 2. Diabetic dogs are increasingly common, but the disease is entirely manageable unless left untreated. MY DOG HAS DIABETES: OVERVIEW 1. If your dog shows symptoms of diabetes (described below), seek veterinary care at once. 2. Work with your vet to determine the right type of insulin and the right dose for your individual dog. 3. Take your dog for frequent veterinary checkups. 4. Learn how to give insulin injections and reward your dog for accepting them. 5. Consistently feed your diabetic dog the same type of food at the same time of day. 6. Report any unusual symptoms or reactions to your vet. For years public health officials have reported a diabetes epidemic among America’s children and adults. At the same time, the rate of canine diabetes in America has more than tripled since 1970, so that today it affects about 1 in every 160 dogs. But while many human cases are caused and can be treated by diet, for dogs, diabetes is a lifelong condition that requires careful blood sugar monitoring and daily insulin injections. The medical term for the illness is diabetes mellitus (mellitus is a Latin term that means “honey sweet,” reflecting the elevated sugar levels the condition produces in urine and blood). Diabetes occurs when the body is unable to produce sufficient insulin to metabolize food for energy, or when the body’s cells fail to utilize insulin properly. The pancreas’s inability to produce insulin is known in humans as type 1 (formerly called juvenile or insulin-dependent) diabetes. This is analogous to the type that affects virtually all dogs. Dogs can also develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy. Type 2 (formerly adult onset) diabetes, which is the result of insulin resistance often l Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dog Treats, The Safest Homemade Recipes

Diabetic Dog Treats, The Safest Homemade Recipes

If you'd rather not add additional treats to your dog's diet, you can adapt their current food into a tasty treat. This changes the texture and subtle taste changes which makes the food more enticing and interesting to your dog but keeps the calorie and carbohydrate content relatively the same. All our dogs deserve a treats! If your dog is on restricted diet, using your dogs food as a treat is a fabulous way to make them feel special. Here's a few great recipes for making your dog they own diabetic dog treats. Place 2 cups of your dog dried food in a blender and grind the food so it becomes a powder consistency. Mix the grinned dried dog food with 1/4 cup of cold water until it forms a dough. Shape the dough into cookie shapes, using the back of a wooden spoon or fork flatten them down a little and place them onto a cookie sheet and bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes. Make sure you let the cookies cool down before serving them to your dog. These cookies can be stored in the refrigerator for up to one week in a sealed container. Open a can of your dogs food and cut the loaf into 1/4" thick slices. To make it fun, use a small cookie cutter to cut out individual pieces of the loaf. If you don't have cookie cutters, you can cut the loaf into bite-sized pieces instead. Place the cookies on a non greased cookie sheet and bake at 350 degree for 30 minutes or until crispy. These treats can be kept in an air tight container in the refrigerator for 5 days. Try rolling the canned food into small bite sized balls and place them in the freezer. A few hours later you can serve these frozen treats to your dog, it's a great refreshing treat to help keep your dog cool in the summer. If you're looking for the best diabetic dog treats then homemade is absolute the best way to go. You'll Continue reading >>

Food Recipes For Diabetic Dogs

Food Recipes For Diabetic Dogs

Dogs that suffer from diabetes, are prone to have harmful effects on their health. Here are some healthy dog food recipes to help your diabetic canine pet live a happy life. Diabetes cannot be cured, but it can be well managed with right food habits and living conditions. It's a lifestyle disease, which has even spread to domestic animals, such as dogs. This class of domestic animals suffer from two types of diabetes known as Mellitus and Insipidus. Among these Mellitus is a common type that affects many dogs. Here, the beta cells present in the body do not produce enough insulin, which uses glucose to provide energy. This unused glucose keeps piling up, bringing a rise in the sugar level in the blood, which ultimately results into diabetes. This disease greatly affects the organs of the body and leads to many other ailments, such as cataracts, hypoglycemia and stomach infections. Poor environment and genetic dispositions are the causes of diabetes in many dogs. Due to these factor they are at a risk of suffering from such a disease. Good living conditions, moderate exercise and choosing the right diabetic dog food , can maintain the lifespan of the dog. Dogs cannot regulate their food habits and the environment in which they reside. It is the duty of the owner or his family members, to take good care of a diabetic dog. There are many food recipes high on fiber and carbohydrates. Such a diet proves beneficial for diabetic dogs, bringing in a healthy change in their eating habits. The only purpose of consuming a good diet is, to regulate the blood sugar level and change the routine of the dog. Let's take a look at a few recipes for diabetic dogs. These dog treats are easy to make and loved by diabetic dogs. Take up the tutorial and let your dog enjoy some of the yummy t Continue reading >>

Home Cooking Recipes For Diabetic Pets

Home Cooking Recipes For Diabetic Pets

Home cooking only Combination home cooking and commercial Web resources Books The following recipes are used by owners of diabetic pets. They may not be appropriate for your pet, and any change in your pet's diet should be done under the supervision of a veterinarian. If you are interested in home cooking, these recipes can be a source of information for you and may help you discuss ideas for your pet's diet with your vet. Home Cooking Only Montauk's Recipe This recipe makes about 2 gallons of food, which is about 30 servings for my Malamute Montauk. I have some very large pans, and you are welcome to cut down the amounts to what suits your needs. I vary both the meats and vegetable depending on what is inexpensive. For this recipe I do not use corn or carrots or peas as a vegetable - nothing with carbohydrates. I will also add other proteins as toppings for the food - hard boiled eggs, cottage cheese, meats, etc. You might just try a little of that on the current food you are using. I call it kick starting the dinner. My Malamute does not need anything of the sort, she is always hungry. Again, anything that does not affect insulin (the stuff the Atkin's diet encourages) is pretty safe to give as a treat. Regular dog treats are high in carbohydrates and should be controlled. 6 pounds lean ground beef, chicken or other lean meat 5 cups uncooked pearl barley 5 cups uncooked brown rice 2 cups minced celery, green beans, chopped spinach or green vegetable 24 cups water. (With brown rice it is 2 cups of water per cup of uncooked rice. The barley takes slightly more so I use 24 cups rather than 20.) Put ingredients in large pan, bring to a boil, lower heat to simmer and cook until all the water is absorbed. Pam, Montauk (dd dx 05/01), Putney and the cats Dixie's Recipe Dixie Continue reading >>

Canine Support Group - Homemade Diets

Canine Support Group - Homemade Diets

Has it become a battle day after day to get your diabetic dog to eat? Does he turn his nose up at the kibble or canned food you give him? Not to worry, you can "dress up" your current food and make your own homemade diet. Although it is more work than putting canned/dry food into a bowl, it does have its benefits. My diabetic dog became a very picky eater and I often found it difficult to find a diet in the pet food store that would suite her diabetic needs. Often times, store bought diets have added by-products or sugar based substances, that could easily make a diabetic dog sick. A homemade diet can be adjusted to fit your dog's needs and it can also assure you that your dog is eating healthy. There are a few things worth considering when using homemade diets: Ask your vet first. Some vets don't like the idea of homemade diets and often times they prefer you to purchase their expensive, name brand, diets. Go to your vet well prepared with a list of information about why a homemade diet will work best for you and your dog. Always be sure to inform your vet of your dog's new diet and ask for suggestions. You will need a good multi vitamin to add to your homemade food. Make sure you understand your dogs nutrition requirements and that your new homemade diet will supply their needs. There are many vitamins that come in powder form you that you can mix in to your homemade diet, making this process easier for the pet owner. Add a digestive enzyme. Digestive enzymes help your dog to digest their food. They also take some of the pressure of the pancreas, which is already stressed from diabetes. Some multivitamins have a digestive enzyme added to them, so always be sure to read the label. Know your dog's recommended caloric intake. Taking into account your dog's current weigh Continue reading >>

Homemade Dog Food For Diabetic Dogs

Homemade Dog Food For Diabetic Dogs

Ruby became sick in August of 2008. He was urinating a lot, had increased water consumption, and looked thinner than normal. He ended up in a veterinary hospital where he was diagnosed with diabetes, diabetic ketoacidosis, and pancreatitis. Ketoacidosis can be a life-threatening complication for those suffering from diabetes. It occurs due to a lack of insulin which the body responds to by burning fat for fuel and producing ketones. High levels of ketones can poison the body. Simply put, Ruby was quite ill. In an attempt to comfort Ruby, I would crawl into his hospital kennel, hold him, and sing to him. ‘You Are My Sunshine’ was on regular rotation. Perhaps I did less singing and more pleading and praying. Either way, after a week in the hospital I was able to take my sunshine home. It was a challenge to convince Ruby that getting two insulin shots a day was actually a good thing. I had success after following some great advice: use his food as a reward for receiving the shot. I started by putting his full food bowl on the counter while prepping his shot. Like any food-motivated dog, movement of his food bowl commands his attention. But then the approaching needle would make him run away. After he ran away, I would put his food bowl in the cupboard. That movement of his bowl would bring him back again. Round and round we went until he realized the simple equation of food bowl on counter + shot in dog = food bowl on floor + full dog belly. See, Ruby, insulin shots are a great thing! Now he rushes each injection along so he can eat. The hospital sent us home with a few samples of diabetic dog food. I sought advice from Ruby’s vet on both packaged and homemade diabetic dog food. Dr. Old Vet was quite ambivalent and offered little to no opinion or advice. His disinter Continue reading >>

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