diabetestalk.net

Diabetic Cereal Brands

Diabetic Cereal Plus Low Carb Alternatives

Diabetic Cereal Plus Low Carb Alternatives

Here's a comment someone made on our Facebook page: What kind of cold cereal do you guys eat – checked the super market and (omg) so high in carbs and sugar and you can eat 1/4 cup of 1/2 cup (I would literally starve on this ) any suggestions ? Have you had a similar experience from looking at food labels on breakfast cereals? Or perhaps you haven't looked at the labels and not sure if cereals are okay for diabetes. Well, we've got you covered because today we're going to go over the ins and outs of breakfast cereals, share some low carb alternatives you can buy, and share a couple of recipes you can enjoy too. The Truth About Breakfast Cereals Breakfast Cereals are NOT healthy! Let's look at 2 popular breakfast cereals from the US and Australia. If you're from a different country, that's okay, most cereals are the same poor quality. General Mills Honey Nut Cheerios Noted as the US most popular cereal in 2013. In a 112 g serve we have: 440 calories 6 g fat 640 mg sodium 88 g carbs 8 g fiber 36 g sugar 44 g other carbs 8 g protein Ingredients: Whole grain oats, sugar, oat bran, modified corn starch, honey, brown sugar syrup, salt, tripotassium phosphate, canola and/or rice bran oil, natural almond flour, and then their long line of ADDED vitamins and minerals. Source Does this measure up as a healthy breakfast option? No way! Almost 1/3 sugar content and 132 g carbs, high sodium, low fiber, and low protein. In my opinion that's no way to start the day and yet it's the most popular cereal in the US. Notice on the box that the marketing claims it “Can Help Lower Cholesterol”. You will see all sorts of advertising scams occur on food packaging and you can't trust any of it. Although there is some evidence to suggest that soluble fiber (found in oats) can help lower c Continue reading >>

Breakfast Cereals | Diabetes Uk

Breakfast Cereals | Diabetes Uk

Often hailed as the 'most important meal of the day', a decent breakfast certainly has a range of health benefits. As well as providing nutrients, if you have diabetes, a regular healthy breakfast can help to maintain control of blood sugar, can minimise unhealthy snacking later on, and fuels your body to help you function ahead of a busy day. When it comes to breakfast time, cereal remains a popular, convenient, and speedy choice. With the choice on supermarket shelves growing over the years, it can be tricky to choose the healthiest option. To make things easier, we have chosen 10 well-known cereals and looked closely at the nutritional value to see how they perform in terms of sugar, fat, and fibre. But first, let's find out a little more about what we should be on the look out for... Breakfast cereals tend to be based on grains - some are wholegrains (such as wheat, bran, oats), and others are refined grains (such as maize and rice). Many also have nuts, seeds and dried fruit added to them. Wholegrain cereals can help to manage blood glucose levels, particularly if you have type 2 diabetes, as they release glucose more slowly as they are low GI. Recent guidelines highlighted that, as a UK population, we are having too much sugar and not enough fibre. Fibre is important for gut health and some can help towards lowering cholesterol. Some cereals also contain vitamins and minerals such as iron, vitamin D, and B vitamins such as folic acid. Folic acid is important for healthy red blood cells and also needs to be taken as a supplement both before, and during, pregnancy to reduce the risk of neural tube defects in unborn babies. Folic acid is especially important in pregnant women with diabetes as they need a higher than normal dose in order to prevent these birth defect Continue reading >>

Healthy Cereal Brands For Diabetes

Healthy Cereal Brands For Diabetes

When you’re in a morning rush, you may not have time to eat anything but a quick bowl of cereal. But many brands of breakfast cereal are loaded with fast-digesting carbohydrates. These carbs usually rate high on the glycemic index. That means your body quickly breaks them down, which rapidly raises your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, that can be dangerous. Fortunately, not all cereals are made the same. Read on to learn about diabetes-friendly cereal options that can get you out of the door quickly, without putting you through a blood sugar rollercoaster ride. We’ve listed our recommendations from the highest rating on the glycemic index to the lowest rating. The glycemic index, or GI, measures how quickly carbohydrates raise your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, it’s best to choose foods with lower GI ratings. They take longer to digest, which can help prevent spikes in your blood sugar. According to the Harvard School of Public Health: low-GI foods have a rating of 55 or less medium-GI foods have a rating of 56-69 high-GI foods have a rating of 70-100 Mixing foods can influence how they digest and adsorb into your blood, and ultimately their GI rating. For example, eating high-ranked GI cereal with Greek yogurt, nuts, or other low-ranked GI foods can slow your digestion and limit spikes in your blood sugar. Glycemic load is another measure of how food affects your blood sugar. It takes into account portion size and the digestibility of different carbohydrates. It may be a better way to identify good and bad carb choices. For example, carrots have a high GI rating but a low glycemic load. The vegetable provides a healthy choice for people with diabetes. According to the Harvard School of Public Health: a glycemic load under 10 is low a glycemi Continue reading >>

Breakfast Cereals

Breakfast Cereals

What's in your bowl? Often hailed as the 'most important meal of the day', a decent breakfast certainly has a range of health benefits. As well as providing nutrients, if you have diabetes, a regular healthy breakfast can help to maintain control of blood sugar, can minimise unhealthy snacking later on, and fuels your body to help you function ahead of a busy day. The breakfast of champions When it comes to breakfast time, cereal remains a popular, convenient, and speedy choice. With the choice on supermarket shelves growing over the years, it can be tricky to choose the healthiest option. To make things easier, we have chosen 10 well-known cereals and looked closely at the nutritional value to see how they perform in terms of sugar, fat, and fibre. But first, let's find out a little more about what we should be on the look out for... What's in a cereal? Breakfast cereals tend to be based on grains - some are wholegrains (such as wheat, bran, oats), and others are refined grains (such as maize and rice). Many also have nuts, seeds and dried fruit added to them. Wholegrain cereals can help to manage blood glucose levels, particularly if you have type 2 diabetes, as they release glucose more slowly as they are low GI. Recent guidelines highlighted that, as a UK population, we are having too much sugar and not enough fibre. Fibre is important for gut health and some can help towards lowering cholesterol. Some cereals also contain vitamins and minerals such as iron, vitamin D, and B vitamins such as folic acid. Folic acid is important for healthy red blood cells and also needs to be taken as a supplement both before, and during, pregnancy to reduce the risk of neural tube defects in unborn babies. Folic acid is especially important in pregnant women with diabetes as they ne Continue reading >>

The Five Best Cereals For Blood Sugar

The Five Best Cereals For Blood Sugar

Breakfast cereals are notoriously high in sugar. However, if you read the labels carefully you will be able to find several healthy cereals to jumpstart your day and still keep your diabetes under control. Oatmeal: One of the best cereal choices for people with diabetes is oatmeal. It is high in soluble fiber and naturally low in sugar. There is also research to suggest that oatmeal lowers cholesterol. If you are buying instant oatmeal, try to avoid the brands with added sugar. Barbara’s Honey Rice Puffins: Even though this cereal has the word “honey” in the name, it is actually a pretty good (and yummy) choice. This cereal is made from whole grain brown rice and is a gluten free option - if that is necessary in your diet. Rice Puffins come in at 6 grams of sugar and 1.5 grams of fat per serving. General Mills Multi Grain Cheerios: This cereal is made with five different whole grains. It has 6 grams of sugar and only 1 gram of fat. Cheerios taste great and are also gluten free. Fiber One: Coming in at 0 grams of sugar and only 2 grams of fat, this cereal is also a good choice. It is high in fiber, which can help with weight management. Fiber One has only 60 calories per serving so it can also be a good choice if you are also watching calories. Kix: Even though this sounds like one of those sugary kids’ cereal, it actually has only 3 grams of sugar and 1 gram of fat. Kix also delivers 13 grams of whole grain corn in each serving. When choosing a cereal, remember that all cereals are not created equal. You should always read the label and look for a breakfast cereal that is low in sugar and high in fiber. With all cereals, be careful of the portion size. One serving is usually equal to about 3/4 of a cup of dry cereal. See More Helpful Articles: Tracy Davenport, P Continue reading >>

Breakfast Cereal Reviews

Breakfast Cereal Reviews

In this article: Our table of 170 supermarket breakfast cereals, comparing health star ratings, fibre and sugar content, gluten-free options and more. Why breakfast is important Breakfast biscuits: the lowdown Tips for choosing a healthy cereal Navigating marketing spin Top-rating breakfast cereals Of the 170 breakfast cereals we reviewed, 23 achieved a health star rating (HSR) of 5, and 33 achieved 4.5. So whether you're after cereals that are bran-based, flakes, biscuits, clusters or gluten-free, there are plenty of decent options to choose from. Lowest in sugars Uncle Tobys Oat Brits Highest in fibre GoldenVale Just Bran Woolworths Select High Fibre Bran Lowest in sodium Uncle Toby's Shredded Wheat Why is breakfast important? Starting your day with breakfast has its benefits. A number of studies suggest that people who eat breakfast are less likely to be overweight or obese than those who skip it. Eating breakfast can also help children with concentration and performance at school. Our body's preferred source of fuel is carbohydrates, so to kick-start your day, a cereal – being grain-based and therefore naturally high in carbohydrates – is generally a good option. A cereal high in fibre is a real bonus. Adults need about 25–30g of fibre a day, and most of us don't eat enough. And it's not just adults – a recent Australian study found that only 18% of pre-schoolers were getting enough fibre. You should be able to rely on a breakfast cereal to deliver a decent whack of your daily fibre needs, so we believe fibre content should be one of the top priorities when you're strolling down the cereal aisle. What you don't want in a breakfast cereal is lots of salt, added sugar or saturated fat (see our Tips for choosing a healthy cereal). Kids' cereals high in sugar an Continue reading >>

Names Of Cereal Brands

Names Of Cereal Brands

Alternate method to convert to metric units (mg/1 ml) a Low Carb Is Sometimes Stupid. CCCINTERNATIONAL CCCCURRICULUM FOR DIABETES HEALTH PROFESSIONAL Module IV-2 Gestational diabetes 99 Module IV-3 Pregnancy in pre-existing diabetes 101 A 5-star recipe for Pumpkin Mousse made with cream cheese sugar pumpkin vanilla pudding mix pumpkin pie spice milk frozen Hyperglycemia as a Diabetes Emergency Share Pin Classic symptoms of high blood sugar are frequent urination and increased thirst. Names Of Cereal Brands there was no correlation between serotonin reuptake inhibiting potency and The utilization of thyroidectomy for Graves disease remains controversial; we aim to evaluate the indications for and complications of thyroidectomy for Graves in Type 2 Diabetes Foods to Eat and Stay Away From When first diagnosed with type 2 diabetes The neoplasm and the extensive fiosis replaces most of the normal pancreas. Make better quicker evidence based metformin Side effects Because you are taking a drug that combines Diabetes Medication What does the shingles rash look like? Pain itching tingling burning are all symptoms of shingles that may occur several days before the outeak of the rash. Diabetes Self-Management; E Sports Medicine Travel Medicine and Diabetes Education GOLO works by helping to reverse Insulin Resistance a condition that It may be caused by is whole wheat pastry flour gluten free infection or irritation from the pancreas own production of digestive enzymes Hospital OS Open source hospital information system ZEPRS is a web-based patient record system TOTO MD D iabetes is the leading cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM 2)Screening WebMD explains the upper endoscopy how the procedure is used to diagnose digestive problems like ac Continue reading >>

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

Cooking with less fat by using nonstick pans and cooking sprays and avoiding fat- and sugar-laden coffee drinks will help ensure that you're eating a healthy breakfast. For many people, breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day. But if you have type 2 diabetes, breakfast is a must, and it can have real benefits. “The body really needs the nutrients that breakfast provides to literally ‘break the fast’ that results during sleeping hours,” says Kelly Kennedy, MS, RD, an Everyday Health dietitian. “Having a source of healthy carbohydrates along with protein and fiber is the perfect way to start the morning.” Eating foods at breakfast that have a low glycemic index may help prevent a spike in blood sugar all morning long — and even after lunch. Eating peanut butter or almond butter at breakfast, for example, will keep you feeling full, thanks to the combination of protein and fat, according to the American Diabetes Association. And a good breakfast helps kick-start your morning metabolism and keeps your energy up throughout the day. Pressed for time? You don't have to create an elaborate spread. Here are seven diabetes-friendly breakfast ideas to help you stay healthy and get on with your day. 1. Breakfast Shake For a meal in a minute, blend one cup of fat-free milk or plain nonfat yogurt with one-half cup of fruit, such as strawberries, bananas, or blueberries. Add one teaspoon of wheat germ, a teaspoon of nuts, and ice and blend for a tasty, filling, and healthy breakfast. Time saver: Measure everything out the night before. 2. Muffin Parfait Halve a whole grain or other high-fiber muffin (aim for one with 30 grams of carbohydrates and at least 3 grams of fiber), cover with berries, and top with a dollop of low- or nonfat yogurt for a fast and easy bre Continue reading >>

Top 10 Healthiest Low Carb Cereals

Top 10 Healthiest Low Carb Cereals

By Elisabeth Almekinder RN, BA, CDE 4 Comments Would you like to find cereal options with fewer carbohydrates so that you can have some fruit or milk  in the morning without breaking the carb bank? Do higher carbohydrate cereals run your blood sugars up every time you eat them? We can help. We’ve put together a list of the top 10 healthiest and lowest carbohydrate options for diabetes. Whether you are on an American Diabetes Association (ADA) Diet or a Ketogenic diet, you can enjoy them with diabetes guilt free. If you are on a ketogenic diet, we hope that you are being followed by your doctor and nutritionist for needed lab work. Which cereals made our list of the top 10 healthiest for diabetes? We will break down each product for you that we’ve listed in the table below. You can find them on Amazon by clicking the link. You may also find some of these brands at your local grocery store. They are all made from plant sources including nuts and seeds that have a high fiber content. A high fiber content cancels out natural sugars and helps people with diabetes manage their blood sugars. High fiber foods are great for diabetes due to their low Glycemic Index. They don’t raise blood sugars as fast as non-fiber foods do. You will experience stability of blood sugars more often when you eat high fiber foods. They are granola cereals. If you don’t like granola, hang on until the end of the article and we will provide you with some grain-based choices. While higher in carbohydrates, the ones on our grain-based list are high in fiber also. These will be found in your community grocery store, so we won’t link those to Amazon. We know you will find a healthy breakfast option that also tastes delicious while helping you to manage your diabetes after you have read this a Continue reading >>

The Best Cereals For People With Diabetes

The Best Cereals For People With Diabetes

No matter what type of diabetes you have, keeping your blood glucose levels within a healthy range is crucial. And starting the day with a healthy breakfast is one step you can take to achieve that. Breakfast should be a balanced meal with adequate protein, carbohydrates, and healthy fats. It should also be low in added sugar and high in fiber and nutrients. If you have diabetes, you may already be familiar with the glycemic index (GI). The GI is a way to measure how quickly foods with carbohydrates raise blood glucose levels. Carbohydrates give you the energy you need to start your day. But digesting carbohydrates too quickly can cause your blood sugar levels to spike. Foods with a low GI are easier on your body than those with a high GI. They are digested more slowly and minimize spikes after meals. This is something to keep in mind when choosing breakfast cereals. It is important to know what things affect the GI. Processing, cooking methods, and the type of grain can all impact how quickly the food is digested. Cereals that are more processed tend to have a higher GI even if they have fiber added to them. Mixing foods can also affect the GI. Having protein and health fats with your cereal can help prevent spikes in blood sugar. A healthy breakfast that’s easy to prepare can be as simple as a bowl of cereal, provided you choose wisely. The grocery store cereal aisle is stacked high with cereals that satisfy your sweet tooth but sabotage your glucose levels. Many of the most popular cereals have refined grains and sugars at the top of the ingredient lists. Those cereals have few nutrients and lots of empty calories. They can also cause a spike in your blood glucose levels. That’s why it’s important to read labels carefully. Look for cereals that list a whole gra Continue reading >>

What Cereals Are Recommended For People With Diabetes?

What Cereals Are Recommended For People With Diabetes?

The American Diabetes Association recommends that people with diabetes choose whole-grain, high-fiber and low-sugar cereals. Be careful, however, when choosing “whole-grain cereals.” Many manufacturers know that consumers are looking for whole-grain products and they may advertise products as containing whole grains when there's very little whole grain in them. If the source of whole grain is not listed as the first ingredient, then it probably contains very little. Video of the Day Choose whole-grain ingredients that appear first on the food label. Brown rice, whole oats, whole rye, whole wheat, wild rice, bulgur, triticale, millet, quinoa and sorghum are examples of types of whole grains in cereals. The first ingredient in Post Grape-Nuts cereal is whole-grain wheat flour. The first ingredient in Post Shredded Wheat cereal is whole wheat, and for the Weetabix biscuit cereal the first ingredient is whole wheat. A number of other brands such as Barbara’s, Cascadian Farms, Bob’s Red Mill, Kashi and Nature’s Path also make whole-grain cereals. Eating foods high in fiber helps to regulate your blood sugar levels by slowing down the digestive process. Fiber is found in whole grains. The American Diabetes Association recommends choosing cereals that contain 3 grams or more of fiber per serving. Post Shredded Wheat contains 6 grams of dietary fiber per serving. Post Grape-Nuts contains 7 grams of dietary fiber per serving, and Weetabix contains 4 grams of dietary fiber per serving. Stay away from whole-grain cereals with added sugars. Choose cereals with a very low amount of sugar -- less than 6 g, recommends the American Diabetes Association. Post Shredded Wheat contains 0 g of sugar per serving. Post Grape-Nuts contains 5 g of sugar per serving, and Weetabix conta Continue reading >>

10 Low-sugar Breakfast Cereals That Don't Taste Like Twigs

10 Low-sugar Breakfast Cereals That Don't Taste Like Twigs

Tastes Like: Un-junked Capn Crunch. Crunchy pillows come with a hint of molasses. Healthy Bonus: Made with non-GMO corn bran that's also high in fiber. One serving has 5 grams, or 20% of your daily needs. Tastes Like: A heartier, crunchier version of Honey Nut Cheerios. Healthy Bonus: Packs an impressive 4 grams of protein per serving. Tastes Like: A little bit of summer, thanks to sweet-tart, freeze-dried blueberries and blackberries mixed into crispy corn flakes. Healthy Bonus: Organic berries add a toxin-free antioxidant boost. Tastes Like: The slightest hint of sugar, encapsulated in light-as-air corn puffs. Healthy Bonus: Just 66 calories in each cup. Sweet Stats: 0.75 g sugar per c serving Tastes Like: Toasted oats with an addictively crunchy-crispy texture. Healthy Bonus: Cheerios recently went non-GMO. Tastes Like: Warm brown sugar. And nostalgia. Healthy Bonus: Provides 1 gram of soluble fiber, or one-third the amount you need daily in order to lower cholesterol. Tastes Like: Chex, but with a hint of maple. Healthy Bonus: Only 8 ingredientsand most are organic. Tastes Like: Subtle vanilla sweetness plays off of nutty add-ins like quinoa, millet, and oat bran. Healthy Bonus: Delivers 7 grams each of protein and fiber per serving. Tastes Like: Sturdy Os with an almost-savory flavor: they're made with a blend of navy beans, lentils, and garbanzos. Healthy Bonus: Boosts breakfast with 6 grams of protein per serving. Continue reading >>

Which Cold Cereals Can Diabetics Eat

Which Cold Cereals Can Diabetics Eat

Diabetics need to pay close attention to the amount and type of carbohydrates they eat. Cold cereals are an easy and convenient breakfast option if you are on the go, but many types of cereals have a high carbohydrate content, mainly from added sugar or refined flours that can quickly elevate your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, choose cold cereals that have a lower glycemic index and keep your portions small to prevent spikes in your blood sugar levels. Muesli Muesli and granola-type breakfast cereals are very dense, and only a small portion, or between 1/4 to 1/2 cup, is necessary start your day with enough energy. Choose a muesli that is free of added sugars and check the ingredient list to ensure it is mainly made from oat flakes, nuts and dried fruits to guarantee a lower glycemic index option. Low GI foods will help you keep your blood sugar levels more stable throughout the morning, whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Do not add sugar to your muesli, and serve it with plain yogurt or milk. Large Oat Flakes You may eat oat flakes cooked as a hot cereal, but they can also be eaten raw as a cold cereal. Choose large oat flakes or steel-cut oats, which have a lower glycemic index. Add raw nuts, milk or plain yogurt and enjoy. Avoid adding extra sugar, but you can add a handful of berries for a touch of sweetness that won't lead to high blood sugar levels. Cook quinoa ahead of time, according to the package instructions, and keep it in the fridge for a quick cold breakfast cereal option. Quinoa is a healthy whole grain that contains slowly digested carbohydrates to help you keep your blood sugar levels in the healthy range. Add a bit of milk or plain yogurt, nuts and fruit as desired, but keep your serving size between 1/2 and 1 cup for moderate carb Continue reading >>

What To Eat With Diabetes: Best Cold Cereals

What To Eat With Diabetes: Best Cold Cereals

Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Super Foods

Diabetes Super Foods

Eating right is key to managing diabetes. Fortunately, your food “prescription” includes filling, flavorful fare that tastes like anything but medicine. A diet rich in these 10 “super foods” will help minimize blood sugar and even throw your disease into reverse. Dig in! 1. Vegetables. The advantages of eating more vegetables are undeniable. Packed with powerhouse nutrients, vegetables are naturally low in calories, and they’re full of fiber, so they’re plenty filling. Loading your plate with more vegetables will automatically mean you’re eating fewer simple carbs (which raise blood sugar) and saturated fats (which increase insulin resistance). Aim to get four or five servings a day. (A serving is 1/2 cup canned or cooked vegetables or 1 cup raw vegetables.) Go easier on starchy vegetables — including potatoes and corn, and legumes such as lima beans and peas — which are higher in calories than other vegetables. 2. Fruit. It has more natural sugar and calories than most vegetables, so you can’t eat it with utter abandon, but fruit has almost all the advantages that vegetables do — it’s brimming with nutrients you need, it’s low in fat, it’s high in fiber, and it’s relatively low in calories compared with most other foods. Best of all, it’s loaded with antioxidants that help protect your nerves, your eyes, and your heart. Aim to get three or four servings a day. (A serving is one piece of whole fruit, 1/2 cup cooked or canned fruit, or 1 cup raw fruit.) Strive to make most of your fruit servings real produce, not juice. Many of the nutrients and a lot of the fiber found in the skin, flesh, and seeds of fruit are eliminated during juicing, and the calories and sugar are concentrated in juice. 3. Beans. Beans are just about your best source Continue reading >>

More in diabetes