diabetestalk.net

Diabetic Cereal

Cold Cereals For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

Cold Cereals For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

Diabetics can eat all kinds of food, including many commercial cold cereals. According to the American Diabetes Association, or ADA, diabetics should eat cereals with 3g or more of dietary fiber and 5g or less of total sugar. When choosing a healthy breakfast cereal, limit your intake of added sugar by skipping granolas and cereals with marshmallows, “frosting,” dried fruits and chocolate flavoring. Also choose cereals that are higher in fiber. Fiber is an important nutrient to help you prevent weight gain and heart disease, for which diabetics have increased risk. Video of the Day The sugar content of some corn and rice breakfast cereals won’t derail a diabetic diet, but many of these cereals don’t supply all the fiber you need. Corn flakes and puffed rice may not contain enough of the whole grain to provide that fiber, reports the CDC. These cold cereals may contain refined grains, in which some of the plant fiber and other nutrients have been removed in processing. One corn cereal that meets the ADA criteria is General Mills Kix, with 3g of fiber and 3g of sugar per suggesting serving. Oat-based cold cereals may deliver enough fiber for a diabetic diet, but most of them have too much sugar in the form of honey or brown sugar ingredients to include frequently for breakfast. People with diabetes may instead opt for natural hot oatmeals, which have less than 1g of sugar and plenty of fiber. One cold breakfast cereal that satisfies ADA requirements is General Mills Cheerios. Like oatmeal, oat Cheerios offer 3g of fiber and only 1g of sugar in a suggested serving. Wheat cereals may be the best breakfast cereal addition to a diabetic diet. Read the nutrition facts on packages, though, because some of these cold cereals that are marketed as healthy have low sugar, b Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

I once went to see a friend who has diabetes. Her table was laid out with a wonderful breakfast for the both of us. However, it didn’t look too much like a breakfast a diabetic should be eating. There were carbs, carbs, and more carbs. To me it was a dream, but my thought for her was, “oh geeze, her blood sugar!” It seems innocent enough that we were having; croissants, jam, fruit, and array of fresh juices. For most people, this is a very healthy start. For diabetics, it is missing one key item that will help stall the burn of all those carbs – protein!” Here you will see biggest diabetes breakfast mistakes you’re probably making and you didn’t know you were doing it. Don’t make these breakfast mistakes to keep your blood sugar stable. At the end I have also included list of some commonly asked questions about diabetes breakfast. 1. Skipping Protein When you eat carbohydrates alone, they are digested quickly causing spikes in your blood sugar levels. When paired with a protein, they bind together and take longer to digest and burn up. If you have a bowl of cereal and toast, eat an egg with it. Fruit with Yogurt. Pancakes with Sausage. In a hurry? Just add Peanut Butter to your toast! 2. Smoothies on the Run Smoothies make you feel great! No doubt a good smoothie gives you a rush to get you going, but turns out its mostly a sugar rush. Make sure to check our 8 best smoothies for people with diabetes. Add a scoop of protein powder to slow the burn. Drink a smoothie and nibble a hardboiled egg. Skip the smoothie and have a bowl of oatmeal with some bacon! 3. Not Eating Breakfast You may have been fine without breakfast before diabetes, but after you are diagnosed you may not be anymore. People who skip breakfast actually have higher blood sugars during the Continue reading >>

Top 10 Healthiest Low Carb Cereals

Top 10 Healthiest Low Carb Cereals

By Elisabeth Almekinder RN, BA, CDE 4 Comments Would you like to find cereal options with fewer carbohydrates so that you can have some fruit or milk  in the morning without breaking the carb bank? Do higher carbohydrate cereals run your blood sugars up every time you eat them? We can help. We’ve put together a list of the top 10 healthiest and lowest carbohydrate options for diabetes. Whether you are on an American Diabetes Association (ADA) Diet or a Ketogenic diet, you can enjoy them with diabetes guilt free. If you are on a ketogenic diet, we hope that you are being followed by your doctor and nutritionist for needed lab work. Which cereals made our list of the top 10 healthiest for diabetes? We will break down each product for you that we’ve listed in the table below. You can find them on Amazon by clicking the link. You may also find some of these brands at your local grocery store. They are all made from plant sources including nuts and seeds that have a high fiber content. A high fiber content cancels out natural sugars and helps people with diabetes manage their blood sugars. High fiber foods are great for diabetes due to their low Glycemic Index. They don’t raise blood sugars as fast as non-fiber foods do. You will experience stability of blood sugars more often when you eat high fiber foods. They are granola cereals. If you don’t like granola, hang on until the end of the article and we will provide you with some grain-based choices. While higher in carbohydrates, the ones on our grain-based list are high in fiber also. These will be found in your community grocery store, so we won’t link those to Amazon. We know you will find a healthy breakfast option that also tastes delicious while helping you to manage your diabetes after you have read this a Continue reading >>

An Good Acceptable Cold Cereal For A Pw Diabetes | Diabetic Connect

An Good Acceptable Cold Cereal For A Pw Diabetes | Diabetic Connect

An Good Acceptable Cold Cereal For A PW Diabetes An good acceptable cold cereal for a PW diabetes By Anonymous Latest Reply2015-03-08 01:50:58 -0600 I have been eating regular hot oatmeal but just getting on the intolerable stage to face it in the am. By the way. Try steel cut oats in the crockpot over nite. Add fresh fruit and it's ready when you get up. Change the fruit so it doesn't get boring. Just watch your serving sizes. Yeah, don't eat it. Wouldn't give it to my kids. Bad stuff all around. Way too much sugar, doesn't fill you up, who really knows what crap they put in it. Vitimans, really? They say vitimans are good for you, but to watch where you buy them and who makes them. How do you know what they put in your cereal. Look for something better for you. You will miss it, but that will go away. many can't have them, and I have found a few I can have. one of them is Cheerios and multigrain Cheerios, they supposedly have recently gone non-GMO too. I like some of the Cascadian Farm organic cereals, some raise me too much, some do not and I stay away from the ones that have too much granola, most of us need to do that. There are only a couple of Kashi cereals that I like and are okay with my numbers. trying to think of the others. there are not many at all, very few. Continue reading >>

The Five Best Cereals For Blood Sugar

The Five Best Cereals For Blood Sugar

Breakfast cereals are notoriously high in sugar. However, if you read the labels carefully you will be able to find several healthy cereals to jumpstart your day and still keep your diabetes under control. Oatmeal: One of the best cereal choices for people with diabetes is oatmeal. It is high in soluble fiber and naturally low in sugar. There is also research to suggest that oatmeal lowers cholesterol. If you are buying instant oatmeal, try to avoid the brands with added sugar. Barbara’s Honey Rice Puffins: Even though this cereal has the word “honey” in the name, it is actually a pretty good (and yummy) choice. This cereal is made from whole grain brown rice and is a gluten free option - if that is necessary in your diet. Rice Puffins come in at 6 grams of sugar and 1.5 grams of fat per serving. General Mills Multi Grain Cheerios: This cereal is made with five different whole grains. It has 6 grams of sugar and only 1 gram of fat. Cheerios taste great and are also gluten free. Fiber One: Coming in at 0 grams of sugar and only 2 grams of fat, this cereal is also a good choice. It is high in fiber, which can help with weight management. Fiber One has only 60 calories per serving so it can also be a good choice if you are also watching calories. Kix: Even though this sounds like one of those sugary kids’ cereal, it actually has only 3 grams of sugar and 1 gram of fat. Kix also delivers 13 grams of whole grain corn in each serving. When choosing a cereal, remember that all cereals are not created equal. You should always read the label and look for a breakfast cereal that is low in sugar and high in fiber. With all cereals, be careful of the portion size. One serving is usually equal to about 3/4 of a cup of dry cereal. See More Helpful Articles: Tracy Davenport, P Continue reading >>

Which Cold Cereals Can Diabetics Eat

Which Cold Cereals Can Diabetics Eat

Diabetics need to pay close attention to the amount and type of carbohydrates they eat. Cold cereals are an easy and convenient breakfast option if you are on the go, but many types of cereals have a high carbohydrate content, mainly from added sugar or refined flours that can quickly elevate your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, choose cold cereals that have a lower glycemic index and keep your portions small to prevent spikes in your blood sugar levels. Muesli Muesli and granola-type breakfast cereals are very dense, and only a small portion, or between 1/4 to 1/2 cup, is necessary start your day with enough energy. Choose a muesli that is free of added sugars and check the ingredient list to ensure it is mainly made from oat flakes, nuts and dried fruits to guarantee a lower glycemic index option. Low GI foods will help you keep your blood sugar levels more stable throughout the morning, whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Do not add sugar to your muesli, and serve it with plain yogurt or milk. Large Oat Flakes You may eat oat flakes cooked as a hot cereal, but they can also be eaten raw as a cold cereal. Choose large oat flakes or steel-cut oats, which have a lower glycemic index. Add raw nuts, milk or plain yogurt and enjoy. Avoid adding extra sugar, but you can add a handful of berries for a touch of sweetness that won't lead to high blood sugar levels. Cook quinoa ahead of time, according to the package instructions, and keep it in the fridge for a quick cold breakfast cereal option. Quinoa is a healthy whole grain that contains slowly digested carbohydrates to help you keep your blood sugar levels in the healthy range. Add a bit of milk or plain yogurt, nuts and fruit as desired, but keep your serving size between 1/2 and 1 cup for moderate carb Continue reading >>

What To Eat With Diabetes: Best Cold Cereals

What To Eat With Diabetes: Best Cold Cereals

Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Continue reading >>

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

Cooking with less fat by using nonstick pans and cooking sprays and avoiding fat- and sugar-laden coffee drinks will help ensure that you're eating a healthy breakfast. For many people, breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day. But if you have type 2 diabetes, breakfast is a must, and it can have real benefits. “The body really needs the nutrients that breakfast provides to literally ‘break the fast’ that results during sleeping hours,” says Kelly Kennedy, MS, RD, an Everyday Health dietitian. “Having a source of healthy carbohydrates along with protein and fiber is the perfect way to start the morning.” Eating foods at breakfast that have a low glycemic index may help prevent a spike in blood sugar all morning long — and even after lunch. Eating peanut butter or almond butter at breakfast, for example, will keep you feeling full, thanks to the combination of protein and fat, according to the American Diabetes Association. And a good breakfast helps kick-start your morning metabolism and keeps your energy up throughout the day. Pressed for time? You don't have to create an elaborate spread. Here are seven diabetes-friendly breakfast ideas to help you stay healthy and get on with your day. 1. Breakfast Shake For a meal in a minute, blend one cup of fat-free milk or plain nonfat yogurt with one-half cup of fruit, such as strawberries, bananas, or blueberries. Add one teaspoon of wheat germ, a teaspoon of nuts, and ice and blend for a tasty, filling, and healthy breakfast. Time saver: Measure everything out the night before. 2. Muffin Parfait Halve a whole grain or other high-fiber muffin (aim for one with 30 grams of carbohydrates and at least 3 grams of fiber), cover with berries, and top with a dollop of low- or nonfat yogurt for a fast and easy bre Continue reading >>

3 Tips For Picking A Diabetic Friendly Breakfast Cereal

3 Tips For Picking A Diabetic Friendly Breakfast Cereal

Cereal Choices for Blood Sugar Management Cereal is such an easy breakfast option, but let’s be real, it can become a big problem for your blood sugar. Many cereals are high in processed sugars and low in fiber, leading to quick rises in blood sugar. It’s also easy to eat several servings in one sitting, greatly increasing the amount of carbohydrate in your meal. That being said, you don’t have to give up on all breakfast cereals to reach your blood sugar goals. But you do need to pay close attention to the nutrition facts and portion size. Here are a few tips to better incorporate a diabetic friendly breakfast cereal into your diet: 1. Read the nutrition facts label. Choose a cereal that is low in sugar, high in fiber. As a general rule of thumb, I’m looking for at least 3 grams fiber and less than 6 grams sugar. When looking at the ingredients, whole grain should be the first ingredient! 2. Measure it out! It is so easy to eat several servings without even realizing it. The serving size for most cereals is 1/2 cup to 1 cup. 3. Consider what you eat with the cereal. Try using unsweetened almond milk. It contains less carbohydrates than cow’s milk and soy milk. Adding fruit will increase the amount of carbohydrate. Only add if your meal plan allows for it. Try adding nuts to increase the protein/healthy fats. Or round out the meal with Greek yogurt, eggs, or other protein foods. Don’t have time to compare labels? Here’s a few to try! Fiber One Original: 1/2 cup serving contains 25 g carbohydrate, 14 g fiber, 0 g sugar, 2 g protein General Mills Total: 3/4 cup serving contains 25 g carbohydrate, 3 g fiber, 5 g sugar, 2 g protein Kellogg’s Special K Protein: 3/4 cup serving contains 19 g carbohydrate, 3 g fiber, 7 g sugar, 10 g protein (this one has more t Continue reading >>

Cereal: It’s What’s For Breakfast… Or Lunch, Or Dinner

Cereal: It’s What’s For Breakfast… Or Lunch, Or Dinner

Raise your hand if you currently eat or have ever eaten cereal. I wouldn’t be surprised if most of you raised your hand. Back in 2005, Good Morning America conducted a poll and found that 60% of Americans eat breakfast, and of those 60%, about 40% eat either hot or cold cereal. I’m a big breakfast cereal eater, mostly because it’s fast and easy, but also because I like it. People eat cereal at any time of day, too — it’s not just for breakfast anymore. And if you’re a Seinfeld fan, you probably remember the episode when Jerry’s girlfriend ate cereal for all three meals. All sorts of studies have been done looking at how breakfast impacts various factors, including obesity, Type 2 diabetes, blood pressure, and cholesterol, as well as alertness and productivity. And starting off the day by eating cereal is a smart way to help meet your fiber and whole-grain goals (most of us fall short on these). Did you know, too, that eating a whole-grain breakfast cereal can help reduce your risk of heart failure, and is a smart way to prevent accumulating fat around your midsection (also known as the dreaded spare tire)? Decisions, Decisions So, eating breakfast is good. Eating cereal is also good with one caveat: you need to choose a cereal that’s healthy. But how? The cereal aisle in the supermarket can be overwhelming. You know you should choose something that’s high in nutrition, but the worry is that the cereal will taste like packing peanuts. Must one sacrifice flavor for health? Choosing Wisely Here are some tips that can help: Read the Nutrition Facts label. Information on the front of the box can be misleading. For example, a cereal claiming to be “low in sugar” might not be so healthful in terms of fat, whole grains, or sodium. The label and the ingredi Continue reading >>

Breakfast Cereal Aka 'gd Kryptonite'!

Breakfast Cereal Aka 'gd Kryptonite'!

The majority of dietitians and hospital dietary info. will suggest a suitable diabetic breakfast being breakfast cereal such as Weetabix, Bran flakes, All Bran, Shreddies, Shredded Wheat, Granola, No added sugar Muesli, or porridge oats. High fibre and low in fat, covered with a helping of lactose (milk) and sometimes they like to advise to add a helping of fructose (fruit) on top too.... so a high carb cereal covered in carbs and more carbs. Carb overload! We have learnt through experience that it is very rare for ladies to be able to tolerate these cereals throughout a pregnancy when diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Many will be able to tolerate them earlier in pregnancy, when insulin resistance has not yet peaked. Then as the pregnancy progresses and insulin resistance increases, overnight, a cereal which was once tolerated often raises levels very high (spikes), usually into double figures, hence we named breakfast cereal GD kryptonite! Sometimes ladies are able to move onto things like porridge oats which are low GI, but for many all cereals become an intolerable food which has to be forgotten until baby is born. For this reason, cereal becomes a craving food for many ladies with gestational diabetes. We see many ladies being told that they should be able to tolerate cereal and that they should continue to try and ultimately this results in them being medicated, or doses of medication or insulin being increased in order to control the sugar hit from the cereals. If it's not broken then you don't need to fix it! If breakfast cereal works for you then that's great. Don't stop eating it if it is not causing you any problems, but eat it in the knowledge that tolerance to it can change (literally overnight) and please be careful if advising others with gestational d Continue reading >>

What Cereal Is Ok | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

What Cereal Is Ok | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi what breakfast cereal is ok to have and what does everyone have with theres None that I am aware of but I'm sure that others may know of some .. and, for me, I wouldn't eat cereal anyway because of the high carb content Most (dare I say all!) breakfast cereals are best avoided for Type 2's. They are usually sugar and carbohydrate packed bundles of poison. Far better to have some scrambled eggs. My best guess would be nothing. At a pinch, Irish/ Steel cut oatmeal might do more good than harm, but I won't be trying it again. I suppose if it really has to be branded cereal, then all bran is very high fibre, and that might be something some people could try, but I *really* wouldn't recommend it coz the carbs must be off the scale! My best guess would be nothing. At a pinch, Irish/ Steel cut oatmeal might do more good than harm, but I won't be trying it again. I suppose if it really has to be branded cereal, then all bran is very high fibre, and that might be something some people could try, but I *really* wouldn't recommend it coz the carbs must be off the scale! What do you have for your breakfast then I got told that weetabix is ok but my my blood sugar go up ?? My best guess would be nothing. At a pinch, Irish/ Steel cut oatmeal might do more good than harm, but I won't be trying it again. I suppose if it really has to be branded cereal, then all bran is very high fibre, and that might be something some people could try, but I *really* wouldn't recommend it coz the carbs must be off the scale! Most (dare I say all!) breakfast cereals are best avoided for Type 2's. They are usually sugar and carbohydrate packed bundles of poison. Far better to have s Continue reading >>

5 Great Cereals To Avoid High Blood Sugar

5 Great Cereals To Avoid High Blood Sugar

I really love eating breakfast. Not only is it the most important meal of the day, but there are so many great things to eat! Since I had a baby almost a year ago (which I can’t believe, but that’s a whole other post!), cereal seems to be the easiest choice. Unfortunately, my blood sugar usually jumps way up into orbit after this typically high carb meal. So what to do? After much experimentation, I found a few cereals that are easy on the blood sugars, delicious, and satisfying. Steel cut oatmeal. A lot of people with diabetes complain that oatmeal spikes their blood sugar. I’ve had this problem as well, but the problem usually isn’t the oatmeal itself, it’s what I put on it. I’ve also noticed that when I eat steel cut oatmeal vs. the quick cook versions my blood sugar isn’t as compromised. I sprinkle a couple berries on top and add some milk and I’ve got a delicious breakfast. The carbs are high, yes, but if I take the right amount of insulin, I’m all good. Weetablx. I’ve been eating Weetabix since I was a kid. It’s not your typical breakfast cereal. Instead of being flakes or clusters, Weetabix is more biscuit like. You pour milk on top, and it becomes soft and delicious. Weetabix is something that I craved while pregnant last year. I love everything about it! I eat two biscuits for breakfast, which is 28g of carbs, without milk. No Sugar Familia Museli. This is also a cereal from my childhood, and it’s also one that I feed my baby girl. Although she eats the baby version! This has been my typical breakfast as of late and I’ve had no spikes to report at all! This cereal comes in a few varieties, so if you’re going to try it out, make sure that you buy the no-sugar variety. Puffed Rice. Boring? I don’t think so. It’s got a different tex Continue reading >>

The Best Cereals For People With Diabetes

The Best Cereals For People With Diabetes

No matter what type of diabetes you have, keeping your blood glucose levels within a healthy range is crucial. And starting the day with a healthy breakfast is one step you can take to achieve that. Breakfast should be a balanced meal with adequate protein, carbohydrates, and healthy fats. It should also be low in added sugar and high in fiber and nutrients. If you have diabetes, you may already be familiar with the glycemic index (GI). The GI is a way to measure how quickly foods with carbohydrates raise blood glucose levels. Carbohydrates give you the energy you need to start your day. But digesting carbohydrates too quickly can cause your blood sugar levels to spike. Foods with a low GI are easier on your body than those with a high GI. They are digested more slowly and minimize spikes after meals. This is something to keep in mind when choosing breakfast cereals. It is important to know what things affect the GI. Processing, cooking methods, and the type of grain can all impact how quickly the food is digested. Cereals that are more processed tend to have a higher GI even if they have fiber added to them. Mixing foods can also affect the GI. Having protein and health fats with your cereal can help prevent spikes in blood sugar. A healthy breakfast that’s easy to prepare can be as simple as a bowl of cereal, provided you choose wisely. The grocery store cereal aisle is stacked high with cereals that satisfy your sweet tooth but sabotage your glucose levels. Many of the most popular cereals have refined grains and sugars at the top of the ingredient lists. Those cereals have few nutrients and lots of empty calories. They can also cause a spike in your blood glucose levels. That’s why it’s important to read labels carefully. Look for cereals that list a whole gra Continue reading >>

Diabetic Cereal Plus Low Carb Alternatives

Diabetic Cereal Plus Low Carb Alternatives

Here's a comment someone made on our Facebook page: What kind of cold cereal do you guys eat – checked the super market and (omg) so high in carbs and sugar and you can eat 1/4 cup of 1/2 cup (I would literally starve on this ) any suggestions ? Have you had a similar experience from looking at food labels on breakfast cereals? Or perhaps you haven't looked at the labels and not sure if cereals are okay for diabetes. Well, we've got you covered because today we're going to go over the ins and outs of breakfast cereals, share some low carb alternatives you can buy, and share a couple of recipes you can enjoy too. The Truth About Breakfast Cereals Breakfast Cereals are NOT healthy! Let's look at 2 popular breakfast cereals from the US and Australia. If you're from a different country, that's okay, most cereals are the same poor quality. General Mills Honey Nut Cheerios Noted as the US most popular cereal in 2013. In a 112 g serve we have: 440 calories 6 g fat 640 mg sodium 88 g carbs 8 g fiber 36 g sugar 44 g other carbs 8 g protein Ingredients: Whole grain oats, sugar, oat bran, modified corn starch, honey, brown sugar syrup, salt, tripotassium phosphate, canola and/or rice bran oil, natural almond flour, and then their long line of ADDED vitamins and minerals. Source Does this measure up as a healthy breakfast option? No way! Almost 1/3 sugar content and 132 g carbs, high sodium, low fiber, and low protein. In my opinion that's no way to start the day and yet it's the most popular cereal in the US. Notice on the box that the marketing claims it “Can Help Lower Cholesterol”. You will see all sorts of advertising scams occur on food packaging and you can't trust any of it. Although there is some evidence to suggest that soluble fiber (found in oats) can help lower c Continue reading >>

More in diabetes