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Diabetic Cataract Definition

Cataracts: Surgery Recovery, Symptoms, Treatment & Causes

Cataracts: Surgery Recovery, Symptoms, Treatment & Causes

A cataract is a clouding of the lens of the eye. Cataracts are extremely common, and most cataracts are a result of the aging process. Although many cataracts are not significant enough to require treatment, surgical removal of cataracts is usually safe and effective, resulting in improvement of vision. Cataract surgery should be performed when the visual loss from the cataract significantly impacts the lifestyle of the individual patient. A cataract is an eye disease in which the clear lens of the eye becomes cloudy or opaque, causing a decrease in vision. Although the word cataract to describe this condition has been part of the English language since only the 15th century, the eye disease has been recognized and surgically treated since ancient times. The lens is a portion of the eye that is normally clear. It focuses rays of light entering the eye onto the retina , the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. In order to get a clear image onto the retina, the portions of the eye in front of the retina, including the lens, must be clear and transparent. The light striking the retina initiates a chemical reaction within the retina. The chemical reaction, in turn, initiates an electrical response which is carried to the brain through the optic nerve . The brain then interprets what the eye sees. In a normal eye, light passes through the transparent lens to the retina. The lens must be clear for the retina to receive a sharp image. If the lens is cloudy from a cataract, the image striking the retina will be blurry or distorted and the vision will be blurry. The extent of the visual disturbance is dependent upon the degree of cloudiness of the lens. Most cataracts are related to aging . Cataracts are very common in older people. By age 80, more than half of all Am Continue reading >>

Are There Different Types Of Cataracts?

Are There Different Types Of Cataracts?

There are three primary types of age-related cataracts: nuclear sclerotic, cortical, and posterior subcapsular. As a person ages, any one type, or a combination of any of these three types, can develop over time. This is the most common type of age-related cataract, caused primarily by the hardening and yellowing of the lens over time. "Nuclear" refers to the gradual clouding of the central portion of the lens, called the nucleus; "sclerotic" refers to the hardening, or sclerosis, of the lens nucleus. As this type of cataract progresses, it changes the eye's ability to focus, and close-up vision ( for reading or other types of close work) may temporarily improve. This symptom is referred to as "second sight," but the vision improvement it produces is not permanent. A nuclear sclerotic cataract progresses slowly and may require many years of gradual development before it begins to affect vision. Tina D. Turner, M.D., VisionAware's Resident Cataract Specialist Dr. Turner is a staff comprehensive ophthalmologist at Henry Ford Health System's Grosse Pointe Ophthalmology. She graduated magna cum laude from the University of Tennessee with a BA in chemistry, received her MD degree from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, and completed her ophthalmology residency at the University of Michigan's Kellogg Eye Center. She lectures widely on many topics in ophthalmology to ophthalmology residents, family medicine residents, emergency medicine residents, ophthalmic technicians, surgical technicians, and patients. Dr. Turner is the author of An Introduction to Cataracts and Cataract Surgery on the VisionAware website, where you can learn more about cataracts, including: Sign up with VisionAware to receive free weekly email alerts for more helpful information and tips for everyday Continue reading >>

Cataracts - Symptoms And Causes - Mayo Clinic

Cataracts - Symptoms And Causes - Mayo Clinic

A cataract occurs when the lens of your eye becomes cloudy. Eventually, a cataract can advance to the degree of the one shown in this person's right eye. Normal vision (left) becomes blurred as a cataract forms (right). A cataract is a clouding of the normally clear lens of your eye. For people who have cataracts, seeing through cloudy lenses is a bit like looking through a frosty or fogged-up window. Clouded vision caused by cataracts can make it more difficult to read, drive a car (especially at night) or see the expression on a friend's face. Most cataracts develop slowly and don't disturb your eyesight early on. But with time, cataracts will eventually interfere with your vision. At first, stronger lighting and eyeglasses can help you deal with cataracts. But if impaired vision interferes with your usual activities, you might need cataract surgery. Fortunately, cataract surgery is generally a safe, effective procedure. Increasing difficulty with vision at night Need for brighter light for reading and other activities Frequent changes in eyeglass or contact lens prescription At first, the cloudiness in your vision caused by a cataract may affect only a small part of the eye's lens and you may be unaware of any vision loss. As the cataract grows larger, it clouds more of your lens and distorts the light passing through the lens. This may lead to more noticeable symptoms. Make an appointment for an eye exam if you notice any changes in your vision. If you develop sudden vision changes, such as double vision or flashes of light, sudden eye pain, or sudden headache, see your doctor right away. Most cataracts develop when aging or injury changes the tissue that makes up your eye's lens. Some inherited genetic disorders that cause other health problems can increase your r Continue reading >>

Cataracts And Diabetes

Cataracts And Diabetes

Cataracts are cloudy opacifications of the lens of the eye Cataracts are one of the sight-related complications of diabetes that can cause misting or blurring of vision. Attending regular eye checks as part of your annual diabetic review will help your health team to identify any signs of cataracts at an early stage and advise on treatment. Cataracts are cloudy opacifications of the lens of the eye which can lead to cloudy or blurred vision. This interferes with your vision, in some cases considerably. Early stage cataract symptoms may barely influence the vision, and a cataract diagnosis may come as a genuine surprise. Challenging visual situations such as driving at night and bright sunlight may cause your sight to become hazy. Attending regular eye checks and screenings will make it easier for your health team to diagnose cataracts at an early stage. The lens of the eye is made up of fluids that contain protein . Over time this fluid may begin to cloud over, causing cataracts. Age is one of the factors and other factors include: Does diabetes increase the risk of cataracts? Diabetes is one of the key factors that result in the development of cataracts. Although the reasons why are still not fully understood, people with diabetes mellitus statistically face a 60% greater risk of developing cataracts. As with most complications of diabetes, maintaining good control of your blood sugar levels will help to reduce your risk. In addition, research has shown that people with type 2 diabetes who lower their HbA1c level by just 1% can reduce their risk of cataracts by 19%. [1] Cataracts treatment has advanced considerably in recent years. Surgery is often prescribed, with the lens removed and replaced with an artificial one. Cataract surgery is widely recommended and is comm Continue reading >>

Cataract In Patients With Diabetes Mellitusincidence Rates In The Uk And Risk Factors

Cataract In Patients With Diabetes Mellitusincidence Rates In The Uk And Risk Factors

Cataract in patients with diabetes mellitusincidence rates in the UK and risk factors To analyze the risk of incident cataract (diagnosis or extraction) in patients with or without diabetes focusing on other comorbid conditions, antidiabetic drug use, and diabetes duration. The study population comprised newly diagnosed diabetes patients (40 years) from the UK-based Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) between 2000 and 2015, and a random sample of the general population matched for age, sex, general practice, and year of diabetes diagnosis. We assessed cataract incidence rates (IRs) and performed a nested case-control analysis in the diabetic cohort to assess potential risk factors for a cataract. There were 56,510 diabetes patients included in the study. IRs of cataract were 20.4 (95% CI 19.820.9) per 1000 person-years (py) in patients with diabetes and 10.8 (95% CI 10.511.2) per 1000 py in the general population. IRs increased considerably around the age of 80 years and with a concomitant diagnosis of macular edema. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) was highest in patients of the age group of 4554 years. In the nested case-control study, we identified 5800 patients with cataract. Risk of cataract increased with increasing diabetes duration (adj. OR 5.14, 95% CI 4.196.30 diabetes for 10 years vs. diabetes <2 years). According to our study, diabetes is associated with an approximately two-fold increased detection rate of cataract. The risk of cataract associated with diabetes is highest at younger ages. Patients with diabetic macular edema are at an increased risk for cataract as well as patients with long-standing diabetes. Cataract is the primary cause of blindness worldwide [ 1 ]. It is defined as a decrease in the transparency of the crystalline lens and can be Continue reading >>

Diabetic Cataract | Definition Of Diabetic Cataract By Medical Dictionary

Diabetic Cataract | Definition Of Diabetic Cataract By Medical Dictionary

Diabetic cataract | definition of diabetic cataract by Medical dictionary opacity of the lens of the eye or its capsule or both. Cataract may result from injuries to the eye, exposure to great heat or radiation, or inherited factors. Rare in cattle and swine, common in dogs. Treatment consists of surgical removal of the lens (lens extraction or cataract extraction). May affect the entire lens or be localized, e.g. posterior polar cataract. any non-congenital cataract; usually the result of trauma, systemic disease or another eye disorder. 1. any membrane of the pupillary area after extraction or absorption of the lens. one consisting of an opacity of the capsule of the lens. a cataract occurring secondarily to other intraocular disease. present at birth; often not progressive. See also white eye calf syndrome . an opacity in the cortex of the lens. The common form of cataract in dogs; inherited in many breeds, often in association with progressive retinal atrophy. one that occurs at any age before the animal becomes an adult. one caused by electrical current as in electrocution. a perinuclear opacity with normal lens fibers surrounding it. Usually the result of an in utero or neonatal insult to the lens. a focal opacity at the point where the hyaloid artery meets the posterior lens capsule. See also mittendorf's dot . one in which the lens has begun to liquefy. a very early stage of development with no impairment of vision. occurs in a number of breeds of cattle, often in combination with other abnormalities of the eye. Affected calves are usually normal in other respects and can be reared if the inconvenience of their blindness can be overcome. Also occurs in dogs, often with late onset and in association with other inherited ocular defects such as progressive retinal Continue reading >>

Cataracts: 3 Common Types, Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Cataracts: 3 Common Types, Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

By Gretchyn Bailey ; reviewed by Vance Thompson, MD On This Page: Cataract symptoms and signs What causes cataracts? Cataract prevention Cataract treatment Eyewear after cataract surgery Cataract Surgery: About Cataract Surgery Laser Cataract Surgery Cataract Surgery Recovery Cataract Surgery Q&A Video: How Cataract Surgery Works Cataract Surgery Cost A Surgeon Gets Cataract Surgery Choosing a Cataract Surgeon Cataract Surgery Complications A cataract is a clouding of the eye's natural lens, which lies behind the iris and the pupil . Cataracts are the most common cause of vision loss in people over age 40 and is the principal cause of blindness in the world. In fact, there are more cases of cataracts worldwide than there are of glaucoma , macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy combined, according to Prevent Blindness America (PBA). Today, cataracts affect more than 22 million Americans age 40 and older. And as the U.S. population ages, more than 30 million Americans are expected to have cataracts by the year 2020, PBA says. A subcapsular cataract occurs at the back of the lens. People with diabetes or those taking high doses of steroid medications have a greater risk of developing a subcapsular cataract. A nuclear cataract forms deep in the central zone (nucleus) of the lens. Nuclear cataracts usually are associated with aging. A cortical cataract is characterized by white, wedge-like opacities that start in the periphery of the lens and work their way to the center in a spoke-like fashion. This type of cataract occurs in the lens cortex, which is the part of the lens that surrounds the central nucleus. A cataract starts out small and at first has little effect on your vision. You may notice that your vision is blurred a little, like looking through a cloudy pie Continue reading >>

Diabetic Cataractpathogenesis, Epidemiology And Treatment

Diabetic Cataractpathogenesis, Epidemiology And Treatment

Diabetic CataractPathogenesis, Epidemiology and Treatment Department of Ophthalmology and Optometry, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna, Austria Received 2009 Dec 11; Accepted 2010 Apr 2. Copyright 2010 A. Pollreisz and U. Schmidt-Erfurth. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Cataract in diabetic patients is a major cause of blindness in developed and developing countries. The pathogenesis of diabetic cataract development is still not fully understood. Recent basic research studies have emphasized the role of the polyol pathway in the initiation of the disease process. Population-based studies have greatly increased our knowledge concerning the association between diabetes and cataract formation and have defined risk factors for the development of cataract. Diabetic patients also have a higher risk of complications after phacoemulsification cataract surgery compared to nondiabetics. Aldose-reductase inhibitors and antioxidants have been proven beneficial in the prevention or treatment of this sightthreatening condition in in vitro and in vivo experimental studies. This paper provides an overview of the pathogenesis of diabetic cataract, clinical studies investigating the association between diabetes and cataract development, and current treatment of cataract in diabetics. Worldwide more than 285 million people are affected by diabetes mellitus. This number is expected to increase to 439 million by 2030 according to the International Diabetes Federation. A frequent complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cataracts

Diabetes And Cataracts

If you have diabetes mellitus, there are many important reasons to follow your doctor's orders about diet and blood sugar control. One of those reasons: avoiding cataracts. People with diabetes are more likely to develop vision-stealing cataracts compared to non-diabetics. Cataract is a condition where the eye's naturally clear lens becomes cloudy, or opaque. Light doesn't pass through the lens as it should and isn't properly reflected onto the retina (the light-sensitive tissue lining the back of the eye). As a result, vision becomes cloudy, distorted or blurry. Usually, cataracts are associated with age-related changes in the eye, though other factors, such as medication, surgery, sun exposure and disease also play a role in cataract development. In addition to speeding up cataract development in adults, diabetes leads to early cataract formation in younger people as well. So how does diabetes lead to cataract? It's all about the sugar—or glucose. The eye's lens gets its nutrients from aqueous humor, fluid filling the front portion of the eye. Aqueous humor provides oxygen and glucose, a simple sugar energy source for the body's cells. When you don't have good control over your glucose levels (as with unchecked diabetes), sugar levels rise in the aqueous humor and in the lens. High levels of glucose in the lens cause it to swell, affecting clarity of vision. The lens also has an enzyme that converts glucose to a substance called sorbitol. When sorbitol collects in the lens, it can affect cells and naturally-occurring proteins, causing the lens to become less clear and more opaque. This condition eventually leads to cataract formation, making the world around you appear blurry, yellowish or faded, and increasing glare. What can you do to prevent cataracts? If you hav Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Cataract: Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, And Treatment

What Is Diabetic Cataract: Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, And Treatment

What Is Diabetic Cataract: Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, and Treatment Cataracts are one of the most common vision-related complications of uncontrolled diabetes along with glaucoma and retinopathy . A cataract is the clouding of the eyes lens. Diabetes, on the other hand, is a life-long disease that compromises the bodys ability to produce or effectively respond to the hormone insulin, resulting in high levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. A person with uncontrolled diabetes has an increased risk of cataract because high levels of blood glucose can cause the eye lens to swell. Diabetes can also cause a substance called sorbitol to collect in the eye, which can also make the lens less clear and more opaque. Although people with diabetes have an increased risk of developing vision-related problems, they can avoid or prevent cataract from occurring. They can do this by working closely with an endocrinologist (a doctor specialising in diagnosing and treating diseases and disorders of the endocrine system including diabetes mellitus) to control their blood glucose levels and undergoing regular eye check with an ophthalmologist. If diabetes is not properly controlled and the cataract is left untreated, it can lead to the continual loss of vision and total blindness. Diabetes is a term that refers to a group of metabolic diseases characterised by high levels of blood glucose. The disease has two main types, which are classified based on what is causing them. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder that occurs when the bodys immune system attacks the pancreas beta cells that produce insulin, a hormone that enables the body to efficiently use and store sugar. Without the beta cells, glucose cannot be moved out from the bloodstream and into the bodys cells. Type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Cataract

Cataract

Change in Cataract Prevalence for People Age 40 and Older Cataract is a clouding of the eye's naturally clear lens. Most cataracts appear with advancing age. The exact cause of cataract is unclear, but it may be the result of a lifetime of exposure to ultraviolet radiation contained in sunlight, or may be related to other lifestyle factors such as cigarette smoking, diet and alcohol consumption. Cataract can also occur at any age as a result of other causes such as eye injury, exposure to toxic substances or radiation, or as a result of other diseases such as diabetes. Congenital cataracts may even be present at birth due to genetic defects or developmental problems. Cataracts in infants may also result from exposure to diseases such as rubella during pregnancy. According to the World Health Organization, cataract is the leading cause of blindness in the world. In the United States, cataract is sometimes considered a conquered disease because treatment is widely available that can eliminate vision loss due to the disease. However, cataract still accounts for a significant amount of vision impairment in the U.S., particularly in older people who may have difficulty accessing appropriate eye care due to cost, availability or other barriers. Treatment of cataract involves removal of the clouded natural lens. The lens is usually replaced with an artificial intraocular lens (IOL) implant. Cataract removal is now one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures with more than a million such surgeries performed each year. Surgery is not truly a cure for cataract, however, and its success in controlling vision loss comes with a price. It is estimated that the direct annual medical costs for outpatient, inpatient and prescription drug services related to the treatment of Continue reading >>

Cataracts | Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, And Prevention

Cataracts | Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, And Prevention

If youre over 60 and your vision has gotten blurry or cloudy, you may have cataracts . Its a common condition in older adults, and it can be treated by your eye doctor. You develop them when protein builds up in the lens of your eye and makes it cloudy. This keeps light from passing through clearly. It can cause you to lose some of your eyesight . There are different types of cataracts . They include: Age-related. These form as you get older. Congenital. This is what doctors call it when babies are born with cataracts . They may be caused by infection, injury, or poor development in the womb. Or, they can form in childhood. Secondary. These happen as a result of other medical conditions, like diabetes . They can also result from being around toxic substances, ultraviolet light, or radiation, or from taking medicines such as corticosteroids or diuretics . Traumatic. These form after an injury to the eye . Other things that can raise your chances of getting cataracts include cigarette smoke, air pollution, and heavy drinking. Cataracts usually form slowly. You may not know you have them until they start to block light. Then you might notice: Vision thats cloudy, blurry, foggy, or filmy Trouble with eyeglasses or contact lenses not working well Your eye doctor will give you an exam to test how well you can see. Hell also dilate your pupil to check the lens and other parts of the eye. Remember to bring your glasses or contacts to the appointment. If your vision can be corrected with glasses or contacts, your doctor will give you a prescription. If it cant, and cataracts are a problem in your daily life, you may need cataract surgery. Its done on an outpatient basis, meaning youll go home the same day, and its usually very successful. The surgeon will remove your lens and r Continue reading >>

Diabetic Cataract—pathogenesis, Epidemiology And Treatment

Diabetic Cataract—pathogenesis, Epidemiology And Treatment

Journal of Ophthalmology Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 608751, 8 pages Department of Ophthalmology and Optometry, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna, Austria Academic Editor: Mark Petrash Copyright © 2010 Andreas Pollreisz and Ursula Schmidt-Erfurth. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract Cataract in diabetic patients is a major cause of blindness in developed and developing countries. The pathogenesis of diabetic cataract development is still not fully understood. Recent basic research studies have emphasized the role of the polyol pathway in the initiation of the disease process. Population-based studies have greatly increased our knowledge concerning the association between diabetes and cataract formation and have defined risk factors for the development of cataract. Diabetic patients also have a higher risk of complications after phacoemulsification cataract surgery compared to nondiabetics. Aldose-reductase inhibitors and antioxidants have been proven beneficial in the prevention or treatment of this sightthreatening condition in in vitro and in vivo experimental studies. This paper provides an overview of the pathogenesis of diabetic cataract, clinical studies investigating the association between diabetes and cataract development, and current treatment of cataract in diabetics. 1. Introduction Worldwide more than 285 million people are affected by diabetes mellitus. This number is expected to increase to 439 million by 2030 according to the International Diabetes Federation. A frequent complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is diabetic re Continue reading >>

Cataract - Wikipedia

Cataract - Wikipedia

For other uses, see Cataract (disambiguation) . A cataract is a clouding of the lens in the eye which leads to a decrease in vision . [1] Cataracts often develop slowly and can affect one or both eyes. [1] Symptoms may include faded colors, blurry vision, halos around light, trouble with bright lights, and trouble seeing at night. [1] This may result in trouble driving, reading, or recognizing faces. [6] Poor vision caused by cataracts may also result in an increased risk of falling and depression . [2] Cataracts are the cause of half of blindness and 33% of visual impairment worldwide. [3] [7] Cataracts are most commonly due to aging but may also occur due to trauma or radiation exposure, be present from birth , or occur following eye surgery for other problems. [1] [4] Risk factors include diabetes , smoking tobacco , prolonged exposure to sunlight , and alcohol. [1] Either clumps of protein or yellow-brown pigment may be deposited in the lens reducing the transmission of light to the retina at the back of the eye. [1] Diagnosis is by an eye examination . [1] Prevention includes wearing sunglasses and not smoking. [1] Early on the symptoms may be improved with glasses . [1] If this does not help, surgery to remove the cloudy lens and replace it with an artificial lens is the only effective treatment. [1] Surgery is needed only if the cataracts are causing problems and generally results in an improved quality of life . [1] [8] Cataract surgery is not readily available in many countries, which is especially true for women, those living in rural areas, and those who do not know how to read. [4] [9] About 20 million people are blind due to cataracts. [4] It is the cause of approximately 5% of blindness in the United States and nearly 60% of blindness in parts of Africa a Continue reading >>

Cataracts In Diabetes

Cataracts In Diabetes

What you can do Controlling diabetes The operation Bupa factsheet macula oedema higher risk of infections Cataracts Normally light enters the eye from the front, passes through a clear lens, and reaches the back of the eye so you can see. If the lens becomes cloudy like frosted glass, light cannot pass through, and you cannot see properly. 'Cataract' is the name of the 'cloudy' human lens. Think of a camera, with a lens that bends the light so that the light 'focuses' onto the film at the back. If this lens becomes scratched or greasy, it cannot bend the light in the correct direction, and the light is scattered in all directions. You may notice blurred or mis ty sight, see double, or notice colours appear much duller than they did previously. bottom: a cloudy lens = a cataract. Light entering the eye is scattered What you can do A cataract will not damage your eye in any way. It can be operated on safely at any time, thick or thin. A cataract may change the focusing in the eye, and you may need new spectacles now and again. If you think you do, ask your optician or the doctor in the hospital eye clinic. But glasses themselves do not help you see better if you have a cataract. Some cataracts get worse quickly, others slowly: most do get worse over months or years. If your sight gets worse very slowly, the cataract is only slowly becoming thick. The thicker or cloudier the cataract becomes, the worse the sight. A doctor cannot predict with certainty. Reading Large print is naturally much easier to read, and a magnifying glass may help (see Coping with poor vision). A good light may help, particularly an anglepoise light behind the shoulder. Stronger glasses that mean you can bring books closer to your eye to make reading easier, and an optician (optometrist) can advise y Continue reading >>

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