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Diabetic Cat Food

Feline Diabetes- Treatment And Prevention In Cats

Feline Diabetes- Treatment And Prevention In Cats

Warning: Before reading even the first sentence of this webpage, you must commit to reading past the STOP sign below . The first section of this paper discusses the detrimental impact of dietary carbohydrates on the blood glucose balance and insulin response of cats as a species with pre-diabetic and diabetic patients being especially susceptible to the negative effects of high carbohydrate diets. However, if your cat is receiving insulin and you switch to a low carb diet without lowering the insulin dosage you will be putting your cat at significant risk for a hypoglycemic crisis. This is discussed under the STOP sign section below. I receive many emails each week asking for food recommendations for diabetic cats. Answers: 1) NO DRY FOOD but see Tips for Transitioning Dry Food Addicts to Canned Food if you are dealing with a dry food addict. All cats can be transitioned to an appropriate diet (no dry food) if the owner is patient enough. 2) See Cat Food Composition chart and stay below 10% carbohydrate calories (the third column). There are many suitable low carbohydrate choices available depending on your cats preference and your budget. Many cats do well on Friskies Classic Pates and Fancy Feast. Stay away from food with gravy they are high in carbohydrates. The same is true for most food with sauces. Higher protein/lower fat is also the goal. However, you will note that most commercial foods are low in protein and high in fat. Why? Because protein is expensive and fat is cheap This is one of many reasons why I make my own cat food . 3) See Commercial Foods when you are ready to learn more about evaluating pet foods. Cats are obligate carnivores and are designed to eat other animals (meat, organs, etc.) not grains and vegetables which only serve to enhance the profi Continue reading >>

10 Good Things About Owning A Diabetic Cat

10 Good Things About Owning A Diabetic Cat

Many people hear the news their cat is a diabetic and they think it’s a death sentence. This is not true. Don’t panic. On the positive side: 1. It’s a treatable disease. A diagnosis of diabetes means your cat can get treatment. When an older cat is presented to me with the common symptoms of drinking lots of water, urinating tons and losing weight, a diagnosis of diabetes can actually be good news. It’s often better news than kidney or liver failure in many cases. If your cat seems very thirsty, this is not normal. Get the cat to the vet. Early intervention with diabetes, as with so many other diseases, gives your cat the best chance of a better life, and possible remission. 2. Sometimes diabetes is reversible; it goes away. With proper diet and the correct insulin therapy, a significant number of cats can go into remission, or have their diabetes reversed. We don’t completely understand this, but we are getting better treatment results with low-carb/high-protein diets and early insulin intervention. Diabetes is more common in male cats, and the statistics show that males have a slightly better chance of reversing their diabetes. 3. Better diets are helping diabetics live healthier lives. A poor diet may have brought on your cat’s diabetes in the first place. Now it’s time to get back on the right track. Most experts recommend a diet with about 7 percent carb content. Fancy Feast Chunky Chicken or Turkey is a good choice for a diabetic. Friskies and 9 Lives have some options too. Evo95 Duck or Venison is great protein, low in carbs. Some of these “regular” cat foods are probably better than the prescription diets, in my opinion. If your cat is addicted to dry foods, the Evo dry diets are probably the best. I still wish you could convert Mr. Mug to a we Continue reading >>

Homemade Diabetic Cat Food

Homemade Diabetic Cat Food

When your furry feline is diagnosed with diabetes you want to do as much as you can to help him get healthy again. This can include home-making your cat's food in an attempt to give him the best quality possible, but that might not be as simple as it sounds. A Difficult Balancing Act The specialized needs of diabetic cats make balanced nutrition more crucial for them than for healthy cats. When putting together a homemade diet it's easy to overlook one or more aspects that can cause a deficiency that then leads to more health problems. If you decide that homemade meals are the best option for your diabetic kitty, commit to being thorough and spending the time it will take to do it right. Remember that cats need taurine as part of a healthy diet in addition to vitamins A and E, fatty acids and niacin, all of which a cat can easily become deficient in. Too much of certain ingredients can be harmful, too. All meat or all fish diets can cause steatitis, mineral imbalances and even hyperthyroidism. Protein A homemade food high in protein from chicken is the best bet for your diabetic cat. Some people advocate a raw meat diet for cats, and although that would be a step in the high protein direction, there is a chance that your cat will become ill from eating raw meat. When including chicken or any meat as a protein source in your cat's homemade meals, always cook it thoroughly before feeding it to her. If it's cooked to the point that you would feel safe eating it, then it's cooked enough for your kitty. Minimal Carbs Carbohydrates can easily be turned to sugar in your cat's system and are often the culprits that lead to obesity and diabetes. Cats don't naturally need a lot of carbs to maintain health; a modest 8 percent or less is all that is necessary for your cat's homemad Continue reading >>

Recommended Canned Food For Diabetic Cats

Recommended Canned Food For Diabetic Cats

For a diabetic cat, a high-protein, all-wet diet could make the difference between going into remission or being on insulin for life. While many veterinarians believe any kind of wet food is better than dry food, there are some guidelines to consider when choosing canned food for your diabetic cat. Canned foods with "sauce" or "gravy" tend to be high in carbs and can cause your cat's blood sugar to skyrocket. While canned food that combines chicken or fish with rice sounds good to human guardians, cats don't use the protein in rice efficiently, and it, too, can make your diabetic cat's blood sugar climb. There's no point in buying "holistic" canned food if your cat refuses to eat it. Many diabetic cats thrive on such supermarket brands as Fancy Feast and Friskies. Chicken, turkey or fish should be listed first on canned cat food labels. If the first ingredient is "meat by-products," choose another brand. Also watch for cane sugar, which is an ingredient in some commercial canned and pouch foods, and is not suitable for a diabetic cat. Veterinarian and author Elizabeth Hodgkins, D.V.M., J.D., says it's not necessary to feed diabetic cats prescription canned food, which is expensive and unpalatable to many cats. Such supermarket brands as Fancy Feast "can be used successfully to manage and cure the feline diabetic," Dr. Hodgkins says on her website (see Resources). Among the hundreds of members of the Feline Diabetes Message Board, the brands of canned food fed most often are Wellness, Fancy Feast, Friskies and commercial raw food (see Resources). Continue reading >>

Best Diabetic Cat Food

Best Diabetic Cat Food

The exact cause of diabetes in cats isn’t known but it seems to affect overweight and obese cats more than other cats. This is probably because being overweight makes the body less sensitive to insulin’s effects. Diabetes is also more likely to occur in older cats – which are also more likely to be overweight. Read Story If your cat is diagnosed with diabetes it is usually a frightening time for an owner. Symptoms typically include lethargy, increased urination, increased thirst, and loss of appetite. Your cat’s urine may be sticky to the touch because it literally contains sugar excreted from his body. Left untreated, diabetes can become life-threatening. However, many cats have diabetes and live long, happy lives with proper management. Following your vet’s diagnosis, you will probably have to give your cat regular doses of the hormone insulin to help control his condition. Feeding your cat a diet suited to his condition can also help manage his diabetes. Quick Look : Top 4 Best Diabetic Cat Foods Food Price Nutrition Rating You probably already know that cats require meat in their diets. They need more meat and protein than dogs and they are not as good at breaking down carbs and starches as dogs. This is even more true when it comes to diabetic cats. Their bodies have greater difficulty moving sugar/glucose from the bloodstream to distribute it to the cells in the body. This is why sugar builds up in the cat’s bloodstream and can become harmful. As you might guess, it makes sense to feed a diabetic cat a diet that has less starch in it so it won’t break down into more sugar/glucose. According to the latest research, diabetic cats can benefit from diets that are high in protein and fat and low in carbohydrates. Kitten foods (especially canned kitten foo Continue reading >>

Organic Cat Food For Diabetic Cats

Organic Cat Food For Diabetic Cats

The ideal food for a diabetic cat is rich in organic meat and low in carbs. These days, it seems that type 2 diabetes is such a widespread epidemic that even our pets aren't safe. If Fluffy has gotten a little too fluffy and developed diabetes as a result, a radical change in her diet can go a long way toward combating the disease. Cats, like humans, are prone to developing type 2 diabetes if they become overweight or have too many carbs in their diet. Type 2 diabetes is a combination of the pancreas losing its ability to secrete insulin, as well as cells becoming insulin resistant, which causes an excess amount of glucose in the bloodstream. The good news is that, unlike type 1 diabetes, type 2 can be controlled and even reversed with a healthy, diabetic-friendly diet designed to lower blood sugar. An organic, low-carb, high-protein diet is recommended for cats with type 2 diabetes. Consult with your veterinarian, who might be able to recommend a good brand or prescribe a special diabetic diet for your cat. Your vet also can help you develop a homemade raw diet using pure, organic animal proteins. When fed consistently, raw organic diets have been shown to almost completely reverse signs of diabetes in cats. If a raw diet isn't possible, look for high-quality, organic moist or semi-moist food that is high in protein and low in carbs. Whether you choose a homemade raw diet or organic store-bought or prescription food for your diabetic cat, it's important to make sure that her new diet is low in carbohydrates. Cats' bodies lack the necessary enzymes to process and utilize carbohydrates, including those high in fiber. Although fiber can be useful in reducing diabetes in both dogs and humans, it only exacerbates the problem in cats, who turn excess carbs into fat. For thi Continue reading >>

Feeding Tips For A Cat With Diabetes

Feeding Tips For A Cat With Diabetes

When Randy Frostig took his cat, Bill, to the veterinarian six years ago, he was seriously worried. “He was lethargic and he wasn’t eating, and his urine was sticking to his paws,” Frostig recalls. The diagnosis -- diabetes -- surprised Frostig. “I didn’t even know that a cat could have diabetes. I didn’t know what it meant,” he says. He was concerned about having to give his cat regular shots of insulin, and how the disease might affect his pet’s life. In reality, a diagnosis of feline diabetes is not a death sentence, and caring for a cat with the disease is far easier than Frostig had envisioned. “Giving him insulin is like brushing your teeth. It’s no big deal,” he says. Thanks to regular doses of insulin and a special diet, the gray tabby started acting more like his old self. “He was running around, and he gained his appetite again.” Why Do Cats Get Diabetes? Cats aren’t so different from people when it comes to diabetes. The disease affects insulin -- a hormone that helps the body move sugar (glucose) from the bloodstream into the cells. Feline diabetes tends to more closely resemble type 2 diabetes in humans, in which the body makes insulin but becomes less sensitive to the hormone. Sugar builds up in the bloodstream, leading to symptoms like increased urination and thirst. If it’s left untreated, eventually diabetes can lead to life-threatening complications. Although the exact cause of feline diabetes isn’t known, it’s more likely to affect overweight cats, because obesity makes the cat’s body less sensitive to the effects of insulin. Diabetes is also more common in older cats. Diseases like chronic pancreatitis and hyperthyroidism, as well as medications such as corticosteroids, may also make cats more prone to develop diab Continue reading >>

Does Dry Cat Food Really Cause Feline Diabetes

Does Dry Cat Food Really Cause Feline Diabetes

The link between food and feline diabetes is a subject that we’ve talked about before but it keeps coming up so I think it’s a good idea to revisit the subject. One of the concerns surrounding dry food is the carbohydrate content in the foods. Dry foods tend to have moderate to high levels of carbohydrates. Many sources on the internet will tell you that feeding dry foods that contain high levels of carbohydrates will cause your cat to develop diabetes. But is this true and what is the real relationship here? We know that feeding a high-protein low-carbohydrate diet can be effective for controlling the glycemic response in diabetic cats and many diabetic cats fed this type of diet will actually go into diabetic remission. Many people make the claim that since feeding these diets to a diabetic cat is beneficial, then feeding a healthy cat a high-protein low-carbohydrate diet should prevent diabetes. However, the situation is actually much more complex than that. In 2011, at the World Small Animal Veterinary Association World Congress, Claudia A. Kirk, DVM, PhD, DACVN, DACVIM presented a session entitled Cats and Carbohydrates – What is the Impact? These are some of the highlights of her presentation: Several studies have evaluated the potential role of carbohydrates in the pathogenesis of DM (diabetes mellitus) in cats. Summarizing key findings: An epidemiological study of cats from the Netherlands found indoor confinement and low physical activity and not amount of dry food were associated with DM. High carbohydrate intake was not considered a risk factor for feline DM. But recent reports from these investigators have suggested an association of high carbohydrate foods with calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Indoor confinement and physical inactivity rather than the pr Continue reading >>

An Appropriate Diet For A Diabetic Cat

An Appropriate Diet For A Diabetic Cat

Updated: Saturday, February 18, 2017 04:38 PM Published: Sunday, April 26, 2009 02:33 PM Feline diabetes is not the natural fate of hundreds of thousands of pet cats world-wide. It is, rather, a human-created disease that is reaching epidemic proportions because of the highly artificial foods that we have been feeding our feline companions for the past few decades. Without the constant feeding of highly processed, high carbohydrate dry foods, better suited to cattle than cats, adult-onset feline diabetes would be a rare disease, if it occurred at all. One of the questions that diabetic cat owners ask most frequently is, "what should I feed my cat?" It is an excellent question, because diet is the cornerstone of health for all cats, but especially the diabetic cat. As a result, there are many pages of recommendations written elsewhere about the nutrient composition of diets for diabetic cats. Unfortunately, great deal of this information is imprecise, at best. What we know about most pet foods, and what is published about the nutrient content of cat foods on other sites, is simply a compilation of information supplied by the pet food companies about their own products (this is because of the high cost of actually conducting independent laboratory tests on each food independently). This nutrient information is NOT the result of third-party testing of current "runs" of these foods produced by those companies. In fact, the information provided by pet food manufacturers is often years-old and hardly representative of the food you are planning to purchase at the supermarket or pet food warehouse today. Often enough, the formulation of the food you buy with has a very different ingredient composition from the food with that same name that was tested for publication months or Continue reading >>

Your Guide To The Very Best Diabetic Cat Food

Your Guide To The Very Best Diabetic Cat Food

If You Have A Diabetic Cat, Their Diet Is Very Important. Fortunately, You Can Help To Keep Them Healthy By Choosing The Best Diabetic Cat Food. In This Article We Take A Look At What Diabetes Means For Your Kitty. Helping You To Choose The Right Diabetic Cat Food For Your Precious Pet. Did you know that cats can get diabetes, just like humans? Its true, but as is the case with us humans, the good news is that most cases of diabetes mellitus can be treated and managed successfully. Of course, for any animal the ideal situation is to remain disease free. But when a diabetic condition is properly managed, cats can enjoy a normal lifespan. My adorable black tabby cat was diagnosed with diabetes 5 years ago. It was startling to hear that he had such a serious condition, but with medication and a diet recommended by his vet, Fuzzy is now doing fine. In fact hes going strong at 12 years old, and there seems to be no end in sight to his natural feline curiosity and enthusiasm for life. If your cat has been diagnosed with diabetes, you should know that there are things you can do to help manage her condition, including introducing diabetic cat food into her diet. Over 80% of diabetic cats are believed to have Type 2 diabetes which can require both medication and nutritional management. In many cases, diet alone can be an effective tool against diabetes, with many cats not requiring medication after switching to a low carbohydrate diet. Did you know that a diet high in carbohydrates increases blood glucose and insulin levels and as such may be a precursor to both obesity and diabetes in cats? This is why many experts view a low carbohydrate/high-protein diet as potentially helpful in preventing diabetes in cats. Particularly those at risk. This includes obese cats and/or feline Continue reading >>

Dont Sugar Coat It: The Best Diets For Cats With Diabetes

Dont Sugar Coat It: The Best Diets For Cats With Diabetes

in General , Pets with Health Conditions , Trending Topics in Pet Nutrition Diabetes is a common disease in cats that affects the ability to properly process sugar. Obesity is a big risk factor for diabetes in cats, but diabetes can also have other causes, such as pancreatitis and certain medications. With aggressive treatment using insulin and diet, it is possible for some cats to go into remission and no longer require insulin therapy. However, many cats require lifelong insulin treatment. In addition to insulin, nutrition plays a key role in the treatment of cats with diabetes. Nutritional Considerations for Cats with Diabetes Calories: Being overweight makes it more difficult to control cats blood sugar. Therefore, it is important to measure food and monitor your cats weight carefully. For overweight cats, measured food amounts and frequent weigh-ins are recommended to promote slow, safe weight loss. Weight loss can reduce a cats insulin needs, so careful monitoring is necessary. There are special veterinary diets marketed for cats with diabetes but, unfortunately, many of them, especially the dry diets, are very high in calories which can make it hard to lose weight or maintain ideal weight. Its important to talk to your veterinarian about the best diet for your cat. Carbohydrates: Lower carbohydrate diets may be beneficial for some cats with diabetes but the optimal amount and type of carbohydrate for diabetic cats is still unknown. Some diabetic cats also have other health problems, such as kidney disease, that may not be an ideal fit with low carbohydrate diets. Low carbohydrate diets, especially dry diets, are often very high in calories. For these reasons, simply choosing the lowest carbohydrate diet available may not be the best option for all diabetic cats. Continue reading >>

Will My Diabetic Cat Need Prescription Cat Food?

Will My Diabetic Cat Need Prescription Cat Food?

One of the biggest and most important factors when treating a diabetic cat is nutrition. Your cat will not only need a brand new diet, but they may need a prescription diet. Learn more here. Was your cat recently diagnosed with diabetes? Even if you’re just delving into the best strategies for managing this disease, you’ve probably gotten a sense of the importance of your cat’s diet to managing feline diabetes. Find out what you’ll need to know about prescription cat food, and tips for feeding your cat after this diagnosis. In general, a prescription diet is not always necessary after a cat’s diabetes diagnosis. It can, however, make feeding simpler. For some cats, even ones on a non-prescription diet that follows all the recommendations, it can be tough to regulate their glucose levels. And for you, it can be a challenge to figure out how ingredients are balanced. Prescription diets remove this guesswork and the need for research. Prescription cat food is more costly, though -- you can expect to pay around $40 to $50 for two dozen cans of wet food. When Not Using an Rx Diet: Go With Wet Cat Food If your cat is currently on a dry food diet, a diabetes diagnosis is a cue to switch them over to wet food. As well as helping to keep them hydrated, wet food generally has less carbohydrates and more protein. For diabetic cats, the right diet is low in carbohydrates and high in protein so wet food more often fits the bill. Remember: cats are carnivorous creatures, and thrive on meat-based foods, so a protein-focused diet is the best option. If you do have to switch your cat from one food to another, do it slowly, since cats deal poorly with dietary changes. Try serving smaller and smaller amounts of the original food, while mixing in larger and larger amounts of the Continue reading >>

Best Cat Food For Diabetic Cats

Best Cat Food For Diabetic Cats

Feline diabetes is deeply connected to diet. Dr. Elizabeth Hodgkins, cat nutrition expert and author of Your Cat: Simple New Secrets to a Longer, Stronger Life describes feline diabetes as a human-caused disease that kills cats. Dr. Hodgkins has a point. Diabetes is a menace among cats leading human-controlled lifestyles lifestyles that are entirely disconnected from their natural instincts and biological needs. Aside from a genetic predisposition to diabetes in Burmese cats, diabetes risk factors are largely environmental. The best candidate for feline diabetes is an overweight senior cat who spends his days lounging around indoors and munching on kitty cereal. Choosing the right diet is your only hope of curing your cats diabetes. In fact, most diabetic cats who leave behind a biologically inappropriate diet see significant reductions in their insulin requirements. A large group can go into remission and no longer need insulin injections whatsoever. The best time to clean up your cats diet is before they show symptoms of diabetes . The second best time is immediately after you start seeing these symptoms. As diabetes progresses, the pancreas may become exhausted and will no longer secrete any insulin at all. In this case, theres no hope of remission and insulin therapy is a life-long commitment. Fortunately for anyone trying to wean their cat off of the wrong food, diabetic cats usually have a ravenous appetite. While a healthy junk food addict might balk at a dietary change, hunger is often enough to force a diabetic cat to try something new. What is the best cat food for diabetic cats? The best food for diabetic cats honors your carnivorous cats natural dietary needs. If you ignore everything else in this article, remember this: a low-carbohydrate diet is essential Continue reading >>

Annabessacook Veterinary Clinic

Annabessacook Veterinary Clinic

_____________________________________________________________________________ There are two forms of diabetes in cats: diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus. Diabetes insipidus is a very rare disorder that results in failure to regulate body water content. Your cat has the more common type of diabetes, diabetes mellitus. This disease is seen on a fairly regular basis, usually in cats 5 years of age or older. Simply put, diabetes mellitus is a failure of the pancreas to regulate blood sugar. The pancreas is a small but vital organ that is located near the stomach. It has two significant populations of cells. One group of cells produces the enzymes necessary for proper digestion. The other group, called beta cells, produces the hormone called insulin. In cats, two types of diabetes mellitus have been discovered. Both types are similar in that there is a failure to regulate blood sugar, but the basic mechanisms of disease differ somewhat between the two groups. 1. Type I, or Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus, results from total or near-complete destruction of the beta cells. This is the most common type of feline diabetes. As the name implies, cats with this type of diabetes require insulin injections to stabilize blood sugar. 2. Type II, or Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (NIDDM), is different because some insulin-producing cells remain. However, the amount produced is insufficient, there is a delayed response in secreting it, and the tissues of the cats body are relatively resistant to it. These cats may be treated with an oral drug that stimulates the remaining functional cells to produce or release insulin in an adequate amount to normalize blood sugar. Alternatively, they may be treated with insulin. Cats with NIDDM may ultimately progress to total beta Continue reading >>

The Most Nutritious Diet For Diabetic Cats

The Most Nutritious Diet For Diabetic Cats

Dear Dr. Fox: Even though I know you advocate feeding pets — especially diabetic ones — homemade food, I wonder whether you’d consider this question. My geriatric cat has been insulin-dependent for more than five years. I started him on Fancy Feast Classics, but I got shamed into changing him to Hill’s m/d. In the summer, I ventured back to Fancy Feast because he likes it so much better. Suddenly, his blood sugar dropped like a rock. On a schedule of 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. insulin glargine injections, his glucose would be 70 to 100 at 1 or 2 a.m. Unusual behavior caused me to get up and test him. Could m/d have been keeping his blood glucose elevated? If I were to cook food for him, what should I give him? M.J., Cheyenne, Wyo. DF: As I repeatedly stress in this column, avoid feeding cats high-carbohydrate treats, as well as regular cat foods. I invited veterinarian Greg Martinez (visit dogdishdiet.com) to offer his opinion because I am impressed with his nutrition-first approach to animal health issues, which I have long advocated, and now I feel less alone professionally! “Diabetes in cats is thought to be caused by too many calories in the diet and too little activity. Overweight, sedentary cats develop Type 2 diabetes, which is the insulin-resistant type also seen in people. A diet with fewer calories per ounce, less fat and fewer carbohydrates will obviously have more protein, just the mix of ingredients that cats evolved to eat (rodents or other prey). That same mix of ingredients will also help cats lose weight and regulate their blood sugar. “Hill’s m/d diet is formulated to have fewer carbohydrates and less fat than other cat foods, but it still may have too many simple carbohydrates for some cats. The reason Fancy Feast Classics worked so well is that Continue reading >>

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