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The Benefits Of Chocolate For Diabetes

The Benefits Of Chocolate For Diabetes

Ohhhhhhhhhh….Chocolate! Chocolate! How many times have you just had that sometimes nearly overwhelming urge to have some chocolate—in any form! You can have a chocolate bar, chocolate milk, chocolate cake, brownies, a chocolate ice cream sundae or a cup of hot cocoa just to list a few forms of chocolate. Oh wait—you can have dark chocolate, milk chocolate, orange, mint or raspberry-flavored chocolate or white chocolate….so much to choose from! But….should you? And if you should, just how much is enough and how much is overdoing it? Are there “healthier” forms of chocolate? Many of us sure as shootin’ hope there is! The “Dark” History of Chocolate Chocolate comes from the fruit and seeds of the cacao tree and is native to the Amazon forest. Botanically, the cacao tree is known as Theobroma cacao – this tree has three major varieties; the Forastero, the Trinitario and the Criollo. The Forastero is the most commonly used variety while the rarest and most prized for its aroma and its delicate taste is the Criollo variety. Christopher Columbus is credited with being the first European to come in contact with the cacao bean—he and his crew found—and stole, apparently—a canoe filled with various food items, including baskets of cacao beans. The cacao beans were actually used as local currency, but their chocolate quality was missed for another twenty years until Hernando Cortez brought 3 chests of cacao beans, this time stolen from the Aztecs, back to the court of the Spanish king—and the popularity of cacao and chocolate took off![1] The history of chocolate though, actually appears to be much older, going back to at least the Mayan civilization and possibly the Olmec civilization that predates the Mayan civilization. The traditional chocolate be Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Chocolate Desserts

Diabetes-friendly Chocolate Desserts

Love chocolate? With these chocolate diabetic recipes, you can have your cake and eat it, too. And your brownies and cookies and ice cream! Love chocolate? With these chocolate diabetic recipes, you can have your cake and eat it, too. And your brownies and cookies and ice cream! Love chocolate? With these chocolate diabetic recipes, you can have your cake and eat it, too. And your brownies and cookies and ice cream! Love chocolate? With these chocolate diabetic recipes, you can have your cake and eat it, too. And your brownies and cookies and ice cream! Continue reading >>

The Dieter’s (and Diabetic Person's) Guide To Buying Chocolate

The Dieter’s (and Diabetic Person's) Guide To Buying Chocolate

How can you get your daily chocolate fix -- and eat less sugar or calories, too? That's a million-dollar question that several companies are banking on people asking. Over the past few years, the sugar-free and portion-controlled chocolate market has exploded. There are all sorts of sugar-free versions of favorite chocolate bars. And you can now buy individually wrapped chocolate bars or sticks in 60- to 100-calorie portions, along with the ever-popular kisses. To help you decide among all the options out there, we taste-tested a number of sugar-free chocolate products (and some portion-controlled ones, too). But first, let's talk about how having a little chocolate every day could actually be good for you. Can Chocolate Really Be Good For You? Yes, it's true -- chocolate does appear to have some health benefits. Though more research needs to be done, studies have indicated that cocoa and darker types of chocolate may help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, decrease blood pressure, and relax blood vessels. Many of the health benefits of chocolate seem to stem from the antioxidant flavanols (a type of flavonoid), which are also found in other plant foods including tea, grapes, grapefruit, and wine. The cocoa bean happens to be extraordinarily rich in them. The flavanol content of chocolate depends on the flavanol content of the cacao plant used, and the way the cocoa was turned into chocolate. But here are three general rules of thumb: Cocoa powder and baking chocolate contain more flavonoids than dark chocolate. Dark chocolate has more flavonoids than milk chocolate. White chocolate has none. Of course, there's a catch to all this -- you don't want to cancel out all these potential health benefits of dark chocolate and cocoa by eating too many calories or too mu Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Chocolate

Diabetes And Chocolate

Tweet A diabetic eating chocolate may raise eyebrows amongst some people but within reason, chocolate needn’t be completely cut out of your diet. In most cases, chocolate will cause blood sugar levels to rise and in light of this it’s best to limit chocolate consumption to small amounts and to avoid eating when blood sugars are already higher than the recommended blood glucose levels. Is eating chocolate good or bad for you? Chocolate contains a number of beneficial nutrients, some of which called flavonoids are thought to guard against heart disease. However, it should be noted that larger quantities of chocolate can be disadvantageous to health in other ways. If a larger amount of chocolate is consumed, it will raise blood sugars which increases the risk of complications, of which cardiovascular problems is one. Secondly, the calorific content of chocolate is relatively high and therefore overconsumption of chocolate could lead to weight gain which also raises the risk of heart problems. How much chocolate should I eat? For most people with diabetes, chocolate is best restricted to a few squares to prevent too much of an increase in sugar levels. For people with diabetes without weight problems, chocolate can be appropriate to have before exercising. For more strenuous activity, however, even shorter acting carbohydrate may be required. Which chocolate is best for me? Chocolate with higher amounts of cocoa solids are best, as the sugar and fat content will often be lower as a result. For high cocoa solids content, dark chocolate is usually a good pick. Is diabetic chocolate better for my sugar levels? Generally speaking, diabetic chocolate is made by replacing some or all of the sugar content with an alternative source of sweetener, such as the polyols (sugar alco Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Chocolate - How To Befriend The Chocolate Monster

Diabetes And Chocolate - How To Befriend The Chocolate Monster

back to Overview My colleague loves chocolate. Loves it! A cruel punishment for someone with diabetes? No, not necessarily! Clara has taken the opportunity to learn a lot about it, and today, we all benefit from her wisdom. Diabetes and chocolate, together from the start, as told by Clara Chocolate has always had a special place in my life. This was true before my diabetes diagnosis and remains true today. Want proof? I was diagnosed on the very day of my 9th birthday, and insisted on finishing my chocolate birthday cake before going to the hospital. At that time, the only chocolate my mom dared taking away from the house was the Nutella (which has, ironically, about the same sugar & fat content as milk chocolate, more on that below). One thing that didn’t disappear though were the Poulain chocolates, for which my sister and I created a cult loyalty and which were, by chance, rather dark. As I grew older, and my sister left the house, my mom’s taste took over on the choice of chocolates. I started going for even darker varieties and have dedicated my love to them ever since. This does spare me from the high sugar spike but doesn’t let me dodge the fat – ’cause contrary to what you might think, dark chocolate is not much slimmer than any other one. In fact – myth busting time – dark chocolate actually tends to get fatter as it gets darker! Can’t have only advantages, right? Some cold, hard facts So let’s talk details. How do you mix diabetes and chocolate? Well, what’s rule number one with diabetes? Understand more about what you’re eating! With that in mind, here’s an infographic about the sugar and fat content of typical chocolate. What does that tell you about how to deal with chocolate? Well first, ladies and gentleman, one more piece of infor Continue reading >>

Use Of Dark Chocolate For Diabetic Patients: A Review Of The Literature And Current Evidence.

Use Of Dark Chocolate For Diabetic Patients: A Review Of The Literature And Current Evidence.

Abstract Dietary changes are a major lifestyle factor that can influence the progression of chronic diseases such as diabetes. Recently, flavanols, a subgroup of plant-derived phytochemicals called flavonoids, have gained increasing attention, due to studies showing an inverse correlation between dietary intake of flavanols and incidence of diabetes. Flavanoids in the cocoa plant may ameliorate insulin resistance by improving endothelial function, altering glucose metabolism, and reducing oxidative stress. Oxidative stress has been proposed as the main culprit for insulin resistance. The well-established effects of cocoa on endothelial function also points to a possible effect on insulin sensitivity. The relationship between insulin resistance and endothelial function is a reciprocal one. Overall, the evidence from these studies suggests that cocoa may be useful in slowing the progression to type 2 diabetes and ameliorating insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome. Additionally, results from several small studies indicate that cocoa may also have therapeutic potential in preventing cardiovascular complications in diabetic patients. Studies highlighting the potential of cocoa-containing diets, in large-randomized controlled trials should be performed which might give us a better opportunity to analyze the potential health-care benefit for reducing the risk of complications in diabetic patients at molecular level. Continue reading >>

15 Diabetes-friendly Chocolate Desserts

15 Diabetes-friendly Chocolate Desserts

Sweet treats that won't send your blood sugar soaring When it comes to sweets, moderation is the key. Luckily, these confections allow you to indulge your sweet tooth without sending your glucose levels on a roller coaster ride. Who says you can't have your cake and eat it, too? Tempt your taste buds with these 15 insanely decadent deserts. These rich chocolate cookies taste like dark chocolate, have little added sugar, and can be baked crispy or chewy. 1. PREHEAT oven to 300F. Line 2 baking sheets with foil. 2. SIFT together cocoa, salt, and cup of the sugar in a small bowl. 3. BEAT egg whites and cream of tartar until soft peaks form in large bowl with an electric mixer at medium low speed. Beat in remaining cup sugar,tablespoon at a time, until meringue is glossy and stiff peaks form. Fold in cocoa mixture and vanilla extract. 4. DROP by rounded teaspoonfuls about 1" apart onto prepared baking sheets. Bake 25 minutes for soft chewy cookies or 40 minutes for crisp ones. Dust cooled cookies with confectioners' sugar. NUTRITION(per serving) 24 cal, 1 g pro, 6 g carb, 1 g fiber, 0.3 g fat, 0.1 g sat fat, 13 mg sodium Cocoa powder and espresso powder combine to give these divine little drops just a kiss of mocha. 1. PREHEATthe oven to 225F. Line 2 large baking sheets with foil or parchment paper. 2. COMBINEthe cocoa powder, flour, and espresso powder in a small bowl. Set aside. 3. BEATthe egg whites and salt until foamy in a large bowl with an electric mixer on medium speed. With the mixer on high speed, gradually beat in the sugar until stiff peaks form and the mixture is glossy. Fold in the cocoa mixture just until blended. 4. DROPthe meringue by rounded teaspoons onto the prepared baking sheets. Bake for 1 hour. Turn off the oven and allow the meringues to stand with Continue reading >>

The Best Ways To Enjoy Dark Chocolate When You Have Diabetes

The Best Ways To Enjoy Dark Chocolate When You Have Diabetes

One of the most widely believed myths about living with type 2 diabetes is that all sweets are off-limits, and upon receiving a diabetes diagnosis, you may feel forced to say goodbye to all the after-dinner treats and 3 p.m. pick-me-ups you once loved. Fortunately, it’s actually true that some sweets are safe for people with diabetes — and in the case of dark chocolate, a moderate amount may even lead to some significant health benefits, including lower blood sugar. Among the possible perks of noshing on a square of the dark stuff are improved brain function, blood pressure, cholesterol, and heart health, according to the American Diabetes Association. Those benefits may seem like enough reason to race for the candy aisle, but not so fast. As with eating any food when you're managing diabetes, details are key. Follow this guide to enjoy dark chocolate safely without throwing your blood sugar out of whack. Why Dark Chocolate and Diabetes Make a Sweet Combination A plain square of high-cocoa dark chocolate is packed with good-for-you components that put that designer cupcake or gourmet chocolate-chip cookie to shame. “The antioxidants in chocolate help the body use its insulin more efficiently to help control blood sugar,” says Anna Simos, CDE, the diabetes education and prevention program manager at Stanford Health Care in Palo Alto, California. “This in turn helps lower blood sugar levels naturally and actually helps your body use your insulin. As a result, it helps decrease insulin resistance, which we see in type 2 diabetes.” According to an animal study published in the November 2017 issue of the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, it’s the compounds found in cocoa called cocoa flavanols that appear to enhance certain cells’ ability to secrete insuli Continue reading >>

Chocolate As Diabetes Medicine

Chocolate As Diabetes Medicine

I used to say chocolate tasted great, but if you thought it was a health food, you were kidding yourself. But research shows that chocolate helps manage diabetes, prevents heart disease, and improves mood. Is this too good to be true? Next week, I’ll get back to toxic chemicals. This week, I felt like something tastier. According to nutritionist Amy Campbell, chocolate is made from cacao (cocoa) beans. The insides of the roasted beans, or the “nibs,” are crushed into a paste. So right there is a good start. We’ve written before about the diabetes benefits of beans, so chocolate has a good pedigree for health. Most of chocolate’s healing power seems to come from “flavonoids,” biological chemicals that Campbell says “are thought to help lower cholesterol and lower the risk of blood clots.” Other studies show chocolate can relax blood vessels; lower blood pressure, LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, and blood glucose; and improve insulin function. Unfortunately, pure chocolate is bitter. You have to add sugar to make it taste good. And pure chocolate is powdery and dry. You have to add an emulsifier, like fat, to give it an enjoyable texture. So authorities have long called chocolate harmful and told people, especially people with diabetes, to avoid it. Is there a way to get the benefits, minimize the harmful sugars and fats, and still have something you want to eat? The healing flavonoids and flavonols are in the dark part of the chocolate. About.com guide Elizabeth LaBau defines “dark chocolate” as “chocolate without milk solids added…The cocoa content of commercial dark chocolate bars can range from 30%… to 70%… or even above 80% for extremely dark bars. Common terms used to distinguish the cocoa content of dark chocolate bars [from bitterest to Continue reading >>

7 Healthier Chocolate Diabetic Desserts

7 Healthier Chocolate Diabetic Desserts

Gooey Double-Chocolate Brownies Reader's Digest This quick and easy dessert becomes even more special when you serve it with a small scoop of low-fat frozen yogurt, berries, and chocolate sauce. Makes 24 brownies. Prep Time: 25 minutes. Cook Time: 30 minutes. • 1/2 cup butter, at room temperature • 1 1⁄3 cups semisweet chocolate, chopped • 2 eggs • 1 cup superfine sugar • 1 tsp. vanilla extract • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour • 2 tbsp. unsweetened cocoa powder • 1 cup walnuts, roughly chopped (optional) 1. Grease 8-by-8-inch cake pan and line with parchment paper. Preheat oven to 350°F. Melt butter and 3/4 cup chocolate in bowl set over gently simmering water or in the microwave; remove from heat and let cool. 2. Whisk eggs in bowl with electric beaters. Gradually add sugar; beat continuously until mixture is thick and foamy and leaves ribbonlike trail when beaters are lifted. Add vanilla extract and chocolate mixture, and blend thoroughly. Sift flour and cocoa powder over mixture and scatter in walnuts, if using, and remaining chocolate. Fold mixture together with large spoon. 3. Pour batter into pan and bake about 30 minutes or until toothpick inserted in middle comes out clean. If top starts to look like it might burn before brownies are cooked through, place a piece of foil over pan. Cool brownies briefly in pan; cut into 24 squares. Cool brownies completely on wire rack. Store in airtight container for 3 to 4 days. Per brownie (with walnuts): 152 cal, 10 g fat (5 g sat), 16 g carbs, 2 g protein, 1 g fiber, 25 mg chol, 40 mg sodium, 8 mg calcium. Chocolate Mousse Tart Reader's Digest Celebrating a special occasion? Go ahead, indulge! This rich, creamy treat is much lower in fat than a traditional chocolate tart, so you can enjoy a bit of guilt-free de Continue reading >>

Israeli Company Develops Chocolate For Diabetics

Israeli Company Develops Chocolate For Diabetics

Israeli Company Develops Chocolate for Diabetics A1C Foods develops foods that are low in carbs and glycemic index. Its planned lines include low-carbs ice creams and pizzas Israeli startup A1C Foods Ltd. develops chocolate and ice cream the company says does not impact blood sugar levels. Instead of substituting real sugar with artificial sweeteners, a spokeswoman for A1C told Calcalist the companys treats are made with traditional ingredients like flour and sugar, with the addition of a patent pending formulation that lowers their glycemic index. For daily updates, subscribe to our newsletter by clicking here. The company was founded by Ran Hirsch, a tax attorney and entrepreneur whose daughter was diagnosed with diabetes, in collaboration with Mariela Glandt, the endocrinologist who treated her. In an interview last week, Mr. Hirsch told Calcalist that when he first took his daughter to see Ms. Glandt, the doctor instructed her to eliminate carbs from her diet altogether, and then, to their surprise, offered her a piece of chocolate. Ms. Glandt developed the special chocolate in her home kitchen for her sweet-toothed diabetic father. Her dream, she told Mr. Hirsch, was to mass-produce the chocolate. I immediately offered to partner up with her, Mr. Hirsch said. The two founded A1C Foods in 2016. Based in Ramat Gan, in the greater Tel Aviv metropolitan area, A1C Foods develops proprietary formulations and technology to create foods that are low in carbs and glycemic index. We took apart chocolate until we were able to isolate specific characteristics of specific substances, to manipulate them to decrease the Glycemic index, or the impact it has on the blood sugar levels, Mr. Hirsch explained. It is a formula that is similar to a medication, and therefore we can paten Continue reading >>

Organic Chocolate Chips | Coconut Palm Sugar Sweetened

Organic Chocolate Chips | Coconut Palm Sugar Sweetened

Organic Chocolate Chips | Coconut Palm Sugar Sweetened Organic Chocolate Chips | Coconut Palm Sugar Sweetened Organic Chocolate Chips, Coconut Sugar Sweetened, No Added Soy: Paleo Diet Alternative to Sugar Free Chocolate. Considered by Natural Foods diet followers a Diabetic Chocolate option. Coco Blossom sweetened Organic Chocolate Chips are considered by athletes a healthy natural type of Diabetic Chocolate because they are GMO Free, organic and sweetened with raw coconut sugar. Organic chocolate chips and a possible diabetic chocolate choice in place of sugar free chocolate. Certified organic and made with raw chocolate ingredients makes these chocolate chips the best you have ever tasted. Looking for a chocolate alternative made with a coco flower sweetener instead of the usual sweeteners? Look no further. We are proud to present to you our very special Organic Chocolate Chips. Coconut sugar is considered by whole food natural health food gurus a diabetic alternative to regular sugar. Diabetic chocolate options are usually traditional chocolates that have no sugar or are strictly sugar free chocolate chips. Our coconut sugar chocolate is a natural diabetic chocolate alternative in place of the typical sugar free chocolate. These organic chocolate chips are sweet tasting and have a combination of pleasantly balanced ratio of cocoa solids, cocoa butter and coco sugar. Santa Barbara Organic Dark Chocolate hips naturally sweetened with a touch of raw coconut sugar in place of regular cane sugar offer natural food enthusiasts a new type of chocolate option. Fitness instructors tell us this is an organic chocolate that fits their diet needs because it is considered as having a lower glycemic index than a chocolate of like kind sweetened with sugar (this is due to the fru Continue reading >>

So Good...it's Unbelievably Sugar Free!

So Good...it's Unbelievably Sugar Free!

The secret to our incredibly good diabetic chocolate is...well, it’s a secret. No, not really, but it is simple. We use only the finest quality natural ingredients from exotic places like Africa, South America, and Belgium. There are no fillers, preservatives, or substitute oils. And an important part of our award-winning diabetic chocolate recipe is the sweetener. Maltitol is the sweetener used in Amber Lyn diabetic chocolate. It is a reduced calorie and reduced carbohydrate sweetener that has 90% the sweetness of sugar. Maltitol is a member of a family of sweeteners known as sugar alcohols or polyols. Most of the Maltitol used to sweeten other diabetic chocolate is derived from corn, but ours comes from wheat. Our observation is that wheat based Maltitol may reduce the mild laxative effect that is sometimes experienced after excessive consumption. And, it’s gluten-free. While Amber Lyn chocolate confections have proven a godsend for diabetics and others who must limit their intake of carbohydrates, it’s not just for diabetics. Our diabetic chocolate is the perfect chocolate for anyone who loves chocolate but wants a healthier lifestyle. Amber Lyn products are much more than diabetic chocolate and we guarantee you won’t be able to tell that it has had no sugar added. Continue reading >>

My Love Of Chocolate And My Diabetes

My Love Of Chocolate And My Diabetes

One of my favorite things to eat is chocolate. As a diabetic, I set out to find if eating chocolate was a treat I needed to give up. Not only did I look into it, but I was very surprised at what I found. In fact, I ended up creating my own line of sugar-free chocolate. One of my favorite things to eat is chocolate. As a diabetic, I set out to find if eating chocolate was a treat I needed to give up. Not only did I look into it, but I was very surprised at what I found. In fact, I ended up creating my own line of sugar-free chocolate. There are over 350 million people suffering from diabetes. One of the most frequently asked questions regarding diabetes and diet is whether diabetics must give up chocolate and other candy treats for good. The good news, however, is that those suffering from diabetes can enjoy an occasional chocolate treat if they exercise restraint and moderation. And with many new products on the market that are sugar-free, it makes it that much easier to have a treat every now and then. One of the reasons that an occasional chocolate bar is okay for diabetics is the fact that the sugar in chocolate is absorbed more slowly than that found in many other foods, such as white bread and even mashed potatoes. This means that the body has a bit more time to deal with the rise in blood sugar caused by chocolate. It is important to keep in mind, however, that too much chocolate can lead to excess weight gain that could complicate ones diabetes. Many diabetics wonder about the special chocolates made with diabetics in mind. Like any other type of food, these diabetic chocolates can be either good or bad, depending on how they are consumed. When eaten as part of an overall healthy diet, diabetic chocolate can be an awesome treat, but when consumed in excess, it c Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Chocolate?

Can Diabetics Eat Chocolate?

If you have diabetes, you can eat anything -- although possibly not in the quantities you'd like. That includes chocolate. Some types of chocolate, such as dark chocolate, might even have health benefits, in moderation. Portion control is the key to enjoying foods like chocolate if you have diabetes, the American Diabetes Association reports. Dark chocolate is rich in polyphenols, plant substances that act as antioxidants and that might also help prevent heart disease and lower blood glucose levels. Types of Chocolate All chocolate is not created equal in terms of health benefits. When it comes to foods high in simple sugars, less is better if you have diabetes. Dark chocolate contains more cocoa and less sugar than milk chocolate, so you can eat a little more of it if you're controlling your calories or sugar intake. With dark chocolate, the higher the cocoa percentage, the better it is for you. Look for dark chocolate with at least 70 percent cocoa, registered dietitian Mitzi Dulan recommends. White chocolate contains no cocoa and is higher in calories and saturated fat than dark or milk chocolate. Potential Benefits According to a study that appeared in the January, 2015 issue of ARYA Atherosclerosis, high-cocoa polyphenol-rich chocolate lowers blood pressure and insulin resistance in patients with diabetes and high blood pressure. Insulin resistance restricts the uptake of glucose into cells, which causes blood glucose levels to rise. People who ate white chocolate did not experience a decrease in blood pressure or insulin resistance. In a British study published in the November 2010 issue of Diabetic Medicine, diabetics who consumed chocolate high in cocoa for 16 weeks experienced a decrease in total cholesterol and an increase in high-density lipoprotein, the so-c Continue reading >>

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