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Diabetic Country Cooking

16 Southern Cooking Recipes

16 Southern Cooking Recipes

Home > Editor's Picks > 16 Southern Cooking Recipes You must be logged in to add a private note. Login | Register We are adding the recipe to your Recipe Box. You must be logged in to add a recipe. Login | Register These down-home dishes are just like mama used to make em! From homestyle favorites like a low-carb chicken dinner to an easy veggie casserole, these recipes put Southern cooking recipes right on your dinner table. Weve lightened up the old-fashioned dishes that you thought you couldnt eat while following a diabetic-friendly diet and made them yummier than ever. Your favorite Southern foods have never tasted this good! The next time you're invited to a get-together bring along a plate of Southern Deviled Eggs. This recipe calls for some of our favorite, classic ingredients, like mayo and sweet pickle relish. It's a recipe any Southern granny would approve of! Mini Crab Cakes are the perfect two-bite appetizer for your next gathering, even if all of your guests aren't on a diabetes diet. Loaded with crab meat, plenty of vegetables and spices, you might have to make another batch if you want leftovers! Serve up a dinnertime classic with our Chicken Fried Steak. This recipe has all that old-fashioned taste you grew up with, but with just a few tweaks to make it diabetic-friendly. Serve it alongside some of your favorite classic veggies and you've got a down-home dish to rave about! Our Hot Chicken Salad Casserole is a down-home casserole recipe that'll make your insides feel warm and cozy. With lighter ingredients and fresh veggies, this is an easy low carb recipe that's perfect for dinner or for bringing along to the next potluck. Southern cooking recipes this good ought to be shared! If you're a fan of Southern cooking recipes, then you better be a fan of fri Continue reading >>

7 Chicken Recipes For Diabetics

7 Chicken Recipes For Diabetics

Onions and leeks are from the same family, but they taste different. Leeks are sweeter and milder than onions. In this recipe, chicken is glazed in Dijon mustard and roasted with a fusion of leeks, onions, garlic, and shallots. According to a 2015 animal study , onions lower high blood sugar levels when given with the diabetes drug metformin. 3. Oven-Fried Parmesan Chicken Drumsticks Think you cant bite into a fried chicken leg if you have diabetes? Think again! The chicken drumsticks in this recipe are coated in a savory Parmesan cheese and breadcrumb crust. Theyre oven-baked instead of fried. Chicken drumsticks are higher in fat than chicken breasts, so be sure to balance your meal with low-fat sides. Drumsticks are still a great source of protein and much cheaper to buy. This recipe brings to mind apple-picking in early fall, but its tasty any time of year. Tart green apples and thyme are the perfect complements for boneless, skinless chicken breasts. Since the fiber in apples is a good carb that doesnt raise blood sugar levels, you can rest assured youre eating a healthy meal. A great roast chicken is a staple in many recipe arsenals. Its the perfect meal option for an elegant dinner party or a casual family dinner. For this recipe, apples, onions, garlic, and spices are stuffed into the cavity of a whole chicken. The chicken then gets an olive oil rub-down and is roasted to moist perfection. Make sure to peel off the skin before eating the meat. Use the leftovers to create a healthy chicken salad made with Greek yogurt and celery. 6. Marinated Grilled Chicken with Zucchini If youve got raw chicken in the fridge, a bumper crop of zucchini, and a grill, then youve got the makings of a healthy dinner. After being marinated in a blend of clementine orange juice, olive Continue reading >>

Chicken And Broccoli

Chicken And Broccoli

In my third pregnancy I developed gestational diabetes. My diagnosis came just prior to Easter, and I was crest-fallen that I would need to avoid Easter chocolates and the accompanying feasting. This, as well as having to learn all about the dos and don’ts of diabetes and overhauling my entire diet left me feeling depressed for a number of weeks. We were in the throws of renovating our house, and with 3 other children in my care I didn’t have time for this! I learnt that the biggest perpetrators of blood sugar spikes weren’t actually ‘sugary’ foods like lollies and chocolates, but carbohydrate-rich foods like hot chips, pizza or burgers. While this meant I could indulge in some Easter chocolates, it also meant that take-away dinners or convenience meals would have to go. This was another frustrating point for me because I was already time-poor and now I needed to spend extra time preparing food, and could never have the night off and serve fish and chips for dinner instead. However, after a couple of weeks of ‘torture’ I started feeling better than I had ever felt in my whole life. Despite the fact I was heavily pregnant, I felt energetic and had actually lost 11 pounds (5kgs). After losing this initial weight I didn’t gain any further weight for the remainder of my pregnancy. This left me feeling comparatively light and and grateful for my diet overhaul. Thankfully, I was declared free from diabetes after baby was born, but I have transferred many of the diabetes-diet practices to my regular eating habits. This Chicken Divan recipe is perfect for my post-pregnancy eating plan. With equal portions of protein and vegetables, it is low in carbs and won’t leave you feeling heavy after eating. It’s not exactly low-fat, but if you are diabetic or want to Continue reading >>

Globalization Of Diabetes

Globalization Of Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a global public health crisis that threatens the economies of all nations, particularly developing countries. Fueled by rapid urbanization, nutrition transition, and increasingly sedentary lifestyles, the epidemic has grown in parallel with the worldwide rise in obesity. Asia's large population and rapid economic development have made it an epicenter of the epidemic. Asian populations tend to develop diabetes at younger ages and lower BMI levels than Caucasians. Several factors contribute to accelerated diabetes epidemic in Asians, including the “normal-weight metabolically obese” phenotype; high prevalence of smoking and heavy alcohol use; high intake of refined carbohydrates (e.g., white rice); and dramatically decreased physical activity levels. Poor nutrition in utero and in early life combined with overnutrition in later life may also play a role in Asia's diabetes epidemic. Recent advances in genome-wide association studies have contributed substantially to our understanding of diabetes pathophysiology, but currently identified genetic loci are insufficient to explain ethnic differences in diabetes risk. Nonetheless, interactions between Westernized diet and lifestyle and genetic background may accelerate the growth of diabetes in the context of rapid nutrition transition. Epidemiologic studies and randomized clinical trials show that type 2 diabetes is largely preventable through diet and lifestyle modifications. Translating these findings into practice, however, requires fundamental changes in public policies, the food and built environments, and health systems. To curb the escalating diabetes epidemic, primary prevention through promotion of a healthy diet and lifestyle should be a global public policy priority. THE GLOBAL BURDEN OF TYPE Continue reading >>

Country Cooking: 48 Best-loved Southern Comfort Recipes

Country Cooking: 48 Best-loved Southern Comfort Recipes

Home > Editor's Picks > Country Cooking: 48 Best-Loved Southern Comfort Recipes Country Cooking: 48 Best-Loved Southern Comfort Recipes You must be logged in to add a private note. Login | Register We are adding the recipe to your Recipe Box. You must be logged in to add a recipe. Login | Register For good old-fashioned Southern comfort, it doesn't get much better than hearty portions of homestyle favorites. We're servin' up plenty of country cooking recipes in our collection of 48 Best-Loved Southern Comfort Recipes, including country chicken recipes and Southern dessert recipes . These down-home favorites will bring the country right intoyour kitchen! Looking for more country-inspired recipes? Check out our collection of Amish-style recipes or see howSoutherners do breakfast ! Whether you're slathering a golden slice of corn bread with butter or dunking buttermilk biscuits in sausage gravy, no Southern meal is complete without the goodness of home-baked biscuits, muffins or bread. Continue reading >>

7 Tips For Diabetes-friendly Cooking

7 Tips For Diabetes-friendly Cooking

Who says that having diabetes means you can’t still whip up delicious, homemade food? When you know the basics of meal planning, you can make almost any recipe work. So don’t throw out your cookbooks or toss your favorite recipes. Instead, take some tips about how to cook wisely. 1. Cook with liquid fats in place of solid fats. Solid fats often include saturated fats, which you should limit, or trans fats, which you should avoid totally. If a recipe calls for solid fat like butter, lard, or hydrogenated shortening, try trans-fat free margarine, spreads, or shortening instead. Check the label to see whether the product will work for cooking or baking. Many liquid fats -- oils such as canola, corn, olive, and grape seed -- can be healthy when used in moderate amounts. Some oils have stronger flavors that may affect the taste. So experiment to find which oils work best with which recipes. 2. Switch to low-fat dairy. Many dairy products used in cooking and baking are high in fat. You can lower the fat content without compromising taste. Instead of whole milk or half-and-half, pour 1% or skim milk, condensed skim milk, or nonfat half-and-half. Instead of sour cream, try low-fat or nonfat plain yogurt, buttermilk, or even low-fat cottage cheese (you may need to blend it first to make it smooth.) To make a sauce that calls for cream or whole milk, use cornstarch and skim milk. 3. Use less fat altogether. For many dishes, you can use 25% to 33% less fat than what the recipe says. Another tip: Substitute applesauce or mashed bananas for some or all of the fat in baked goods. *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, if patient is taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings, and if not performed, may result in hypoglycemia. Pl Continue reading >>

Diabetic Recipes - Cooking Light

Diabetic Recipes - Cooking Light

Take charge of the battle against diabetes with the help of the experts at Cooking Light magazine, including these recipes, study reports, videos and more. Find carb-conscioustips and recipes that will stick to your ribs, and not ... Find carb-conscioustips and recipes that will stick to your ribs, and not your waistline. Be sure to put these in your meal rotation. Be sure to put these in your meal rotation. We asked a nutritionist if diabeticsshould eat fruit. What she said may su... We asked a nutritionist if diabeticsshould eat fruit. What she said may surprise you. 15 Healthy Lettuce Wraps for Low-Carb Lunches Buns are great for burgers and brats, but when you just need something a li... Buns are great for burgers and brats, but when you just need something a little lighter and brighter, fresh lettuce wraps are a delicious option for lunch or dinner. These healthy lettuce wraps recipes are filled with tasty combinations of bright sauces, tender meats, and crispy-crunchy vegetables. Chicken lettuce wraps are classic, but you will really enjoy putting steak, pork, even vegetables between the delicate lettuce leaves. Low-carb recipes don't have to be just meat and vegetables, though if you s... Low-carb recipes don't have to be just meat and vegetables, though if you search for any low-carb dinners on the Internet, that's about all you will find. We've limited these low-carb dinners to 30 grams of carbohydrates per serving. Many are even lower than our 30-gram cap. Any carbs you do see in this collection are of the "smart" variety. Smart carbs (like fruit, whole grains, and beans) stretch any carb count you get into a healthier option. They come filled with fiber, protein, and other nutrients, not just empty carb calories. Click through this delicious recipe slideshow Continue reading >>

Diabetes Meal Plan Recipes

Diabetes Meal Plan Recipes

It's not always easy to follow your diabetes meal plan day after day, but these delicious recipes may help. Appetizer recipes Beverage recipes Bread recipes Breakfast recipes Dessert recipes Main dish recipes Salad recipes Sandwich recipes Sauce and dressing recipes Side dish recipes Soup recipes Vegetable recipes Continue reading >>

El Paso Diabetes El Paso Diabetes

El Paso Diabetes El Paso Diabetes

TAKING STEPS TOWARD AN EL PASO FREE OF DIABETES The El Paso Diabetes Association (EPDA) opened its doors in Mrs. Estelle Goldmans garage in El Paso, Texas, in November 1968 as the South chapter of the American Diabetes Association, to offer a support group for families with children with type 1 diabetes. This was the only diabetes service available in El Paso at that time. Four years later, the EPDA chose to expand programs and to disaffiliate, making it one of a handful of independent diabetes associations in the country. Programs grew to diabetes management, cooking sessions, support groups, and the Annual Blossoms and Blooms. In the 1990s, the EPDA opted to move towards a public health direction as the rates of type 2 diabetes escalated in our community and along the border region. Today, the EPDA is an accredited, local and independent diabetes organization with many programs and services. The EPDA continues without any affiliations to state or national diabetes organizations, to ensure that the needs of our local community are understood and met. In the last few years, unnecessary diabetes emergencies have consistently cost our community an excess of 100 million dollars. By increasing education and awareness, the EPDAs hope is to reduce these financial costs as well as decrease the financial and emotional burdens of unmanaged diabetes for residents of El Paso. To improve the quality of life of individuals and their families with and at risk of developing diabetes within the El Paso Region. We believe that through educational programming, awareness and advocacy, we can prevent, manage and detection of diabetes before it's too late. Continue reading >>

5 Common Food Myths For People With Diabetes Debunked

5 Common Food Myths For People With Diabetes Debunked

There are many misconceptions that people with diabetes must follow a strict diet, when in reality they can eat anything a person without diabetes eats. Amy Campbell, MS, RD, LDN, CDE, nutritionist at Joslin Diabetes Center and co-author of 16 Myths of a "Diabetic Diet," debunks some common food myths for people with diabetes. 1. People with diabetes have to eat different foods from the rest of the family. People with diabetes can eat the same foods as the rest of their family. Current nutrition guidelines for diabetes are very flexible and offer many choices, allowing people with diabetes to fit in favorite or special-occasion foods. Everyone, whether they have diabetes or not, should eat a healthful diet that consists of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein foods, and heart-healthy fats. So, if you have diabetes, there's no need to cook separately from your family. 2. People with diabetes should never give in to food cravings. Almost everyone has food cravings at some point, and people with diabetes are no exception. It's not uncommon for people with diabetes to cut out all sweets or even cut way back on food portions in order to lose weight. In turn, your body often responds to these drastic changes by creating cravings. Nine times out of ten, your food choices in these situations tend to be high in fat and/or sugar, too. The best way to deal with food cravings is to try to prevent them by following a healthy eating plan that lets you occasionally fit sweets into your diabetes meal plan. If a craving does occur, let yourself have a small taste of whatever it is you want. By doing so, you can enjoy the flavor and avoid overeating later on. 3. People with diabetes shouldn't eat too many starchy foods, even if they contain fiber, because starch raises your blo Continue reading >>

Dinner Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Dinner Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Every 23 seconds, someone in the United States is diagnosed with diabetes. But although diabetes is widespread, public awareness and understanding of the disease can be limited. The Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention (CDC) report that 29 million Americans currently have diabetes, but a quarter of them do not know it. Another 86 million adults have prediabetes, with 90 percent of them being unaware. Diabetes is a serious disease that can, if uncontrolled, lead to loss of eyesight, cardiovascular problems, kidney damage, and even amputation of lower limbs. The good news is, it can be managed and these serious health problems can be avoided. Diet techniques for diabetes The even better news is that diabetes can be managed through a combination of exercise, health care, and diet. Despite popular belief, a diet can be varied, tasty, and fulfilling. The "diabetic plate" Maintaining a consistent, well-balanced diet can help people with diabetes keep their blood sugar levels under control. Portion control is also important, which is where the "diabetic plate" comes in. Endorsed by several organizations, including the American Diabetes Association, the "diabetic plate" can be very helpful when planning dinners. Follow these simple steps: Draw an imaginary line down the center of your plate. Divide one half into two further sections, so that your plate is now divided into three. Fill the biggest section with non-starchy vegetables, such as spinach, green beans, salsa, mushrooms, broccoli, or others. Use proteins to fill one of the smaller sections. Good options are skinless chicken, salmon, shrimp, tempeh or tofu, eggs, and much more. Legumes can fit in either the protein or the starch section because they provide both protein and carbohydrate. Grains, legumes and starch Continue reading >>

Paula Deen's Top Recipes, Made Diabetes-friendly

Paula Deen's Top Recipes, Made Diabetes-friendly

1 / 9 Back in January, celebrity chef Paula Deen went public with her type 2 diabetes diagnosis around the same time an endorsement deal was announced between Deen and the company that makes the diabetes drug Victoza. Since then, the public has been in an uproar over her full-fat, high-sugar recipes and how they may have contributed to her developing the condition, and it's easy to see why. "If you were to regularly eat the foods that Paula Deen traditionally cooks on her show, it certainly would increase the risk for developing type 2 diabetes," says Megan Fendt, nutritionist and certified diabetes educator at the Friedman Diabetes Institute at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City. "These types of foods are high in calories, and any calories over and above what our bodies need are stored as fat. And there is a strong link between carrying excess weight and developing diabetes." When she made her announcement on the Today Show, Deen told co-host Al Roker, "I share with you all these yummy, fattening recipes, but I tell people, 'in moderation.' However, it's hard to figure out what constitutes a moderate portion of some of her more famous creations — like battered, deep-fried butter balls and a bacon-and-egg burger served on a glazed donut. The good news is you can enjoy Southern-style cooking with a fraction of the fat, sugar, and calories found in Deen's cooking. Here's our healthier, diabetes-friendly take on Paula's classic cuisine. Continue reading >>

Geoenvironmental Diabetology

Geoenvironmental Diabetology

Go to: Introduction Multiple studies have documented negative health effects that environmental stressors can have on patients with diabetes. Studies examining the interaction between the environment and a patient with diabetes can be unified under a single discipline termed “geoenvironmental diabetology.” Geoenvironmental diabetology is defined more specifically as the study of how geophysical phenomena impact a patient with diabetes, to include effects on metabolic control, ancillary equipment (e.g., glucometers and insulin pumps), medications, supplies, access to care, and influences on the adaptive strategies employed by patients to care for their diabetes under extreme circumstances. Geological events such as natural disasters (e.g., earthquakes) or extreme weather (e.g., heat waves) are examples of stressors that can be included under the heading of geoenvironmental diabetology. The proposed concept of geoenvironmental diabetology refers to how events in the physical world affect those with diagnosed diabetes, rather than how environmental factors interact with genetic predisposition to trigger development of disease.1,2 An overview is provided on how various geoenvironmental phenomena affect patients with diabetes. Discussion could also incorporate scenarios where patients voluntarily insert themselves into physically stressful environments, such as traveling to high altitudes (e.g., recreational mountain climbing), or situations that involve increased atmospheric pressure (e.g., scuba diving). Much of diabetology is concerned with teaching patients how to interact with their environment. This article focuses on the unexpected (though in some cases foreseeable) geological disasters and environmental stresses that can impact patients with diabetes. The global Continue reading >>

Diabetic Soul Food Recipes

Diabetic Soul Food Recipes

Answer our question before trying our diabetic soul food recipes . Do you have a family history of diabetes? Do you have a family member suffering from diabetes? Have you been recently diagnosed with type 1 or 2 diabetes? If you answered yes to any of the questions above, you'll be surprised to know that you can find recipes for diabetic soul food here. Lately I've been very concerned about my health and the health of my family. Eating healthy has not always been a top priority for me, but NOW it is, due to the fact that I have a family history of diabetes. This deadly disease has already claimed two of my family members. You're probably searching for diabetic soul food recipes on the internet because you still want to be able to eat great tasting foods. And I'm sure you're well aware that proper exercise and diet are key to preventing or controlling diabetes. I can't help you with the exercise piece, but I can help you by providing recipes that are tasty and diabetic friendly. You've made a wise decision to consider changing your diet. If you have not already done so, be sure to consult a physician or dietitian before making any changes in your diet. This is especially true if you have been recently diagnosed. These people are experts who know all of the details involved in helping you meet your goals. How To Make Your Recipes Diabetic Friendly Primarily, nothing works better than taking your medication, exercising and proper diet. Does this sound familiar? It should these are all things your have heard from your personal physician and dietitian. I can't help with the medication, however, if you follow some simple recipe guidelines you can still enjoy deliciously prepared foods that taste great. The ideal diabetic recipes will have the following nutritionalcharacteris Continue reading >>

Popular Recipes

Popular Recipes

Award-winning cookbook authors Frances Towner Giedt and Bonnie Sanders Polin, PhD, created hundreds of diabetes-friendly recipes featured in our recipe center. The duo also authored The Joslin Diabetes Gourmet Cookbook—the only diabetes cookbook to have ever won the prestigious James Beard Award. Welcome to the Type 2 Diabetes Center! This is your launching pad for living better with type 2 diabetes. We’ve gathered all the latest type 2 diabetes information, research updates, and advances in devices and medications. And because diabetes impacts every facet of your life, you’ll also find practical advice from leading experts and other people living with type 2 diabetes featured here. That includes mouth-watering, healthy recipes; money-saving tips; advice to help navigate social, professional, and relationship issues; and inspiring personal stories from people just like you. Explore the resources here and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter to be alerted to new additions. Continue reading >>

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