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Diabetic Cat Vomiting

Not Eating

Not Eating

When your cat refuses to eat, you need to call your veterinarian for an appointment immediately. Some causes for not eating (anorexia) are simple to treat, and others are more complex to identify. Either way, you need to call your veterinarian and have your cat examined. Fortunately, many conditions can have a positive outcome with timely and appropriate medical care. At the Examination Your veterinarian will ask you questions about what you have noticed regarding your cat’s loss of appetite. Have you recently changed the food your cat was used to eating? Have there been any major changes in your home, like the addition of a dog or another cat? Could this be frightening your cat and causing her not to feel comfortable to eat? Have there been changes in your cat’s urination or defecation lately? Were there any loose stools? Has your cat been drinking extra water? During the physical examination, your veterinarian will look for things that might be causing your cat’s lack of appetite. They will look in your cat’s mouth to see if there is any dental disease which might cause your cat to not want to eat. They will take your cat’s temperature to see if your cat has a fever and perhaps has an infection, also leading to a lack of appetite. Often samples of blood, urine, and stool are examined to help your veterinarian determine the cause for the decreased appetite. Your veterinarian may need to do further diagnostic tests like x-rays or an abdominal ultrasound to be able to see why your cat is not eating. Possible Diseases as the Cause Kidney Disease – when the kidneys stop working well. As your cat ages, the risk of kidney disease increases. Kidney disease can also be caused by eating poisonous substances, such as certain plants (e.g. lilies or plants of the Liliu Continue reading >>

4 Signs Of An Impending Diabetic Pet Emergency

4 Signs Of An Impending Diabetic Pet Emergency

Caring for a diabetic pet can be challenging, but there are certain precautions pet owners can take to prevent a diabetic emergency like hypoglycemia. Preventing a health crisis in a dog or cat with diabetes involves employing a consistent daily routine involving diet, exercise, insulin therapy, and supplementation. It also involves avoiding any and all unnecessary vaccinations. Even the most diligent pet parent can find himself facing a diabetic emergency with a dog or cat. Hypoglycemia is the most common health crisis, and is usually the result of an inadvertent overdose of insulin. Symptoms of hypoglycemia can appear suddenly and include lethargy or restlessness, anxiety or other behavioral changes, muscle weakness or twitching, seizures, coma, and death. At-home treatment for a diabetic pet with hypoglycemia is determined by whether or not the animal is alert. Signs of other potential impending diabetic emergencies include ketones in the urine; straining to urinate or bloody urine; vomiting or diarrhea; or a complete loss of appetite or reduced appetite for several days. By Dr. Becker Caring for a diabetic pet can be quite complex and time consuming. It involves regular monitoring of blood glucose levels, making necessary dietary adjustments, giving insulin injections or oral medications, and keeping a careful eye on your pet at all times. Frequent veterinary visits are the norm for dogs and cats with diabetes, as are the costs associated with checkups, tests, medical procedures, and insulin therapy. And unlike humans with the disease, our pets can’t tell us how they’re feeling or help in their own treatment and recovery. Preventing Diabetic Emergencies The key to preventing diabetic emergencies with a pet involves implementing a consistent daily routine and sti Continue reading >>

Feline Diabetes | Cornell University College Of Veterinary Medicine

Feline Diabetes | Cornell University College Of Veterinary Medicine

Avoiding inducing inappropriately low blood glucose levels with therapy Cats with diabetes are most often treated with injectable insulin. Oral drugs for humans (hypoglycemic medications) such as glipizide rarely work in controlling diabetes in cats. Insulin injection (see Figure 1) can be taught to most owners and, with a bit of experience, both owners and cats usually adapt to these injections very well. There are a variety of insulin preparations available, and each works for a different duration and has different effects on the ups and downs of blood glucose. Ideally, your veterinarian will perform a 12-24 hour glucose curve, during which insulin is administered intermittently and blood glucose is measured to establish the type of insulin and dosing frequency that best controls blood glucose while avoiding inappropriately low blood glucose levels (hypoglycemia). Your veterinarian may recommend feeding your cat a diet restricted in carbohydrates, which has been shown to improve control of blood glucose levels. When it comes to diet, its important to help your cat combat the weight loss that often occurs as a result of this disease. In diabetic cats that are underweight, this often means feeding multiple meals per day or allowing access to food at all times. If your cat is overweight, however, work with your veterinarian to institute a weight loss program, as managed weight loss in overweight diabetic cats will likely help the cat maintain steadier glucose levels. The optimal timing of meals for diabetic cats is controversial. Many veterinarians recommend feeding at the time of insulin injection to avoid a dangerous drop in blood glucose levels. However, there is no definitive evidence that the timing or frequency of meals in diabetic cats protects them from insulin- Continue reading >>

Feline Diabetes: Symptoms, Treatments, Prevention, And Diet Tips

Feline Diabetes: Symptoms, Treatments, Prevention, And Diet Tips

An alarming number of cats are developing diabetes mellitus, which is the inability to produce enough insulin to balance blood sugar, or glucose, levels . Left untreated, it can lead to weight loss, loss of appetite, vomiting , dehydration, severe depression, problems with motor function, coma, and even death. To find out why so many cats are being diagnosed with diabetes, and what owners can do, WebMD talked to Thomas Graves, a former feline practitioner who is associate professor and section head of small animal medicine at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine. Graves’ research focus is on diabetes and geriatric medicine. Q: How common is feline diabetes? A: The true incidence isn’t known, but it’s estimated at 0.5% to 2% of the feline population. But it’s also probably under diagnosed. Q: What are the signs of diabetes in cats? A: The main symptoms are increased thirst and increased urination. And while we do see it in cats with appropriate body weight, it’s more common in obese cats. Some cats with diabetes have a ravenous appetite because their bodies cannot use the fuel supplied in their diet. Q: What’s the treatment for a cat with feline diabetes? A: Diet is certainly a component. It’s felt that a low-carbohydrate diet is probably best for cats with diabetes. Treatment is insulin therapy. There are some oral medications, but they have more side effects and are mainly used when insulin can’t be used for some reason. There are blood and urine tests, physical examinations, and behavioral signals, which are used to establish insulin therapy. This is done in conjunction with your veterinarian. We don’t recommend owners adjust insulin therapy on their own because it can be sort of complicated in cats. Most patients come in every t Continue reading >>

Vomiting In Diabetic Cats

Vomiting In Diabetic Cats

It’s not difficult to recognize the more common diabetes symptoms in cats. They drink a lot of water, urinate more frequently and lose weight. Treatment of diabetes involves regular injections of insulin to keep blood glucose levels within normal limits. Vomiting isn’t one of the most common feline symptoms of this disease. Having said that, if a cat is being treated for feline diabetes, vomiting is definitely something to watch out for. It can indicate that their blood glucose is not being well controlled, and they may be developing diabetic ketoacidosis. This is a potentially fatal condition that needs urgent veterinary treatment. However, if a diabetic cat starts throwing up, it doesn’t necessarily mean that their diabetes is worsening. Other symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis to look for are increased thirst, loss of appetite and extreme lethargy. Another reason for diabetic vomiting in cats is pancreatitis. This condition can be hard to diagnose in our feline family members but should always be considered when cat vomiting in a diabetic pet becomes a problem. Some veterinarians believe that up to one half of all cases of diabetes in cats are accompanied by a low grade chronic inflammation of the pancreas. When they have a flare up, it can reduce their appetite and make them vomit. They need to be closely monitored until they recover because the change in their food intake will affect the amount of insulin they need. Don’t forget that there are many other cat vomiting causes that are totally unrelated to diabetes. Some examples include gastroenteritis, kidney disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Because a diabetic cat has an underlying chronic medical condition, any illness will need a thorough investigation including comprehensive blood tests and possibly Continue reading >>

Is Your Cat In A Diabetic Coma?

Is Your Cat In A Diabetic Coma?

Cats with diabetes need continuous care. Unlike diabetic humans who can check their own blood sugar levels, cats rely on their owners to properly monitor what's happening in their pancreas. That twice-daily dosage of insulin given under his skin may require adjustment, depending on a variety of factors. You can keep your diabetic cat on track by knowing what's going on, and what to expect, particularly in the case of a diabetic coma. How common is feline diabetes? Some estimates suggest that one out of 1,200 cats will develop diabetes in their lifetimes, although this disease most often afflicts older or overweight cats. A diabetic cat suffers a deficiency of insulin, the pancreatic hormone that converts glucose, the fuel we get from food, into energy. A diabetic cat's body either cannot produce enough insulin, or cannot process it correctly. Without insulin controlling the flow of glucose from the cat's bloodstream into its body cells, the cat's body uses its own fat and protein to survive. High blood glucose levels force glucose to be processed into the urine, leading to excessive urination. Most cats contract an insulin-dependent type of diabetes, requiring insulin injections to control their illness. Felines suffering non-insulin-dependent diabetes will eventually need insulin injections as the disease progresses. Signs of diabetes An early warning of feline diabetes is frequent urination. A diabetic cat may also urinate, or attempt to do so, outside of his litter box. You may see him straining to urinate, a symptom of a urinary tract infection common to diabetic felines. He'll consume larger amounts of water, and return to his water bowl more often, because his glucose-heavy urine passes more water from his system. His appetite may change, too, as he either loses i Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia In Non-diabetic Cats

Hypoglycemia In Non-diabetic Cats

If your kitty has hypoglycemia, it means her blood sugar has dropped so low she is having neurological symptoms because her brain isn't getting enough fuel. Hypoglycemia is a symptom, not a disease, and is almost always related to diabetes. But even if your cat isn't diabetic, hypoglycemia in a kitty is always a medical emergency. Copious Vomiting Your non-diabetic cat can have an episode of hypoglycemia if she has an insulin spike. The most common cause of natural insulin spikes is excessive vomiting following a meal. Your kitty's pancreas naturally releases insulin at mealtime to break down her food. When the food comes back up, the excess insulin causes a sudden blood glucose drop. In this case, you'll have to find and treat the cause of vomiting after you stabilize her blood sugar levels. Anorexia Anorexia doesn't mean your kitty's starving herself to fit into that prom dress. In animals, anorexia refers to any refusal to eat for a prolonged period, regardless of the cause. Parasites, bacterial and viral infections, tumors, organ diseases, pain and stress can all cause anorexia. Hypoglycemia can result directly from your kitty's anorexia -- her body simply uses up all its fuel -- or it can be the result of anorexia-induced liver damage. Loss of fuel kills off liver cells, which screws up blood insulin levels, resulting in screwed up levels of glucose. Infections and Tumors Liver and pancreas diseases are major culprits when it comes to hypoglycemia in non-diabetic cats. Any infection or toxin-related damage to these organs can cause an insulin spike and glucose plummet. If your kitty has been accidentally exposed to any poisons or a medication overdose right before a hypoglycemic episode, suspect liver damage. If she's vomiting bile (yellow or green slime), suspect Continue reading >>

The Signs, Diagnosis & Types Of Diabetes Mellitus In Cats

The Signs, Diagnosis & Types Of Diabetes Mellitus In Cats

Share with us any comments or suggestions, to help us build the best service for you and your pet Download our free app today and access verified vets, trainers, nutritionists and other pet experts anywhere, anytime The Signs, Diagnosis & Types of Diabetes Mellitus in Cats There are certain signs or symptoms which are commonly seen in cats with diabetes mellitus. Unfortunately, these signs also occur in other diseases and conditions. Therefore, laboratory tests are necessary to diagnose diabetes mellitus in cats. The following article includes a discussion of how this diagnosis is made and the types of diabetes found in cats. What are the signs of diabetes mellitus in cats and why do they occur? Depending on how severely insulin production is impaired, there may be few signs of disease, or the signs may be severe. Dogs with diabetes often develop cataracts ; cats do not. The most common signs of diabetes are: Increased thirst (polydipsia) and urination (polyuria) Because the glucose cannot enter the cells, the glucose levels in the blood become abnormally high (hyperglycemia). The glucose is filtered out by the kidneys and is found in the urine (glucosuria). When it is filtered out, it carries water with it. The animal, then, is losing more water through the urine than normal and has to make up for it by drinking more. The increased urination may result in the cat not always urinating in the litter box. This inappropriate urination may be one of the first signs of diabetes in cats. In addition, cats with diabetes can often develop urinary tract infections, which may also result in inappropriate elimination. Some diabetic cats eat less, because frankly, they do not feel well. Other cats may have voracious appetites and eat a lot (polyphagia) because their hypothalamus k Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Cats

Diabetes In Cats

Diabetes Mellitus in Cats Diabetes in cats is most similar to type 2 diabetes in people: the blood sugar becomes elevated because the cat’s insulin is either ineffective or not produced in sufficient quantity. If not treated accordingly, it can become a life-threatening condition. Obese, middle-aged indoor male cats are most likely to develop diabetes, but it can happen to any cat at almost any age. There is the possibility that your cat will not need life-long insulin therapy, especially if diagnosed early and the blood sugar is stabilized quickly. What to Watch For Increased water consumption Increased urination, possibly urinating outside the litterbox Increased appetite (early stages) or loss of appetite (late stages) Weight loss Lethargy Vomiting Sometimes the cat will develop a plantigrade stance – that is, he will stand and walk with his hocks touching or nearly touching the ground. This is a form of diabetic neuropathy. If a diabetic cat goes untreated for long enough, it will develop ketoacidosis. Cats at this stage will not eat or drink, become dehydrated and more lethargic. Eventually they will slip into a coma and die if not treated immediately. Primary Cause of Diabetes in Cats The insulin produced by the cat is either insufficient or ineffective. Immediate Care It is important that you schedule an appointment with your veterinarian if you suspect you cat has diabetes. In the meantime, let him have all the water he wants. Diagnosing Diabetes in Cats After a physical exam and discussion of your cat’s symptoms, your veterinarian will take blood and urine samples for testing. In addition to checking the glucose (sugar) levels in the blood and urine, your vet will be checking for evidence of other disease that have symptoms similar to diabetes, like kidne Continue reading >>

Your Cat And Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

Your Cat And Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetes is a very serious issue – and not just in people either. That’s right, this chronic and potentially debilitating condition also affects cats (and dogs). And while it’s difficult to know the exact incidence of diabetes in cats, best estimates put it somewhere in the range of 1 cat in every 100-200 cats will become diabetic. What’s even sadder is that this incidence seems to be on the increase. Fortunately, armed with some good information, important tips, and a good working relationship with your veterinarian, you can give your cats the best chance at avoiding this frustrating condition. And if they’ve already developed it, know that these same tools can help you best manage your cat’s diabetic state; avoiding the potential complications and perhaps even getting them into diabetic remission. What is diabetes? In the most basic sense, diabetes mellitus is a disorder where blood sugar, or glucose, cannot be effectively utilized and regulated within the body. There are several hormones within the body that play important roles in glucose metabolism. Insulin is one of the most important, if not the most important, and it’s the hormone most central to the development and control of the diabetic state. Glucose fuels the body and insulin is the hormone that helps to get it into most cells within the body. Diabetes is often easily diagnosed and controllable. However, when undiagnosed or poorly managed, diabetes can be devastating. Diabetes can absolutely be managed and your cat can still lead a long and happy life. Routine veterinary care and evaluation are important, as is achieving and maintaining an appropriate weight in your cat and feeding him an appropriate diet. There are two types of diabetes – Type I and Type II. In Type I diabetes, the pancreas Continue reading >>

Preventing And Handling Diabetic Emergencies

Preventing And Handling Diabetic Emergencies

Caring for a pet with diabetes can be daunting. Fortunately, the key to successful diabetes management is simple: a consistent, established daily routine. A healthy diet is essential, and feeding your pet the same amount of food at the same time every day will help make blood sugar easiest to control. Your pet will usually also need twice-daily insulin injections, which should be given at the same time every day. (The easiest way to do this is to coordinate shots with mealtimes.) Routine daily exercise and regular at-home monitoring of urine and/or blood sugar round out a plan for good diabetic regulation. Even if you are following a consistent routine, a diabetic pet may occasionally experience an emergency. A number of different things can cause an emergency, but the most common is hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. In this case, it is important that you be prepared in order to avoid a life-threatening situation. Hypoglycemia: Why It Happens Hypoglycemia most often results from accidental overdosage of insulin, but it can also occur if a pet is not eating well, misses a meal or vomits after eating, or if the type and amount of food he is being fed changes. Hypoglycemia may become a problem with very vigorous exercise; for this reason, regular daily controlled exercise is best. Hypoglycemia can also result if the body’s need for insulin changes. This scenario is particularly common in cats who often return to a non-diabetic state once an appropriate diet and insulin therapy start. Vet Tips Avoid “double-dosing” insulin. Only one person in a household should have the responsibility of giving insulin. A daily log should be kept of the time/amount of food and insulin that is given to avoid errors. Proper daily monitoring of blood and/or urine glucose can help identif Continue reading >>

What To Do With Insulin When Your Diabetic Pet Is Vomiting Or Not Eating

What To Do With Insulin When Your Diabetic Pet Is Vomiting Or Not Eating

Once you have your diabetic pet regulated on insulin it’s smooth sailing, right? Well, not necessarily. Even a well-regulated diabetic doggie may mischievously get into the trash and subsequently vomit. Or Fluffy might toss up a random hair ball. Just because your pet is diabetic doesn’t mean it can’t have a dietary indiscretion or gastroenteritis the same as non-diabetic pets! Even if you are new to having a diabetic pet, if you understand the basics of diabetes (most importantly that insulin drops the blood sugar levels) you can work your way through a short-term treatment plan. You know that insulin allows sugar (from the food we eat) to enter our cells. Without food, giving the usual dose of insulin could drop the blood glucose to dangerously low levels. However, if the blood glucose is still quite elevated, you might consider giving a lesser dose of insulin even if a diabetic won’t eat. You know your pet… Some have a sensitive stomach whereas others might have the constitution as sturdy as a goat. Some have ravenous appetites whereas other pets may be finicky. None of us have a crystal ball when it comes to predicting if a pet will vomit more. Not eating and vomiting are both situations that put us in the same boat in regards to insulin dosing. No food in the tummy means there is nothing for the insulin to utilize. Of course, vomiting is worse than simply not eating because we don’t know why the pet is nauseous nor if there will be more vomiting to follow. Not eating may simply be that a pet isn’t hungry. Obviously you need a good relationship with your veterinarian to help you work through contingency plans for these situations, but I want you to understand in general what we might do. Of course making choices to alter the insulin dose mandates that Continue reading >>

My Cat Is Diabetic. He Keeps Throwing Up. He Is Alos ...

My Cat Is Diabetic. He Keeps Throwing Up. He Is Alos ...

Thanks for the additional information, At this point it is highly recommended that he is reevaluated by a vet. At the very least, I would see that a general bloodwork panel is done. Not only would this check his glucose level (to make sure he is still managed) but also check the function of his liver and kidneys. Any food change will alter the glucose intake and thus could change his status and insulin needs. If he vomits his food prior to his injection he would need to skip that injection and if he vomited after the injection, may require glucose intake to keep his levels from falling dangerously low. If the food change, vomiting, refusal to eat all resulted at the same time and as a direct result of each other, it could be a sign that something else is going on in the body. If his demeanor is different, weak, slow, clumsy, extremely lethargic, dehydrated (skin does not bounce back immediately when pulled up in between shoulder blades), etc, I would have him seen tonight by a veterinarian. Otherwise, I would have him seen before the weekend to be checked for more serious conditions. If he vomits before then, I would restrict water for an hour after vomiting and then only offer a small amount of room temperature water. Drinking too much can elicit vomiting and it is important to determine if he is able to hold down water or not. Small amounts should not be vomited (1-2 teaspoons at a time wait 30 minutes in between) and if they are, he will need immediate care. Hope this helps. Please let me know if you need additional information. Best wishes, Amy At this point it is more important that he eats rather than what he eats. If he does not appear interested in his normal diet, you could try the baby food. Keep in mind that vomiting can be a sign of the glucose level falling Continue reading >>

Diabetic Remission In Cats

Diabetic Remission In Cats

To grasp diabetic remission in cats, it helps to have an understanding of feline diabetes, so here is a quick review. Diabetes is a complex disease involving a hormone called insulin. When a cat does not make enough insulin or cannot properly use the insulin it does make, diabetes results. Why is insulin important? Insulin keeps the body’s engine working properly. The body is like a well-tuned machine and needs fuel to run properly. The fuel for a cat is food that contains fats, carbohydrates, and proteins. But this fuel needs to be broken down into smaller parts that the body can utilize. One of these usable fuel components is glucose. Without glucose, the body’s engine stalls. Glucose must enter the body’s individual cells to keep the engine running. That is where insulin comes in to play. Insulin regulates the flow of glucose from the blood stream into the cells where it is needed to sustain life. When there is not enough insulin produced by the pancreas, or the cat does not use it effectively, glucose cannot enter the cells and high levels of glucose build up in the bloodstream. This condition is called diabetes. "The common signs of diabetes include increases in appetite, water consumption, and urination, along with weight loss." Without insulin to steer glucose into the cells, the cat's body looks for alternative sources of fuel and breaks down reserves of fat and protein stored in the body. Fueling the body is not efficient without the insulin/glucose team, so the cat loses weight despite eating more. Meanwhile, the accumulation of glucose in the blood stream is eliminated in the urine. The cat urinates more which makes him thirsty and he drinks more water. The common signs of diabetes include increases in appetite, water consumption, and urination, along w Continue reading >>

Diabetic Cat With Loose Stool

Diabetic Cat With Loose Stool

House Cat image by phizics from Fotolia.com Cats are genetically predisposed to consuming high protein and low carbohydrates, but if they eat processed cat foods high in carbohydrates, they may become diabetic, which means they are unable to produce enough insulin to balance blood sugar and glucose levels. High glucose levels can contribute to dehydration, frequent urination and loose stools. Diabetes can be easily managed in felines, but it is important to know the right way to maintain your cat's health. Loose stool (diarrhea) in your cat can result from poor diabetic treatment and monitoring. According to Cornell University, "Diabetes will shorten a cat's lifespan. A dangerous, sometimes fatal condition called ketoacidosis may develop, indicated by loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, weakness, dehydration, and breathing abnormalities." Along with excessive urination, loose stool in diabetic cats develops from hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar levels, which will begin to turn excess sugar into glucosuria. When glucosuria builds up in the blood stream, the cat's body responds by flushing it out in urine and runny stool. Feline diabetes can be controlled and treated with a well-monitored diet plan. Cats need a diet high in fiber and low in sugar (carbohydrates) to maintain proper insulin levels and to decrease digestion problems associated with diabetes. Insulin, a hormone produced in the pancreas, is responsible for regulating sugar levels. When insulin is deficient, the cat's body starts breaking down fat and protein and, instead of storing it, uses it for an alternative energy source. As a result, a feline can develop a ravenous appetite and have frequent urination and loose stool. To correct poor insulin levels, diabetic cats require insulin injections Continue reading >>

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