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Diabetic Diet Servings Per Day

Can A Diabetes Diet Include Fruit?

Can A Diabetes Diet Include Fruit?

Although fruit contains sugar, it's also loaded with essential vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Learn how fruit can be part of a healthy type 2 diabetes diet. Most people with type 2 diabetes know they can't indulge in a piece of chocolate cake or sip sugar-laden drinks every day. But is all sugar off limits in a type 2 diabetes diet even the natural sugar found in fruits? "For most people with diabetes,eating fruit is fine," says dietitian Nora Saul, RD , a certified diabetes educator at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. Fruit is a healthy snack, packed with the fiber, vitamins, and nutrients essential for good health. But that doesn't mean people with type 2 diabetes can eat all the fruit they want. "Every single fruit has carbohydrates, which means it will impact your blood sugar levels ," says Lorena Drago , a certified diabetes educator and spokesperson for the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Read on to learn how you can enjoy natures candy while keeping your blood sugar levels in check. Fruit is an important part of a healthy diabetes-friendly diet. But because its a source of carbohydrates, you need to pay attention to each fruits glycemic index ranking and appropriate serving size. The glycemic index (GI)is a numerical rating assigned to carbohydrate foods that indicates how much a food will affect blood sugar levels. Ounce for ounce, low GI foods raise blood sugar levels less than higher GI foods, says Saul. So to keep your blood sugar levels stable the goal for everyone with diabetes its important to reach for low GI foods. Of course, portion size is also very important since the more of a carbohydrate-containing food you eat, the more it impacts your blood sugar levels. If you're looking for the most nutritional bang for your carbohydrate buck, Continue reading >>

Portion Sizes For A Diabetic Diet

Portion Sizes For A Diabetic Diet

For many people, controlling portions is the biggest challenge in controlling diabetes. Whether you are counting carbohydrates or watching portion sizes, the guide below will help you visualize the appropriate serving size for each of a variety of foods. 1 ounce cooked meat, poultry, or fish = A matchbook 3 ounces cooked meat, poultry, or fish = A deck of playing cards, a cassette tape, or the palm of a womans hand 1 ounce cheese = 4 dice or a tube of lipstick 2 tablespoons peanut butter = A golf ball 1 standard bagel = A hockey puck or a 6-ounce can of tuna 1 cup potatoes, rice, or pasta = A fist or a tennis ball 1 medium potato = A computer mouse or 1 small bar of soap 12 cup cooked vegetables = 6 asparagus spears, 7 to 8 baby carrots or carrot sticks, 1 ear of corn, or 3 spears broccoli 12 cup chopped fresh vegetables = 3 regular ice cubes 1 cup chopped fresh leafy greens = 4 lettuce leaves 1 medium orange or apple, or 1 cup fruit or yogurt = A baseball Source: National Center for Nutrition and Dietetics of The American Dietetic Association and its Foundation, ADAF Continue reading >>

How Much Fruit Should Be Eaten By Diabetics?

How Much Fruit Should Be Eaten By Diabetics?

An October 2011 study published in the “Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics” found that diabetics who ate adequate amounts of fruit were able to reduce two medical risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease. If you have diabetes, eating fruit daily provides your body with essential nutrients, helps control your blood sugar and reduces your risk for other illnesses such as cardiovascular disease. Ask your health care provider or registered dietitian how to include fruits in your meal plan. Video of the Day 2 to 4 Servings Daily The National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse suggests that people with diabetes consume two to four servings of fruit a day, depending on their calorie needs. If you require between 1,200 and 1,600 calories, aim for two fruits daily. Three fruits should be your goal if you need between 1,600 and 2,000 calories daily. People requiring 2,000 to 2,400 calories should consume four fruits daily. A serving is equivalent to a small piece of fruit roughly the size of a tennis ball, 1/2 cup of juice or canned fruit, 2 tablespoons of dried fruit or 3/4 cup to 1 cup of fresh berries or melon. Avoiding the Blood Sugar Roller Coaster Because fruits contain natural sugars, they will raise your blood sugar. Balancing them throughout your day will help prevent peaks and valleys in your blood sugar levels. The American Diabetes Association suggests that the best fruits to choose include fresh, frozen or canned without added sugar. Canned fruits in juice or light syrup, dried fruits and juices contain more sugar, and you should limit these. Melons and pineapple have a higher glycemic index and so may raise your blood sugar more than other fruits, but they can still be included in your diet. An important component of fruit for diabetics Continue reading >>

A Guide To Fruit: How Much Can People With Diabetes Safely Eat?

A Guide To Fruit: How Much Can People With Diabetes Safely Eat?

Q: What are the recommended servings depending on calorie needs for people with diabetes? A: The National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse (part of the National Institutes of Health) recommends different amounts of fruit depending on how many calories you eat in a day. 1,200-1,600 calories per day: Two fruit servings per day 1,600-2,000 calories per day: Three fruit servings per day 2,000-2,400 calories per day: Four fruit servings per day A: It depends what kind of fruit you’re talking about. If it’s a round fruit like an apple or orange, it should be on the smaller size—about the size of a tennis ball. For fruit that can be measured by the cup like cubed melon or fresh berries, a serving is one cup. Q: Is fruit juice a nutritious choice? A: Unfortunately, not really. Drinking fruit juice doesn’t give you the same nutritional benefits as eating the entire fruit. And it’s tough to stick to four ounces or less, which is all you should be drinking at a time. A: Some fruit is higher in sugar than others. Recommended fruits for diabetics include cantaloupe, strawberries, clementine, avocado, banana, blackberries and more. If you go with frozen or canned fruit, make sure there aren’t any added sugars (the syrup is often packed with sugar). And when eating dried fruit, keep a close watch on portion sizes—they’re small and one serving (usually just a few tablespoons) and can be eaten really quickly. Try your best to stay away from syrup-filled canned fruit, fruit rolls, regular jam and jelly and sweetened applesauce. For other advice about what diabetics should and should not eat, check out these blogs: Continue reading >>

Know Your Food Groups With Diabetes

Know Your Food Groups With Diabetes

Diabetes Food Pyramidvs.USDA Food Guide Pyramid The Diabetes Food Pyramid is very similar in design to the old USDA Food Pyramid. The old pyramid has been redesigned as MyPyramid . The design is intended to encourage a variety in a number of different food choices, as well as physical activity , according to Amanda Kirpitch, M.A., R.D., C.D.E., L.D.N., at Joslin Diabetes Center. The Diabetes Food Pyramid categorizes food based on its carbohydrate content. In the traditional pyramid, milk and cheese are both contained in the dairy category, whereas in the Diabetes Food Pyramid, cheese is a protein and included in meat, and the milk group contains carbohydrate-containing foods, such as milk and yogurt, Kirpitch says. Starchy and non-starchy vegetables are also separated accordingly. In addition, portion sizes are adjusted to equal approximately 15 g of carbohydrates, or one choice. Importance of Following the Diabetes Food Pyramid The Diabetes Food Pyramid helps people with diabetes identify the foods that contain carbohydrates and recognize the items that will have a greater effect on their blood glucose . It may also help patients determine portion sizes of different foods.However, bothpyramids lack individualization and makes it difficult for people with diabetes to truly determine what and how much they should be eating, she says. Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat?

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat?

Figuring out how many carbs to eat when you have diabetes can seem confusing. Meal plans created by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) provide about 45% of calories from carbs. This includes 45–60 grams per meal and 10–25 grams per snack, totaling about 135–230 grams of carbs per day. However, a growing number of experts believe people with diabetes should be eating far fewer carbs than this. In fact, many recommend fewer carbs per day than what the ADA allows per meal. This article takes a look at the research supporting low-carb diets for diabetics and provides guidance for determining optimal carb intake. Glucose, or blood sugar, is the main source of fuel for your body's cells. In people with diabetes, the body's ability to process and use blood sugar is impaired. Although there are several types of diabetes, the two most common forms are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to produce insulin, a hormone that allows sugar from the bloodstream to enter the body's cells. Instead, insulin must be injected to ensure that sugar enters cells. Type 1 diabetes develops because of an autoimmune process in which the body attacks its own insulin-producing cells, which are called beta cells. This disease is usually diagnosed in children, but it can start at any age, even in late adulthood (1). Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is more common, accounting for about 90% of people with diabetes. Like type 1 diabetes, it can develop in both adults and children. However, it isn't as common in children and typically occurs in people who are overweight or obese. In this form of the disease, either the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or the body's cells are resistant to insulin's effects. Therefore, too much sugar stays Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs To Eat A Day

How Many Carbs To Eat A Day

Q: How many grams of carbohydrates should a woman with diabetes have each day? A: Generally speaking, being a woman means you likely need to eat fewer carbohydrates each day than a man. However, the amount of carbohydrates you need should depend on many factors, including your size, age, activity, desire to lose weight, and food preferences. There is not a one-size-fits-all amount of carbohydrates for all women. Everyone is different and has diverse nutritional needs. Carb intake depends on: Height and weight. Are you currently underweight, normal weight, or overweight? Activity level. Are you sedentary, moderately active, or highly active? Gender. Generally, men require more calories, and thus more carbohydrates, than women. Pregnant women and those who are breast-feeding require more as well. Most adults need 6-11 servings of carbs per day, depending on the factors listed above. The general starting point for a moderate-size woman is 45-60 grams of carbohydrates at each meal; for moderate-size men, 60-75 grams of carbs per meal. Most people with diabetes don't need to eat snacks. If you enjoy eating a snack in the late afternoon or before bed, use some of your allotted carb grams, say 15-30 grams, for a snack. To work with a registered dietitian to learn more about your carbohydrate needs and controlling your diabetes, find a diabetes education program in your area by contacting the American Diabetes Association. Jeannette Jordan, M.S., RD, CDE, is the American Dietetic Association's national spokesperson for African-American nutrition issues and oversees nutrition education at the Medical University of South Carolina. Virginia Zamudio Lange, a member of Diabetic Living's editorial advisory board, is a founding partner of Alamo Diabetes Team, LLP. Continue reading >>

Healthy Nutrition For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Healthy Nutrition For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Join the conversation. register now or log in Healthy nutrition for people with type 2 diabetes Getting proper nutrition is an important part of healthy living for any person. However, this is especially true for people with type 2 diabetes, because diabetes is a disorder of metabolism, a word that means how our body uses the food you digest for growth and energy. With diabetes something goes wrong with the way our body processes the food we take in, interfering with our ability to use that food for energy and to maintain our health. So, a healthy eating plan that supplies the proper nutrients (carbohydrates, fat, protein, and vitamins and minerals) and works to control the elevated blood glucose, as well as blood pressure and lipids, is not just optional, but is a necessary part of any diabetes treatment plan. Its important to make good decisions when it comes to putting together healthy meals. This includes selecting foods according to their nutrient content (how much and what kinds of carbohydrates, fat, and protein a food contains). In general, you a healthy pattern of eating should focus on getting1: Carbohydrates from fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, and low-fat milk, rather than other carbohydrate sources, such as those containing fats, sugars, and sodium. Protein from leaner meats and other sources of protein, including meat alternatives. Fat from sources of polyunsaturated (eg, fish, olive oil, nuts) and monounsaturated fats (eg, nuts, vegetable oils, canola oil, olive oil, avocado), limiting saturated fats (red meats, butter, cheese, margarine, and shortening) and trans fats (processed and fried foods) to no more than 10% of daily calorie intake. In this section, well make some specific recommendations for meal planning based on how specific groups Continue reading >>

Food Serving Sizes: A Visual Guide

Food Serving Sizes: A Visual Guide

Find out how everyday objects can ease the guessing game of serving sizes and portion control. What you eat is important, especially when it comes to making positive food choices, but how much you eat is the real brainteaser of healthy eating. When you look at the oversize food portions, ranging from the diameter of bagels to mounds of pasta, translating a serving size into portions is a big challenge in a more-is-better world. The first step is knowing the difference between a portion and a serving size. A serving size is a recommended standard measurement of food. A portion is how much food you eat, which could consist of multiple servings. Visually comparing a serving size to an everyday object you have at home, such as a baseball or a shot glass, can be helpful in identifying what a serving size looks like without carting around a scale and measuring cups for every meal and snack. Here are some general guidelines for the number of daily servings from each food group*: Grains and starchy vegetables: 6-11 servings a day Nonstarchy vegetables: 3-5 servings a day Lean meats and meat substitutes: 4-6 ounces a day or 4-6 one-ounce servings a day *Check with your doctor or dietitian to determine the appropriate daily recommendations for you. Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Truth About Food Serving Sizes

Diabetes: The Truth About Food Serving Sizes

Confused about how much you can eat when you have diabetes? First you need to know how much food is in a serving. It may be different from what you expect. Let’s say you eat a cup of rice at dinner. But a serving is actually considered 1/3 cup. So you got three times as many carbs as you thought. To outsmart those mistakes, get to know what a serving size really holds. And for expert help, talk to your dietitian or a certified diabetes educator. 1/2 banana 1 small apple, orange, or pear 1/2 cup chopped, cooked, or canned fruit 1 cup raw leafy vegetables 1/2 cup other vegetables cooked, raw (chopped), or canned 1/2 cup vegetable juice 1 slice of bread 1/2 English muffin, bun, small bagel, or pita bread 1 6-inch tortilla 4-6 crackers 2 rice cakes 1 ounce ready-to-eat cereal 1/2 cup cooked cereal, pasta, or bulgur 1/3 cup cooked rice 1 small potato or 1/2 large potato 1/2 cup sweet potatoes or yams 1/2 cup corn kernels or other starchy vegetables such as winter squash, peas, or lima beans 2-3 ounces cooked lean beef, veal, pork, lamb, chicken, turkey, or fish 2-3 ounces low-fat natural cheese (such as Swiss, cheddar, Muenster, parmesan, mozzarella, and others) 1/2 cup cooked dry beans 1/4 cup tofu 1 egg (or an equal serving of egg substitute) 2 tablespoons peanut butter 2 ounces processed cheese (American) 1/2 cup low-fat cottage cheese 1/2 cup canned tuna (packed in water) 1 cup low-fat milk 1 cup low-fat yogurt (unsweetened, or sweetened with aspartame or other artificial sweeteners) Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

The mainstays of diabetes treatment are: Working towards obtaining ideal body weight Following a diabetic diet Regular exercise Diabetic medication if needed Note: Type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin; if you have type 2 diabetes, you may not need to take insulin. This involves injecting insulin under the skin for it to work. Insulin cannot be taken as a pill because the digestive juices in the stomach would destroy the insulin before it could work. Scientists are looking for new ways to give insulin. But today, shots are the only method. There are, however, new methods to give the shots. Insulin pumps are now being widely used and many people are having great results. In this Article Working towards obtaining ideal body weight An estimate of ideal body weight can be calculated using this formula: For women: Start with 100 pounds for 5 feet tall. Add 5 pounds for every inch over 5 feet. If you are under 5 feet, subtract 5 pounds for each inch under 5 feet. This will give you your ideal weight. If you have a large frame, add 10%. If you have a small frame, subtract 10%. A good way to decide your frame size is to look at your wrist size compared to other women's. Example: A woman who is 5' 4" tall and has a large frame 100 pounds + 20 pounds (4 inches times 5 pounds per inch) = 120 pounds. Add 10% for large frame (in this case 10% of 120 pounds is 12 pounds). 120 pounds + 12 pounds = 132 pounds ideal body weight. For men: Start with 106 pounds for a height of 5 foot. Add 6 pounds for every inch above 5 foot. For a large frame, add 10%. For a small frame, subtract 10%. (See above for further details.) Learn More about Treating Type 2 Diabetes The Diabetic Diet Diet is very important in diabetes. There are differing philosophies on what is the best diet but below is Continue reading >>

Basic Diabetes Meal Plan

Basic Diabetes Meal Plan

Diabetes meal planning starts with eating a well-balanced diet that includes carbohydrates (carbs), protein, and fat. Carbs (found in starches, fruit, vegetables, milk/yogurt and sweets) turn into sugar (glucose) in the body. The body needs carbs for energy. Eating too many carbs can raise blood glucose levels too much, but it is important not cut out these foods. Eating too few carbs may cause your blood glucose to go too low. Eating a moderate amount of carbs at each meal, with a balanced intake of protein and fat, will help your blood glucose stay in a healthy range. Here are some tips to get you started. Your dietitian will give you more specific information when you meet with him or her. Limit your intake and portion sizes of high-sugar foods to 2 or 3 times a week or less. These include: Cakes (frosted, layer, plain), pies, and cookies Candy (hard tack, chocolate, nougats, etc.) Jelly, jam, and preserves Table sugar, honey, molasses, and syrup Regular ice cream, sherbet, regular and frozen yogurt, fruit ices, and Popsicles Regular soft drinks, fruit drinks (canned or concentrated), and drink mixes with sugar added Milkshakes, chocolate milk, hot cocoa mix Sugar coated cereals, granola, breakfast/snack bars Canned fruits with heavy syrup, dried fruit, fruit roll-ups, candied fruit Iced sweet breads, coffee cakes, breakfast rolls, and donuts Avoid the following: Table sugar, honey, molasses and syrup Regular soft drinks, fruit drinks (canned or concentrated), and drink mixes with sugar added Milkshakes, chocolate milk, hot cocoa mix Canned fruits with heavy syrup Eat 3 well-balanced meals a day and a small snack at night. Each meal should contain both carbs and protein. When planning meals, select a variety of foods from each food group, and watch your portion sizes Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Counting & Diabetes

Carbohydrate Counting & Diabetes

What is carbohydrate counting? Carbohydrate counting, also called carb counting, is a meal planning tool for people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Carbohydrate counting involves keeping track of the amount of carbohydrate in the foods you eat each day. Carbohydrates are one of the main nutrients found in food and drinks. Protein and fat are the other main nutrients. Carbohydrates include sugars, starches, and fiber. Carbohydrate counting can help you control your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, levels because carbohydrates affect your blood glucose more than other nutrients. Healthy carbohydrates, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, are an important part of a healthy eating plan because they can provide both energy and nutrients, such as vitamins and minerals, and fiber. Fiber can help you prevent constipation, lower your cholesterol levels, and control your weight. Unhealthy carbohydrates are often food and drinks with added sugars. Although unhealthy carbohydrates can also provide energy, they have little to no nutrients. More information about which carbohydrates provide nutrients for good health and which carbohydrates do not is provided in the NIDDK health topic, Diabetes Diet and Eating. The amount of carbohydrate in foods is measured in grams. To count grams of carbohydrate in foods you eat, you’ll need to know which foods contain carbohydrates learn to estimate the number of grams of carbohydrate in the foods you eat add up the number of grams of carbohydrate from each food you eat to get your total for the day Your doctor can refer you to a dietitian or diabetes educator who can help you develop a healthy eating plan based on carbohydrate counting. Which foods contain carbohydrates? Foods that contain carbohydrates include grains, such as b Continue reading >>

Meal Planning Tips For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Meal Planning Tips For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Meal Planning Tips for People with Type 2 Diabetes By Becky Hand, Licensed & Registered Dietitian 6/20/2007 If you have diabetes, SparkPeople highly recommends that you work directly with a Registered Dietitian or Certified Diabetes Educator to receive comprehensive training in diabetes self-management. Together you can develop a diabetes meal plan based on your health goals, tastes, and lifestyleas well as the latest guidelines for healthy eating. Below are examples of two different meal planning systems; your registered dietitian can help you decide which is best for you. 1. Carbohydrate Counting is the most accurate meal planning system for controlling blood sugar levels. Essentially, carbohydrate counting is a way to budget the amount of carbohydrate eaten at any meal or snack. This method allows you to choose any type of carbohydrate foods, as long as the portion size you choose allows you stay within your goal budget. In general, about half of your daily calories should come from carbohydrate foods. However, if you have diabetes, it is important to eat roughly the same amount of carbohydrate at each meal. Commonly recommended budgets are 30 to 45 grams (2 to 3 servings) of carbohydrate per meal for women and 45 to 60 grams (3-4 servings) per meal for men. Both women and men should limit snacks to 15 to 30 grams (1 to 2 servings) of carbohydrates. ( Click here for a printable reference chart of carbohydrate servings.) Your Registered Dietitian will determine the right amount of carbohydrates for you, along with guidelines for protein and fat intake. In addition to carbohydrate budgeting, it is important to space your meals and snacks evenly throughout the day to keep blood sugar levels stable. Experts recommend waiting at least two hours (but no more than five hou Continue reading >>

How To Count Carbs In 10 Common Foods

How To Count Carbs In 10 Common Foods

What are carbohydrates? Carbohydrates are sugar-based molecules found in many foods, from cookies to cantaloupes. If you have diabetes, planning your carb intake—and sticking to the plan—is critical to keep blood sugar on an even keel and to cut your risk of diabetes-related problems like heart disease and stroke. Whether or not you have diabetes, you should aim to get about half your calories from complex carbohydrates (which are high in fiber), 20-25% from protein, and no more than 30% from fat, says Lalita Kaul, PhD, RD, a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. How to read a food label The Nutrition Facts label lists the total amount of carbohydrates per serving, including carbs from fiber, sugar, and sugar alcohols. (If you're counting carbs in your diet, be aware that 15 grams of carbohydrates count as one serving.) Sugar alcohols are often used in sugar-free foods, although they still deliver calories and carbs. Sugar alcohols and fiber don't affect blood sugar as much as other carbs, because they're not completely absorbed. If food contains sugar alcohol or 5 or more grams of fiber, you can subtract half of the grams of these ingredients from the number of total carbs. (See more details at the American Diabetes Association and University of California, San Francisco.) How many carbs per day? If you eat 2,000 calories a day, you should consume about 250 grams of complex carbohydrates per day. A good starting place for people with diabetes is to have roughly 45 to 60 grams of carbs per meal and 15 to 30 grams for snacks. While snacks are key for people with diabetes who use insulin or pills that increase insulin production (otherwise, they run the risk of low blood sugar), they aren’t essential for non-insulin users. The goal for anyone with diab Continue reading >>

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