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Diabetic Doctor Offers A New Treatment

Inhalable Insulin Offers New Approach To Diabetes Treatment

Inhalable Insulin Offers New Approach To Diabetes Treatment

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — There’s an exciting development for people who take insulin to control their diabetes. There’s a new way to do it — largely replacing needles with an inhaler. That simple process is how Type-1 Diabetic Bradley Saveth now takes most of the insulin that keeps his blood sugar under control. It’s a huge difference from what he used to do. “I probably took eight to ten shots of insulin per day and followed it up with 12 or so finger sticks,” he tells CBS2’s Dr. Max Gomez. In addition to those finger sticks to check blood sugar levels, diabetics who need insulin have to carry around vials of the hormone, syringes, and needles — and then inject themselves multiple times a day, especially right before meals. Life comes to a halt several times a day. “You have to do it at the moment when you’re ready to eat,” says Dr. Anastasios Manessis from the Endocrine Associates of the West Village. “You have to check your sugars, you have to give insulin. Not only that, you have to take it 15 to 20 minutes before you eat in order to cover the elevation of sugars after you eat.” Now. there’s a much easier way to take the fast-acting insulin diabetics need at meal time. It’s called Afrezza — and it’s inhaled. What makes it possible is a unique combination of molecules that micro-encapsulate the fragile insulin, protecting it until it gets deep into the lungs where it dissolves and released into the bloodstream. “It acts faster so there’s more leeway with when you take it,” says Manessis. “It’s very short acting. There’s less risk of too low blood sugar level, which is also dangerous.” Saveth still injects long acting insulin once or twice a day, but he uses Afrezza instead of the half dozen or more injections of short Continue reading >>

Partnership With Virta Health Offers Employees A New Health Benefit For Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Partnership With Virta Health Offers Employees A New Health Benefit For Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Purdue University announced today a new partnership with Virta Health, a company founded by a world-class team of doctors and scientists, to offer its online Type 2 diabetes clinic as a covered health benefit to its employees and their dependents. The partnership comes on the heels of a peer-reviewed study (in which the Virta approach was successful in lowering A1c levels below the diabetic range in more than 50 percent of trial participants with Type 2 diabetes. Like many organizations affected by the challenges posed by Type 2 diabetes, over 1,800 known Purdue employees and their family members live with the disease, leading to millions of dollars in medical costs. Since early 2016, a group of Purdue employees has been enrolled in the Virta Clinic in an effort to treat their Type 2 diabetes, save money and live better lives. “The success of Virta with our already-enrolled Purdue employees speaks volumes,” said Candace Shaffer, interim associate director in benefits. “This program and what it offers to our employees living with Type 2 diabetes supports our university-wide initiative to continue to improve employee wellness for years to come.” Moving forward, university leadership hopes to see continued and expanded success with the program. “Virta enrolled patients from within the Purdue population in its clinical trial,” said Denny Darrow, vice president for human resources at Purdue. “They did the work for us and kept our employees engaged, and the results have been incredibly promising. Based upon that early success, we are now making Virta available to all eligible people with Type 2 diabetes in our employee and dependent populations.” Virta Health is a specialty medical clinic that works to remove or reduce the need for Type 2 diabetes medications Continue reading >>

New Treatment May Prevent Diabetes After Pancreatitis Surgery

New Treatment May Prevent Diabetes After Pancreatitis Surgery

Video: Preventing Diabetes After Pancreatectomy—Dr. Beth Schrope NEW YORK (September 22, 2014)—NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center now offers autologous islet cell transplantation, or auto islet surgery, to prevent diabetes in patients who require a total pancreatectomy. The hospital is the first center in the New York metropolitan area to offer this treatment. Every year, roughly 87,000 people in the United States receive surgical treatment for pancreatitis, a debilitating condition that causes intense abdominal pain and, potentially, diabetes. Pancreatitis can be so painful that, in some cases, patients must have the entire pancreas removed. While surgery relieves pain in 90 percent of cases, patients are left without the ability to produce insulin, causing a difficult-to-treat form of Type 1 diabetes known as “brittle diabetes.” In auto islet surgery, the patient’s islet cells, which produce hormones that regulate the endocrine system, are extracted from the pancreas after it is removed. The cells are then processed and reinfused into the patient’s liver. When auto islet surgery is successful, the reinfused cells produce insulin, acting in place of the pancreas to regulate blood sugar. The most recent findings show that about one third of patients require no insulin therapy after autologous islet transplantation, another third require some insulin therapy after the procedure, and the procedure is unsuccessful in preventing diabetes in the remaining third. “The goal of pancreatectomy is to relieve pain,” says Dr. Beth Schrope, gastrointestinal surgeon and assistant professor of surgery, NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center, who specializes in the treatment of pancreatitis. “Returning to normal activities and liv Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Print Diabetic neuropathy is usually diagnosed based on your symptoms, your medical history and a physical exam. During the exam, your doctor is likely to check your muscle strength and tone, tendon reflexes, and sensitivity to touch, temperature and vibration. Your doctor may also conduct tests that include: Filament test. Sensitivity to touch may be tested using a soft nylon fiber called a monofilament. Nerve conduction studies. This test measures how quickly the nerves in your arms and legs conduct electrical signals. It's often used to diagnose carpal tunnel syndrome. Electromyography (EMG). Often performed along with nerve conduction studies, electromyography measures the electrical discharges produced in your muscles. Quantitative sensory testing. This noninvasive test is used to assess how your nerves respond to vibration and changes in temperature. Autonomic testing. If you have symptoms of autonomic neuropathy, your doctor may request special tests to look at your blood pressure in different positions and assess your ability to sweat. The American Diabetes Association recommends that all people with diabetes have a comprehensive foot exam — either by a doctor or by a foot specialist (podiatrist) — at least once a year. In addition, your feet should be checked for sores, cracked skin, calluses, blisters, and bone and joint abnormalities at every office visit. Treatment Diabetic neuropathy has no known cure. Treatment for diabetic neuropathy focuses on: Slowing progression of the disease Relieving pain Managing complications and restoring function Slowing progression of the disease Consistently keeping blood sugar within a target range can help prevent or delay the progression of diabetic neuropathy and may even improve some of the symptoms you already have. Continue reading >>

Doctor Offers Cure For Diabetes In 72 Hours, Invites Minister

Doctor Offers Cure For Diabetes In 72 Hours, Invites Minister

Doctor offers cure for diabetes in 72 hours, invites Minister Cure for Diabetes Type-I and II in 72 hours, three steps to be heart attack-proof, insight into the science, commerce and arts of diabetes, and finally the launch of a book titled Why mortality rate drops when doctors go on strike? are among the issues Dr. Biswaroop Roy Chowdhury shall discuss during his talk show scheduled for June 20 at the Siri Fort auditorium. Delhi Health Minister Satyendra Jain is believed to be the chief guest for the event. City doctors, meanwhile, are concerned about how this fraud is being allowed and why Mr. Jain has agreed to be part of this illegal activity. The Delhi Medical Association has now written to the Health Minister warning him about allowing and participating in such events. Dr. Anil Bansal, chairman of the Delhi Medical Councils Anti-Quackery Cell, said, What is being allowed is illegal. People should be warned against such activity. There is no cure for diabetes. The man claims to be the author of 25 books and is offering cure for an incurable disease. In medical science, there is no cure for diabetes. However, it can be managed, or even prevented, by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. The State Health Ministers Office has denied receiving any invitation for the event. Continue reading >>

East Bay Doctor Offers Alternative To Standard Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

East Bay Doctor Offers Alternative To Standard Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Dr. Raymond Knapp, DC, ACN of East Bay Chiropractic Health Center began his pursuit of an alternative to the standard Type 2 Diabetes treatment following the loss of his uncle, a man whose battle with the disease laid the foundation for the post-graduate studies that Knapp explored in an effort to help others with the progressive, degenerative disease. Determined to learn all that he could, Knapp incorporated new scientific research that allows diabetic patients to walk away from prescription drugs and insulin, lose weight without exercise, increase energy levels and improve their overall quality of life. Patch: Tell us about Type 2 Diabetes. What happens to the body when insulin levels are high? Subscribe Knapp: It is the body's inability to control blood sugar. After breathing, it may be the second most important function in the human body. When you lose the ability to control your blood sugars, your chances of complications — such as increased cholesterol, blood pressure, heart attack, blindness, stroke, cancer, kidney disease, Alzheimer's and amputations — increases dramatically. This disease ( type 2 Diabetes) is reversible — and don't let anyone tell you it's not! Patch: East Bay Chiropractic Health Center offers a fresh, clinical approach for patients suffering from Type II Diabetes and hypothyroidism. How does it work? Knapp: After extensive lab testing, we get to the source of the body's dysfunction and work supporting the body's ability to repair itself. The cause for one person's Type 2 Diabetes is generally not the same cause as another's. We want to get to the root of the problem rather than manage the symptoms. Patch: How did your implementation of this clinical process come to be? Knapp: A lot of education, hard work, persistence and passion. My des Continue reading >>

First-in-class Diabetes Drug Offers New Treatment Options For Va Patients

First-in-class Diabetes Drug Offers New Treatment Options For Va Patients

SAN DIEGO – The Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) recent approval of canagliflozin might soon offer new treatment options for the more than one million VA patients with diabetes. “This is definitely not a ‘me too’ drug,” said Candis Morello, PharmD, CDE, FCSHP, director, Diabetes Intense Medical Management Clinic, Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System, and associate professor of clinical pharmacy, University of California San Diego, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. “It’s an additional treatment option and a very complementary medication, particularly with metformin. Some new efficacy studies show that it significantly reduces HbA1c and promotes weight loss, and other studies have indicated that it lowers blood pressure as well, which is definitely a problem for people with diabetes,” Morello told U.S. Medicine. “It also doesn’t cause hypoglycemia, which we want to avoid at all costs.” Canagliflozin, marketed as Invokana by Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen Pharmaceuticals Inc., is the first FDA-approved therapy in the sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor class of drugs. SGLT2 inhibitors block a protein involved in glucose reabsorption in the kidneys, allowing the body to excrete excess blood sugar in urine. Consequently, drugs in this class lower blood glucose levels and contribute to weight loss. Last year, the FDA rejected another drug in the category, dapagliflozin, because of concerns about cancer. Dapagliflozin gained approval in Europe in November and is likely to be reconsidered by the FDA this summer. Another SGLT-2 inhibitor, empagliflozin, recently filed for FDA approval and a fourth, ipragliflozin, filed for approval in Japan. “It’s important to have medications with multiple mechanisms of Continue reading >>

What Doctors Don't Tell You: Treating Diabetes Naturally

What Doctors Don't Tell You: Treating Diabetes Naturally

There are a number of 'natural' treatment approaches which can help to keep type 2 diabetes under control. Supplement with vitamin E. Vitamin E can reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke in diabetics, according to a study carried out by researchers at the University of Texas (Circulation, 2000; 102: 191-6).Furthermore, there is mounting evidence that raised blood glucose levels lead to the production of more free radicals, and vitamin E has been shown to stop the production of free radicals (Diabetes Care, 1991; 14: 68-72). Vitamin E also helps with circulation and stabilises blood sugar (Diabetes, 1982; 31: 947-51; Diabetes, 1984; 33: 239-43; Metabolism, 1992; 41: 613-21; Am J Clin Nutr, 1993; 57: 650-6). Use onion and garlic liberally. Both are now known to have a significant ability to lower blood sugar (Ind J Med Res, 1977; 65: 422-9; Quart J Crude Drug Res, 1979; 17: 139-96). Take fenugreek seeds, as these have also been shown to be effective in lowering blood sugar (Eur J Clin Nutr, 1988; 42: 51-4; Eur J Clin Nutr, 1990; 44: 301-6). Include nopal, a type of prickly pear cactus, in your diet. This plant has been shown to reduce glucose and insulin levels. In a double blind study, a group of type 2 diabetics consumed 500 g of broiled nopal stems. After three hours, all achieved an average reduction of 17 per cent in glucose and 50 per cent in insulin compared with those taking a placebo (Diabetes Care, 1988; 11: 63-6). Include dandelion root, Jerusalem artichokes and burdock root in your diet. These all contain a substance called inulin, which assists in controlling blood sugar (Am J Clin Nutr, 1990; 52: 675-81), and in reducing hyperglycaemia and fatigue after a starchy meal (Ann Intern Med, 1931; 5: 274-84). Take a spoonful of cinnamon every day, as this can Continue reading >>

Pardon Our Interruption...

Pardon Our Interruption...

As you were browsing www.mdlinx.com something about your browser made us think you were a bot. There are a few reasons this might happen: You're a power user moving through this website with super-human speed. You've disabled JavaScript in your web browser. A third-party browser plugin, such as Ghostery or NoScript, is preventing JavaScript from running. Additional information is available in this support article. To request an unblock, please fill out the form below and we will review it as soon as possible. You reached this page when attempting to access from 35.193.216.90 on 2017-12-27 14:15:37 UTC. Trace: b5090e50-4af3-4150-9f66-b2bb56465ff5 via 7bcaee21-0f58-4c1e-b08a-f4cd97c75010 Continue reading >>

Purdue, Virta Health Partner With New Approach To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Purdue, Virta Health Partner With New Approach To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Online type 2 diabetes clinic provides new solution without risk, expense of surgery WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind., and SAN FRANCISCO – Purdue University, one of the nation’s leading research universities, and Virta Health, a company founded by a world-class team of doctors and scientists, announced today a new partnership to offer its online type 2 diabetes clinic as a covered health benefit to its employees and their dependents. The partnership comes on the heels of a peer-reviewed study in which the Virta approach was successful in lowering A1c levels below the diabetic range in more than 50 percent of trial participants with type 2 diabetes. Like many organizations affected by the challenges posed by type 2 diabetes, over 1,800 known Purdue employees and their family members live with the disease, leading to millions of dollars in medical costs. Since early 2016, a group of Purdue employees has been enrolled in the Virta Clinic in an effort to treat their type 2 diabetes, save money and live better lives. “The success of Virta with our already-enrolled Purdue employees speaks volumes,” said Candace Shaffer, interim associate director in benefits. “This program and what it offers to our employees living with type 2 diabetes supports our university-wide initiative to continue to improve employee wellness for years to come.” Moving forward, university leadership hopes to see continued and expanded success with Virta and its approach. “Virta enrolled patients from within the Purdue population in its clinical trial,” said Denny Darrow, vice president for human resources at Purdue. “They did the work for us and kept our employees engaged, and the results have been incredibly promising. Based upon that early success, we are now making Virta available to all eligib Continue reading >>

Ground-breaking Discovery Could Lead To New Treatments For Diabetes

Ground-breaking Discovery Could Lead To New Treatments For Diabetes

Why would a bacteria-killing protein be present in an area of the body that is not normally exposed to bacteria, like the pancreas? Researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa puzzled over this question for some time, until they eventually discovered that the protein in question was doing something entirely unexpected - it was actually helping the pancreas regenerate and produce insulin. This ground-breaking discovery, recently published in the journal Diabetes, could lead to new treatments for this devastating disease. More than 400 million people around the world have diabetes, which occurs when the body can't properly control the level of sugar in the blood. Normally, insulin produced by the pancreas tightly controls blood sugar levels, but people with diabetes either can't produce enough insulin or can't properly respond to it. Even with insulin injections patients still face many health challenges, including organ damage and decreased lifespan. Dr. Fraser Scott and his team study type 1 diabetes, which occurs when the immune system - which is supposed to protect the body against dangerous microbial invaders - mistakenly attacks and destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Nobody knows exactly what causes this, but genetics, diet, bacteria and viruses are thought to play a role. Dr. Scott's previous research suggested that a bacteria-killing protein called cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) might also play a role in type 1 diabetes, but it was not clear how. "We were looking for this bacteria-killing protein in various parts of the body, and as expected, we found high levels in the gut tissues that are exposed to bacteria," explained Dr. Scott, a senior scientist at The Ottawa Hospital and professor at the University of Ottawa. "H Continue reading >>

Partnership With Virta Health Offers New Employee Health Benefit For Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Partnership With Virta Health Offers New Employee Health Benefit For Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Purdue announced today (April 14) a new partnership with Virta Health, a company founded by a world-class team of doctors and scientists, to offer its online type 2 diabetes clinic as a covered health benefit to its employees and their dependents. The partnership comes on the heels of a peer-reviewed study in which the Virta approach was successful in lowering A1c levels below the diabetic range in more than 50 percent of trial participants with type 2 diabetes. As in many organizations affected by the challenges posed by type 2 diabetes, over 1,800 known Purdue employees and their family members live with the disease, leading to millions of dollars in medical costs. Since early 2016, a group of Purdue employees has been enrolled in the Virta Clinic in an effort to treat their type 2 diabetes, save money and live better lives. "The success of Virta with our already-enrolled Purdue employees speaks volumes," said Candace Shaffer, interim associate director in benefits. "This program and what it offers to our employees living with type 2 diabetes supports our University-wide initiative to continue to improve employee wellness for years to come." Moving forward, University leadership hopes to see continued and expanded success with the program. "Virta enrolled patients from within the Purdue population in its clinical trial," said Denny Darrow, vice president for human resources at Purdue. "They did the work for us and kept our employees engaged, and the results have been incredibly promising. Based upon that early success, we are now making Virta available to all eligible people with type 2 diabetes in our employee and dependent populations." Virta Health is a specialty medical clinic that works to remove or reduce the need for type 2 diabetes medications and lowers A1c l Continue reading >>

British Doctors Trial Simple Gut Operation That 'cures Or Controls' Diabetes

British Doctors Trial Simple Gut Operation That 'cures Or Controls' Diabetes

A simple gut operation that sees a plastic film inserted into the stomach could cure or control diabetes, British doctors have found. Patients taking part in trials at King's College Hospital and University College Hospital in London and City Hospital in Birmingham found their diabetes had disappeared or become much milder after the operations. Francesco Rubino, professor of metabolic surgery at King's, told The Sunday Times: "About 50 per cent of patients are diabetes-free after these procedures. "The remaining people demonstrate big improvements of blood sugar control and can drastically reduce their dependence on insulin or other medication. "In many patients, blood sugar levels go back to normal within days, long before declines in fat levels or weight." The treatments stem from a new view of the causes of diabetes, a condition in which there is too much glucose in the blood. Diabetes has previously been blamed on the pancreas not secreting enough insulin, the hormone that controls glucose levels - but Rubino and his colleagues believe the gut is the key player. Andrea Midmer, 59, a nurse, took part in the trial, in which a plastic liner or "endobarrier" was fitted into her stomach to stop the walls of her upper gut coming into contact with the food she ate. How to | Manage and reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes Six tips from Dr David Cavan, the UK's leading expert on diabetes self-management and author of Reverse Your Diabetes: The Step-by-Step Plan to Take Control of Type 2 Diabetes. Limit yourself to two standard alcoholic drinks a day. Alcohol is high in calories and can lead to weight gain and increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Moderate alcohol intake is associated with reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. Cider, sweet wines and some beers are best avoided as the c Continue reading >>

Breakthrough Pill Can Cure Diabetes: New Drug Fights Both Types Of Killer Disease

Breakthrough Pill Can Cure Diabetes: New Drug Fights Both Types Of Killer Disease

Handing hope to the millions of sufferers in the UK, the new study suggests that a “probiotic pill” - one containing live bacteria - can radically reduce blood glucose levels. In experiments researchers discovered that using a pill containing common bacteria found in the human gut can shift the control of glucose levels from the pancreas to the upper intestine. It is believed that this “rewiring” of the body could revolutionise treatment for diabetes - both Types 1 and 2 - and potentially one day offer the possibility of a cure. Professor John March, leading the research, said: “If it works really well in people, it could be that they just take the pill and wouldn’t have to do anything else to control their diabetes. It’s likely, though, that it will be used in conjunction with some other treatment.” Diabetes occurs when the amount of glucose in a sufferer’s blood becomes too high because the body cannot use it properly. This happens when the pancreas does not produce any insulin (Type 1), or not enough insulin to help glucose enter the body’s cells – or the insulin that is produced does not work properly, known as insulin resistance (Type 2). But the new study suggests a manufactured probiotic pill could shift control of glucose levels away from the pancreas - addressing both types of diabetes. Published in the journal Diabetes, senior author Professor March and colleagues at Cornell University, New York, told how they had engineered a common strain of “friendly” human gut bacteria called Lactobacillus to secrete a peptide - a hormone that releases insulin in response to food. Lactobacillus is a probiotic often used to prevent and treat diarrhoea, as well as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), Crohn’s disease and some skin disorders. Over a peri Continue reading >>

Other Treatments For Managing Gestational Diabetes

Other Treatments For Managing Gestational Diabetes

Other Treatments for Managing Gestational Diabetes DISCLAIMER: This Health Library is for educational purposes only and does not necessarily reflect the services provided by this practice/facility. Main Page Risk Factors Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Screening Reducing Your Risk Talking to Your Doctor Resource Guide Proper diet is an essential part of treating gestational diabetes . The American Diabetes Association offers these general guidelines: Eat a total of 2,000 to 2,200 calories per day. Increase fiber intake to avoid constipation . Keeping track of your day-to-day glucose level is extremely important especially if you are being treated with insulin. Certain things you do can affect your glucose level, including eating and exercising. In addition, as your pregnancy progresses, the placenta releases more of the hormones that work against insulin. Keeping track of your glucose level will allow you and your doctor to determine what treatment, or combination of treatments, works best for you. You can monitor your glucose level using a glucose monitoring kit. This includes a special device to obtain a drop of blood, which you then test to determine the glucose level. Your doctor will show you how to use the monitoring kit. To obtain the drop of blood, you may use: Lanceta disposable, sharp needle-like pricking device Lancet devicea spring-loaded instrument used for a finger prick The drop of blood is applied to a chemically treated test strip. Some strips are read visually, meaning that you compare your strip against a color chart provided to determine glucose level. But more often, you will use a glucose metera device that reads the test strip and gives you a digital number valueto interpret your results. If you are on insulin, you may need to test your blood throug Continue reading >>

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