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Vinegar Improves Insulin Sensitivity To A High-carbohydrate Meal In Subjects With Insulin Resistance Or Type 2 Diabetes

Vinegar Improves Insulin Sensitivity To A High-carbohydrate Meal In Subjects With Insulin Resistance Or Type 2 Diabetes

The number of Americans with type 2 diabetes is expected to increase by 50% in the next 25 years; hence, the prevention of type 2 diabetes is an important objective. Recent large-scale trials (the Diabetes Prevention Program and STOP-NIDDM) have demonstrated that therapeutic agents used to improve insulin sensitivity in diabetes, metformin and acarbose, may also delay or prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes in high-risk populations. Interestingly, an early report showed that vinegar attenuated the glucose and insulin responses to a sucrose or starch load (1). In the present report, we assessed the effectiveness of vinegar in reducing postprandial glycemia and insulinemia in subjects with varying degrees of insulin sensitivity. Our study included nondiabetic subjects who were either insulin sensitive (control subjects, n = 8) or insulin resistant (n = 11) and 10 subjects with type 2 diabetes. Subjects provided written informed consent and were not taking diabetes medications. Fasting subjects were randomly assigned to consume the vinegar (20 g apple cider vinegar, 40 g water, and 1 tsp saccharine) or placebo drink and, after a 2-min delay, the test meal, which was composed of a white bagel, butter, and orange juice (87 g total carbohydrates). The cross-over trial was conducted 1 week later. Blood samples were collected at fasting and 30 and 60 min postmeal for glucose and insulin analyses. Whole-body insulin sensitivity during the 60-min postmeal interval was estimated using a composite score (2). Fasting glucose concentrations were elevated ∼55% in subjects with diabetes compared with the other subject groups (P < 0.01, Tukey’s post hoc test), and fasting insulin concentrations were elevated 95–115% in subjects with insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes compared w Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes: 3 Inexpensive Foods You Need To Know About

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes: 3 Inexpensive Foods You Need To Know About

Is there a way to reverse diabetes? Specifically, type 2 diabetes? You might be surprised to discover there are three unbelievable natural remedies that I don’t believe the medical establishment—or, more specifically, the pharmaceutical companies—want you to know about. Why would they not want you to know about this stuff? It’s because the pharmaceutical industry is a gigantic machine which has to sustain itself. The diabetic industry alone is massive, owing to the fact that over 300 million people in the world have type 2 diabetes. The treatments and medication used to treat diabetes are big business, so why would these companies be at all interested in truly reversing diabetes? How would that benefit them financially? Unfortunately, a lot of diabetes drugs don’t actually work, or work with limited success and a lot of potential side effects. Science has shown that—in terms of diabetic management—these drugs are more dangerous than anything. Drugs used in the 1950s, for the most part, have all been taken off the market because they were shown to increase the risk of heart disease. This has even happened recently with drugs like Avandia. It was the world’s most popular Type 2 diabetes drug until it was revealed to have side effects that caused serious heart problems. New drugs haven’t proven to be much better. With that in mind, I’m going to share with you 3 amazing, all-natural solutions to reverse diabetes. Even if you don’t have type 2 diabetes, these solutions can help you prevent it. Here’s something I want you to realize; please never forget this: If you have type two diabetes, it’s not a life sentence. It’s actually one of the easiest—and I don’t say that in a condescending way; I say it in an optimistic way—diseases to completel Continue reading >>

Apple Cider Vinegar And Diabetes: Does It Help? How Is It Taken?

Apple Cider Vinegar And Diabetes: Does It Help? How Is It Taken?

For many years, apple cider vinegar has been linked with an array of health benefits. These have ranged from aiding weight loss to relieving cold symptoms. But does taking it help people with diabetes? The majority of the health claims around apple cider vinegar have yet to be supported by clinical research. However, evidence has been emerging to suggest that apple cider vinegar may have certain benefits for the management of type 2 diabetes. This article will discuss the research behind this claim and how apple cider vinegar should be taken, if at all. What is apple cider vinegar? Vinegar can be made from nearly any carbohydrate. Apple cider vinegar is derived from cider or freshly pressed apple juice. Like most vinegars, apple cider vinegar is produced after a slow process spanning several weeks or months in which sugars are broken down. Mother of vinegar is a cobweb-like substance made from yeast and bacteria that builds up during this period. Mother of vinegar gives the vinegar a cloudy appearance and it is only present in unfiltered apple cider vinegar. It is thought to boost the vinegar's nutritional value. However, most vinegar is pasteurized. This heating process kills bacteria but prevents mother of vinegar from forming. Apple cider vinegar and diabetes In 1980, there were around 108 million people with diabetes worldwide. Its prevalence has increased greatly over the past few decades to an estimated 422 million. Diabetes is a chronic condition marked by an inability to manage blood sugar levels appropriately. The hormone responsible for regulating blood sugar levels is called insulin. People with type 1 diabetes are unable to produce this hormone. People with type 2 diabetes are unable to produce enough insulin or respond appropriately to the hormone. People c Continue reading >>

Drinking Alcohol? (cider)

Drinking Alcohol? (cider)

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Today I've had 3 ciders and I haven't gave myself any insulin apart from correction doses and carbing for my food. My blood sugar was quite high (18). I just don't know how to manage alcohol with t1 and I really need some help. Right now I'm scared to go to sleep in case I have a severe hypo in the night from the alcohol I drank. Please help? Any advice on how to manage alcohol/ experiences with alcohol and their diabetes (specifically cider) Id probably bolus for cider. It's a fairly sugary drink. If your blood sugar is 18 I'd say the chance of any hypo, let alone a severe hypo, is exceedingly slim to none. The reason alcohol creates a risk of hypos overnight is because your liver can't multitask. Usually overnight your liver gives out glucose, if you've been drinking your liver will be too busy dealing with alcohol to give out glucose and that might cause a low. The length of time you liver is busy with alcohol depends on how much alcohol you've been drinking. 3 pints isn't really a lot to put the liver out of action all night. Usually the rule is don't bolus for drinks, because of the risk of later lows. But with something like cider that is full of fast acting sugar not bolusing for it is going to send you sky high. And if you haven't really drunk a lot the risk of later lows goes down and you can deal with that risk by just having something small and carby before bed - have a bit of toast before you go to sleep. Today I've had 3 ciders and I haven't gave myself any i Continue reading >>

Cider

Cider

Can we (diabetics!!) drink a dry cider or is it in the same category as Beer? Have just bought a fruit cider - with blackcurrent and have got an elderflower and lime flavoured one!! Just thought that you will say test!! It's about 90 mins since I had it with my meal and am registering 7.0 (126) so I suppose that is not too bad. D.D. Family T1 for 54 years - on Pump since 03/2008 Depends if you are a Type 1 or 2. Being a Type 1 myself, I can always take some insulin if it puts my sugar up.Being a pre-diabetic, I would be suprised if it did much. I'm not so sure if "pre diabetic " exists because if I ate a normal diet I would be on meds. I stick to a low carb/low GI diet and have learnt (mostly) what spikes me. I can only eat a tiy bit of suspect things within a meal. If I eat 1/2 an apple between meals it will spike me. D.D. Family Metabolic Syndrome (T2) since 2003 While the carbs in beer/cider etc.. may tend to raise the BG, the alcohol may have an overall lowering effect.. possibly by keeping the Liver occupied. Dry suggests to me less sugar so that is the way to go and you may also find that a glass with a meal has less effect than on it's own. Juts in case anyone is wondering... "cider" in the UK is fermented apple-juice -- ranging from a mildly pleasant sweet drink, to downright evil concoctions straight from the farmer... "scrumpy"..! Over this side of the pond, "apple cider" is just fresh squeezed apple juice... without the kick! Some folks even simmer it in a saucepan... with cinnamon sticks and lawd-knows what all else floating about in it! 52, Metabolic Syndrome (Type 2) Diagnosed March 2003 - MDI then Pump(ed) 5+ years Real whole food diet, including natural fats; avoiding starches, grains and most fruit -- physically active -- Levemir 6u each night Now your Continue reading >>

Apple Cider Vinegar—good For Your Health

Apple Cider Vinegar—good For Your Health

Today I found a great article on many uses of vinegar. I posted the cleaning part in another discussion, but this part has been a topic several times. It might help clear up what kinds of vinegars we want to consume to help our glucose numbers. Now that I am making my own apple cider vinegar, I look forward to see how the "mother" in the vinegar makes a difference for me, if at all. Here is part of the article. The cider vinegars, made from fermenting fruits such as apples, have little value as cleaners or herbicides. Instead, these are the types of vinegar associated with a number of different health benefits when taken internally. There are two basic categories of cider vinegars: Regular apple cider vinegar Organic apple cider vinegar with the "mother" included When purchasing an apple cider vinegar, you'll want to avoid the perfectly clear, "sparkling clean" varieties you commonly see on grocery store shelves. Instead, you want organic, unfiltered, unprocessed apple cider vinegar, which is murky and brown. When you try to look through it, you will notice a cobweb-like substance floating in it. This is known as "mother," and it indicates your vinegar is of good quality. While it may look suspicious at first, in this case, it's the murky looking stuff you want. As with everything else, the more processed a food is, the less nutritious it is, and this holds true for apple cider vinegar. Surprisingly enough, while apple cider vinegar has historically been prized for its health benefits, little research has been done to evaluate its therapeutic actions. However, lack of scientific studies is a common problem for many natural and alternative therapies. Perhaps the most researched and the most promising of apple cider vinegar's benefits are in the area of type 2 diabetes. S Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Diabetes

Alcohol And Diabetes

For some people, having a few drinks at home or in the pub is part of everyday life. And having diabetes shouldn’t get in the way of this. But when you have diabetes, it’s a bit more complicated. You might want to know whether it's safe to drink alcohol, and how much is okay. So yes, you can still drink, but you need to be aware of how it can affect your body and how to manage this. For example, drinking can make you more likely to have a hypo, because alcohol makes your blood sugars drop. It can affect your weight too, as there can be a lot of calories in alcoholic drinks. We’ll give you all the facts here. Alcohol and risk factors for Type 2 We don’t know exactly what causes Type 2 diabetes. But we do know that your family history, age and ethnic background affects your risk of developing it, and we know you’re more likely to develop it if you’re overweight. These are all called risk factors. Alcohol isn’t a risk factor in itself. But it can contain a lot of calories, which can lead to putting on weight. Take a look at our information about risk factors and find out your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Government guidelines on alcohol units To help keep health risks from alcohol at a low level, it’s safest not to regularly drink more than 14 units a week. These guidelines are the same for men and women. But what does this actually mean when you’re in the pub or having dinner with a glass of wine at home? It means you shouldn’t drink more than six medium glasses of wine or six pints of lager a week. But the size of the glass and type of alcohol affects the number of units, so it’s best to check the guidelines at drinkaware.co.uk Alcohol and hypos If you use insulin or some other diabetes medications like sulphonylureas, you’re more likely to Continue reading >>

Awesome Reasons Why Acv Is Good For Diabetes

Awesome Reasons Why Acv Is Good For Diabetes

Apple cider vinegar has long been a favorite natural remedy for an extraordinary number of ailments. It has been used to treat bacterial and fungal infections, hyperacidity, warts, fatigue, cancer, to clear acne, cure hiccups, lower blood pressure, get rid of dandruff, on sunburns and to treat leg cramps, to name just a few. Apple cider vinegar has been used for centuries and is made from fermented apple mash. It contains acetic acid, vitamins, minerals, amino acids, polyphenols and other types of acids. The “mother” fluid is a product of a long fermentation process and will often look cloudy because of the non-infectious and non-toxic bacteria (the probiotics) that it contains. Other, “non-mother” products are filtered to remove the cloudiness and may be less beneficial. Evidence is beginning to pile up for at least some uses of apple cider vinegar—commonly known as ACV. Many professionals will recommend, however, that you only use the “mother” ACV and not any filtered ACV products. Some of the Evidence-based Medical Uses of Apple Cider Vinegar Many of the uses for ACV is to fight infections, particularly skin infections—since ACV is high in acetic acid, it is very likely that ACV can kill off bacterial, fungal and viral infections because the acid in ACV is absorbed and directly kills off any infectious agent. This is likely to explain the traditional use of ACV on skin infections. [1] Using ACV on wounds may also be useful in preventing infections because of its acidity. ACV is also used to treat hyperacidity (heartburn). To use ACV for heartburn, the recommendation is to add about 1 tablespoon of ACV to 6 ounces of water and drink it about 20 minutes before a meal—this actually stimulates a normal amount of acid in the stomach.[2] ACV has been test Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - Could A Spoonful Of This Every Day Condiment Cure You?

Type 2 Diabetes - Could A Spoonful Of This Every Day Condiment Cure You?

Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas which allows your body to use sugar from carbohydrates for immediate energy or to store for later - a process type 2 diabetes sufferers struggle to do. In this condition, the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin, or the body’s cells don’t react to insulin. Which means blood sugar levels can get too high for too long a period. This can cause hyperglycaemia, which in turn can trigger heart disease, stroke and kidney disease. The weight loss benefits of drinking it are known, but it could also help you manage your diabetes too. But there might be a simple solution in the form of apple cider vinegar. The weight loss benefits of drinking it are known, but it could also help you manage your diabetes too. Research has found it improved type 2 diabetes patients’ insulin sensitivity - that’s insulin’s ability to bring sugar out of the bloodstream and into the body’s cells. The 2004 study also discovered it lessened the rise of blood sugar and insulin when patients were given insulin- and glucose-spiking foods, such as a bagel and orange juice. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. Further research supports these findings. A Swedish study saw healthy males given bread with and without white vinegar - the former group showed a lowering of blood sugar and insulin - while in a 2008 study on rats it reduced blood sugar levels. Researchers have found that less than one ounce of apple cider vinegar is needed to significantly reduce blood sugar levels after a meal, while a study published in the journal Diabetes Care discovered two tablespoons with a cheese snack w Continue reading >>

Can Drinking Apple Cider Vinegar Help With Diabetes?

Can Drinking Apple Cider Vinegar Help With Diabetes?

Part 1 of 4 Overview Type 2 diabetes is a preventable and chronic disease that affects how your body controls sugar (glucose) in your blood. Medications, diet, and exercise are the standard treatments. But recent studies vouch for something you can find in most kitchen cabinets too: apple cider vinegar. Over 9 percent of Americans have type 2 diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). If apple cider vinegar has potential as a natural treatment, that would be good news indeed. Part 2 of 4 While a number of studies have looked at the link between apple cider vinegar and blood sugar management, they are usually small, with varying results. “There have been several small studies evaluating the effects of apple cider vinegar, and the results are mixed,” said Dr. Maria Pena, an endocrinologist in New York. “For example, there was one small study done in rats showing that apple cider vinegar helped lower LDL and A1C levels. But the limitation to this study is that it was only done in rats, not humans.” One study from researchers at Arizona State University found that taking 20 grams of apple cider vinegar diluted in 40 grams of water, with 1 teaspoon of saccharine, could lower blood sugar after meals. Another study found that taking apple cider vinegar before bed helped moderate blood sugar upon waking up. But both studies were small, looking only at 19 and 11 participants, respectively. Another study that looked at apple cider vinegar’s impact on type 1 diabetes found that it could actually worsen glycemic control, according to Pena. “The take-home message is that until a large, randomized control trial is done, it is difficult to ascertain the true benefits of taking apple cider vinegar,” she said. Part 3 of 4 Dilute apple cide Continue reading >>

Apple Cider Vinegar And Diabetes

Apple Cider Vinegar And Diabetes

OK, y’all. I wrote about this several years ago, but now I’m serious. If you want to control any type of diabetes better, consume vinegar before meals and at bedtime. Start today! It lowers post-meal and fasting glucose levels. In a study from Arizona State University, subjects took a drink of 20 grams of apple cider vinegar, 40 grams of water, and 1 teaspoon of saccharin with each meal. (I think stevia might be better than saccharin.) Those with insulin resistance who drank the vinegar had 34% lower postprandial (after-meal) glucose compared to controls. These postprandial benefits had been found before. It was thought that vinegar might slow the absorption of carbohydrate into the blood, or slow the breakdown of starches into sugars. This effect would mimic the effect of drugs like acarbose (brand name Precose). But the 2004 study cited above reported that vinegar reduced postprandial glucose more in subjects who were highly insulin resistant. The authors say this result shows that vinegar increases insulin sensitivity, perhaps acting similarly to metformin. Now studies have found that vinegar at bedtime reduces fasting blood glucose in the morning, indicating that vinegar might promote insulin production, like nateglinide (Starlix). Pretty amazing that a simple chemical like vinegar (acetic acid) could have the benefits of three different classes of diabetes drugs, and all for a few cents a dose! It’s likely good for both Type 2 and Type 1, especially for lowering postprandial glucose. And postprandial glucose levels account for 30% to 70% of A1C values. Vinegar has got to be the most cost-effective medicine in history, but most people with diabetes still aren’t taking it. And doctors aren’t prescribing it. Why not? Is it because there are no “vinegar rep Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Diabetes

Alcohol And Diabetes

Alcohol and the heart Alcohol and diabetes Alcohol and the liver Alcohol and cancer Alcohol and women Alcohol and allergy Alcohol and older people Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disorder in the blood level of insulin, a pancreatic hormone, that helps convert blood glucose into energy. Diabetes occurs when the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin, or the insulin it does produce doesn’t work properly. Insulin is a hormone that transfers glucose from the bloodstream into the cells to be used for energy. If you have diabetes, your body cannot make proper use of this glucose so it builds up in the blood instead of moving into your cells. The chances of developing diabetes may depend on a mix of your genes and your lifestyle. It’s a manageable condition. But when it’s not well managed, it is associated with serious complications including heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease, nerve damage and amputations. In 2014, it was estimated that 29 million Americanse have diabetes (9.3% of the population) and 21 million of these have been diagnosed. Data reported by researchers from the CDC in the journal Population Health Metrics (November 2010) showed three scenarios for projected prevalence of diabetes in the year 2050 predicting that diabetes in the US population could rise to between 21% and 33% in 2050) It is estimated 95% of Americans with diabetes have type 2 diabetes, while 5% have type 1 diabetes (CDC). The total economic burden of diabetes in the US, including direct and indirect costs, was estimated to be $245 billion in 2012. There are two main types of diabetes Type 1 diabetes develops if the body can’t produce enough insulin, because insulin-producing cells in the pancreas have been destroyed. It can happen: because of genetic factors when a viru Continue reading >>

Apple Cider Vinegar And Diabetes: A Cure Or An Aid?

Apple Cider Vinegar And Diabetes: A Cure Or An Aid?

If you’ve been searching for various remedies to help manage blood glucose levels, you’ve probably come across the suggestion to add apple cider vinegar into your meal plan. But does this so-called natural remedy really work? It turns out that using vinegar as a treatment for health aliments, such as infections and stomachaches, has been practiced for centuries in cultures throughout the world. But it was a Japanese study that suggested apple cider vinegar may promote weight loss that thrust it into the spotlight for people looking to slim down or better manage their diabetes. Since then, other researchers have studied this vinegar’s impact on appetite and blood glucose management. “There is some emerging evidence that suggests apple cider vinegar may have certain potential benefits for people with diabetes,” says Susan Weiner, RDN, CDE, author of Diabetes 365: Tips for Living Well. But she adds, “all of the studies in this area are small and have varying results.” Mona Morstein, ND, author of Master Your Diabetes: A Comprehensive Integrative Approach for Both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes, also shared concern regarding the research so far. “Studies done with small groups is always something to be wary of when expanding findings to millions of others,” says Morstein, noting that, at the same time, the results in the studies conducted to date have all been positive. Apple Cider Vinegar for Diabetes: What Studies Say Controlling blood sugar is important for people with diabetes, and some research suggests apple cider vinegar may help do the job. According to a study published in the journal Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, consuming vinegar with complex carbohydrates may reduce post-meal blood glucose levels by as much as 20 percent. Additional research Continue reading >>

Apple Cider Vinegar And Your Health

Apple Cider Vinegar And Your Health

Apple cider vinegar has a long history as a home remedy, used to treat everything from a sore throat to varicose veins. But there’s not much science to support the claims. Still, in recent years, some researchers have been taking a closer look at apple cider vinegar and its possible benefits. It’s mostly apple juice, but adding yeast turns the fruit sugar into alcohol -- this is fermentation. Bacteria turn the alcohol into acetic acid. That’s what gives vinegar its sour taste and strong smell. Vinegar’s used in cooking, baking, salad dressings, and as a preservative. There’s a lot of acid in it, so drinking vinegar straight isn’t recommended. And it can cause serious problems if you have a lot of it. If you’re looking to take some for health reasons, most people recommend adding one to two tablespoons to water or tea. Vinegar has been used as a remedy since the days of Hippocrates. The ancient Greek doctor treated wounds with it. In recent years, people have explored apple cider vinegar as a way to lose weight, improve heart health, and even treat dandruff. Many of these claims aren’t supported by modern research. But some studies have found that acetic acid -- which gives vinegar its distinctive taste and smell -- may help with a variety of conditions: Japanese scientists found that drinking vinegar might help reduce obesity. One small study found that vinegar improved blood sugar and insulin levels in a group of people with type 2 diabetes. Vinegar also has chemicals known as polyphenols. They’re antioxidants that can curb cell damage that can lead to other diseases, such as cancer. But studies on whether vinegar actually lowers your chances of having cancer are mixed. Did we mention it’s highly acidic? Drinking a lot of apple cider vinegar can dam Continue reading >>

4 Advantages Of Apple Cider Vinegar For Diabetes

4 Advantages Of Apple Cider Vinegar For Diabetes

The benefits of apple cider vinegar are endless. It has been reported to help with everything from skin conditions to curing allergies. Research has shown that adding apple cider vinegar to your diet may also help manage your diabetes. What is it about apple cider vinegar that makes it so special? It comes down to the amount of nutrients it contains, vitamins, minerals, amino acids and beneficial enzymes. Vinegar is an acetic acid, which may increase your body’s absorption of important minerals from the food you eat. One theory suggests that vinegar inactivates the digestive enzymes that break down carbohydrates into sugar, thus slowing the absorption of sugar from a meal into your bloodstream and preventing sugar levels from spiking. Here are four ways that apple cider vinegar may help manage your diabetes: 1- Improve insulin sensitivity after a high carb meal. A study in the Diabetes Care Journal revealed that when subjects consumed apple cider vinegar diluted with water and teaspoon of saccharine, two minutes before a test meal of a white bagel, butter and orange juice, that there was a decrease in both fasting and postprandial (after-meal) glucose levels. 2- Moderate waking glucose levels. Taking two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar along with one ounce of cheese before bed led to a 4 to 6 percent decrease in fasting blood sugar levels, said a study from 2007 in the Diabetes Care Journal. 3- Decrease high blood pressure. An article from Livestrong recommends one tablespoon of apple cider vinegar twice daily to decrease high blood pressure. Apple cider vinegar contains potassium, which may assist your body in balancing sodium levels, thus reducing hypertension. 4- Help weight loss. During the study mentioned above, researchers noticed that those who ate a tablesp Continue reading >>

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