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Diabetic Cat Diarrhea

What You Should Know When Your Cat Has Diabetes - Care Of Your Diabetic Cat -

What You Should Know When Your Cat Has Diabetes - Care Of Your Diabetic Cat -

Some Information About Your Cats Pancreas Your cats pancreas is a small, pinkish organ that is nestled in the folds of its small intestine. You can see it if you enlarge the fanciful image I put at the top of this page. Although it is quite small, the pancreas has two very important functions. One is to produce enzymes that allow your cat to digest food. The other is to produce a hormone (insulin) that regulates how your cats body utilizes sugar (glucose). Glucose is the main fuel of all animal cells. Most of it is manufactured in the pets liver or released from recent carbohydrate meals. The process by which the pancreas regulates your cats blood sugar level is actually much more complicated than my explanation and not yet fully understood. But my explanation should do for this article. Should you wish to know more, go here . Many types of cells form the pancreas. The ones that are important in understanding diabetes occur in small islands scattered throughout the pancreas ( islets of Langerhans ). These particular insulin-secreting cells are called (beta) cells. There are several forms of diabetes. But the one affecting your cat is almost certainly the one known as diabetes mellitus, also called Type 2 (Type II, DM) diabetes. In this form of diabetes, your cats cells have lost some of their ability to respond to the insulin your cats pancreas is still producing. In some cases, less insulin is also being produced than should be. When this occurs, blood sugar can not move out of the cats blood and into all of its body cells that rely on the sugar for energy. When this occurs, a number of things happen. The cats blood sugar level skyrockets up (hyperglycemia) , some of the excess sugar spills out the kidneys and into the urine (glycosuria) and the cats body shifts to al Continue reading >>

Feline Diabetes | Cornell University College Of Veterinary Medicine

Feline Diabetes | Cornell University College Of Veterinary Medicine

Avoiding inducing inappropriately low blood glucose levels with therapy Cats with diabetes are most often treated with injectable insulin. Oral drugs for humans (hypoglycemic medications) such as glipizide rarely work in controlling diabetes in cats. Insulin injection (see Figure 1) can be taught to most owners and, with a bit of experience, both owners and cats usually adapt to these injections very well. There are a variety of insulin preparations available, and each works for a different duration and has different effects on the ups and downs of blood glucose. Ideally, your veterinarian will perform a 12-24 hour glucose curve, during which insulin is administered intermittently and blood glucose is measured to establish the type of insulin and dosing frequency that best controls blood glucose while avoiding inappropriately low blood glucose levels (hypoglycemia). Your veterinarian may recommend feeding your cat a diet restricted in carbohydrates, which has been shown to improve control of blood glucose levels. When it comes to diet, its important to help your cat combat the weight loss that often occurs as a result of this disease. In diabetic cats that are underweight, this often means feeding multiple meals per day or allowing access to food at all times. If your cat is overweight, however, work with your veterinarian to institute a weight loss program, as managed weight loss in overweight diabetic cats will likely help the cat maintain steadier glucose levels. The optimal timing of meals for diabetic cats is controversial. Many veterinarians recommend feeding at the time of insulin injection to avoid a dangerous drop in blood glucose levels. However, there is no definitive evidence that the timing or frequency of meals in diabetic cats protects them from insulin- Continue reading >>

Cat Has Loose Stool | Feline Diarrhea

Cat Has Loose Stool | Feline Diarrhea

Intestinal foreign bodies (may or not cause a mechanical obstruction) Cancer (neoplasia; especially lymphosarcoma and adenocarcinoma in domestic cats; also mast cell tumors) Irritable bowel syndrome; inflammatory bowel disease Underlying systemic disease (feline leukemia virus [FeLV], feline immunodeficiency virus [FIV], feline infectious peritonitis [FIP], feline panleukopenia, liver [hepatic] disease, kidney [renal] disease, hypoadrenocorticism [Addisons disease], pancreatitis, hyperthyroidism [common in cats], diabetes mellitus, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency [EPI; more so in dogs], lactase deficiency [intolerance to dairy products; especially prominent in cats], others) The best way to prevent diarrhea is to avoid the things that cause it. Companion cats should be on a regular de-worming protocol as advised by their veterinarian. Food allergies can be identified by a medically-supervised elimination diet. Dietary changes should always be made gradually. Cats should eat a well-balanced commercial diet, which can include dry kibble, canned food or both. Most veterinarians discourage feeding a raw diet. Cats should be kept away from garbage, rat poison, standing pools of water, dead birds and rodents, chemicals, household cleaners, fertilizer, prescription drugs and other toxins and potentially dangerous foreign objects. They also should be kept away from sick cats and be housed in a calm, stress-free environment. The litter box should be changed frequently. Food bowls should be washed with soap and hot water after each meal. Antibiotics should only be used when necessary, to promote a healthy gastrointestinal bacterial flora and to reduce the likelihood of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. Systemic illnesses should be diagnosed and treated (or at least manag Continue reading >>

My 10 Year Old Cat Who Is Diabetic Has Developed Severe Diarrhea

My 10 Year Old Cat Who Is Diabetic Has Developed Severe Diarrhea

my 10 year old cat who is diabetic has developed severe diarrhea .he is getting Lantus insulin 3 units twice a day...6.30 am and 6.30 pm.He is being fed Hills M/D Rx diet twice a day after the Insulin is given and also has Royal Canin Indoor cat dry available through the day.The insulin he is receiving now was ordered a week ago. Prior to that he was on Caninsulin 7 units twice a day but my veterinarian said it was not effective after doing several glucose curves.We have been seeing the doctor regularly and I have mentioned the diarrhea however he did not seem to be concerned about it.In my opinion the diarrhea is getting more severe with many trips to the litter box.He is eating well and does not appear to be in distress.but I am worried he will become dehydrated . I need some advice Continue reading >>

4 Signs Of An Impending Diabetic Pet Emergency

4 Signs Of An Impending Diabetic Pet Emergency

Caring for a diabetic pet can be challenging, but there are certain precautions pet owners can take to prevent a diabetic emergency like hypoglycemia. Preventing a health crisis in a dog or cat with diabetes involves employing a consistent daily routine involving diet, exercise, insulin therapy, and supplementation. It also involves avoiding any and all unnecessary vaccinations. Even the most diligent pet parent can find himself facing a diabetic emergency with a dog or cat. Hypoglycemia is the most common health crisis, and is usually the result of an inadvertent overdose of insulin. Symptoms of hypoglycemia can appear suddenly and include lethargy or restlessness, anxiety or other behavioral changes, muscle weakness or twitching, seizures, coma, and death. At-home treatment for a diabetic pet with hypoglycemia is determined by whether or not the animal is alert. Signs of other potential impending diabetic emergencies include ketones in the urine; straining to urinate or bloody urine; vomiting or diarrhea; or a complete loss of appetite or reduced appetite for several days. By Dr. Becker Caring for a diabetic pet can be quite complex and time consuming. It involves regular monitoring of blood glucose levels, making necessary dietary adjustments, giving insulin injections or oral medications, and keeping a careful eye on your pet at all times. Frequent veterinary visits are the norm for dogs and cats with diabetes, as are the costs associated with checkups, tests, medical procedures, and insulin therapy. And unlike humans with the disease, our pets can’t tell us how they’re feeling or help in their own treatment and recovery. Preventing Diabetic Emergencies The key to preventing diabetic emergencies with a pet involves implementing a consistent daily routine and sti Continue reading >>

Related Conditions

Related Conditions

Diabetic Complications Just as with humans, untreated diabetes in cats can lead to a number of complications. These include pancreatitis, diabetic neuropathy (walking on the hocks), diabetic ketoacidosis, as well as hypoglycemia and kidney failure. Research in humans and mice has shown that organ damage begins to occur when the blood sugar is above 140 (7.8). Many of these studies can be found here: Research Connecting Organ Damage with Blood Sugar Level. Several of the more common complications are described below. Pancreatitis Pancreatitis is a condition that causes severe inflammation in and around the duct area. The pancreas is already damaged, to varying degrees, by the time our cats are diagnosed with feline diabetes (FD). Dr. Hodgkins states in her book Your Cat, Secrets to a Longer, Stronger Life; cats with FD typically have at least low-grade pancreatitis. As a result, when a cat comes along that is not achieving expected results with insulin, initial thoughts should turn to the likelihood of pancreatitis. Pancreatitis may be acute or chronic. Acute pancreatitis is a sudden inflammation of the pancreas, where chronic pancreatitis refers to a long-standing inflammation of the pancreas that alters its normal structure and functions. Both forms of pancreatitis can cause serious complications for our cats, some more severe than others. Malabsorption of food, internal bleeding, damage to tissue, infection, cysts, fluid accumulation, enzymes and toxins entering the bloodstream, damage to the heart, lungs, kidneys, and/or other organs may occur if left untreated. It is now suspected that pancreatitis may be a cause of diabetes in cats. Malabsorption of food is a very common outcome in humans with pancreatitis, as is diabetes. Diabetes develops because insulin-producin Continue reading >>

Feeding Tips For A Cat With Diabetes

Feeding Tips For A Cat With Diabetes

When Randy Frostig took his cat, Bill, to the veterinarian six years ago, he was seriously worried. “He was lethargic and he wasn’t eating, and his urine was sticking to his paws,” Frostig recalls. The diagnosis -- diabetes -- surprised Frostig. “I didn’t even know that a cat could have diabetes. I didn’t know what it meant,” he says. He was concerned about having to give his cat regular shots of insulin, and how the disease might affect his pet’s life. In reality, a diagnosis of feline diabetes is not a death sentence, and caring for a cat with the disease is far easier than Frostig had envisioned. “Giving him insulin is like brushing your teeth. It’s no big deal,” he says. Thanks to regular doses of insulin and a special diet, the gray tabby started acting more like his old self. “He was running around, and he gained his appetite again.” Why Do Cats Get Diabetes? Cats aren’t so different from people when it comes to diabetes. The disease affects insulin -- a hormone that helps the body move sugar (glucose) from the bloodstream into the cells. Feline diabetes tends to more closely resemble type 2 diabetes in humans, in which the body makes insulin but becomes less sensitive to the hormone. Sugar builds up in the bloodstream, leading to symptoms like increased urination and thirst. If it’s left untreated, eventually diabetes can lead to life-threatening complications. Although the exact cause of feline diabetes isn’t known, it’s more likely to affect overweight cats, because obesity makes the cat’s body less sensitive to the effects of insulin. Diabetes is also more common in older cats. Diseases like chronic pancreatitis and hyperthyroidism, as well as medications such as corticosteroids, may also make cats more prone to develop diab Continue reading >>

Preventing And Handling Diabetic Emergencies

Preventing And Handling Diabetic Emergencies

Caring for a pet with diabetes can be daunting. Fortunately, the key to successful diabetes management is simple: a consistent, established daily routine. A healthy diet is essential, and feeding your pet the same amount of food at the same time every day will help make blood sugar easiest to control. Your pet will usually also need twice-daily insulin injections, which should be given at the same time every day. (The easiest way to do this is to coordinate shots with mealtimes.) Routine daily exercise and regular at-home monitoring of urine and/or blood sugar round out a plan for good diabetic regulation. Even if you are following a consistent routine, a diabetic pet may occasionally experience an emergency. A number of different things can cause an emergency, but the most common is hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. In this case, it is important that you be prepared in order to avoid a life-threatening situation. Hypoglycemia: Why It Happens Hypoglycemia most often results from accidental overdosage of insulin, but it can also occur if a pet is not eating well, misses a meal or vomits after eating, or if the type and amount of food he is being fed changes. Hypoglycemia may become a problem with very vigorous exercise; for this reason, regular daily controlled exercise is best. Hypoglycemia can also result if the body’s need for insulin changes. This scenario is particularly common in cats who often return to a non-diabetic state once an appropriate diet and insulin therapy start. Vet Tips Avoid “double-dosing” insulin. Only one person in a household should have the responsibility of giving insulin. A daily log should be kept of the time/amount of food and insulin that is given to avoid errors. Proper daily monitoring of blood and/or urine glucose can help identif Continue reading >>

Diabetic Cat With Loose Stool

Diabetic Cat With Loose Stool

House Cat image by phizics from Fotolia.com Cats are genetically predisposed to consuming high protein and low carbohydrates, but if they eat processed cat foods high in carbohydrates, they may become diabetic, which means they are unable to produce enough insulin to balance blood sugar and glucose levels. High glucose levels can contribute to dehydration, frequent urination and loose stools. Diabetes can be easily managed in felines, but it is important to know the right way to maintain your cat's health. Loose stool (diarrhea) in your cat can result from poor diabetic treatment and monitoring. According to Cornell University, "Diabetes will shorten a cat's lifespan. A dangerous, sometimes fatal condition called ketoacidosis may develop, indicated by loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, weakness, dehydration, and breathing abnormalities." Along with excessive urination, loose stool in diabetic cats develops from hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar levels, which will begin to turn excess sugar into glucosuria. When glucosuria builds up in the blood stream, the cat's body responds by flushing it out in urine and runny stool. Feline diabetes can be controlled and treated with a well-monitored diet plan. Cats need a diet high in fiber and low in sugar (carbohydrates) to maintain proper insulin levels and to decrease digestion problems associated with diabetes. Insulin, a hormone produced in the pancreas, is responsible for regulating sugar levels. When insulin is deficient, the cat's body starts breaking down fat and protein and, instead of storing it, uses it for an alternative energy source. As a result, a feline can develop a ravenous appetite and have frequent urination and loose stool. To correct poor insulin levels, diabetic cats require insulin injections Continue reading >>

The Signs, Diagnosis & Types Of Diabetes Mellitus In Cats

The Signs, Diagnosis & Types Of Diabetes Mellitus In Cats

Share with us any comments or suggestions, to help us build the best service for you and your pet Download our free app today and access verified vets, trainers, nutritionists and other pet experts anywhere, anytime The Signs, Diagnosis & Types of Diabetes Mellitus in Cats There are certain signs or symptoms which are commonly seen in cats with diabetes mellitus. Unfortunately, these signs also occur in other diseases and conditions. Therefore, laboratory tests are necessary to diagnose diabetes mellitus in cats. The following article includes a discussion of how this diagnosis is made and the types of diabetes found in cats. What are the signs of diabetes mellitus in cats and why do they occur? Depending on how severely insulin production is impaired, there may be few signs of disease, or the signs may be severe. Dogs with diabetes often develop cataracts ; cats do not. The most common signs of diabetes are: Increased thirst (polydipsia) and urination (polyuria) Because the glucose cannot enter the cells, the glucose levels in the blood become abnormally high (hyperglycemia). The glucose is filtered out by the kidneys and is found in the urine (glucosuria). When it is filtered out, it carries water with it. The animal, then, is losing more water through the urine than normal and has to make up for it by drinking more. The increased urination may result in the cat not always urinating in the litter box. This inappropriate urination may be one of the first signs of diabetes in cats. In addition, cats with diabetes can often develop urinary tract infections, which may also result in inappropriate elimination. Some diabetic cats eat less, because frankly, they do not feel well. Other cats may have voracious appetites and eat a lot (polyphagia) because their hypothalamus k Continue reading >>

How To Manage Feline Chronic Diarrhea, Part I: Diagnosis

How To Manage Feline Chronic Diarrhea, Part I: Diagnosis

An increase in the frequency and liquidity of bowel movements is an important sign of gastrointestinal (GI) disease in cats. Veterinarians are often consulted when diarrhea is associated with systemic illness or when it becomes persistent. When diarrhea occurs either intermittently or continuously for three weeks or more, it is considered a chronic condition. Chronic diarrhea in cats can be a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge, so we'll help you approach these cases logically and thoroughly. First we'll discuss which diagnostic tests are most helpful in cats with chronic diarrhea, and in the article that follows we'll cover drug and dietary treatments. In evaluating cats with chronic diarrhea, first obtain a careful and complete history that includes signalment, vaccination and deworming history, and information about the cat's environment, recent travel, past medical problems or surgeries, current diet regimen plus recent changes, and current prescription medications and nutraceuticals. A thorough history may suggest extraintestinal disease or exposure to parasites, infectious agents, drugs, or toxins. Ask additional questions that focus on the diarrhea and elucidate the onset, duration, specific characteristics, and associated clinical signs. A description of the feces (color, volume, presence of blood or mucus), the frequency and urgency of defecation, and associated clinical signs (anorexia, weight loss, vomiting, tenesmus, dyschezia) may localize the problem to a specific region of the GI tract (Table 1). Also ask about response to any treatments or dietary changes to help identify aggravating or alleviating factors. Thoroughly evaluate all body systems before focusing on the GI tract. You may identify a fever or detect evidence of weight loss, cachexia, dehydra Continue reading >>

Feline Diabetes

Feline Diabetes

Definition: Diabetes mellitus is an endocrine disease in which the blood sugar level rises because of failure of insulin to control it. This occurs either because the pancreas has lost its ability to manufacture insulin (known as Type I diabetes) or that mechanisms of insulin release and tissue responsiveness are dysfunctional (Type II diabetes). Without proper insulin regulation, the body is unable to transport glucose (a simple sugar obtained from digested food) into cells. Because glucose remains trapped in the bloodstream, the tissues of the body are deprived of the energy needed to function normally. Risk factors: In many cases, the cause for why a cat has developed diabetes cannot be determined. However, it is known that obesity predisposes cats for Type II diabetes. Other causes or factors include: damage to the pancreas caused by inflammation, infection, immune mediated disease, tumors, genetic predisposition, and exposure to certain drugs. Cats receiving steroids are also predisposed to diabetes. Symptoms: The most common symptoms of diabetes are weight loss (often with a healthy appetite), excessive water consumption and excessive urine output. Because so much urine is being produced, some diabetic cats will urinate in unusual places (i.e., outside of the litter box). Owners may notice that litter has suddenly begun to stick to their cat’s paws because of the excess volume of urine being produced. Some cats will also show weakness, lethargy, vomiting, abnormal gait, poor grooming habits and changes in behavior. Diagnosis: Physical examination may show poor body condition, dehydration, jaundice, and an enlarged liver. Laboratory testing is essential to diagnose diabetes. Blood tests show hyperglycemia (high blood sugar, usually above 300 mg/dl), and often the Continue reading >>

Feline Diabetes: Symptoms, Treatments, Prevention, And Diet Tips

Feline Diabetes: Symptoms, Treatments, Prevention, And Diet Tips

An alarming number of cats are developing diabetes mellitus, which is the inability to produce enough insulin to balance blood sugar, or glucose, levels . Left untreated, it can lead to weight loss, loss of appetite, vomiting , dehydration, severe depression, problems with motor function, coma, and even death. To find out why so many cats are being diagnosed with diabetes, and what owners can do, WebMD talked to Thomas Graves, a former feline practitioner who is associate professor and section head of small animal medicine at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine. Graves’ research focus is on diabetes and geriatric medicine. Q: How common is feline diabetes? A: The true incidence isn’t known, but it’s estimated at 0.5% to 2% of the feline population. But it’s also probably under diagnosed. Q: What are the signs of diabetes in cats? A: The main symptoms are increased thirst and increased urination. And while we do see it in cats with appropriate body weight, it’s more common in obese cats. Some cats with diabetes have a ravenous appetite because their bodies cannot use the fuel supplied in their diet. Q: What’s the treatment for a cat with feline diabetes? A: Diet is certainly a component. It’s felt that a low-carbohydrate diet is probably best for cats with diabetes. Treatment is insulin therapy. There are some oral medications, but they have more side effects and are mainly used when insulin can’t be used for some reason. There are blood and urine tests, physical examinations, and behavioral signals, which are used to establish insulin therapy. This is done in conjunction with your veterinarian. We don’t recommend owners adjust insulin therapy on their own because it can be sort of complicated in cats. Most patients come in every t Continue reading >>

5 Signs Your Cat's Diarrhea May Be Serious | Pet Wellbeing

5 Signs Your Cat's Diarrhea May Be Serious | Pet Wellbeing

Cat Diarrhea Dog Diarrhea BM Tone-Up Gold - Cat Diarrhea Support Loose stool that is accompanied by vomiting When a cat with diarrhea is vomiting at the same time, the risks of dehydration increase dramatically. Dehydration can lead to listlessness and make it even harder for the cat to recover on her own. If your cat vomits more than two or three times when she is battling diarrhea, she should be seen by a veterinarian. Lack of appetite occurring concurrently with the diarrhea If your cat has diarrhea and is simultaneously not eating or drinking, she should visit the veterinarian. When she is not taking in food or water, your cat will be less able to recover from the diarrhea. Lack of appetite may also be a sign that the cause of your cats loose stool is a bit more serious. Diarrhea that looks like coffee grounds or contains blood A black, tarry, or coffee ground appearance to your cats diarrhea indicates that it contains digested blood. This means that blood is entering the gastrointestinal tract at the level of the stomach or small intestines. In this case, your veterinarian should examine and run some tests on your cat to determine the cause of the bleeding. Your cat is lethargic in addition to having diarrhea. If your cat is having diarrhea and also isnt moving around, doesnt interact with you normally, or generally looks lethargic and sick, she should be seen by a veterinarian right away. This listlessness may be caused by dehydration, but it may also indicate a more serious issue. Many causes of diarrhea in cats are minor and will resolve on their own in an otherwise healthy cat. Its important to study the above signs that might indicate that the cause of the diarrhea is more serious so you know when to pick up the phone and consult with your veterinarian. Continue reading >>

What To Do With Insulin When Your Diabetic Pet Is Vomiting Or Not Eating

What To Do With Insulin When Your Diabetic Pet Is Vomiting Or Not Eating

Once you have your diabetic pet regulated on insulin it’s smooth sailing, right? Well, not necessarily. Even a well-regulated diabetic doggie may mischievously get into the trash and subsequently vomit. Or Fluffy might toss up a random hair ball. Just because your pet is diabetic doesn’t mean it can’t have a dietary indiscretion or gastroenteritis the same as non-diabetic pets! Even if you are new to having a diabetic pet, if you understand the basics of diabetes (most importantly that insulin drops the blood sugar levels) you can work your way through a short-term treatment plan. You know that insulin allows sugar (from the food we eat) to enter our cells. Without food, giving the usual dose of insulin could drop the blood glucose to dangerously low levels. However, if the blood glucose is still quite elevated, you might consider giving a lesser dose of insulin even if a diabetic won’t eat. You know your pet… Some have a sensitive stomach whereas others might have the constitution as sturdy as a goat. Some have ravenous appetites whereas other pets may be finicky. None of us have a crystal ball when it comes to predicting if a pet will vomit more. Not eating and vomiting are both situations that put us in the same boat in regards to insulin dosing. No food in the tummy means there is nothing for the insulin to utilize. Of course, vomiting is worse than simply not eating because we don’t know why the pet is nauseous nor if there will be more vomiting to follow. Not eating may simply be that a pet isn’t hungry. Obviously you need a good relationship with your veterinarian to help you work through contingency plans for these situations, but I want you to understand in general what we might do. Of course making choices to alter the insulin dose mandates that Continue reading >>

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