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7 Healthier Chocolate Diabetic Desserts

7 Healthier Chocolate Diabetic Desserts

Gooey Double-Chocolate Brownies Reader's Digest This quick and easy dessert becomes even more special when you serve it with a small scoop of low-fat frozen yogurt, berries, and chocolate sauce. Makes 24 brownies. Prep Time: 25 minutes. Cook Time: 30 minutes. • 1/2 cup butter, at room temperature • 1 1⁄3 cups semisweet chocolate, chopped • 2 eggs • 1 cup superfine sugar • 1 tsp. vanilla extract • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour • 2 tbsp. unsweetened cocoa powder • 1 cup walnuts, roughly chopped (optional) 1. Grease 8-by-8-inch cake pan and line with parchment paper. Preheat oven to 350°F. Melt butter and 3/4 cup chocolate in bowl set over gently simmering water or in the microwave; remove from heat and let cool. 2. Whisk eggs in bowl with electric beaters. Gradually add sugar; beat continuously until mixture is thick and foamy and leaves ribbonlike trail when beaters are lifted. Add vanilla extract and chocolate mixture, and blend thoroughly. Sift flour and cocoa powder over mixture and scatter in walnuts, if using, and remaining chocolate. Fold mixture together with large spoon. 3. Pour batter into pan and bake about 30 minutes or until toothpick inserted in middle comes out clean. If top starts to look like it might burn before brownies are cooked through, place a piece of foil over pan. Cool brownies briefly in pan; cut into 24 squares. Cool brownies completely on wire rack. Store in airtight container for 3 to 4 days. Per brownie (with walnuts): 152 cal, 10 g fat (5 g sat), 16 g carbs, 2 g protein, 1 g fiber, 25 mg chol, 40 mg sodium, 8 mg calcium. Chocolate Mousse Tart Reader's Digest Celebrating a special occasion? Go ahead, indulge! This rich, creamy treat is much lower in fat than a traditional chocolate tart, so you can enjoy a bit of guilt-free de Continue reading >>

Desserts And Sweets For Diabetics

Desserts And Sweets For Diabetics

Get our comprehensive list of the best desserts and sweets for people with diabetes. Having diabetes doesn't mean you can never have dessert again. With some simple swaps and diabetic-friendly dessert recipes, you can satisfy your sweet tooth without sending your blood sugar soaring. Desserts may seem off-limits since many are high in sugar, but remember that for people with diabetes the total number of carbohydrates of a meal or snack matters more than the total sugar. That means dessert can still fit into your diet—with a few adjustments. Before you head to the kitchen, here are a few dessert guidelines and some of our favorite sweets that fit into a diabetic diet. If you opt for something sweet after dinner, you might want to skip the starch at your meal to keep your total carbs in check. But remember that, while exchanging your sweet potato for cheesecake can keep your carb intake steady, you'll lose the fiber, vitamins and other good-for-you nutrients that the sweet potato would provide. It's not a good idea to indulge in dessert every night; instead, enjoy desserts in moderation. The American Diabetes Association recommends that most people with diabetes aim for 45-60 grams of carbohydrates per meal. Unfortunately, a bakery-sized cookie can contain 60 grams of carbs alone. Choose a smaller portion, and you can still enjoy something sweet without using up your allotted carbohydrates for the meal. One of these Almond Cookies has only 9 grams of carbohydrates. While making desserts with artificial sweeteners can help you cut down on calories and carbs, it's a better idea to try to reduce your total sweetener consumption (from both sugar and noncaloric sources). Because artificial sweeteners are much sweeter than sugar, they may enhance your craving for sweets. They Continue reading >>

Dark Chocolate Is Good For Diabetics

Dark Chocolate Is Good For Diabetics

I often hear comments from many people that diabetics cannot have chocolate. While it is true that they should not have candy with chocolate in it they can have chocolate. Remember that candy with chocolate in it is laced with fillers and refined white sugars, the ‘bad’ chocolate. The ‘good chocolate’, gourmet healthy chocolates are just what the doctor may order to help diabetics. In the Journal of Diabetic Medicine one study shows the difference between the good chocolate with high polyphenols (high flavanoids or plant based antioxidants) and bad chocolate with low polyphenols. This study reported was the first of it’s kind with diabetics. According to the University of Hull: “Twelve individuals with Type 2 diabetes were selected and those who participated were on stable medication. They were given 45gr of dark chocolate to eat daily for 16 weeks in a double blind study. The patients were given chocolate either with or without a high cocoa content. The dark chocolate contained 85% cocoa solids compared to the placebo which contained no cocoa solids but was dyed the same colour as the dark chocolate. Individual 15g foil wrapped bars were provided and the volunteers were asked to consume one bar three times a day. The patients were advised not to consume any other chocolate for the duration of the study and they were instructed to make no changes to their diet and lifestyle.” After the 16 week study there were significant increases to their HDL (High Density Lipoprotein) prompting comments from endocrine specialists advising diabetics to make a high polyphenonl (high flavanol) dark chocolate part of their daily dietary intake. In the Hull University article Steve Atkin, Professor of Diabetes and Endocrinology, who led the study says: “People with Type 2 Continue reading >>

8 Best Dark Chocolate Bars – All Low Carb & Super Tasty

8 Best Dark Chocolate Bars – All Low Carb & Super Tasty

If you don’t love chocolate, then you’re definitely in the minority. A food popular since the ancient days of Mexico, it remains a societal treasure to this day. However, not all chocolate is made the same, and the ‘dark’ variety is where the health benefits lie. This low carb chocolate guide will show some of the healthiest dark chocolate bars that you can currently buy. Why is Dark Chocolate Healthy? For the most part, dark chocolate is healthy because it restricts the amount of sugar and contains much larger amounts of cacao. While not everybody knows this, cacao is one of the most polyphenol-rich foods in the world (1). It contains a large number of polyphenols which contribute to fighting oxidative stress and disease in the body. These polyphenols have been linked to decreased inflammation, reduced cancer risk, and protection against cardiovascular risk (2, 3, 4, 5, 6). The fact that some bars are virtually sugar-free chocolate also plays a part in the health benefits. Sugar is one of the most damaging food products in the human diet, and a wealth of studies show the detrimental role it plays in declining health. Notably, increasing sugar intake raises the risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, dementia, and almost all chronic illnesses (7, 8, 9, 10, 11). Overall, low carb chocolate has the best of both worlds due to more health-protective compounds and a whole lot less sugar. For more on the health benefits of dark chocolate, see this article. Key Point: Dark chocolate is healthy because it maximizes the cocoa content and also minimizes the sugar. Is Low Sugar Chocolate and Dark Chocolate the Same? Just a quick note; there is a difference between low carb chocolate and dark chocolate. While there are many dark chocolate brands, not all of them p Continue reading >>

What Are The Best Milk Options For People With Diabetes?

What Are The Best Milk Options For People With Diabetes?

Many people have childhood memories of parents urging them to drink lots of milk. When you’re a child, you typically have to drink whatever milk your parents provided for you. It may have been a more traditional option such as whole milk or a sweet alternative such as almond milk. Now that you’re the one doing the choosing, you can pick the best type of milk for you. If you have diabetes, you should know that not all types of milk are beneficial for you. Although you need the nutritious calcium and protein found in milk, it’s important to note the saturated fats, carbohydrates, and sugar levels in each. This information will help you pick the best milk for your dietary needs. People with diabetes are not able to make, or use, insulin effectively. Insulin is a hormone that helps regulate blood sugar. When insulin isn’t doing its job efficiently, blood sugar levels can spike. There are two kinds of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. No matter which type you have, managing your sugar intake is important. Sugar is a type of carbohydrate, which is why carb counting is often recommended for people with diabetes. People with diabetes may also have high cholesterol or triglycerides in their blood. Triglycerides are a type of fat, which can increase the risk for a heart attack. Keeping an eye on the saturated and trans fat content in your diet is important. Diabetes can also make some people more susceptible to bone fractures. A diet high in calcium can help keep bones strong. One way to do this is by drinking milk daily. Adding calcium-rich milk into your diet may take a bit of planning. Creating a meal plan specifically designed for people with diabetes can be a good place to start. The American Diabetes Association recommends several meal plans geared toward keeping blood s Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dark Chocolate

Diabetes And Dark Chocolate

Share: Mouthwatering dark chocolate; could it be true that there are health benefits to eating it? Should someone with diabetes avoid the sheer pleasure of dark chocolate? Are there any precautions to take? What is the real story surrounding dark chocolate and diabetes? Last but not least DiabetesCare.net has a list of 5 recipes that include dark chocolate for your utter enjoyment. The health benefits of eating chocolate: Research scientists are studying good bacteria found in the digestive tract of people that normally eat cocoa. Preliminary findings are pointing in the direction that this bacteria is helping to ferment antioxidants and fiber found in cocoa. These bacteria are thought to help create compounds that are anti-inflammatory and help with our cardiovascular health. In one study of healthy individuals, it was found that by eating a small square (8 grams) of dark chocolate (70% cocoa chocolate) every day for a months’ time an improvement in vascular function over their own baseline as well as the control group was shown. This small amount can potentially help to decrease the risk of heart disease. The research was done on pure, unsweetened cocoa powder and it is advised that even the darkest chocolate must be consumed in moderation to avoid excess calories and weight gain. At this time scientists can not recommend an ideal amount of cocoa powder to eat. (1) For people with type 2 diabetes, daily dark chocolate consumption of 20 grams per day (that was rich with polyphenols) helped increase the sensitivity to insulin. This is important for blood glucose control. Increasing insulin sensitivity may also help delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in people with pre-diabetes. (1) A review of literature in 2012 found that eating dark chocolate every day reduced blood Continue reading >>

Best Ice Cream For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Ice Cream For Type 2 Diabetes

Ice cream does not have to be strictly off limits for people with type 2 diabetes. While it is still best to enjoy ice cream in moderation, there are ice cream and frozen yogurt choices out there that will not derail a healthful diet. People with type 2 diabetes have more to think about than simply ruining their diet with ice cream. Their main concerns are about how ice cream will affect their blood sugar levels, since controlling this is critical to managing diabetes. While people with diabetes can include ice cream as part of their healthful diet, it is important for them to make informed decisions about what ice creams they should eat. Understanding ice cream sugar servings Most ice cream has a lot of added sugar, making it something a person with diabetes should avoid. Because of this, one of the first things they should consider when choosing an ice cream is the sugar content. People with diabetes need to understand how their ice cream indulgence fits into their overall diet plan. Here are a few facts for people with diabetes to consider: Every 4 grams (g) of sugar is equivalent to 1 teaspoon. The more sugar that is in the ice cream, the more carbohydrates it has. An ice cream serving with 15 g of carbohydrates is equal to 1 serving of carbohydrates. Any carbohydrates in ice cream will count towards the total carbohydrate goal for the day, which will be different for each person. Protein and fat found in ice cream can help slow absorption of sugar. Choosing an ice cream higher in protein and fat may be preferable to choosing a lower fat option. A suitable portion of ice cream for somebody with diabetes is very small, usually half a cup. But most people serve much more than this. It is crucial that a person with diabetes sticks to the proper portion size, so they kn Continue reading >>

Chocolate And Diabetes

Chocolate And Diabetes

Easter is a time for family, friends, new beginnings and, of course, chocolate… If you – or a child in the family – has diabetes, you might be wondering if it’s OK to eat chocolate and other sweet treats. How could eating chocolate affect your diabetes? Is ‘diabetic’ chocolate a good choice? We’re here to answer all your chocolate questions, plus there are eight top tips on how to eat chocolate in moderation and and some chocolate recipes. Can you eat chocolate if you have diabetes? When you have diabetes it’s important to eat a healthy, balanced diet and only include sugary, high-fat foods occasionally as a treat. That said, Easter only comes once a year, so don’t worry about the odd one or two indulgences as these will not affect your long-term blood diabetes management. It’s a myth that you can’t eat chocolate if you have diabetes, just eat it in moderation, rather than using it to satisfy hunger, and don’t eat a lot in one go as it affects your blood sugar levels. Should I buy ‘diabetic’ chocolate? In a word, no! Here’s why: Chocolate labelled ‘diabetic’contains a type of sweetener, such as fructose or sorbitol, which can affect blood sugar levels. It also tends to contain just as much fat as ordinary chocolate – and is often high in the really bad type of fats – saturated and trans fat. It usually has as many calories, if not more, than normal chocolate. It can a laxative effect and make you need the loo more often. It is also more expensive. Children and chocolate Easter is a fun time for children. There are Easter eggs to be eaten and Easter egg hunts they’ll want to be part of, so it’s important that they don’t feel that their diabetes excludes them from any of this. They’ll also want to enjoy a chocolate treat like Continue reading >>

Guiltless Indulgence Assured With Sugar-free Ice Cream Brands

Guiltless Indulgence Assured With Sugar-free Ice Cream Brands

I doubt whether the world holds for anyone a more soul-stirring surprise than the first adventure with ice cream. ~ Heywood Broun Indeed, what would we do without ice cream! Life would have been so incomplete, the notion of gustatory ecstasy absent and the sweet tooth eternally condemned to deprivation but for a scoop of ice cream every now and then! However, for those who religiously watch the carbs and suffer from diabetes - well, what about them? Are they to remain deprived from this frozen joy of a dessert for the rest of their lives? Isn't that too great a punishment for their human follies? Not if it can be helped! Behold - sugar-free ice cream brands have come to the rescue of such people! Many popular dessert and ice cream manufacturing brands have come up with a solution for the sugar-abstaining populace in the form of sugarless recipes for low-carb ice creams which limit the intake of fats and carbs by the body but taste as good as conventional ice creams! So, people, join me in the slogan - I scream, you scream, we all scream for ICE CREAM! Low-carb Ice Cream Brands The following low-carb ice cream brands come as an answer to the prayers of weight watchers and diabetics all over the world! Check these great sugarless substitutes to break those sweet-less spells and guilt trips you've been suffering from till now. So folks, dig into the following list to find out what these brands are! Dreyer's Carb Benefit Turkey Hill No Sugar Added Ice Cream CarbSmart from Breyers Breyers No Sugar Added Skinny Cow Clemmy's 100% Sugar Free All Natural Ice Cream Edy's No Sugar Added Ice Cream Hershey's No Sugar Added Hand Dipped Ice Creams Amul Prolife Sugar Free Probiotic BRight Choices from Baskin-Robbins Ice Cream Brands for Diabetics The following ice cream brands are tail Continue reading >>

Top 5 Diabetic Chocolate Picks

Top 5 Diabetic Chocolate Picks

Are you a chocolate lover? And more importantly are you a diabetic on the lookout for your best chocolate options? I tend to make my own chocolate (and we have quite a few recipes for that), but I know most people aren't as motivated as me and prefer to buy something prepackaged. So to save you time and energy I went on a search for some ‘healthy' diabetic chocolate brands, ones I thought stood out of the crowd. When I did my search I was looking for ones low in carbs and preferably sugar free and made with stevia (my preferred natural sweetener). So I came up with a few good contenders for you to choose from and have gathered all the info below so you can make your own comparisons. 1. Dante's Confection This brand is a very popular top seller on Amazon, and I like it because it only contains 3 ingredients! Any ‘product' that has 5 or less ingredients, with ingredients we can recognize, gets the T2DT seal of approval It's also low in carbs and is excellent value for money. Another reason this one is the chocolate of choice is because it is the lowest in total carbs as well. Ingredients: Organic Fair-Trade Cocoa, Stevia, Natural Vanilla. Nutrition – Serving size: 45 g (1 bar) Calories: 260 Fat: 24 g Carbs: 12 g Fiber: 7 g Sugars: 0 g Net carbs: 5 g Protein: 7 g Cost: $16.99 for 4 x 45 g (1.5 oz) bars and many people say that eating just half a bar is all you need to feel satisfied. Check Out Dante's Confection on Amazon Here 2. Lily's Sweets Lily's Sweets has a variety of chocolate blends to choose from, dark chocolate, dark chocolate almond, milk chocolate, milk chocolate almond and more. These are sweetened with stevia and erythritol and have lots of good reviews on Amazon. They do contain a few more ingredients but some of their flavors might be worth exploring. Continue reading >>

7 Awesome Health Benefits Of Dark Chocolate

7 Awesome Health Benefits Of Dark Chocolate

If you’re like me, you love to eat chocolate. But not just any chocolate — I eat the varieties that are often referred to as “superfoods.” I’m talking about dark chocolate and cacoa nibs, which are both truly healthy forms of chocolate if you pick the right products. You’re probably thinking how is dark chocolate good for you, and in general, is chocolate good for you? Well, I’m about to tell you all about dark chocolate and how the benefits of dark chocolate are definitely for real. The average American consumes roughly 12 pounds of chocolate each year, and over $75 billion is spent annually worldwide on chocolate. (1) There is a lot of chocolate eating going on regularly, which is why I want to help you make the smart, healthy choice. That way you can have your chocolate without guilt and with health benefits of dark chocolate to boot! Chocolate lovers rejoice when the benefits of antioxidants found in chocolate are talked about, but it’s important to realize that not all chocolate is created equal, not even close. The potential health benefits of processed, highly sweetened chocolate are slim to none, but the health benefits of dark chocolate are numerous and quite impressive. Love chocolate? See why you should add the dark chocolate version to your diet. As preventive cardiologist Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum of Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City says, “When looking for a sweet snack, a square of dark chocolate might, in fact, be your healthiest choice!” (2) Let’s look at exactly why this expert medical opinion really does ring true and why a little dark chocolate is more than just a tasty treat — with health benefits of dark chocolate that include protection against disease and improved brain and heart health. 7 Awesome Health Benefits of Dark Ch Continue reading >>

The 5 Best Dark Chocolate Bars In The World

The 5 Best Dark Chocolate Bars In The World

389 Comments The Modern Paleo blog’s been doing chocolate reviews recently, which struck me as a novel but totally understandable practice for a blog called Modern Paleo. In my mind, good dark chocolate – high cacao content, high fat, low-ish sugar stuff – makes any downsides to living in this modern world well worth it. Good dark chocolate really is that good. And one of the best parts about going Primal has been the way my heightened sensitivity to the slightest dash of sugar enables true appreciation of the bean’s slightly sweet product. I’ve eaten a lot of chocolate in my day. Cheap American milk chocolate with an absurdly low cacao content was regularly gobbled up in my endurance days, but I’ve since moved on to more bitter pastures. About five years ago, I could enjoy your standard mid-grade bittersweet dark chocolate without worrying about the cacao content percentage. Now, I find the sweetness of anything lower than 72% cloyingly overpowering. That’s not to say I don’t like being overpowered by intense flavor, because I do – but only when that flavor is based on the bean. So, yeah, 72% is too low, and even the late 70s are generally pushing too much sugar. I try to stick to the 80s and even 90s. You might notice that my picks are not inexpensive. They aren’t throwaway bars to be wolfed down in between mouthfuls of movie popcorn in a single sitting. In fact, throughout the composition of this post (the tasting, the writing, the sampling), I probably ate almost an entire bar’s worth of really high-quality, super dark chocolate. It wasn’t easy. It was probably too much. Normally, I’ll eat a square, maybe two, after dinner a few times a week, so I’m preparing myself for an impending stomachache. We’ll see. My point is this: good dark ch Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Chocolate - How To Befriend The Chocolate Monster

Diabetes And Chocolate - How To Befriend The Chocolate Monster

back to Overview My colleague loves chocolate. Loves it! A cruel punishment for someone with diabetes? No, not necessarily! Clara has taken the opportunity to learn a lot about it, and today, we all benefit from her wisdom. Diabetes and chocolate, together from the start, as told by Clara Chocolate has always had a special place in my life. This was true before my diabetes diagnosis and remains true today. Want proof? I was diagnosed on the very day of my 9th birthday, and insisted on finishing my chocolate birthday cake before going to the hospital. At that time, the only chocolate my mom dared taking away from the house was the Nutella (which has, ironically, about the same sugar & fat content as milk chocolate, more on that below). One thing that didn’t disappear though were the Poulain chocolates, for which my sister and I created a cult loyalty and which were, by chance, rather dark. As I grew older, and my sister left the house, my mom’s taste took over on the choice of chocolates. I started going for even darker varieties and have dedicated my love to them ever since. This does spare me from the high sugar spike but doesn’t let me dodge the fat – ’cause contrary to what you might think, dark chocolate is not much slimmer than any other one. In fact – myth busting time – dark chocolate actually tends to get fatter as it gets darker! Can’t have only advantages, right? Some cold, hard facts So let’s talk details. How do you mix diabetes and chocolate? Well, what’s rule number one with diabetes? Understand more about what you’re eating! With that in mind, here’s an infographic about the sugar and fat content of typical chocolate. What does that tell you about how to deal with chocolate? Well first, ladies and gentleman, one more piece of infor Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Chocolate?

Can Diabetics Eat Chocolate?

If you have diabetes, you can eat anything -- although possibly not in the quantities you'd like. That includes chocolate. Some types of chocolate, such as dark chocolate, might even have health benefits, in moderation. Portion control is the key to enjoying foods like chocolate if you have diabetes, the American Diabetes Association reports. Dark chocolate is rich in polyphenols, plant substances that act as antioxidants and that might also help prevent heart disease and lower blood glucose levels. Types of Chocolate All chocolate is not created equal in terms of health benefits. When it comes to foods high in simple sugars, less is better if you have diabetes. Dark chocolate contains more cocoa and less sugar than milk chocolate, so you can eat a little more of it if you're controlling your calories or sugar intake. With dark chocolate, the higher the cocoa percentage, the better it is for you. Look for dark chocolate with at least 70 percent cocoa, registered dietitian Mitzi Dulan recommends. White chocolate contains no cocoa and is higher in calories and saturated fat than dark or milk chocolate. Potential Benefits According to a study that appeared in the January, 2015 issue of ARYA Atherosclerosis, high-cocoa polyphenol-rich chocolate lowers blood pressure and insulin resistance in patients with diabetes and high blood pressure. Insulin resistance restricts the uptake of glucose into cells, which causes blood glucose levels to rise. People who ate white chocolate did not experience a decrease in blood pressure or insulin resistance. In a British study published in the November 2010 issue of Diabetic Medicine, diabetics who consumed chocolate high in cocoa for 16 weeks experienced a decrease in total cholesterol and an increase in high-density lipoprotein, the so-c Continue reading >>

What To Eat With Diabetes: Winning Ice Creams

What To Eat With Diabetes: Winning Ice Creams

The next time you're craving a bowl of ice cream, scoop up one of our 16 best consumer-tasted and dietitian-approved finalists or winners. We conducted blind taste panels for more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated ice creams our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. The next time you're craving a bowl of ice cream, scoop up one of our 16 best consumer-tasted and dietitian-approved finalists or winners. We conducted blind taste panels for more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated ice creams our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. The next time you're craving a bowl of ice cream, scoop up one of our 16 best consumer-tasted and dietitian-approved finalists or winners. We conducted blind taste panels for more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated ice creams our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. The next time you're craving a bowl of ice cream, scoop up one of our 16 best consumer-tasted and dietitian-approved finalists or winners. We conducted blind taste panels for more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated ice creams our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. The next time you're craving a bowl of ice cream, scoop up one of our 16 bes Continue reading >>

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