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Diabetic Cheese

Is Cheese Safe For People With Diabetes?

Is Cheese Safe For People With Diabetes?

Compared with many other foods, cheese is high in fat and calories and may not be an obvious choice for someone with diabetes. Cheese and diabetes can, however, be a healthful combination. Cheese lovers can enjoy a wide variety of cheeses without elevating blood sugar, raising blood pressure, or gaining weight. For diabetes-friendly meals or snacks, people should choose healthful cheeses and serve them with foods that are rich in fiber and low in calories. Can people with diabetes eat cheese? People with diabetes can safely eat cheese as part of a balanced, healthful diet. Just as with other foods, moderation is the key. A diet mainly consisting of cheese is unhealthy for anyone. When selecting cheeses, people with diabetes need to consider a few things: Calories Cheese is very high in calories and fat. Though calorie content varies among cheese varieties, people with diabetes should avoid overindulging in cheese. Type 2 diabetes is linked with obesity, and losing just a few pounds can reduce the risk of diabetes. There are several steps that people with diabetes can take to help them eat cheese without gaining weight: stick to small servings choose lower-calorie cheeses use cheese as a source of flavor rather than as the main course Saturated fat Cheese is high in saturated fat compared with many other foods. In small quantities, saturated fat is harmless and can actually be beneficial to the body. But excessive intake of saturated fats is linked to weight gain, high cholesterol, gallbladder problems, and heart disease. The American Heart Association recommend a diet that contains no more than 5-6 percent saturated fat. That means that in a 2,000 calorie diet, no more than 120 calories or 13 grams (g) should come from saturated fats. Other experts advise no more than 1 Continue reading >>

Top 23 Snacks For People With Diabetes

Top 23 Snacks For People With Diabetes

NEW! Download our free grocery shopping companions: Free Foods – a guide to foods that won’t impact your blood sugar 15 Carbs Snack List – a mega-list of great snack ideas What’s the best snack for someone with diabetes? A snack with few carbs! (There are some exceptions. If you are planning on working out or have low blood sugar, than some carbohydrates may be beneficial.) Here are our top 23 favorite low-carb snacks in no particular order: Peanut butter Cheddar cheese String cheese Cottage cheese Broccoli with melted cheese Salad with free veggies and low-carb dressing Tomato and mozzarella salad Celery with peanut butter Fresh strawberries or blueberries with low-fat plain yogurt Veggies with hummus Cucumbers with olive-oil and rice vinegar Carrot sticks Snap peas with Caesar dressing Green beans cooked and cooled with lemon juice Nuts Sauteed Spinach Pickles Rotisserie chicken Deli meat Pepperoni and cheese Beef jerky Hard boiled eggs What are your favorites? You can get more snack ideas in our recipes forum, diabetes cookbook, and the Simply Cooking blog. Further reading on diabetes diet: Read more about low blood glucose/sugar (hypoglycemia), low-carb diet, snacks. Continue reading >>

Cream Cheese Desserts: 16 Diabetic-friendly Cream Cheese Recipes

Cream Cheese Desserts: 16 Diabetic-friendly Cream Cheese Recipes

Just because you're on a diabetic diet, it doesn't mean you have to relinquish your favorite sweets! Our collection of Cream Cheese Desserts: 16 Diabetic-Friendly Cream Cheese Recipes allows you to enjoy all of your favorites from cheesecake recipes to cream pie to cookie bars and more! If you're looking for desserts with cream cheese that'll get everyone on board, then you've gotta check out this collection. Our Favorite Cream Cheese Desserts Looking for a healthy alternative to cheesecake? Our Chocolate Chip Cheese Squares start with a light and fluffy base made from reduced-fat cream cheese and reduced-fat sour cream. Cocoa powder and chocolate chips take them over the edge. Who doesnt love blueberries? They remind us of childhood picnics for Fourth of July and family breakfasts at the diner. So its a no-brainer to add them to a perennial favorite like cheesecake. Our Blueberry Cheesecake Bars are fuss-free, and nobody will guess this cream cheese dessert is on the lighter side! This Orange Cream Pie is delightfully refreshing. By using fat-free and reduced-fat ingredients, you won't have to feel guilty after indulging in one of our favorite cream cheese recipes! Ooey Gooey Marbled Brownies Some people just don't like to eat their crusts on pizza, bread or even cheesecake. Now there's a dessert just for them: Crustless Cheesecake! It's one of those cream cheese desserts that'll please everyone! This is a recipe for peanut butter lovers and kids of all ages! Our Chocolate Peanut Butter Dirt Cake is fun to make and tasty to eat. Really, who could resist a chocolate and peanut butter pudding cake? Flashy Fruit Tarts are a healthy and enjoyable dessert that the whole family will love. Using store-bought tart shells will have you looking like a professional pastry chef wi Continue reading >>

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

Healthy Combinations Ready in Minutes When you have type 2 diabetes, a smart strategy for controlling your blood sugar levels is to think of snacks as miniature versions of meals and plan your carbs accordingly. Snacks with a good mix of protein, fat, and fiber will help keep hunger at bay and your blood sugar on an even keel throughout the day. "Since a meal should include 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates, a snack should have around 15 to 20 grams," says Katherine Basbaum, MS, RD, a clinical dietitian in the Cardiology and Cardiac Rehabilitation departments at University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville. By the same token, she says, fill your snack plate the same way you would for a regular meal. That means half should be non-starchy vegetables, one-quarter should be lean protein, and one-quarter a starchy carb. Here are 10 terrific options for healthy diabetes snacks. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

"Don't eat between meals." That's one piece of advice diabetics might want to take with a grain of salt. If you go more than four or five hours between meals, a mid-afternoon snack might be just what the doctor ordered to help you keep your blood sugar steady. Snacking is also important if you're taking medication that could cause a blood-sugar low between meals. Discuss with your doctor or a registered dietitian what snacking approach is right for you. Keep your snacks to 150 calories or less The danger of snacks is that they can become more like extra meals if you go overboard. First, make sure you're truly hungry—and not just bored or stressed or craving chocolate—before reaching for a snack. Then limit yourself to 150 calories per snack. (Cutting calories is easier than you think.) This will help keep your snacking "honest." After all, it's hard to find a candy bar with only 150 calories. And if you're hankering for a candy bar, but a healthier snack doesn't appeal, you're probably not truly hungry. Beware of low-fat snacks Studies show that people tend to eat about 28 percent more of a snack when it's low-fat because they think they're saving on calories. But low-fat snacks, such as cookies, only have about 11 percent fewer calories than their full-fat counterparts. Stick to the same amount you'd eat if you thought the snack was full-fat. Need more snack ideas? Check out these delicious snacks for adults. Check the ingredients Avoid heavily processed crackers and chips. If the list of ingredients is long and has big words with lots of syllables, put it back on the shelf. Stay away from these worst eating habits for diabetics. Watch those carbs Carbohydrates are major culprits when it comes to raising blood sugar (though there are some good carbs for diabetes). Continue reading >>

Cheese Consumption Linked With Lower Type 2 Diabetes Risk: Study

Cheese Consumption Linked With Lower Type 2 Diabetes Risk: Study

Cheese eaters may have more than refined palates — they may also carry a lower risk of Type 2 diabetes, according to a new study. Research in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition shows that people who reported being cheese eaters have a 12 percent lower risk of the disease than people who don’t eat cheese. Plus, people who ate more cheese, fermented milk and yogurt in the study were also more likely to have a decreased diabetes risk than people who ate less of these foods, noted the researchers, who came from Oxford University and Imperial College London. But overall, dairy consumption was not linked with an increased or decreased risk of diabetes, the researchers found. The results of the study came from data from eight countries in Europe, which included 340,234 people. The researchers compared the diets of 12,403 people who went on to have diabetes in the study, with 16,835 randomly chosen people in the study. The highest cheese-eaters in the study consumed more than 56 grams of the food a day, while the lowest cheese-eaters ate fewer than 11 grams a day, the UK’s NHS Choices reported. However, NHS Choices noted that the effect of cheese on diabetes risk may differ from country to country. For example, French cheese-eaters had a lower risk of Type 2 diabetes, but UK cheese-eaters actually had a higher risk of the disease, NHS Choices reported. In addition, the researchers did not note whether the cheese or dairy products the study participants ate were low-fat or full-fat, or how exactly eating cheese could lower the risk of diabetes, according to NHS Choices. But before you go wild eating cheese, keep in mind that the food is high in calories and saturated fat. Plus, the study shows just a link between cheese consumption and decreased diabetes risk, not Continue reading >>

Dairy And Diabetes

Dairy And Diabetes

All of us, whether we have diabetes or not, need some dairy products (or non-dairy alternatives like soya products) such as milk, cheese and yogurt every day. These all contain proteins and vitamins and are an important source of calcium, which help to keep your bones and teeth strong. Some dairy foods, however, can be high in fat and saturated fat, so choose lower-fat alternatives where you can. Adults and older children who consume too much fat may find they gain weight and too much saturated fat can cause your cholesterol levels to rise, which increases your risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Unfortunately, diabetes increases your risk of having CVD, so it pays to opt for the lower-fat options to help manage your risk. How much per day? Aim for 3 portions. What's a portion? One portion equals: 190ml (⅓ pint ) milk a small pot of yogurt 2 tbsp cottage cheese a matchbox-sized portion of cheese (30g) How to make healthy dairy choices Milk Switching to lower-fat milk, such as semi-skimmed milk (green top) from whole milk (blue top), which contains the most fat, is a good start. To make even more of a difference, try 1 per cent fat milk (orange top) or even better skimmed milk (red top). Lower-fat milks have all the goodness of whole milk, including calcium, all you lose is the fat. This table shows the savings you could make. The figures are for 100ml but bear in mind a pint is 568ml, which many of us consume each day on cereal and in cups of tea and coffee. It shows how the savings can really add up. Milk Kcal /100ml Fat /100ml Saturated fat /100ml Carbohydrate /100ml Of which sugars /100ml Salt /100ml Whole 64 3.6 2.3 4.7 4.7 0.1 Semi-skimmed 50 1.8 1.1 4.8 4.8 0.1 1% fat 43 1 0.7 4.9 4.9 0.1 Skimmed 35 0.1 < 0.1 5 5 0.1 To help you see if your favourite milk or c Continue reading >>

Cheese Ball | Diabetic Connect

Cheese Ball | Diabetic Connect

My daughter has been making this for years. It's wonderful! Now it's nice to know the nutrition facts. I had no idea this could be a healthy choice for diabetics. Thanks for sharing! Great for the holidays or any party or get to gether! Thank-you i love to entertain and this will be one of my favorites!!!! We do these for office parties a lot. Like Gabby says, one iin parsley and one in paprika, but I use smoked Spanish paprika. Oh, and a fun tip for Christmas parties. Roll one in the parsley (green) and one in paprika (red) This is great for the holidays. I have a recipe that is different from this one, so it will be nice to have both for some variety. I don't get the butter idea either, so I will leave that out. Other than that, the spice of the hot sauce should be nice. Maybe I will add a little banana peppers to it. In Cheese Ball recipes they all say add butter. However they can be made without the butter and it does not change the flavor or the durability of the cheese ball I did 10 different cheese balls for christmas and did not use butter in any of them and they were awsome. It will cut back on a few calories as well. You can use tofu in place of the cheeses, and still use the other ingredients without having to use ginger. Have a neice that can't do dairy..How would tofu work for the dairy maybe with ginger peices>>pickled ginger?? Why are you adding the extra butter to cream cheese and reg cheese?? Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Your food choices matter a lot when you've got diabetes. Some are better than others. Nothing is completely off limits. Even items that you might think of as “the worst" could be occasional treats -- in tiny amounts. But they won’t help you nutrition-wise, and it’s easiest to manage your diabetes if you mainly stick to the “best” options. Starches Your body needs carbs. But you want to choose wisely. Use this list as a guide. Best Choices Whole grains, such as brown rice, oatmeal, quinoa, millet, or amaranth Baked sweet potato Items made with whole grains and no (or very little) added sugar Worst Choices Processed grains, such as white rice or white flour Cereals with little whole grains and lots of sugar White bread French fries Fried white-flour tortillas Vegetables Load up! You’ll get fiber and very little fat or salt (unless you add them). Remember, potatoes and corn count as carbs. Best Choices Fresh veggies, eaten raw or lightly steamed, roasted, or grilled Plain frozen vegetables, lightly steamed Greens such as kale, spinach, and arugula. Iceberg lettuce is not as great, because it’s low in nutrients. Low sodium or unsalted canned vegetables Go for a variety of colors: dark greens, red or orange (think of carrots or red peppers), whites (onions) and even purple (eggplants). The 2015 U.S. guidelines recommend 2.5 cups of veggies per day. Worst Choices Canned vegetables with lots of added sodium Veggies cooked with lots of added butter, cheese, or sauce Pickles, if you need to limit sodium -- otherwise, pickles are okay. Sauerkraut, for the same reason as pickles -- so, limit them if you have high blood pressure Fruits They give you carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Most are naturally low in fat and sodium. But they tend to have more carbs Continue reading >>

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

Yes, you can snack if you have diabetes When your stomach starts to rumble, you need a snack that can curb your hunger without blowing your blood sugar. Just like meals, snacks should be a combination of fat, protein, and carbohydrates. Aim for one that consists of 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates and 100 to 200 calories (depending on your meal plan and medication). Here are five that typically get a seal of approval from diabetes educators and nutritionists. Whole-grain crackers, grapes, and cottage cheese Nutrient-rich whole grains like cracked wheat, whole wheat, rye, and quinoa can lower blood sugar and cholesterol. The cottage cheese adds protein to stabilize blood sugar, curb hunger pangs, and provide calcium for strong bones. Buy your favorite whole-grain crackers, and make sure that the first ingredient is whole-wheat flour or another whole grain, such as rye. (Even if the ingredient list says "wheat flour," it is not a whole-grain food unless it specifies "whole-wheat flour.") Arrange on a small plate 2 crackers, 1/4 cup nonfat cottage cheese, and 1/4 cup grapes. Serving size: 2 crackers, 1/4 cup cottage cheese, and 1/4 cup grapes. Nutritional information—Calories: 138, Total Carbohydrate: 21.2 g (7%), Dietary Fiber: 1.5 g (6%), Sugars 11.9 g Homemade popcorn Popcorn is high in fiber, and when made from scratch is an all-natural food without additives and artificial flavorings. Pour 1 tablespoon of mild-flavored oil such as canola into a heavy-bottomed medium-large pot. Cover the bottom of the pot with 1/2 cup of popcorn kernels spread in a thin layer. (If the kernels are too crowded, not all of them will pop.) Cover the pot and heat on medium, shaking the pot every minute or so until all of the kernels have popped. Take care not to cook too long, which could Continue reading >>

The Low Carb Diabetic: Feta Cheese : Is It Good Or Bad?

The Low Carb Diabetic: Feta Cheese : Is It Good Or Bad?

It also has decent amounts of vitamins A and K, folate, pantothenic acid, iron and magnesium. Bottom Line: Feta cheese is a low-calorie, low-fat cheese. It is also a good source of B vitamins, calcium and phosphorus. Cheese seems to be the primary source of calcium in Western diets. Feta cheese is a good source of calcium, phosphorus and protein, all of which have been proven to promote bone health. Calcium and protein help maintain bone density and prevent osteoporosis, while phosphorus helps your bones absorb calcium. Bottom Line: Calcium and phosphorus are present in feta cheese in amounts that can help support bone health. Probiotics are live, friendly bacteria that can benefit your health. Feta has been shown to contain Lactobacillus plantarum, which accounts for about 48% of its bacteria. These bacteria can help promote immune system and gut health by protecting the intestinal tract from disease-causing bacteria like E. coli and Salmonella. Furthermore, they seem to increase the production of compounds that inhibit the inflammatory response, thus providing anti-inflammatory benefits. Bottom Line: Feta cheese contains friendly bacteria that have been shown to promote immune and intestinal health, in addition to their anti-inflammatory effects. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a fatty acid found in animal products. It has been shown to help improve body composition, decreasing fat mass and increasing lean body mass. CLA may also help prevent diabetes and has shown anti-cancer effects. - eating feta cheese could contribute to your intake of CLA and provide you with all of the benefits it offers. Interestingly enough, Greece has the lowest incidence of breast cancer and the highest consumption of cheese in the European Union. Bottom Line: Feta cheese contains good Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Mac And Cheese Recipes

Diabetes-friendly Mac And Cheese Recipes

Macaroni and cheese isn't just for kids. These yummy cheesy pasta recipes are perfect for people with diabetes and those without. Macaroni and cheese isn't just for kids. These yummy cheesy pasta recipes are perfect for people with diabetes and those without. Macaroni and cheese isn't just for kids. These yummy cheesy pasta recipes are perfect for people with diabetes and those without. Macaroni and cheese isn't just for kids. These yummy cheesy pasta recipes are perfect for people with diabetes and those without. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Update: You Can Eat Cheese (as Long As It’s These Types)

Diabetes Update: You Can Eat Cheese (as Long As It’s These Types)

There are over four million people in the UK with diabetes, and 90 per cent of them have type 2. According to Diabetes UK, sufferers should follow a healthy, balanced diet which helps to control blood glucose, blood fats and blood pressure, as well as maintaining a healthy weight. It’s to reduce risk of complications with the condition, such as heart disease and stroke. Along with starchy foods, cheese might seem like it should be off limits to diabetics too since it’s high in fat and calories. A 2012 study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found it could reduce diabetes risk by 12 per cent. But not only is it safe for sufferers to consume, it’s actually beneficial. A 2012 study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found it could reduce diabetes risk by 12 per cent. The researchers discovered those who ate just 55g of cheese - roughly two slices - per day got the health benefits. They were unable to pin-point exactly why it helped, but cheese has many known positives for diabetics. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. It has a low glycemic index (GI), meaning it releases glucose slowly and won’t trigger a spike. Additionally, it’s high in protein which can keep you satisfied for longer, and specifically reduce the likelihood diabetics will consume too many sugary carbohydrates. However, some cheeses are better than others for sufferers. Varieties low in salt are best for diabetics, because it can elevate blood pressure, triggering or worsening cardiovascular problems. Lower-sodium types include Wensleydale, Emmental, mozzarella and cream cheese, whereas f Continue reading >>

The Benefits And Risks Of Cheese For People With Diabetes

The Benefits And Risks Of Cheese For People With Diabetes

Can people with diabetes eat cheese? The answer in many cases is yes. This delicious, calcium-rich food contains many nutritional properties that make it a healthy part of a balanced diet. Of course, there are some precautions to keep in mind. Read on to find out what people with diabetes need to know about eating cheese. Cheese can help maintain healthy glucose levels People with diabetes must consider the glycemic content of various foods. This is based on how quickly the body is able to digest the carbohydrates in those foods. The glycemic index (GI) is a 100-point scale that rates foods based on how rapidly they cause blood sugar to rise. Foods are given a higher value the more rapid the rise in blood sugar. Most cheeses contain little to no carbohydrates and thus rate very low on the GI scale. Some cheeses, however, have more than others. For example, cheddar cheese contains just 0.4 grams of carbohydrates per 1 ounce, while Swiss cheese contains 1.5 grams of carbohydrates per 1 ounce. So it’s important to check the nutritional label on various cheeses. Cheese is protein-rich Cheese is generally high in protein, which is great to help balance out the blood sugar spikes that occur when eating carbohydrates alone. When eaten together, they take longer to burn off. Protein also helps people feel full longer, thus reducing cravings for other unhealthy foods. The amount of protein varies depending on the type of cheese. For example, 1 ounce of parmesan contains 10 grams of protein, while cheddar contains 7 grams of protein. Cottage cheese has less than 3 grams per 1 ounce. Cheese may lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes At least one study has shown that cheese may lower a person’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the first place. The 2012 study found th Continue reading >>

Could Eating Cheese Reduce The Risk Of Developing Type 2 Diabetes?

Could Eating Cheese Reduce The Risk Of Developing Type 2 Diabetes?

Behind the headlines They say In July 2012 stories by the Daily Mail, Daily Express and the Daily Telegraph all claimed that eating cheese could reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. So, is there any truth to these claims? Diabetes UK says The stories were based on the results from a study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, which aimed to find out whether eating a diet high in dairy products is associated with a change in the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Overall, the study found no link between total dairy product consumption and diabetes risk, but the results did suggest that people who ate a lot of cheese and other products such as yogurt and buttermilk may have a lower risk of developing the condition. However, there is no significant link between eating more of one particular dairy product and a reduced risk of Type 2. Also, the European-wide study found the difference in risk varied between countries – people in the UK who ate more cheese were at increased risk, while people in France were at a reduced risk. While the study was well designed, the possible preventative effects could be down to luck, not cheese. Diabetes UK's Director of Research said, "It is too simplistic to concentrate on individual foods and this study gives us no reason to believe that people should change their dairy intake in an attempt to avoid diabetes. We recommend a healthy balanced diet, rich in fruit and vegetables and low in salt and fat." You can read a more detailed analysis by NHS Choices on their website. Continue reading >>

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