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Diabetic Diet Teaching Plan

Teaching Plan For Diabetes Mellitus

Teaching Plan For Diabetes Mellitus

Please read about my new book This is a powerful antioxidant therapy which has natural ingredients to combat effects of oxidative stress to promote health and wellness. Please visit our other website by Louise Diehl, RN, MSN, ND, CCRN, ACNS-BC, NP-C Nurse Practitioner - Owner Doctor of Naturopathy Lehigh Valley Wellness Center Before you begin your teaching plan be sure to define the characteristics of the clinical site and patient population. The teaching plan should be customized to this population. This is a sample teaching plan that you can use and customize to your needs. You may want to design a pre-test and post-test to give your patients would are attending the teaching program. Based on statistics from the Centers for Disease Control website, 17.0 million people in the United States, approximately 6.2% of the population, have diabetes. Of this 17 million people, 11.1 million are diagnosed and 5.9 million are undiagnosed. In the different age groups, about 151,000 people less than 20 years of age have diabetes, approximately 0.19% of people in this age group. In the 20 and older age group 16.9 million and 8.6% of people have diabetes. The 65 and older age group has 7.0 million and 20.1% of all people with diabetes (www.cdc.gov/diabetes). The Identified Learning Need Patients with Diabetes have very comprehensive learning needs. The learning needs are focused on managing their glucose levels and preventing complications of diabetes. Learning needs for managing diabetes are complex and include: monitoring blood glucose levels, menu/food planning, exercise, medications, skin care, management of co-existing disease processes, knowledge of medications, knowledge of the disease process and how to manage hypo/hyperglycemic episodes. Many patients are diagnosed with dia Continue reading >>

Diabetes | Nurse Teachings

Diabetes | Nurse Teachings

SN explained that the Diabetes can affect the small blood vessels of the body that supply the skin with blood. Changes to the blood vessels because of diabetes can cause a skin condition called diabetic dermopathy. This appears as scaly patches that are light brown or red, often on the front of the legs. SN instructed patient on the diabetes. Make wise food choices. Choose fruits, vegetables, whole grains, fish, lean meats, and low - fat dairy products. Learn when to eat and how much to have.Be physically active for 30 to 60 minutes most days, such as taking a brisk walk as tolerated. Two times a week do activities to strengthen muscles and bone, such as lifting weights or sit - ups. Reach and stay at a healthy weight. Making wise food choices and being active can help you control your weight. Take your medicines as prescribed and keep taking them, even after youve reached your targets. Sn instructed patient on diabetes management. Aim for your A1c level to be between 6-7%. For every 1% you decrease your A1c levels you decrease your risk of Diabetic complications. Physical activity helps to decrease blood sugar levels and monitor your food intake such as carbohydrates and fats. Patient verbalized understanding. SN instructed patient on diabetes and kidney problem, that diabetes mellitus ( DM ) is one of the leading cause of kidney failure in the United States. Approximately one-half of people who need dialysis have kidney disease from diabetes.With that, tight control of blood sugar must be done by avoiding concentrated sweets and high-carbohydrate content foods.Diabetic patients with hypertension have a special lower blood pressure target of less than 130 / 80 mmHg to reduce cardiovascular risk and delay progression of kidney disease. SN instructed that if you have di Continue reading >>

Basic Diabetes Meal Plan

Basic Diabetes Meal Plan

Diabetes meal planning starts with eating a well-balanced diet that includes carbohydrates (carbs), protein, and fat. Carbs (found in starches, fruit, vegetables, milk/yogurt and sweets) turn into sugar (glucose) in the body. The body needs carbs for energy. Eating too many carbs can raise blood glucose levels too much, but it is important not cut out these foods. Eating too few carbs may cause your blood glucose to go too low. Eating a moderate amount of carbs at each meal, with a balanced intake of protein and fat, will help your blood glucose stay in a healthy range. Here are some tips to get you started. Your dietitian will give you more specific information when you meet with him or her. Limit your intake and portion sizes of high-sugar foods to 2 or 3 times a week or less. These include: Cakes (frosted, layer, plain), pies, and cookies Candy (hard tack, chocolate, nougats, etc.) Jelly, jam, and preserves Table sugar, honey, molasses, and syrup Regular ice cream, sherbet, regular and frozen yogurt, fruit ices, and Popsicles Regular soft drinks, fruit drinks (canned or concentrated), and drink mixes with sugar added Milkshakes, chocolate milk, hot cocoa mix Sugar coated cereals, granola, breakfast/snack bars Canned fruits with heavy syrup, dried fruit, fruit roll-ups, candied fruit Iced sweet breads, coffee cakes, breakfast rolls, and donuts Avoid the following: Table sugar, honey, molasses and syrup Regular soft drinks, fruit drinks (canned or concentrated), and drink mixes with sugar added Milkshakes, chocolate milk, hot cocoa mix Canned fruits with heavy syrup Eat 3 well-balanced meals a day and a small snack at night. Each meal should contain both carbs and protein. When planning meals, select a variety of foods from each food group, and watch your portion sizes Continue reading >>

7 Lessons From The Diabetic Diet

7 Lessons From The Diabetic Diet

I dont believe in the diabetic diet. I believe in a balanced diet that focuses on wholesome, real foods. I teach my patients that no food is off-limits. With planning and moderation, all foods can fit into a healthful diet. To put it simply, we could all benefit from the lessons of the diabetic diet. Here are the 7 lessons from the diabetic diet I teach my young patients and families: With my diabetic patients, type 1 or type 2, I recommend a limit of one concentrated sweet per day . A concentrated sweet is a dessert (cake, cookies, candy, etc.), sweet snack food, or sweet breakfast item (sweetened cereal, pastries, donuts, etc.). Not only do these foods raise blood sugars, but they tend to be nutritionally void. That being said, a life without chocolate is not a life worth living. I encourage my patients to include these foods in their diet, but plan for no more than one, reasonably-sized portion per day. Carbohydrates are an essential part of a balanced diet. The Dietary Guidelines recommend that 45-65% of calories come from carbohydrate. I give my patients a carbohydrate allowance per meal, and teach them to spend wisely. If your meal allowance is 60 grams of carbohydrate per meal, you can choose to eat 2 pancakes (57 grams of carbohydrate, 2 grams of fiber). Alternatively, you could choose to eat an egg, whole grain English muffin, and an apple with peanut butter (49 grams of carbohydrate, 9 grams of fiber). Im not saying pancakes are forbidden, but I teach my patients to focus on getting the most bang for their carbohydrate-buck. Carbs are the nutrient of concern for diabetes, but this principle applies to all components of the diet. Choose your foods wisely. I tell my patients that there are no strict rules when it comes to planning a diabetic dietexcept for this Continue reading >>

Carbohydrates And Diabetes

Carbohydrates And Diabetes

Foods containing carbohydrates become glucose or blood sugar when digested, and controlling blood sugar is important if you have diabetes. Healthy eating is a key strategy to blood sugar control as well as timing, type and quantity of foods eaten. Monitor your blood glucose levels and keep a written record to get a sense of how your body responds to specific foods. Below, you will find tips on managing your consumption of carbohydrates. Meals Eat three main meals each day. Time your meals based on your blood sugar, activity levels and medication. Establish an eating pattern that works for you. Do not skip meals. Try to eat a consistent amount of carbohydrates and consistent portions. Eat a variety of foods from each food group for good nutrition. Beverages High carbohydrate liquids can quickly raise blood sugar levels. Strictly limit fruit juice and regular sodas. Diet drinks and other beverages with artificial sweeteners won't raise your blood sugar levels. Fruit juice is high in natural sugars. Eight ounces of natural fruit juice, without added sugar, has the same amount of sugar as 8 ounces of regular soda, about 6 teaspoons of sugar. Eat fruit instead of drinking fruit juice. Dairy Milk and yogurt have a natural sugar called lactose. Choose the healthier nonfat or low-fat versions. Cheese has a trace of carbohydrate but is high in fat. Choose reduced fat cheese, such as 2 percent fat, low-fat or nonfat cheese. Fruit Fruit is naturally sweet so limit yourself to one serving of fruit at a time. A serving, for example, is one small apple or orange; half of a large banana; or one cup of cubed melon. Choose fresh fruit, unsweetened frozen fruit or canned fruit packed in water or its own juice. Eat fruit, rather than drinking fruit juice. Starch Eat foods made of whole gr Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet

Diabetic Diet

If you have diabetes, your body cannot make or properly use insulin. This leads to high blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels. Healthy eating helps keep your blood sugar in your target range. It is a critical part of managing your diabetes, because controlling your blood sugar can prevent the complications of diabetes. A registered dietitian can help make an eating plan just for you. It should take into account your weight, medicines, lifestyle, and other health problems you have. Healthy diabetic eating includes Limiting foods that are high in sugar Eating smaller portions, spread out over the day Being careful about when and how many carbohydrates you eat Eating a variety of whole-grain foods, fruits and vegetables every day Eating less fat Limiting your use of alcohol Using less salt NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

Diabetes Self Management Patient Education Materials

Diabetes Self Management Patient Education Materials

Table of Contents Click on any of the links below to access helpful materials on managing all aspects of diabetes that can be printed and given to your patients . Introductory Information 1. Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 Symptoms, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment (e.g., insulin) 2. Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 Symptoms, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment (e.g., medications) 3. Women and Diabetes: Eating and weight, pregnancy, and heart disease 4. Men and Diabetes: Sexual Issues and employment concerns 5. Diabetes and Your Lifestyle: Exercise, traveling, employment, sexual issues, and special considerations for the elderly General Self-Care (e.g., Blood Glucose, Foot Care) Blood Glucose 6. Pass This Test: Testing blood glucose levels 7. Get off the Blood Glucose Rollercoaster: High/low blood sugar symptoms and treatment A. TOOL: Blood Sugar Monitoring Log (Oral Meds): Patient log to record levels B. TOOL: Blood Sugar Monitoring Log (Insulin Meds): Patient log to monitor levels Feet 8. Foot Care for People with Diabetes: Hygiene, inspection, and when to call your physician C. TOOL: Foot Care Log Patient log to record self-inspections and any problem areas D. TOOL: Injection Sites Patient log to help rotate injection sites Exercise E. TOOL: Planning Your Exercise: Guide to help patients design an exercise program F. TOOL: Physical Activity Log: Patient log to record physical activity 9. Exercise in Disguise Finding ways to exercise at home and outside of the gym 10. Exercising Like Your Life Depends on It: Health benefits to exercising 11. Hot Weather Exercise: Taking extra care when exercising in hot weather Nutrition/Health Diet/Weight Loss 12. Managing Type 2 Diabetes through Diet: Suggestions for balancing your diet 13. Losing Weight When You Have Diabetes: Weight loss be Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet: Foods That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetic Diet: Foods That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

There is no single diabetes diet, meal plan, or diet that is diabetes-friendly that can serve as a correct meal plan for all patients with diabetes (type 2, gestational, or type 1 diabetes). Glycemic index, carbohydrate counting, the MyPlate method, and the TLC diet plan are all methods for determining healthy eating habits for diabetes management. The exact type and times of meals on a diabetic meal plan depend upon a person's age and gender, how much exercise you get and your activity level, and the need to gain, lose, or maintain optimal weight. Most diabetic meal plans allow the person with diabetes to eat the same foods as the rest of the family, with attention to portion size and timing of meals and snacks. Eating a high-fiber diet can help improve blood cholesterol and blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. Glycemic index is a way to classify carbohydrates in terms of the amount that they raise blood sugar. High glycemic index foods raise blood sugar more than lower index foods. Some patients with type 2 use supplements as complementary medicine to treat their disease. However, there is limited evidence on the effectiveness of supplements in treating the disease. A diabetes meal plan (diabetes diet) is a nutritional guide for people with diabetes that helps them decide when to consume meals and snacks as well as what type of foods to eat. There is no one predetermined diabetes diet that works for all people with diabetes. The goal of any diabetic meal plan is to achieve and maintain good control over the disease, including control of blood glucose and blood lipid levels as well as to maintaining a healthy weight and good nutrition. Health care professionals and nutritionists can offer advice to help you create the best meal plan to manage your diabe Continue reading >>

12 Tips For Creating A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

12 Tips For Creating A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Although there is no single type 2 diabetes diet prescribed to everyone, what you eat really does matter if your blood sugar is uncontrolled. In fact, if you have prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, a personalized diet could help you lower your A1C and lose unwanted excess weight, thereby reducing insulin resistance, the hallmark of type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is marked by the body’s inability to use the hormone insulin ineffectively. Insulin helps ferry glucose, or blood sugar, from the blood to the cells for energy. Meanwhile, A1C is a two- to three-month average of blood sugar levels, and an A1C of 6.5 percent or higher is considered type 2 diabetes, while an A1C below 5.7 is normal, according to the Mayo Clinic. Elevated blood sugar levels can lead to potentially dangerous diabetes complications, including heart disease, diabetic neuropathy (nerve damage), diabetic retinopathy (vision issues), and more. How Diet Choices May Play a Role in Preventing and Reversing Diabetes While there are a number of factors that contribute to the onset of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes — including your family health history and ethnicity — experts agree changing your diet has the potential to prevent prediabetes from escalating to type 2 diabetes. It also may stop type 2 diabetes from progressing and causing health complications. Maintaining a healthy weight is key: If you're overweight, losing only 5 to 7 percent of your weight can help improve blood sugar control and prevent prediabetes from progressing into full-blown type 2 diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Here are 12 basic guidelines you can follow to help build a healthy type 2 diabetes diet plan, whether you have prediabetes or full-blown type 2 diabetes: 1. Know What Mak Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Diabetes, Prevention

Patient Education: Diabetes, Prevention

Young, Smart, Attractive, DIABETIC? Why college students should care about diabetes — and how to prevent it Tell me what diabetes is and what it has to do with me. Diabetes means that your blood glucose (sugar) is too high. The health choices you make as a college student can determine whether or not you will have to deal with serious complications — such as blindness, nerve damage and heart disease — that can come with having diabetes. But no one in my family has ever had it! Did you know that you can develop type 2 diabetes without having any genetic predisposition to it? Recent studies show more and more college-age students starting their after-college lives with type 2 diabetes or prediabetes as a result of poor diet and/or physical fitness while at school. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes/prediabetes include: High Body Mass Index (BMI) Little or no physical activity Family history of diabetes Race/ethnicity (African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, Asian, Pacific Islander) Prediabetes? Never heard of it. Prediabetes means your blood glucose is higher than normal but lower than the diabetes range. It also means you’re at risk for type 2 diabetes; however, you can reduce your risk of getting diabetes and even return to normal blood glucose levels with modest weight loss and moderate physical activity. How would I know if I have diabetes? Some signs of diabetes include being very thirsty or hungry, feeling very tired, blurry vision, tingling in the hands or feet, and sores that are slow to heal. But I don’t feel sick, and my weight is totally fine. Skinny is good, right? Skinny does not always equal healthy. While the association between having a high BMI and diabetes or prediabetes is well-established, weight alone is not the only thing that can Continue reading >>

Eat Well!

Eat Well!

When you have diabetes, deciding what, when, and how much to eat may seem challenging. So, what can you eat, and how can you fit the foods you love into your meal plan? Eating healthy food at home and choosing healthy food when eating out are important in managing your diabetes. The first step is to work with your doctor or dietitian to make a meal plan just for you. As soon as you find out you have diabetes, ask for a meeting with your doctor or dietitian to discuss how to make and follow a meal plan. During this meeting, you will learn how to choose healthier foods—a variety of vegetables and fruits, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat dairy foods, lean meats, and other proteins. You will also learn to watch your portion sizes and what to drink while staying within your calorie, fat, and carbohydrate (carbs) limits. You can still enjoy food while eating healthy. But how do you do that? Here are a few tips to help you when eating at home and away from home. Eating Healthy Portions An easy way to know portion sizes is to use the “plate method.” Looking at your basic 9-inch dinner plate[PDF – 14 MB], draw an imaginary line down the middle of the plate, and divide one side in half. Fill the largest section with non-starchy vegetables, like salad, green beans, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, and carrots. In one of the smaller sections, put a grain or starchy food such as bread, noodles, rice, corn or potatoes. In the other smaller section, put your protein, like fish, chicken, lean beef, tofu, or cooked dried beans. Learn more at Create Your Plate, an interactive resource from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) that shows how a healthy plate should look. This tool allows you to select different foods and see the portion sizes you should use in planning your meal Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Your diabetes diet is simply a healthy-eating plan that will help you control your blood sugar. Here's help getting started, from meal planning to exchange lists and counting carbohydrates. Definition A diabetes diet simply means eating the healthiest foods in moderate amounts and sticking to regular mealtimes. A diabetes diet is a healthy-eating plan that's naturally rich in nutrients and low in fat and calories. Key elements are fruits, vegetables and whole grains. In fact, a diabetes diet is the best eating plan for most everyone. Purpose If you have diabetes or prediabetes, your doctor will likely recommend that you see a dietitian to help you develop a healthy eating plan. The plan helps you control your blood sugar (glucose), manage your weight and control risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure and high blood fats. When you eat excess calories and fat, your body responds by creating an undesirable rise in blood glucose. If blood glucose isn't kept in check, it can lead to serious problems, such as a dangerously high blood glucose level (hyperglycemia) and long-term complications, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. You can help keep your blood glucose level in a safe range by making healthy food choices and tracking your eating habits. For most people with type 2 diabetes, weight loss also can make it easier to control blood glucose and offers a host of other health benefits. If you need to lose weight, a diabetes diet provides a well-organized, nutritious way to reach your goal safely. Diet details A diabetes diet is based on eating three meals a day at regular times. This helps your body better use the insulin it produces or gets through a medication. A registered dietitian can help you put together a diet based on your health goals, tas Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood glucose level, also called blood sugar, in your target range. To manage your blood glucose, you need to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity and diabetes medicine, if you take any. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all important in keeping your blood glucose level in the range that your health care team recommends. Becoming more active and making changes in what you eat and drink can seem challenging at first. You may find it easier to start with small changes and get help from your family, friends, and health care team. Eating well and being physically active most days of the week can help you keep your blood glucose level, blood pressure, and cholesterol in your target ranges prevent or delay diabetes problems feel good and have more energy What foods can I eat if I have diabetes? You may worry that having diabetes means going without foods you enjoy. The good news is that you can still eat your favorite foods, but you might need to eat smaller portions or enjoy them less often. Your health care team will help create a diabetes meal plan for you that meets your needs and likes. The key to eating with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines. The food groups are vegetables nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes starchy: includes potatoes, corn, and green peas fruits—includes oranges, melon, berries, apples, bananas, and grapes grains—at least half of your grains for the day should be whole grains includes wheat, rice, oats, co Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Diet (beyond The Basics)

Patient Education: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Diet (beyond The Basics)

TYPE 2 DIABETES OVERVIEW Diet and physical activity are critically important in the management of the ABCs (A1C, Blood pressure, and Cholesterol) of type 2 diabetes. To effectively manage glycated hemoglobin (A1C) and blood sugar levels, it is important to understand how to balance food intake, physical activity, and medication. Making healthy food choices every day has both immediate and long-term effects. With education, practice, and assistance from a dietitian and/or a diabetes educator, it is possible to eat well and control diabetes. This article discusses diet in the management of type 2 diabetes. The role of diet and activity in managing blood pressure and cholesterol are reviewed separately. (See "Patient education: High blood pressure, diet, and weight (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: High cholesterol and lipids (hyperlipidemia) (Beyond the Basics)".) Articles that discuss other aspects of type 2 diabetes are also available. (See "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Overview (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Insulin treatment (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Self-monitoring of blood glucose in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Alcohol, exercise, and medical care (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Preventing complications in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)".) WHY IS DIET IMPORTANT? Many factors affect how well diabetes is controlled. Many of these factors are controlled by the person with diabetes, including how much and what is eaten, how frequently the blood sugar is monitored, physical activity levels, and accuracy and consi Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Plan: List Of Foods To Eat And Avoid

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Plan: List Of Foods To Eat And Avoid

Currently, there are nine drug classes of oral diabetes medications approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Sulfonylureas, for example, glimepiride (Amaryl) and glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL) Meglitinides, for example, nateglinide (Starlix) and repaglinide (Prandin) Thiazolidinediones, for example, pioglitazone (Actos) DPP-4 inhibitors, for example, sitagliptin (Januvia) and linagliptin (Tradjenta) What types of foods are recommended for a type 2 diabetes meal plan? A diabetes meal plan can follow a number of different patterns and have a variable ratio of fats, proteins, and carbohydrates. The carbohydrates consumed should be low glycemic load and come primarily from vegetables. The fat and proteins consumed should primarily come from plant sources. What type of carbohydrates are recommended for a type 2 diabetic diet plan? Carbohydrates (carbs) are the primary food that raises blood sugar. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure the impact of a carbohydrate on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. The main factors that determine a food's (or meal's) glycemic load are the amount of fiber, fat, and protein it contains. The difference between glycemic index and glycemic load is that glycemic index is a standardized measurement and glycemic load accounts for a real-life portion size. For example, the glycemic index of a bowl of peas is 68 (per 100 grams) but its glycemic load is just 16 (lower the better). If you just referred to the glycemic index, you'd think peas were a bad choice, but in reality, you wouldn't eat 100 grams of peas. With a normal portion size, peas have a healthy glycemic load as well as being an excellent source of pro Continue reading >>

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