diabetestalk.net

Diabetic Chips

Pepperoni Chips

Pepperoni Chips

The kids big and small love these bites of flavor. Use them as chips for dips, with a slice of cheese or on their own to satisfy your salty pleasure. While I have seen several recipes floating around I would rather not use a microwave. So I did a little experimenting at low and higher temperatures. I used a plain baking sheet what a mess. One with a Silpat liner that was easier but you have to turn them over. So I came to the conclusion that unless you have a convection oven the best way is to bake them on a cooling rack over your baking sheet to catch the rendered oil. That way they cook and crisp up on both sides at the same time. Effortless. Once they are cooked and cooled, I store half of them in 2 snack packs. One goes into the refrigerator so that they store longer and are easy to grab for grandkids lunches. The other bag is left out to gobble up in a few days. 6 oz Sliced Pepperoni (3 inches in diameter) Place the cookie cooling rack over the top of your baking sheet. It can hang over the edge if needed. Lay the pepperoni slices so that they touch each other on the rack. As they cook they will get smaller. So again dont worry if the edge of the pepperoni looks like it is past the edge of the baking sheet. It is still on the cooling rack and will shrink. Place pan in the preheated oven and bake for 8-10 minutes. Every oven is different so check them and see if they need a little more crisping or not. You do not want them over done. Let them cool and then place them in an airtight container. Your best choice will be to go to the deli and get your pepperoni there. It should be approximated 3 inches in diameter. Six ounces will yield about 20 sliced on the #1 slice. Continue reading >>

Tortilla Chip For Diabetics !!

Tortilla Chip For Diabetics !!

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Im new here, so nice to meet everyone, I discovered that I am a type 2 several months ago... so ive cut out all refined sugar as I can identify and stay away from, Ive dropped sodas like a hot rock and only have ice water, sparkling carbonated water, or unsweetened tea, and am eating well. I can say how much better I am feeling ! My reason for writing is the seemingly endless quest for some kind of replacment for tortilla chips ( gotta have my salsa) made with Brown Rice, Flaxseed, and organic corn. They are made by a company called R.W. GARCIA , I found them at Safeway in the Health foods section. the specs on the Nutrition list was probably not completly outstanding but it was a heck of alot better than regular chips The look ok but still 17 net carbs for 7 chips. OK, since im new to this stuff, 17 net carbs means what ? is there a total amount of carbs per day that you should At this point I dont think that Im going to get all involved in counting this and that... im more going to concentrait on the bigger picture, overall consumption of lean meats, no sodas candy white breads potatoes regular chips no junk food eat good fruits like apples oranges and bannanas, eggs , good soups..ect ect... basically cut out as much sugar as possible Dude, you can put salsa on lots of things. And the recipe you gave tells me I won't go out of my way to buy those chips. I see no big difference. If you can stop yourself at a handful, go for it. I still take a few and crush and put in my salads, a little goes a long way. As for the sugar, I have no problem with a limited amount. It's the corn syrup that you n Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. Pretzels Pretzels have a healthy image, but a glance at the ingredients list reveals that their wholesome reputation is grossly undeserved. Nearly every brand is made from the same basic ingredients: white flour (wheat flour that’s been stripped of its nutrients and fiber), yeast, salt, and maybe some vegetable oil or corn syrup. It’s obvious from its subpar ingredient list that this popular snack is pretty much devoid of nutrition. Pretzels are baked, not fried like potato chips, which saves you a few calories, but the white, refined carbs do a number on your blood sugar and do little to satisfy your appetite. Skip the carb-fest and opt for a more balanced and filling snack that includes some protein to help steady your sugars. Great choices include a rice cake with reduced-fat cheese, a handful of pistachio nuts in the shell, or a nonfat Greek yogurt. Looking for tips on how to manage diabetes? Give these lifestyle changes a shot. Continue reading >>

Sweet Potato Chips Diabetic Health Clinic

Sweet Potato Chips Diabetic Health Clinic

A favourite for most people is fries or chips. For diabetics this is not the best food choice. Here is your replacement. These are guilt-free chips, You can enjoy these as a snack, or as an addition to your meal. Being made of sweet potato, they are low GI, which means they take longer to digest, therefore keep you full for longer and dont turn into sugar so quickly once you eat them. These are chips that diabetics can enjoy. They are not deep fried, therefore not soaked up with oil. Yet they retain quite nice flavour that you will enjoy any time. Cut into 2mm slices/wedges and place in a bowl. Add remaining ingredients and toss well, to achieve an even distribution of all ingredients throughout all the slices of potato. Spread out as a single layer on some baking paper, which has been placed on a baking tray. Place in an oven that has been warmed up to 170 degrees, and bake for approximately 30 minutes, or until the thickest part of the chip is soft. Ideally, the edges should be a little golden brown, and crunchy. Depending on the size of the potatoes, this recipe will serve 2-4. Continue reading >>

Homemade Potato Chips

Homemade Potato Chips

Serving Size: 1/3 potato (about 15 chips) Serving Size: 1/3 potato (about 15 chips) russet potato (about 5 oz.), washed, unpeeled kosher salt (or salt-free seasoning such as Mrs. Dash Garlic & Herb Seasoning Blend) Slice the potato very thinly, making sure all slices are about the same thickness. You should have about 45 slices. Cover the turntable of the microwave oven with a piece of baking parchment paper. Sprinkle the paper with some of the salt and chili powder. Place the potato slices on the paper in a single layer. Sprinkle with some more salt and chili powder. You may have to do this in two or three batches, depending on the size and shape of your turntable. Cook at full power for 4 to 6 minutes, or until the potatoes just start to brown. Turn off the microwave oven and let the potatoes rest for 1 minute. Cook again at full power until the potatoes are nicely browned. Make sure they do not burn. Repeat with any remaining slices. Technique: Thinly Slicing, Microwave Cooking Use a mandoline slicer to create nearly paper-thin slices, which quickly cook to crisp stage insurprise!the microwave, with no added fat. Continue reading >>

Best Quick Snacks For Diabetics: Chips And Salsa, Fruit, And More | Everyday Health

Best Quick Snacks For Diabetics: Chips And Salsa, Fruit, And More | Everyday Health

Healthy Snacks Boost Energy And Stabilize Blood Sugar Levels Snacking often gets a bad rap. But if you are managing type 2 diabetes , including healthy snacks in your diet can be a great way to keep blood sugar levels in a healthy range and energy levels high. They can also be a great weight-loss tool. "Sometimes people think of snacks as an unhealthy thing, but [they] can be quite the opposite," says Kelly Kennedy, RD , a nutritionistat Everyday Health. "Snacks provide another opportunity for nutrition, and with a small amount of carbohydrates (15 grams or less), [they] can help keep blood sugar levelssteady throughout the day," Kennedy adds.Eating a healthy snack can also help keep hunger at bay until your next meal, which can ultimately prevent overeating. RELATED: How to Tell the Difference Between a Good Carb and a Bad Carb When it comes to lowering your risk for diabetes complications, maintaining a healthy weight and controlling blood sugar go hand in hand. After all, being overweight can contribute to insulin resistance, the hallmark of type 2 diabetes. "People are often amazed at the changes they see with even a little weight loss," Kennedy says. Indeed, losing at least 5 to 7 percent of body weight can lead to improved insulin sensitivity and even help preventprediabetesfrom progressing to full-blown type 2 diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) . But how you choose to lose weight matters. Remember that a healthy diet that promotes gradual weight loss of 1 to 2 pounds per week is best. Unsure of which snacks are best for weight loss, improving blood sugar control, and boosting energy? Admittedly healthy choices can be challenging if you're pressed for time or work in an office filled with processed, packaged snacks that co Continue reading >>

Kale Chips: A Smart Snack Choice For Diabetics

Kale Chips: A Smart Snack Choice For Diabetics

Section / Eating Well / Kale Chips: a Smart Snack Choice for Diabetics Kale Chips: a Smart Snack Choice for Diabetics According to the American Diabetes Association, 25.9% of Americans (thats 11.8 million seniors) ages 65 and older are diagnosed with prediabetes or diabetes.If youre one of them, you know the importance of eating healthful snacks. Regular, healthy snacks keep glucose levels in check, and they also keep you energized throughout the day. What are the best snacks to choose? Go for options that offer a balance of healthful fiber, carbohydrates and protein. Keep portions in check by using measuring cups and food scales to make sure weight and carb counts are accurate. Here are 10 of our favorite snack options to help maintain a low-glycemic diet: Kale chips are packed with fiber, vitamin K and omega-3 fatty acids that aid in controlling blood sugar levels and are low in calories and carbohydrates. Theyre also easy to make at home.Mix four cups kale (wash, dry and tear into small pieces) with olive oil and a dash of salt and pepper. Arrange in a single layer on a baking sheet. Bake at 250F for 20 minutes. For some, however, too much kale can be harmful. Lorie Eber, certified nutritionist and frequent contributor to Lifetime Daily wrote about the downsides of kale for older adults, especially those with gastrointestinal problems or individuals who take blood thinner medication. 2. Homemade Popcorn Get Your Dietary Fiber Homemade popcorn is great for its fiber content and trace amounts of vitamin B. Spice it up with ingredients such as chili powder, garlic powder and paprika.Try an Indian spiced version with turmeric, curry powder and salt, or add ground cinnamon to your fresh popcorn for a hint of sweetness. Spices such as cinnamon have antioxidants that can p Continue reading >>

What To Eat With Diabetes: Best Chips

What To Eat With Diabetes: Best Chips

Looking for a better snack chip? Try one of our 18 winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated pretzels, flavored chips, cheesy chips, plain potato chips, BBQ chips, and corn chips our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better snack chip? Try one of our 18 winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated pretzels, flavored chips, cheesy chips, plain potato chips, BBQ chips, and corn chips our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better snack chip? Try one of our 18 winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated pretzels, flavored chips, cheesy chips, plain potato chips, BBQ chips, and corn chips our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better snack chip? Try one of our 18 winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated pretzels, flavored chips, cheesy chips, plain potato chips, BBQ chips, and corn chips our Diabetic Living W Continue reading >>

Diabetes? Pick Popcorn Over Potato Chips

Diabetes? Pick Popcorn Over Potato Chips

Move over, potato chips. Who doesn’t love a bowl of hot, crunchy popcorn? It’s one of my favorite snacks for several reasons: It’s a healthy whole grain. It’s fairly low in calories. It’s easy and quick to make. You can season it many different ways. Chips Versus Popcorn When you compare the nutritional values of popcorn to potato chips, popcorn comes out way ahead. A little 1-ounce bag of potato chips has 150 calories, 15 grams of carbs, 10 grams of fat, and 150 grams of sodium. One cup of air-popped popcorn has just 31 calories, 6 grams of carbohydrates, less than 1 gram of fat, and 0 grams of sodium. Even when popped in oil, a cup of popcorn has only 55 calories. So dig in to three cups of popcorn. It’s a nutritious, satisfying snack with fewer than 100 calories. Make It Healthy Forget the bags of already-popped corn in the supermarket snack aisle. They often have extra fat and sodium. Some “light” microwavable popcorn products are fine, but it’s easy and cheaper to pop your own: Use the microwave oven. Place two tablespoons of popcorn in a brown paper bag. Fold the bag shut twice. Microwave for 2 to 3 minutes until the popping stops. Use the stove top. Heat two teaspoons canola oil in a heavy-bottomed pan on medium-high heat. When the oil is hot, add two tablespoons of kernels. Cover the pot and shake gently for 2 to 3 minutes until the popping has slowed. Use a hot air popcorn popper. Just follow the machine’s instructions. You won’t need to use any oil to pop the corn. Season It Your Way Instead of melted butter, drizzle the popped corn with olive oil (my favorite healthy oil). A little oil helps seasonings stick to the popcorn. If you’re watching calories, skip the oil, or use an oil mister so a little goes a long way. Try these zesty seas Continue reading >>

10 Dangerous Foods For Diabetes

10 Dangerous Foods For Diabetes

Tagged with: dangerous diabetes food Approximately 20 million people have diabetes and over 40 million are on the way of getting type 2 diabetes (pre-diabetes). Type 2 diabetes is the most common form and is diagnosed during adulthood; while type 1 is diagnosed in early childhood. People with diabetes have high blood sugar. It is because their pancreas does not make or not enough insulin; and the muscle, fat, and liver cells does respond to insulin properly. Diet is a key component in helping to manage diabetes. Since the goal is to maintain a good blood sugar level, it is important not to consume too many foods that are high in sugar. If you have type 2 diabetes, stay away from foods that can spike your blood sugar levels or increase your risk of diabetes complications. Below are 10 foods that people with diabetes should stay away from: Candy – high-sugar foods like candy, cookies, syrup, and soda lack nutritional value, but these low-quality carbohydrates also cause a dramatic spike in blood sugar levels and can contribute to weight gain, both of which can worsen diabetes complications. Fruit Juice – whole fruits are a healthy, fiber-rich carbohydrate option for diabetics, but not fruit juice. Even 100 percent fruit juices — are chock full of fruit sugar, and therefore cause a sharp spike in blood sugar. Raisins – or other dried fruits may be a better option than snacking on cookies, but it’ll still spike your blood sugar. Why? During the dehydration process, fruits’ natural sugars become very concentrated, causing an unhealthy elevation in blood sugar when they are rapidly absorbed by the body. Pancakes and Syrup – most pancakes are jumbo-sized and made with junky white flour (similar to white bread). Butter is loaded with artery-clogging saturated fat, Continue reading >>

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

"Don't eat between meals." That's one piece of advice diabetics might want to take with a grain of salt. If you go more than four or five hours between meals, a mid-afternoon snack might be just what the doctor ordered to help you keep your blood sugar steady. Snacking is also important if you're taking medication that could cause a blood-sugar low between meals. Discuss with your doctor or a registered dietitian what snacking approach is right for you. Keep your snacks to 150 calories or less The danger of snacks is that they can become more like extra meals if you go overboard. First, make sure you're truly hungry—and not just bored or stressed or craving chocolate—before reaching for a snack. Then limit yourself to 150 calories per snack. (Cutting calories is easier than you think.) This will help keep your snacking "honest." After all, it's hard to find a candy bar with only 150 calories. And if you're hankering for a candy bar, but a healthier snack doesn't appeal, you're probably not truly hungry. Beware of low-fat snacks Studies show that people tend to eat about 28 percent more of a snack when it's low-fat because they think they're saving on calories. But low-fat snacks, such as cookies, only have about 11 percent fewer calories than their full-fat counterparts. Stick to the same amount you'd eat if you thought the snack was full-fat. Need more snack ideas? Check out these delicious snacks for adults. Check the ingredients Avoid heavily processed crackers and chips. If the list of ingredients is long and has big words with lots of syllables, put it back on the shelf. Stay away from these worst eating habits for diabetics. Watch those carbs Carbohydrates are major culprits when it comes to raising blood sugar (though there are some good carbs for diabetes). Continue reading >>

15 Best Snack Foods For Diabetics

15 Best Snack Foods For Diabetics

Figuring out the right snack foods in between meals is hard enough for most people, but what if you're one of the 18.8 million people in the United States who have been diagnosed with diabetes? The options may seem even more limited. That's why we've put together a list of 15 diabetic-friendly snacking options based on advice from a few experts. Lori Kenyon, certified nutritional consultant, says that raw almonds and cashews are high in protein and fiber, making them a very satisfying treat. One 1-ounce serving, or 24 to 28 medium-sized nuts, has around 170 calories, 5.5 to 8 grams of carbohydrates, and almost no transfat. Kenyon also recommends jicama to her clients. Jicama is a root vegetable that is super tasty raw or cooked. After peeling, you can slice it into sticks and then refrigerate until cold. Either dash the slices with diced red pepper or hot spices for a kick, dip into salsa or your favorite hummus , or grill or bake it with a little olive oil to make a diabetic-friendly french fry. Eat your fill, since each ounce of jicama has only 11 calories, 2 grams of carbohydrates, and 1 gram of sodium. Edamame are also a favorite of Kenyon's. She says one 1-ounce serving of this tasty snack has only 34 calories, 1 gram of fat, 3 grams of carbohydrates, 2 milligrams of sodium, and 3 grams of protein. You can boil and eat them alone or toss some into a blender or food processor with a little olive oil and seasonings to make a tasty dip or spread to pair with raw veggies. Kenyon says that similar to jicama, zucchini and yellow squash can be sliced like french fries, chilled, and then dipped in salsa or hummus for a tasty treat that satisfies cravings. One cup of yellow squash has 18 calories, 0.2 grams of fat, 3.8 grams of carbohydrates, 2 milligrams of sodium, and 1. Continue reading >>

7 Diabetes-friendly Snacks

7 Diabetes-friendly Snacks

Part 1 of 10 Snacks are a great way to keep your blood glucose levels stable, but sometimes it may seem that choosing what to snack on is easier said than done. Making smart food choices starts with understanding the fundamentals. For most people with diabetes, that means understanding the effects of carbohydrates on blood glucose levels. Carbohydrates break down into sugar, and when you eat large amounts of certain types of carbohydrates, blood glucose levels can spike. Part 2 of 10 The glycemic index (GI) measures how much a food containing carbohydrates raises your blood glucose level compared to the consumption of pure glucose. Pure glucose has a score of 100. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) identifies low-GI foods as those with a ranking of 55 or less. Low-GI foods include: 100 percent stone-ground whole wheat oatmeal legumes non-starchy vegetables Medium-GI foods have ratings between 56 and 69. Some examples are: whole wheat rye pita bread Eating mixed snacks can also help, since foods digest more slowly when they’re eaten together. Adding protein or healthy fats to a snack with carbohydrate can help increase fullness and decrease the risk of blood sugar spikes. Part 3 of 10 Counting the number of carbohydrates in your snacks and choosing foods using the glycemic index are both great ways to make smart snacking decisions. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics says that a diabetes-friendly snack should contain 15–30 grams of carbohydrates. We’ve come up with a few healthy snack ideas that are great on-the-go and can help make managing your blood glucose level simple! Part 4 of 10 Store-bought trail mix can be boring, bland, and not so healthy — not to mention expensive. Save money (and your taste buds) by making your own! Ingredients*: 1 cup roaste Continue reading >>

New Implants Could Treat Type 2 Diabetes Without Needles

New Implants Could Treat Type 2 Diabetes Without Needles

Implants that deliver a constant metered dose of medication have plenty of promise. They’re especially useful for making sure patients don’t have to orient their daily schedule around their medication times. For the same reasons, they’re a potential solution for patients who tend to forget to take medications that have to be delivered right on schedule. Their major strength is being able to keep a patient’s serum concentration of their medication at a specific level. For example: Nexplanon, a hormonal contraceptive implant, delivers a constant dose of medication that keeps a woman’s progesterone levels within a particular range that prevents her from ovulating. Too high or too low a dose, and everything would get out of whack. But the implant keeps the serum concentration pretty stable. But because of the steady diffusion of the active substance, such drug-delivery implants aren’t fabulous for conditions that require medication only when symptoms appear. There hasn’t been a lot of luck with an implant for asthma, for example, because we haven’t surpassed the rescue inhaler for timely asthma treatment. Another condition that has resisted the implant approach is type 2 diabetes. Because type 2 is all about insulin insensitivity, and insulin is something that operates in a tight feedback loop with fluctuating blood glucose levels, you don’t necessarily want a blood insulin concentration that’s always held stable at the same level. Monitoring Blood Chemistry in Real Time Not to worry, though: the biotechnologists are on this. Scientists are developing implantable biomedical microelectromechanical systems (bioMEMS) that can monitor your blood chemistry in real time, deliver timed and quantized doses of medication, and phone home to your doctor to report o Continue reading >>

Baked Apple Chips - Recipes For Healthy Living By The American Diabetes Association

Baked Apple Chips - Recipes For Healthy Living By The American Diabetes Association

Experiment using other fruits such as pears to make these chips. 2 medium apples (Honeycrisp or another sweeter apple) Preheat the oven to 200 degrees F. Lay the parchment paper on one large or two medium baking sheets. Using a mandolin or knife, thinly slice the apples to make round chips. Discard the seeds. Lay the apple slices on the prepared baking sheets without overlapping. Sprinkle the cinnamon over apples. Bake for 1 hour, then flip the apples. Continue baking for 1-2 hours, flipping occasionally, until the apple slices are no longer moist. Let cool completely and then store in airtight container. Do you often eat so quickly that you end up feeling stuffed? Eating more mindfully could help. Its important to make sure you are choosing nutritious, healthy foods when you decide to snack. Calculate the number of calories you should eat each day to maintain your present body weight: Please select an option before you continue. I don't do any physical activity other than what I need to do for my usual activities, such as going to work or school, grocery shopping, or doing chores around the house. I do some moderate exercise every day in addition to doing my usual activities. For example, I walk about 1.5 to 3 miles a day at about 3 to 4 miles an hour. Or I do something else that's moderately active. I am very active every day in addition to doing my usual activities. For example, I walk more than 3 miles a day at about 3 to 4 miles an hour. Or I do something else that's very active. This number estimates how many calories you should eat per day to keep your body weight where it is now. If you want to lose weight, you may need fewer calories. You should talk with your health care team for more personalized recommendations, but this calculator can help to get you start Continue reading >>

More in diabetes