diabetestalk.net

Diabetic Dermopathy Cure

Skin Problems Associated With Diabetes Mellitus

Skin Problems Associated With Diabetes Mellitus

Introduction It is estimated that 30% of patients with diabetes mellitus will experience a skin problem at some stage throughout the course of their disease. Several skin disorders are more common in diabetic patients, particularly those due to infection such as candida and impetigo. Patients with type 2 diabetes also have twice the risk of developing the common scaly disease, psoriasis, as non-diabetics. Specific skin conditions associated with diabetes mellitus are described below. Diabetics with renal failure are also prone to reactive perforating collagenosis and Kyrle disease. Diabetic dermopathy Diabetic dermopathy is a skin condition characterised by light brown or reddish, oval or round, slightly indented scaly patches most often appearing on the shins. Although these lesions may appear in anyone, particularly after an injury or trauma to the area, they are one of the most common skin problems found in patients with diabetes mellitus. It has been found to occur in up to 30% of patients with diabetes. Diabetic dermopathy is sometimes also referred to as shin spots and pigmented pretibial patches. What causes diabetic dermopathy? The exact cause of diabetic dermopathy is unknown but may be associated with diabetic neuropathic (nerve) and vascular (blood vessels) complications, as studies have shown the condition to occur more frequently in diabetic patients with retinopathy (retinal damage of the eye), neuropathy (nerve/sensory damage) and nephropathy (kidney damage). Diabetic dermopathy tends to occur in older patients or those who have had diabetes for at least 10-20 years. It also appears to be closely linked to increased glycosylated haemoglobin, an indicator of poor control of blood glucose levels. Because lesions often occur over bony parts of the body such Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Dermopathy?

What Is Diabetic Dermopathy?

SolveYourProblem Article Series: Diabetes Diabetes Causes, Symptoms & Treatments Diabetic dermopathy is a common skin problem seen in people who have had diabetes for a while. It is also called shin spots because it is most often found on the shins. Do you have diabetic dermopathy: YES / NO ? Diabetic dermopathy forms lesions or visible changes of the skin. The lesions are also known as shin spots or pigmented pretibial patches. In the beginning you will usually see papules or raised areas of skin which are a dull red color. After a while they form round or oval spots. They may turn darker and become indented and scaly. Often there will be many together, making large discolored patches of skin on the lower legs. They may become slightly indented after a time. They do not usually itch or sting, so if you have an itchy rash, it is probably not diabetic dermopathy. What does it look like on your body: ____________________. Where are you seeing it: ____________________. The cause of shin spots in diabetics is not known for sure but it is likely related to other vascular problems that diabetics can have. Deterioration of the small blood vessels that supply blood to the skin may lead to some leakage of blood and blood products into the skin. Diabetic dermopathy is found in between 25% and 50% of people with diabetes. Although the patches are usually seen on the lower legs, they may also be found on thighs, forearms and the sides of the feet, and occasionally on the scalp or trunk. This condition is more common in people who have had diabetes for a longer time, and in people whose blood glucose levels are not well controlled. Unfortunately there is not very much that can be done for this unsightly skin condition. Keeping the skin well moisturized may help to prevent it, or sto Continue reading >>

How To Get Rid Of Diabetic Dermopathy

How To Get Rid Of Diabetic Dermopathy

How to Get Rid of Diabetic Dermopathy in an Easy way It is a normal condition of skin that is located in people who suffers from diabetes on their lower part of legs. Dermopathy refers to every skin problems and complications that happen with diabetes. They are even referred to as shin spots or pigmented pretibial patches. Up to 50 percent of persons with diabetes might have had or have diabetic dermopathy with it is usually common on persons. Many people want to know how to get rid of diabetic dermopathy in a right way. People who suffer from diabetes that is not controlled properly or suffering from diabetes for 10-20 years and already cross 60 years of age. They have shown after harm in people who are not suffering from diabetes. While it is generally common after sixty years of age as it can affect people who are suffering from diabetes of any age, sex or race. Although you get it mainly on the lower part of legs it can look on thighs, shins, forearms and your feet sides. It is necessary to completely understand about it to try a good diabetic dermopathy treatment. Primarily diabetic dermopathy might appear like patches that are available in different colors from pink to red or tan to dark brown. Other types of symptoms one might have include; ·The patches are normally slightly scaly. ·They can be round or oval in shape. ·The patches might become indented weakly if they are long-lasting, which is known as atrophic. ·A huge amount of these spots are there and will include a big area. ·Very rarely do these patches itch, sting, burn, become hurt or open sores. Persons those are suffering from diabetic dermopathy looks like age spots. Lesions of Diabetic dermopathy will usually look more often after an injury or trauma in the part where you mostly seen but no speci Continue reading >>

Skin Problems In Diabetes

Skin Problems In Diabetes

If you have diabetes, it’s important to be aware of potentially serious skin problems related to the disease and see your doctor before the problem gets out of control. In most cases, skin problems in diabetes can be managed with early diagnosis and treatment. you might like Scleroderma diabeticorum: While rare, this skin problem affects people with type 2 diabetes, causing a thickening of the skin on the back of the neck and upper back. The treatment is to bring your blood sugar level under control. Lotions and moisturizers may help soften skin. Vitiligo: Vitiligo, a skin problem more commonly associated with type 1 diabetes than type 2 diabetes, affects skin coloration. With vitiligo, the special cells that make pigment (the substance that controls skin color) are destroyed, resulting in patches of discolored skin. Vitiligo often affects the chest and abdomen, but may be found on the face around the mouth, nostrils, and eyes. Current treatment options for vitiligo include topical steroids and micropigmentation (tattooing). If you have vitiligo, you should use sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher to prevent sunburn on the discolored skin. Acanthosis nigricans. This is a skin problem that results in the darkening and thickening of certain areas of the skin especially in the skin folds. The skin becomes tan or brown and is sometimes slightly raised and described as velvety. Most often the condition, which typically looks like small warts, appears on the sides or back of the neck, the armpits, under the breast, and groin. Occasionally the top of the knuckles will have a particularly unusual appearance. Acanthosis nigricans usually strikes people who are very overweight. While there is no cure for acanthosis nigricans, losing weight may improve the skin condition. Acant Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dermopathy Susannah Mc George1, Shernaz Walton2

Diabetic Dermopathy Susannah Mc George1, Shernaz Walton2

REVIEW Diabetic dermopathy SUSANNAH MC GEORGE1, SHERNAZ WALTON2 Abstract Diabetic dermopathy is a term used to describe the small, round, brown atrophic skin lesions that occur on the shins of patients with diabetes. The lesions are asymptomatic and occur in up to 55% of patients with diabetes, but incidence varies between different reports. Diabetic dermopathy is more common in older patients and those with longstanding diabetes. It is associated with other microvascular complica- tions of diabetes such as retinopathy, nephropathy and neu- ropathy and also with large vessel disease. Histological changes include epidermal atrophy with flattening of the rete ridges, dermal fibroblastic proliferation, altered colla- gen, dermal oedema and an increase in dermal capillaries, with a perivascular inflammatory infiltrate, changes to the vessel walls and melanin and haemosiderin deposition. The underlying mechanism for diabetic dermopathy is unknown, although it may be related to local thermal trauma, decreased blood flow causing impaired wound healing or local subcutaneous nerve degeneration. Diabetic dermopa- thy requires no treatment, but may be a surrogate for more serious complications of diabetes, which require investiga- tion and management. Br J Diabetes Vasc Dis 2014;14:95-97 Key words: dermatology, diabetes mellitus, diabetic dermopathy, microvascular disease, akin Introduction Diabetic dermopathy is the commonest skin condition that oc- curs in patients with diabetes mellitus. The condition was first reported in 1964 by Melin, who described small, circumscribed, brownish atrophic skin lesions occurring on the lower extremi- ties.1 The phrase diabetic dermopathy was coined by Binkley in 1965,2 but the lesions have variously been termed “pigmented pretibial patch Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dermopathy - How To Deal With?

Diabetic Dermopathy - How To Deal With?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Has anyone ever had diabetic dermopathy before? They're annoying little skin sores that suddenly appear & take forever to fade away. I've been told they're harmless & need no treatment. However I've just had one appear on my shin & it sticks out like a sore thumb. Would love to hear from anyone who's found some good topical remedy for them. I've tried putting Vitamin E oil on it but does not seem to respond at all. I never knew the name of this condition until you posted your question. I looked up on the Internet and found this link, and then realized that I did have one shortly after I was first diagnosed seven years ago. You may find some helpful information on this link. Diabetic Dermopathy in Adults: Condition, Treatment and Pictures - Overview | skinsight I haven't been troubled with another one of this since my doctor prescribed some antibiotic cream for it and advised me to be careful with my blood sugar control. Good Luck to you. PinkRose I thank you for your question. Like GrammaBear I too had to look it up & now I know what those 3 spots are on my shin. It is characterized of small spots or pigmented (red, light brown in round or oval shape) patches usually located in your lower limbs (usually on your shins). Actually, these lesions appear more often after an injury or trauma in this area and remains in this condition usually quiet long time till they disappear. If you are diabetic and have had it for about 10 to 20 years and are older than 60s, then most probably youll face this complication. If you want to recognize a diabetes dermopathy, just look for lesions on your shins, which Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dermopathy

Diabetic Dermopathy

Images of Diabetic Dermopathy (6) Overview Diabetic dermopathy, also known as shin spots or pigmented pretibial patches, is a skin condition usually found on the lower legs of people with diabetes. It is thought to result from changes in the small blood vessels that supply the skin and from minor leakage of blood products from these vessels into the skin. Who's at risk? Diabetic dermopathy is the most common skin finding in people with diabetes. Up to 50% of diabetics may have shin spots, and it seems to be even more common in people with long-standing or poorly controlled diabetes. In people who do not have diabetes, the lesions often appear after injury. Signs and Symptoms Diabetic dermopathy appears as pink to red or tan to dark brown patches, and it is most frequently found on the lower legs. The patches are slightly scaly and are usually round or oval. Long-standing patches may become faintly indented (atrophic). Locations of diabetic dermopathy: Shins (the pretibial area) Thighs Sides of feet Forearms Diabetic dermopathy does not typically itch, burn, or sting. Self-Care Guidelines The skin lesions of diabetic dermopathy often improve over time. Keeping skin moisturized and trying to avoid any injury to the legs should help prevent the development of some lesions. When to Seek Medical Care Diabetic dermopathy is harmless and does not require any treatment. Treatments Your Physician May Prescribe If necessary, a physician will likely stress the importance of controlling blood sugar and reiterate that appropriate diabetes management will help improve lesions as quickly as possible. References Bolognia, Jean L., ed. Dermatology, pp.1653, 1658. New York: Mosby, 2003. Freedberg, Irwin M., ed. Fitzpatrick's Dermatology in General Medicine. 6th ed, pp.716. New York: McGr Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health: Conditions And Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health: Conditions And Treatment

Skin complications usually occur when blood sugar levels are too high, and they are often the first visible sign of diabetes. An estimated one-third of people with diabetes experience skin conditions either related to or influenced by the condition. Medication options exist, but managing blood sugars is normally the best prevention and treatment option. How does type 2 diabetes affect skin health? When blood sugar levels are too high for too long, several changes take place in the body that affect skin health. Blood sugar is removed from the body through the urine. When there is excess blood sugar, the rate of urination increases, which can cause dehydration and dry skin. High blood sugar levels can also lead to inflammation, which over time dulls or overstimulates the immune response. High blood sugar levels can also cause nerve and blood vessel damage, reducing circulation. Poor blood flow can alter the skin's structure, especially its collagen. Without healthy collagen networks, the skin can become stiff and in some cases brittle. Collagen is also necessary for proper wound healing. Skin conditions associated with type 2 diabetes Several skin conditions are associated with high or uncontrolled blood sugar levels. While most skin complications associated with diabetes are harmless, the symptoms of some can be painful, persistent, and they may require medical attention. The best and easiest treatment option for most diabetes-related skin conditions is managing blood sugar levels. In severe cases, however, oral steroids or medicated creams may be used. Common skin conditions associated with type 2 diabetes include the following: Acanthosis nigricans This condition is marked by a darkened band of velvety skin, especially in the folds near the groin, back of the neck, or Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Dermopathy?

What Is Diabetic Dermopathy?

I’ve been a type 1 diabetic now for the past 8 years and I’ve heard of most of the associated complications associated with the disease, but I came across an article the other day talking about Dermopathy in diabetics. Never hearing of it, it automatically peaked my interest so I started to research what it was all about. Diabetic dermopathy, a harmless condition, is likely the most commonskin problem in people who have had diabetes for a while, or whose blood sugar levels have remained high. What Causes Dermopathy? The exact cause of diabetic dermopathy is unknown but may be associated with diabetic neuropathic (nerve) and vascular (blood vessels) complications, as studies have shown the condition to occur more frequently in diabetic patients with retinopathy (retinal damage of the eye), neuropathy (nerve/sensory damage) and nephropathy (kidney damage). Diabetic dermopathy tends to occur in older patients or those who have had diabetes for at least 10-20 years. It also appears to be closely linked to increased glycosylated haemoglobin, an indicator of poor control of blood glucose levels. Because lesions often occur over bony parts of the body such as the shins, it is thought that diabetic dermopathy may also be a magnified response to injury or trauma to these areas. Studies have shown that shin spots have appeared in response to trauma with heat, cold or blunt objects in patients with diabetes. Signs and Symptoms of Dermopathy: Diabetic dermopathy appears as pink to red or tan to dark brown patches, and it is most frequently found on the lower legs. The patches are slightly scaly and are usually round or oval. Long-standing patches may become faintly indented (atrophic). Locations of diabetic dermopathy: Shins (the pretibial area) Thighs Sides of feet Forearms Ar Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Skin Conditions

Diabetes: Skin Conditions

Diabetes can affect every part of the body, including the skin. Many people with diabetes will have a skin disorder caused or affected by diabetes at some time in their lives. In some cases, skin problems can be the first sign that a person has diabetes. In some cases, people with diabetes develop skin conditions that can affect anyone. Examples of these conditions include bacterial infections, fungal infections, and itching. However, people with diabetes also are more prone to getting certain conditions. These include diabetic dermopathy, necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum, and eruptive xanthomatosis. Some common skin conditions in people with diabetes: Acanthosis nigricans This is a condition that results in the darkening and thickening of the skin. Often, areas of tan or brown skin, sometimes slightly raised, appear on the sides of the neck, the armpits, and groin. Occasionally, these darkened areas might appear on the hands, elbows, and knees. Acanthosis nigricans can affect otherwise healthy people, or it can be associated with certain medical conditions. It is frequently found in people with diabetes. Allergic reactions Allergic reactions to foods, bug bites, and medicines can cause rashes, depressions or bumps on the skin. If you think you might be having an allergic reaction to a medicine, contact your health care provider. Severe allergic reactions might require emergency treatment. It is especially important for people with diabetes to check for rashes or bumps in the areas where they inject their insulin. Atherosclerosis Atherosclerosis is the narrowing of blood vessels thickening of the vessel walls. While atherosclerosis most often is associated with blood vessels in or near the heart, it can affect blood vessels throughout the body, including those that su Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dermopathy

Diabetic Dermopathy

First of all you must understand that dermopathy is a term which involves all skin problems and complications during diabetes. It is characterized of small spots or pigmented (red, light brown in round or oval shape) patches usually located in your lower limbs (usually on your shins). Actually, these lesions appear more often after an injury or trauma in this area and remains in this condition usually quiet long time till they disappear. What are the signs and symptoms? If you want to know the reason why it happens, you’ll never find a specific one. It’s all related to nerve and blood vessels damages that occur during diabetes. If you are diabetic and have had it for about 10 to 20 years and are older than 60s, then most probably you’ll face this complication. If you want to recognize a diabetes dermopathy, just look for lesions on your shins, which have the following characteristics: - Shape: oval or round - Color: reddish or brown - Location: commonly – both shins; less frequently– on the front of the thighs, side of the foot, scalp, trunk or forearm. - Dissemination: at the beginning – scaly; then – becomes flattened; at least- more indented What can I do to prevent it? You cannot do anything to treat a diabetes dermopathy, because it’s something that your body and skin tend to clear themselves. What you can do is to prevent its onset. If you’re a diabetic, you should get better control of your diabetes. You should keep your blood glucose levels at a steady range, near your optimal ones, such as acceptable glucose levels. You may help yourself by inserting natural herbs in your daily diet plan menu. Click here to get to know about a natural formula that helps controlling your blood sugar levels and prevent future diabetes complications such as diabe Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dermopathy Symptoms

Diabetic Dermopathy Symptoms

What is Diabetic Dermopathy? This is a common skin condition that is found in diabetic people on their lower legs. The word dermopathy refers to all complications and skin problems that occur with diabetes. They are also referred to as pigmented pretibial patches or shin spots. Up to fifty percent of people with diabetes may have or have had diabetic dermopathy with it being more common in ones who have diabetes that is poorly controlled or have had diabetes for ten to twenty years and older than the age of sixty. They have appeared after an injury in people who do not have diabetes. Although it is more common after the age of sixty it can affect diabetics of any age, race, or sex. Although you find it primarily on the lower legs it can appear on your thighs, forearms, shins, and sides of your feet. Initially diabetic dermopathy will appear as patches that range in color from tan to dark brown or pink to red. Other symptoms you may have include: The patches are usually slightly scaly. They can be oval or round in shape. The patches may become indented faintly if they are long-standing, which is called atrophic. There can be a number of these spots and will cover a big area. Very seldom do these patches sting, itch, burn, become open sores, or hurt. In some people with diabetic dermopathy they look like age spots. Causes Diabetic dermopathy lesions will usually appear more often after trauma or an injury in the area where you see them the most but there is not specific reason. The reason is that this medical condition is all related to the blood vessels and nerve damage that happens when a person has diabetes. It is also thought to happen when there is minor leakage of blood products from the vessels into your skin and also there could be changes in the small blood vesse Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dermopathy

Diabetic Dermopathy

Diabetic Dermopathy As those with diabetes know, the disease, especially when poorly treated or monitored, may lead to other complications like infections, wounds, and other health complications. Diabetic dermopathy is one of these many health risks for those with diabetes, and may effect patients of all genders, ages, and races if diabetes is not well monitored and cared for. Why do diabetics have skin problems? Diabetic people are more prone to dry skin, especially when the blood glucose level is high. This results in the body to lose fluids and skin tends to get dry. Dry skin cracks easily. If left untreated it turns itchy and leads to numerous infections. Skin problems associated with diabetes mellitus According to researchers, 30% of the individuals with diabetes mellitus experience skin problems at different stages of the ailment. These skin problems are quite common, mainly the ones that occur as a result of infection like candida and impetigo. Common skin conditions include: Diabetic dermopathy Diabetic bullae Diabetic stiff skin Other not so common ailments include: Foot ulcers Necrobiosis lipoidica What is Diabetic Dermopathy? Diabetic dermopathy is a variety of skin lesion. It is seen in individuals suffering from diabetes mellitus. The most common features include dull-red papules that develop in to small, round, atrophic hyper pigmented skin lesions appearing mainly on the shin area. One of the most popular diabetic skin ailment, it is found in more than 50% of individuals suffering from diabetes. One can find similar lesions in non diabetic individuals as well. They appear because of an injury or trauma in the shin area. What are the symptoms of Diabetic Dermopathy? In the initial stages diabetic dermopathy appear as patches that vary in color from light b Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Dermopathy? How To Get Rid Of It?

What Is Diabetic Dermopathy? How To Get Rid Of It?

What is Diabetic Dermopathy? How To Get Rid Of It? What is Diabetic Dermopathy? How To Get Rid Of It? Once upon a time, the diabetes was one of the deadliest silent killers of all the lifestyle diseases. Over the time, with the advancement of medical science, it has lost its hold and has been less fatal. However, it can cause other complications to organs such as kidney, eyes, and nerves, and can also cause various skin problems. In this article, we will mainly focus on skin problems it can cause, their effects and treatment techniques. On an average 30% of diabetic patients of the people suffer from skin problem at some or other point; few of the common skin problem caused by infections are quite generic such as impetigo and candid. Besides, type-2 diabetic patients are more prone to developing scaly diseases too. These skin diseases are also very likely with non-diabetic people; however, some skin infections appear only diabetic patients. What is the treatment for Diabetic Dermopathy? Cause and Effects of Diabetic Skin Problems Skin diseases occur due to bacterial and fungal infections; bacterial infections can cause skin problems on eyelid glands, boils, infections around nails and at the follicles of hair. Most of these conditions can cause swollen, burning sensation leading to severe pain and can affect other organisms. Similarly, fungal infections can cause various skin disorders in diabetic patients. The victims of fungus infected people are likely to develop rashes, scales, and blisters in moister fold areas such as beneath the breast, in the armpit region, at the corners of the mouth, under the foreskin of male genital, between toes and fingers, etc. In this article, we will discuss a common skin condition Diabetic dermopathy known as Shin Spots as the term su Continue reading >>

Natural Cure For Diabetic Dermopathy And Alternative Treatments

Natural Cure For Diabetic Dermopathy And Alternative Treatments

Diabetic dermopathy is also commonly known as shin spots or the pigmented pretibial patches. This is a skin condition that is usually found to develop on the lower legs of people who have diabetes. This medical condition is often the result of changes in the small blood vessel, which are primarily responsible in supplying the skin blood products. Diagnosis is based on the skin condition done by physical examination. In most cases, the blood sugar is also checked. There is actually no known treatment for diabetic dermopathy. However physicians usually advise the patient to closely control and monitor the blood sugar and help manage diabetes better. Diabetic dermopathy often appears as pink or tan patches, and are known to be most frequently to grow on the lower legs. The patches are often slightly scaly in texture and are usually round or oval in shape. Unlike other skin conditions, diabetic dermopathy is not itchy or cause any discomfort. The primary cause of diabetic dermopathy is said to be a type of angiitis, which is a form of vascular inflammation that affects the small blood vessels of the skin. It can also appear on diabetics after a trauma to the lower leg. Continue reading >>

More in diabetes