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Diabetic Breakfast Cereal

Healthy Cereal Brands For Diabetes

Healthy Cereal Brands For Diabetes

When you’re in a morning rush, you may not have time to eat anything but a quick bowl of cereal. But many brands of breakfast cereal are loaded with fast-digesting carbohydrates. These carbs usually rate high on the glycemic index. That means your body quickly breaks them down, which rapidly raises your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, that can be dangerous. Fortunately, not all cereals are made the same. Read on to learn about diabetes-friendly cereal options that can get you out of the door quickly, without putting you through a blood sugar rollercoaster ride. We’ve listed our recommendations from the highest rating on the glycemic index to the lowest rating. The glycemic index, or GI, measures how quickly carbohydrates raise your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, it’s best to choose foods with lower GI ratings. They take longer to digest, which can help prevent spikes in your blood sugar. According to the Harvard School of Public Health: low-GI foods have a rating of 55 or less medium-GI foods have a rating of 56-69 high-GI foods have a rating of 70-100 Mixing foods can influence how they digest and adsorb into your blood, and ultimately their GI rating. For example, eating high-ranked GI cereal with Greek yogurt, nuts, or other low-ranked GI foods can slow your digestion and limit spikes in your blood sugar. Glycemic load is another measure of how food affects your blood sugar. It takes into account portion size and the digestibility of different carbohydrates. It may be a better way to identify good and bad carb choices. For example, carrots have a high GI rating but a low glycemic load. The vegetable provides a healthy choice for people with diabetes. According to the Harvard School of Public Health: a glycemic load under 10 is low a glycemi Continue reading >>

Breakfast Cereals Ranked Best To Worst

Breakfast Cereals Ranked Best To Worst

We’ve ranked the most popular cereals from best to worst based on their nutritional value – in particular added sugar, fibre content, salt. Read on to get your day off to a heart-healthy start. 1. Porridge Porridge is our top choice for a heart healthy breakfast – when it is made with low-fat milk or water and unsweetened. All porridge oats are wholegrains and they all contain a soluble fibre called beta-glucan, which can help lower your cholesterol level if you have 3g or more of it daily, as part of a healthy diet. (A 40g serving of porridge oats contains 1.6g of beta-glucan.) As well as this, you’ll be getting the fibre from the whole grains, plus there is no added sugar or salt. Make sure you don’t add extra sugar or salt to your porridge as this will undo all your good work – instead, try adding a banana or some fruit for extra sweetness. For every 80g that you add it will be one of your 5-a-day at the same time. A serving of porridge made with 40g of oats and semi-skimmed milk contains: Energy 1016kJ / 241kcal, 12% of your Reference Intake (RI) Fat 6.2g, 9% of your RI Saturates 2.5g, 13% of your RI Sugars 8.2g, 9% of your RI Salt 0.2g, 3% of your RI A 40g serving of oats (not made up) contains: Energy 645kJ / 152kcal, 7.6% of your RI Fat 3.2g, 5% of your RI Saturates 0.5g, 2.6% of your RI Sugars 0.1g, 0.1% of your RI Salt <0.01g, <1% of your RI Our expert answers the question ‘Instant or traditional porridge?’ Try our 14 delicious heart-healthy porridge variations 2. No added sugar or salt muesli No added sugar muesli contains a mixture of grains, fruit and nuts and the combination will differ between brands and varieties so the amount of oat beta glucans will be more variable than porridge, which is made only of oats. The dried fruit that is added Continue reading >>

Breakfast Cereals

Breakfast Cereals

What's in your bowl? Often hailed as the 'most important meal of the day', a decent breakfast certainly has a range of health benefits. As well as providing nutrients, if you have diabetes, a regular healthy breakfast can help to maintain control of blood sugar, can minimise unhealthy snacking later on, and fuels your body to help you function ahead of a busy day. The breakfast of champions When it comes to breakfast time, cereal remains a popular, convenient, and speedy choice. With the choice on supermarket shelves growing over the years, it can be tricky to choose the healthiest option. To make things easier, we have chosen 10 well-known cereals and looked closely at the nutritional value to see how they perform in terms of sugar, fat, and fibre. But first, let's find out a little more about what we should be on the look out for... What's in a cereal? Breakfast cereals tend to be based on grains - some are wholegrains (such as wheat, bran, oats), and others are refined grains (such as maize and rice). Many also have nuts, seeds and dried fruit added to them. Wholegrain cereals can help to manage blood glucose levels, particularly if you have type 2 diabetes, as they release glucose more slowly as they are low GI. Recent guidelines highlighted that, as a UK population, we are having too much sugar and not enough fibre. Fibre is important for gut health and some can help towards lowering cholesterol. Some cereals also contain vitamins and minerals such as iron, vitamin D, and B vitamins such as folic acid. Folic acid is important for healthy red blood cells and also needs to be taken as a supplement both before, and during, pregnancy to reduce the risk of neural tube defects in unborn babies. Folic acid is especially important in pregnant women with diabetes as they ne Continue reading >>

How To Pick Healthier Breakfast Cereal Options

How To Pick Healthier Breakfast Cereal Options

With more than 100 kinds of cereal in many grocery store aisles, choosing a healthier cereal can be like searching for a needle in a haystack. To help you make a good choice without spending hours in the cereal aisle, focus on three key nutrition areas: sugar, salt and fiber. Go for Fiber Aim to get fiber from whole grains—they should be listed as the first ingredient. Many cereals bump up fiber content with functional fibers (isolated, nondigestible carbohydrates) like inulin and oat fiber. Look for: Dietary Fiber ≥ 3 g per serving Limit Sodium Some cereals are so low in calories you may be tempted to eat more. But if you double your portion, your breakfast can easily eat up a quarter or more of your daily allotment of sodium since many cereals hover around 200 mg of sodium per serving and milk adds about another 100 mg sodium per cup. Look for: Sodium ≤ 240 mg per serving Save on Sugar Look for a cereal with sugar toward the end of the ingredient list (which means the cereal contains less sugar). Be aware that sugars go by many names—including corn syrup, molasses, agave nectar, fruit juice concentrate or evaporated cane juice—and cereals often contain more than one. Many cereals use dried fruit that’s been coated with sugar. Better to add fresh or unsweetened dried fruit for natural sweetness. Look for: Sugar ≤ 7 g per serving Continue reading >>

What To Eat With Diabetes: Best Cold Cereals

What To Eat With Diabetes: Best Cold Cereals

Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Continue reading >>

Fab 5 Breakfast Cereals For Diabetes!

Fab 5 Breakfast Cereals For Diabetes!

“I have diabetes, what is the best breakfast cereal for me?” This is a question that is pondered all too often. The breakfast aisle in the supermarket can make this even harder as there are so many different boxes with flashy colours and eye-catching claims. Does green mean healthy? Is it better for me if it says “natural”? (For more on this read our ‘Food Labels: The Healthy Halo’ post here). This can be a daunting task for many, and so we’ve taken the liberty of analysing a few breakfast cereals to give you a list of the best ones! So without further ado, here are our pick of the ultimate breakfast cereals (in no particular order): Kellogg’s Guardian Nutrition info (per 100 grams): G.I.: 34 Carbohydrate: 62.3 g Fibre: 21.8 g Total fat: 1.2 g Saturated fat: 0.3 g Sugar: 11.8 g Sodium: 200 mg Why it’s good: Guardian has a glycaemic index (G.I.) of 34 which is quite low and fantastic for controlling blood glucose levels. It’s also high in fibre which keeps you feeling full and slows the absorption of glucose into the blood. Guardian is also low in fat which is good for weight control. Kellogg’s All Bran Nutrition info (per 100 grams): G.I.: 55 Carbohydrate: 46.8 g Fibre: 29.5 g Total fat: 2.7 g Saturated fat: 0.5 g Sugar: 16.7 g Sodium: 360 mg Why it’s good: All Bran is packed full of fibre with one serve (1/2 cup) providing almost half of your daily fibre need! With a medium G.I. it’s a fantastic choice to keep you feeling fuller for longer, as well as slowing the absorption of glucose into the blood. It is also low in fat which is good for weight control. Sanitarium Weet-Bix Nutrition info (per 100 grams): G.I.: 69 Carbohydrate: 67 g Fibre: 11 g Total fat: 1.3 g Saturated fat: 0.3 g Sugar: 3.3 g Sodium: 270 mg Why it’s good: Weet-Bix is a cl Continue reading >>

Breakfast Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Breakfast Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Sugary cereals, bagels covered in cream cheese, and high-fat bacon breakfasts are the subjects of many food fantasies. However, they are all poor choices for people with diabetes. Diabetes management requires attention to sugar and carbohydrates. To optimize heart health, people with diabetes should also steer clear of high-fat foods that have little nutritional value. This does not mean that people with diabetes have to have dull breakfasts. A number of classic breakfasts are excellent choices. A few minor tweaks to traditional breakfasts can make many of them healthful even for people with type 2 diabetes. Classic breakfasts for type 2 diabetes Breakfasts high in fiber, but low in added sugar, carbohydrates, and salt are excellent choices for people with diabetes. Nutrient-dense foods support feelings of fullness, which can help stop people snacking on unhealthful options. Some healthful breakfast options include the following: Smoothies Fruit juices contain rapidly absorbed sugar and, sometimes, artificial sweeteners that can either trigger blood sugar spikes or affect insulin sensitivity and gut bacteria. Smoothies offer the same sweet taste as juice but contain lots of nutrients that help fight hunger. There are many ways to include different nutrients in a smoothie. Load up on fiber by using spinach, kale, or avocado in a smoothie. Layer on sweetness by adding frozen berries, bananas, apples, or peaches. Make sure to include some fat or protein to make the smoothie as filling as possible. This will also slow down the digestion of the carbohydrates. Adding a scoop of a protein powder or one-half of a cup of Greek yogurt can make a smoothie even more satisfying. Try this diabetes-friendly smoothie: Blend two cups of frozen raspberries, blueberries, and strawberries Continue reading >>

Effect Of A Barley Breakfast Cereal On Blood Glucose And Insulin Response In Normal And Diabetic Patients

Effect Of A Barley Breakfast Cereal On Blood Glucose And Insulin Response In Normal And Diabetic Patients

Abstract Prowashonupana (Prowash) is a shrunken-endosperm, short awn, waxy starch, hulless barley with low starch, high fiber, high protein, and a relatively high concentration of free sugars. The study was designed to compare equivalent breakfast meals (w/w) of Prowash and oatmeal for glycemic response in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects. A commercial liquid meal replacer (LMR) was included as a reference standard. A substantial reduction of the post-prandial glycemic peak following ingestion of Prowash was observed as compared to LMR or oatmeal. In the non-diabetic subjects, the maximal rise in glucose from baseline was 26.3± 3.9 mg/dL after LMR, 41.3± 3.9 mg/dL after oatmeal and 6.4± 2.7 mg/dL after Prowash (p < 0.01). The maximal increase in glucose in the diabetic patients was 69.9± 4.5 mg/dL after LMR, 80.8± 8.8,mg/dL after oatmeal and 28.4± 3.5 mg/dL after Prowash (p < 0.01). The maximal increase in insulin post-LMR was 33.9± 3.6 mIU/ml in the diabetic patients and 54.0± 9.8,mIU/ml in the non-diabetic controls. Oatmeal elicited a maximal insulin increase of 29.9± 4.2, mIU/ml in the control subjects and 21.4± 2.5 mIU/ml in the diabetic patients. In contrast, the maximal insulin increase after Prowash was 8.6± 1.5 mIU/ml in the non-diabetic controls and 6.8± 1.2 mIU/ml in the diabetic patients (p < 0.01). Continue reading >>

Diabetic Cereal Plus Low Carb Alternatives

Diabetic Cereal Plus Low Carb Alternatives

Here's a comment someone made on our Facebook page: What kind of cold cereal do you guys eat – checked the super market and (omg) so high in carbs and sugar and you can eat 1/4 cup of 1/2 cup (I would literally starve on this ) any suggestions ? Have you had a similar experience from looking at food labels on breakfast cereals? Or perhaps you haven't looked at the labels and not sure if cereals are okay for diabetes. Well, we've got you covered because today we're going to go over the ins and outs of breakfast cereals, share some low carb alternatives you can buy, and share a couple of recipes you can enjoy too. The Truth About Breakfast Cereals Breakfast Cereals are NOT healthy! Let's look at 2 popular breakfast cereals from the US and Australia. If you're from a different country, that's okay, most cereals are the same poor quality. General Mills Honey Nut Cheerios Noted as the US most popular cereal in 2013. In a 112 g serve we have: 440 calories 6 g fat 640 mg sodium 88 g carbs 8 g fiber 36 g sugar 44 g other carbs 8 g protein Ingredients: Whole grain oats, sugar, oat bran, modified corn starch, honey, brown sugar syrup, salt, tripotassium phosphate, canola and/or rice bran oil, natural almond flour, and then their long line of ADDED vitamins and minerals. Source Does this measure up as a healthy breakfast option? No way! Almost 1/3 sugar content and 132 g carbs, high sodium, low fiber, and low protein. In my opinion that's no way to start the day and yet it's the most popular cereal in the US. Notice on the box that the marketing claims it “Can Help Lower Cholesterol”. You will see all sorts of advertising scams occur on food packaging and you can't trust any of it. Although there is some evidence to suggest that soluble fiber (found in oats) can help lower c Continue reading >>

Cereals And Diabetes: A Rundown Of The Healthiest And Unhealthiest Options

Cereals And Diabetes: A Rundown Of The Healthiest And Unhealthiest Options

The variety of sugar content in cereal makes it a signficant food choice for everyone with diabetes. Cereals with the lowest sugar content are naturally much better for people with diabetes, and it can be surprising just much sugar is packed in some well-known brands. Because cereals are grains, and consequently high in carbohydrates, all cereals are likely to raise your blood glucose levels. Therefore, it’s best to limit your portion sizes to no more than the recommended size, which should be listed on each cereal box. Editor’s note: If you are following a low-carb diet, you could visit the Low Carb Program for healthier breakfast ideas. To commemorate National Cereal Day over in the US, we’ve looked at some of the most popular breakfast cereals in the UK and surveyed the carbs and sugar content per 100g. To help make this information easier to digest, we’ve grouped each cereal into the healthiest and unhealthiest options. Right, on with the list. The healthiest cereals, per 100g To discover more healthy breakfast recipes, check out 12 Deliciously Tasty Low Carb Breakfasts. You can also visit the Food, Recipes and Nutrition forum. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Super Foods

Diabetes Super Foods

Eating right is key to managing diabetes. Fortunately, your food “prescription” includes filling, flavorful fare that tastes like anything but medicine. A diet rich in these 10 “super foods” will help minimize blood sugar and even throw your disease into reverse. Dig in! 1. Vegetables. The advantages of eating more vegetables are undeniable. Packed with powerhouse nutrients, vegetables are naturally low in calories, and they’re full of fiber, so they’re plenty filling. Loading your plate with more vegetables will automatically mean you’re eating fewer simple carbs (which raise blood sugar) and saturated fats (which increase insulin resistance). Aim to get four or five servings a day. (A serving is 1/2 cup canned or cooked vegetables or 1 cup raw vegetables.) Go easier on starchy vegetables — including potatoes and corn, and legumes such as lima beans and peas — which are higher in calories than other vegetables. 2. Fruit. It has more natural sugar and calories than most vegetables, so you can’t eat it with utter abandon, but fruit has almost all the advantages that vegetables do — it’s brimming with nutrients you need, it’s low in fat, it’s high in fiber, and it’s relatively low in calories compared with most other foods. Best of all, it’s loaded with antioxidants that help protect your nerves, your eyes, and your heart. Aim to get three or four servings a day. (A serving is one piece of whole fruit, 1/2 cup cooked or canned fruit, or 1 cup raw fruit.) Strive to make most of your fruit servings real produce, not juice. Many of the nutrients and a lot of the fiber found in the skin, flesh, and seeds of fruit are eliminated during juicing, and the calories and sugar are concentrated in juice. 3. Beans. Beans are just about your best source Continue reading >>

High-fiber Cereal May Ward Off Diabetes

High-fiber Cereal May Ward Off Diabetes

June 18, 2004 -- Eating a bowlful of high-fiber cereal may help prevent type 2 diabetes and other health problems in people at risk for developing the disease. A new study showed eating a high-fiber cereal lowered insulin production and reduced blood glucose levels in men with elevated insulin levels, a condition known as hyperinsulinemia. People with hyperinsulinemia are in danger of developing type 2 diabetes because the cells in their bodies are resistant to the effects of insulin and cannot process glucose (sugar) properly. This causes the pancreas to produce more insulin in order to compensate. High insulin levels and insulin resistance have also been associated with an increased risk of heart disease. By lowering the rise in insulin and sugar levels that normally follows eating a meal high in carbohydrates, researchers say people at risk for developing diabetes may be able to ward off the disease and its complications. Other research has shown that exercise and the diabetes medication Glucophage are also effective at preventing diabetes in these people. In the study, which appears in the June issue of Diabetes Care, researchers compared the effects of eating a high- or low-fiber ready-to-eat breakfast cereal in 77 men without diabetes. Forty-two of the men had elevated insulin levels. The men in the high-fiber cereal group ate 1.3 cups of cereal -- Fiber One from General Mills -- which provided nearly 36 grams of fiber. The low-fiber cereal group ate Country Corn Flakes from General Mills which had less than 1 gram of fiber in the 1-cup serving size. The men with hyperinsulinemia were significantly heavier and had larger waistlines as well as lower HDL "good" cholesterol levels than the others. Being overweight is one of the biggest risk factors for diabetes, and Continue reading >>

African Yam Bean Rte Breakfast Cereal Holds Promise For Diabetics: Study

African Yam Bean Rte Breakfast Cereal Holds Promise For Diabetics: Study

In a study published in the Journal of Food Processing and Preservation​, researchers successfully produced a RTE breakfast cereal that incorporated African yam bean – a legume hailed for its value to diabetics but often difficult to cook with. The legume has a low glycemic index and high dietary fiber content and is therefore becoming increasingly important in the management of chronic diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases, the study said. It cited previous research that suggested the slow digestion of the legume results in a gentle rise in blood sugar levels among diabetic consumers. It is also high in essential amino acids and is also rich in minerals such as magnesium, zinc, potassium and calcium. The successful incorporation of African yam bean into a RTE cereal format could be used on an industrial scale to promote health in vulnerable groups, such as diabetics, said the researchers from the University of Nigeria. They added that it could also aid food security and energy malnutrition in the long-term. Processing into RTE format​ African yam bean is traditionally consumed boiled or in the form of porridge, and in some African countries its seeds are processed into flours and pastes. “​African yam bean is being increasingly consumed by diabetics, hypertensive and cardiovascular patients in some Nigerian communities. However, the processes involved in making it ready to eat are cumbersome and time consuming, thereby denying vulnerable groups instant consumption access,”​ they wrote. “Therefore, it is of great industrial and commercial importance to develop the technology for its processing into ready-to-eat breakfast cereals, in combination with other local food materials, which will eliminate the associated drudgery and add value to the Continue reading >>

Breakfast Cereal Reviews

Breakfast Cereal Reviews

In this article: Our table of 170 supermarket breakfast cereals, comparing health star ratings, fibre and sugar content, gluten-free options and more. Why breakfast is important Breakfast biscuits: the lowdown Tips for choosing a healthy cereal Navigating marketing spin Top-rating breakfast cereals Of the 170 breakfast cereals we reviewed, 23 achieved a health star rating (HSR) of 5, and 33 achieved 4.5. So whether you're after cereals that are bran-based, flakes, biscuits, clusters or gluten-free, there are plenty of decent options to choose from. Lowest in sugars Uncle Tobys Oat Brits Highest in fibre GoldenVale Just Bran Woolworths Select High Fibre Bran Lowest in sodium Uncle Toby's Shredded Wheat Why is breakfast important? Starting your day with breakfast has its benefits. A number of studies suggest that people who eat breakfast are less likely to be overweight or obese than those who skip it. Eating breakfast can also help children with concentration and performance at school. Our body's preferred source of fuel is carbohydrates, so to kick-start your day, a cereal – being grain-based and therefore naturally high in carbohydrates – is generally a good option. A cereal high in fibre is a real bonus. Adults need about 25–30g of fibre a day, and most of us don't eat enough. And it's not just adults – a recent Australian study found that only 18% of pre-schoolers were getting enough fibre. You should be able to rely on a breakfast cereal to deliver a decent whack of your daily fibre needs, so we believe fibre content should be one of the top priorities when you're strolling down the cereal aisle. What you don't want in a breakfast cereal is lots of salt, added sugar or saturated fat (see our Tips for choosing a healthy cereal). Kids' cereals high in sugar an Continue reading >>

Cereal: It’s What’s For Breakfast… Or Lunch, Or Dinner

Cereal: It’s What’s For Breakfast… Or Lunch, Or Dinner

Raise your hand if you currently eat or have ever eaten cereal. I wouldn’t be surprised if most of you raised your hand. Back in 2005, Good Morning America conducted a poll and found that 60% of Americans eat breakfast, and of those 60%, about 40% eat either hot or cold cereal. I’m a big breakfast cereal eater, mostly because it’s fast and easy, but also because I like it. People eat cereal at any time of day, too — it’s not just for breakfast anymore. And if you’re a Seinfeld fan, you probably remember the episode when Jerry’s girlfriend ate cereal for all three meals. All sorts of studies have been done looking at how breakfast impacts various factors, including obesity, Type 2 diabetes, blood pressure, and cholesterol, as well as alertness and productivity. And starting off the day by eating cereal is a smart way to help meet your fiber and whole-grain goals (most of us fall short on these). Did you know, too, that eating a whole-grain breakfast cereal can help reduce your risk of heart failure, and is a smart way to prevent accumulating fat around your midsection (also known as the dreaded spare tire)? Decisions, Decisions So, eating breakfast is good. Eating cereal is also good with one caveat: you need to choose a cereal that’s healthy. But how? The cereal aisle in the supermarket can be overwhelming. You know you should choose something that’s high in nutrition, but the worry is that the cereal will taste like packing peanuts. Must one sacrifice flavor for health? Choosing Wisely Here are some tips that can help: Read the Nutrition Facts label. Information on the front of the box can be misleading. For example, a cereal claiming to be “low in sugar” might not be so healthful in terms of fat, whole grains, or sodium. The label and the ingredi Continue reading >>

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