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Diabetic Blister Treatment

Kills Infection-causing Bacteria.

Kills Infection-causing Bacteria.

More than 3X the bacteria-fighting power of other products* to stop the germs that delay diabetic blisters from healing Relieves blisters of burning and discomfort Customer report relief within 1 to 7 days‡ Designed for easy, at-home use: no complicated therapies or procedures Eliminates Bacteria for Fast Relief and Diabetic Blister Closure What Is A Diabetic Blister: Diabetic blisters, also known as bullosis diabeticorum or diabetic bullae, may develop in individuals with diabetes. The condition is rare, only affecting about one-half of one perfect of those with the disease. Fortunately, when treated proactively, these blisters are not harmful and do not leave scars in most cases. Here are the symptoms to look out for when dealing with diabetic blisters: Blisters appear most commonly on feet and legs (rarely will they appear on hands and fingers, but it is possible) Blisters may resemble a burn, with an irregular shape, clear, containing sterile liquid May notice a burning sensation or discomfort (not common) These blisters may show up for no apparent reason, and since diabetics experience neuropathy (lasting numbness), they may be hard to detect. It is essential for individuals with diabetes to scan over their bodies at least once a day to make sure there are no blisters to be treated. If left unattended or unrecognized, blisters can become infected and grow into serious wounds, sores, and ulcers. Unfortunately, there is no single known cause for diabetic blisters. Researchers seem to think that a decreased ability to sustain an injury may play a role in their cause. What is known is that most people who develop these blisters have been diagnosed with diabetes for years or have had several complications from the disease. To treat diabetic blisters, it is important t Continue reading >>

Should You Pop A Blister On Your Foot?

Should You Pop A Blister On Your Foot?

This is the most common question I get about blisters! I'm a big fan of popping a foot blister, but only in certain circumstances. Pop. Burst. Puncture. Drain. Lance. It’s the same question. Should I open it up and get the fluid out? Do a quick scan of the internet and you’ll find about 50% against and 50% for popping. And some recognise there's a place for both interventions. What's missing is the practical information you need to decide whether your blister needs to be lanced or left alone. Here's the question you should be asking yourself: Deciding how to treat a foot blister - to pop or not to pop! ©iancorless.com - all rights reserved Because it depends entirely on your blister (size, location, your foot) and your situation (for example, are you about to leave home to run a marathon, half way through the race or have you just finished?). I’ll demonstrate the point further. But first, it helps to properly understand the risks associated with popping a blister. What are the risks of popping blisters on the feet? Dealing with the pain of a foot blister, the inconvenience of blister treatment and the downtime in waiting for it to resolve is bad enough. But an infection is a whole different story. It makes your blister more sore, requires more of your attention and things can go nasty quickly. So you need medical help close at hand. And let's face it, while they're tucked away in your shoes, feet spend a lot of time in a dirty, dark, warm, moist environment that lends itself to bacterial infection. And when not in shoes, out feet are what connects us to the ground - a source of limitless germs. So foot blisters are particularly prone to infection. Signs your blister is infected Pus Increasing pain, swelling, redness and warmth An infected blister requires at leas Continue reading >>

Diabetes Skin Disorders

Diabetes Skin Disorders

Diabetes can cause complications affecting all parts of the body, including the skin. The American Diabetes Association reports that up to 33 percent of people with diabetes have diabetes-related skin disorders at some point in their lives. Skin disorders linked to diabetes Diabetic dermopathy: Symptoms are oval or circular scaly patches on the skin, ranging in color from light to dark brown. Commonly called "shin spots," these patches typically appear on the lower legs. Medical treatment is traditionally not required. Diabetic blisters: People with high blood glucose levels are especially at risk for this rare disorder. Symptoms are sores on the hands, fingers, feet, and toes, and occasionally on the legs and arms. The blisters are relatively painless and, in most cases, heal on their own. They commonly afflict individuals with poor blood sugar control or those with diabetic neuropathy. Vitiligo. Vitiligo is a skin disorder that affects the coloration of the skin. More commonly found in individuals with type 1 diabetes, vitiligo occurs when cells that produce pigment are destroyed. This leads to the discoloration of the skin, most often in patches. Treatment options include tattoos (micropigmentation) and topical steroids. Acanthnosis nigricans: Symptoms are raised patches of tan or brown skin. Affected areas usually include the neck, armpits, and groin. It is especially common in overweight people with type 2 diabetes. There is currently no cure or treatment for acanthnosis nigricans, although weight loss may help improve the condition. Eruptive xanthomatosis: More common in people whose diabetes is not under control, and in young men with type 1 diabetes, although those with type 2 diabetes also are at risk. Symptoms are firm, yellow, pea-sized blisters. Parts of the Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Problems

Diabetic Foot Problems

People with diabetes are at risk for foot problems. This handout explains why these problems occur and what you can do to protect your feet. Why are foot problems so common in people with diabetes? In people with diabetes, high blood glucose can cause two complications — both of which can result in foot problems. You may have one or both of these: Nerve damage (neuropathy). Nerve damage from high blood glucose usually begins in the hands and feet. It can cause painful symptoms — tingling, aching, or throbbing — but it can also reduce sensation. If you can’t really feel cold, heat, or pain in your feet, it’s easy to ignore an injury or infection. And unfortunately, in people with diabetes, even a small blister or stubbed toe can become serious. Poor circulation. High blood glucose can damage your blood vessels and reduce blood flow to your feet. This means that injuries take longer to heal. Over time, poor circulation in your feet can even change the shape of your feet and toes. This can cause problems with the way you walk. Are foot problems really that serious? In people with diabetes, yes — foot problems can be very serious. In the worst cases, they can lead to deformed feet, wounds that won’t heal, and serious infections that require surgery. In fact, diabetes-related foot problems are a leading reason for leg and foot amputations. Fortunately, good care can lower your chance of serious problems. You and your medical caregivers can work together to care for your feet. However, the most important things are those you do (and don’t do) on your own to protect your feet. Work with your diabetes care team To protect and treat your feet, take these steps with your doctor, diabetes educator, or other provider: Follow your diabetes treatment plan to control y Continue reading >>

6 Key Factors In Treating A Diabetic Wound

6 Key Factors In Treating A Diabetic Wound

Diabetic wound treatment methods require high attention to achieve healing. By 2030, it is estimated that more than 550 million people around the world will have diabetes. Approximately 25% of these diabetic patients will develop foot ulcers during their lifetime, which often require advanced diabetic wound treatment to prevent complications. To help achieve the optimal healing environment and protect against problems, there are six key factors to consider when treating diabetic wounds. 1. Wound Assessment Diabetic wounds fall into three categories: neuropathic, ischemic, and neuroischemic. Knowing the distinct features of each wound category is essential to identifying wound progression, infection, and healing. Failure to properly identify the type of wound that exists can lead to an ineffective diabetic wound treatment plan, causing long-term complications or amputation. 2. Tissue Debridement Wound debridement, or the removal of necrotic tissue from a wound, will reduce pressure, stimulate wound healing, allow for the inspection of underlying tissue, help with secretion or wound drainage, and optimize a wound dressing’s effectiveness. Clinicians typically recommend sharp debridement by scalpel or scissors, but there are other tissue-removal treatments they may recommend, including larval, autolytic, and ultrasonic. Only an experienced practitioner who knows which section of the tissue to remove without damaging blood vessels, nerves, or tendons should perform a debridement procedure. Understanding the importance of debridement to your diabetic wound treatment plan is often essential with advanced diabetic wounds. 3. Infection Control Infections are the top concern in any diabetic wound treatment plan. Due to the high morbidity and mortality rates associated with dia Continue reading >>

Foot Blisters

Foot Blisters

A blister is a pocket of fluid which forms a bubble in the upper layers of the skin. Blisters on the feet are normally caused by a mixture of friction and pressure. They can be very painful. The word "blister" comes from the Old French "blostre" which meant a nodule caused by leprosy. In this article What is a blister? A blister is a fluid pocket in the skin which develops when the upper skin layers separate and the space between them fills with serum. Serum is the liquid part of the blood - it contains protective substances like antibodies. The appearance is of a bubble on the skin. Sometimes a small blood vessel will bleed into the bubble, in which case rather than being clear it will be red. Occasionally the contents of a blister will become infected and the contents will become cloudy as the blister may then contain pus. Most blister formation is a self-defence strategy by the body. The purpose is to protect the skin beneath from further injury and encourage fast healing. The associated pain also has a protective effect. Blisters are caused by pressure and friction and we are therefore less likely to continue the activity that causes them if they become increasingly painful. What causes foot blisters? Blisters are most common on the feet and ankles, as these are the areas most subject to heat and pressure in most people. Generally blisters may be caused by: Friction - the most common cause in the feet. Direct damage to the skin by corrosive substances or heat. Some infectious diseases (for example, chickenpox). Some inherited diseases (for example, pompholyx). This article focuses on foot blisters caused by friction. Areas of the foot will suffer repeated friction if you: Have poorly fitting or rigid shoes which rub as you walk. Wear high heels (which force pressure Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Skin Complications

Diabetes And Skin Complications

Copyright © 2005 American Diabetes Association From Reprinted with permission from The American Diabetes Association Diabetes can affect every part of the body, including the skin. As many as one third of people with diabetes will have a skin disorder caused or affected by diabetes at some time in their lives. In fact, such problems are sometimes the first sign that a person has diabetes. Luckily, most skin conditions can be prevented or easily treated if caught early. Some of these problems are skin conditions anyone can have, but people with diabetes get them more easily. These include bacterial infections, fungal infections, and itching. Other skin problems happen mostly or only to people with diabetes. These include diabetic dermopathy, necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum, diabetic blisters, and eruptive xanthomatosis. Bacterial Infections Several kinds of bacterial infections occur in people with diabetes. One common type is styes. These are infections of the glands of the eyelid. Another kind of infection is boils, or infections of the hair follicles. Carbuncles are deep infections of the skin and the tissue underneath. Infections can also occur around the nails. Inflamed tissues are usually hot, swollen, red, and painful. Several different organisms can cause infections. The most common ones are the Staphylococcus bacteria, also called staph. Once, bacterial infections were life threatening, especially for people with diabetes. Today, death is rare, thanks to antibiotics and better methods of blood sugar control. But even today, people with diabetes have more bacterial infections than other people do. Doctors believe people with diabetes can reduce their chances of these infections in several ways (see “Good Skin Care” on page 15). If you think you have a bac Continue reading >>

Common Skin Conditions For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Common Skin Conditions For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Common skin conditions for people with type 2 diabetes People with diabetes are at an increased risk of developing skin problems , or from complications of skin problems that have not been spotted soon enough, often because of reduced skin sensation. Most skin conditions can be prevented and successfully treated if caught early. However, if not cared for properly, a minor skin condition in a person with diabetes can turn into a serious problem with potentially severe consequences. Scleroderma diabeticorum : This condition causes a thickening of the skin on the back of the neck and upper back. This condition is rare but can affect people with type 2 diabetes . The treatment involves bringing your blood glucose level under control. Lotions and moisturisers may help soften the skin. Diabetic dermopathy: Also called shin spots, this condition develops as a result of changes to the blood vessels that supply the skin. Dermopathy appears as a shiny round or oval lesion of thin skin over the front lower parts of the lower legs. The patches do not hurt, although rarely they can be itchy or cause burning. Treatment is usually not necessary. Diabetic blisters (bullosis diabeticorum): In rare cases, people with diabetes develop blisters that resemble burn blisters. These blisters can occur on the fingers, hands, toes , feet , legs or forearms. Diabetic blisters are usually painless and heal on their own. They often occur in people who have severe diabetes and diabetic neuropathy . Bringing your blood glucose level under control is the treatment for this condition. Disseminated granuloma annulare : This condition causes sharply defined, ring or arc-shaped areas on the skin. These rashes most often occur on the fingers and ears , but they can occur on the chest and abdomen . The ras Continue reading >>

Skin Conditions And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Skin Conditions And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Everyone knows about the major long- and short-term complications of diabetes. But what many newly-diagnosed patients might not realize, is that skin conditions often come with having diabetes. My first exposure to skin conditions was a fungal infection. I can remember saying to the trainer that I could not have a fungal infection because my A1c was 6%. A specific over-the-counter anti-fungal ointment stopped the fungal infection process, and now I travel with this small tube just in case. I use it in the summer when I'm in the water and I develop itchy skin on my upper shoulder always in the same place. It's gone, and I'm happy. First, we want you to know that people who do not have diabetes get these skin conditions also, but as with many other complications, we tend to get them more often. About one-third of people with diabetes will have a skin disorder caused or affected by diabetes at some time. In fact, doctors report noting the presence of skin disorders before they diagnose diabetes. Second, if you think you have one of the skin conditions outlined in this article, please see your physician right away. Don't wait. Finally, we end this article with some easy ways to protect your skin when you have diabetes (either type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes). Skin Conditions that Can Affect People with Diabetes Bacterial Infections: People with diabetes appear to suffer more bacterial infections than the general population. There are several kinds of infections that can affect those of us with diabetes. One is a sty, which is an infection of the glands of the eyelids. A second type is a boil, which are infections of the hair follicles. Carbuncles are deep infections of the skin and the tissue underneath. Infections can also occur around the nails. We all know bacterial i Continue reading >>

Diabetic Bullae Raman Bhutani, Shernaz Walton

Diabetic Bullae Raman Bhutani, Shernaz Walton

REVIEW Abstract Bullosis diabeticorum is an uncommon dermatological man- ifestation of diabetes. Bullae can appear spontaneously in diabetic patients. The majority of patients have pre-existing complications such as nephropathy and neuropathy. The condition is generally self-limiting and the diagnosis is often made clinically with, the appearance of painless, tense blisters arising from non-inflamed skin. Br J Diabetes Vasc Dis 2015;15:8-10 Key words: diabetic bullae, bullosis diabeticorum, diabetes Introduction Diabetic bullae, also known as bullosis diabeticorum, is a spon- taneous, distinct, non-inflammatory, blistering condition of the skin predominantly seen in patients with diabetes mellitus with a distal distribution. The condition was first reported in 1930 by Kramer.1 Later, Rocca and Pereyra2 in 1963 described this lesion as “like burn-induced blisterâ€. In 1967, Cantwell and Martz3 coined the term, “bullosis diabeticorumâ€. The majority of patients with bullous disease of diabetes have associated nephropathy and neuropathy, leading to the hypoth- esis of an underlying associated local sub-basement membrane- zone connective-tissue alteration and micro-angiopathy causing blisters. A lower threshold of suction-induced blister formation4 has led to the theory that trauma is a possible aetiological factor. Spontaneous bullae may be the first sign of underlying impaired glycaemic control.5 The overall prevalence of diabetic bullae is under-reported. Annual incidence is variable. The incidence in a diabetic popu- lation in the United States has been reported to be around 0.5%, being twice as common in males with an age range of 17–84 years.6 However, a study from the Indian sub-continent suggested an incidence of 2%.7 Characteristics Diabeti Continue reading >>

What Are Some Treatments For Diabetic Blisters?

What Are Some Treatments For Diabetic Blisters?

Health Medications & Vitamins Diabetic blisters, also known as bullosis diabeticorum or diabetic bullae, are painless lesions that appear most commonly on the legs, feet and toes of diabetic patients, according to Healthline. The blisters can be up to 6 inches in size and normally appear in clusters. There is no known cause, but the blisters are more common among patients who do not have their blood sugar under control and patients with diabetic nerve damage. To rule out a more serious skin condition, Healthline suggests consulting a dermatologist. If the blister is large, the doctor may drain some of the fluid to keep the skin intact and prevent accidental rupturing. To relieve itching, the doctor may prescribe a steroidal cream. Call your doctor immediately if you experience redness around the blister, pain, fever, swelling or warmth radiating from the lesion. If you have diabetes, it is important to consistently inspect your skin for blisters and lesions, notes Healthline. To prevent blisters, examine your feet and legs every day, wear socks and shoes that aren't too tight, and apply sunscreen when out in the sun, as ultraviolet light can cause blisters in some patients. Learn more about Medications & Vitamins Continue reading >>

How To Look After Your Feet If You Have Diabetes

How To Look After Your Feet If You Have Diabetes

It's especially important to look after your feet if you have diabetes. Here's how to take care of your feet and advice on when to get professional help. Diabetes can reduce the blood supply to your feet and cause a loss of feeling known as peripheral neuropathy. This can mean foot injuries do not heal well, and you may not notice if your foot is sore or injured. "The risk of complications can be greatly reduced if you're able to bring your blood sugar levels under control," says foot specialist Mike O'Neill. "Ensure that your blood pressure and cholesterol levels are also monitored and controlled with medication if needed." Foot care tips if you have diabetes See a private or NHS podiatrist at least once a year. You should be eligible for an NHS podiatrist if you have a long term condition such as diabetes. Ask your GP for a referral or find a local podiatrist. Keep your feet clean and free from infection. Wear shoes that fit well and don't squeeze or rub. Ill-fitting shoes can cause corns and calluses, ulcers and nail problems. Never walk barefoot, especially in the garden or on the beach on holidays to avoid cuts and try to avoid sitting with your legs crossed so you don't constrict your blood circulation. Cut or file your toenails regularly. Get corns or hard skin treated by a podiatrist. Stop smoking to protect your feet If you have diabetes, it's important to try to stop smoking. Smoking impairs the blood circulation, particularly in people with diabetes. It can seriously worsen foot and leg problems. Read more about how the NHS can help you to stop smoking. When to see a doctor Seek treatment from your GP or podiatrist if blisters or injuries do not heal quickly. You should see your doctor urgently if: you notice breaks in the skin of your foot, or discharge seep Continue reading >>

3 Steps To Treating A Blister

3 Steps To Treating A Blister

A small blister from a new pair of shoes might seem harmless at first, but that tiny mark can lead to some big problems if you're not careful. If the blister breaks, germs can get into your foot. These germs can cause not only an infection on the skin, but also in the bone. Bone infections are very difficult to treat, and when they worsen, you could end up with an amputation. Here are three steps to prevent a blister from turning into a serious problem: Wash your feet carefully in gentle soap and water and dry them thoroughly. Then put a small amount of antibiotic ointment on a dressing and cover the wound. Next, although a blister may seem like a small concern, place a call to someone on your medical team. You'll probably get a foot exam and possibly an antibiotic to prevent infection. Last, stop wearing the shoes that caused the blister, even if you think you're on your way to "breaking them in." A comfortable pair of shoes is one of the best investments you can make. And remember, they must properly fit your feet at the store. This kind of careful attention can prevent future problems. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Problems

Diabetic Foot Problems

What foot problems can be caused by diabetes? Diabetes mellitus can cause serious foot problems. These conditions include diabetic neuropathy (loss of normal nerve function) and peripheral vascular disease (loss of normal circulation). These two conditions can lead to: Diabetic foot ulcers: wounds that do not heal or become infected Infections: skin infections (cellulitis), bone infections (osteomyelitis) and pus collections (abscesses) Gangrene: dead tissue resulting from complete loss of circulation Charcot arthropathy: fractures and dislocations that may result in severe deformities Amputation: partial foot, whole foot or below-knee amputation What are the symptoms of a diabetic foot problem? ​Symptoms of neuropathy may include the loss of protective sensation or pain and tingling sensations. Patients may develop a blister, abrasion or wound but may not feel any pain. Decreased circulation may cause skin discoloration, skin temperature changes or pain. Depending on the specific problem that develops, patients may notice swelling, discoloration (red, blue, gray or white skin), red streaks, increased warmth or coolness, injury with no or minimal pain, a wound with or without drainage, staining on socks, tingling pain or deformity. Patients with infection may have fever, chills, shakes, redness, drainage, loss of blood sugar control or shock (unstable blood pressure, confusion and delirium). How do some of these complications develop? ​Neuropathy is associated with the metabolic abnormalities of diabetes. Vascular disease is present in many patients at the time of diagnosis of diabetes. Ulcers may be caused by external pressure or rubbing from a poorly fitting shoe, an injury from walking barefoot, or a foreign object in the shoe (rough seam, stone or tack). Infecti Continue reading >>

The Dos And Don’ts Of Treating Blood Blisters On Your Feet

The Dos And Don’ts Of Treating Blood Blisters On Your Feet

Whether you walk, hike, run, or dance, your feet can take a lot of abuse. But when you’re particularly active, you can easily injure or otherwise damage your feet, especially if you have ill-fitting socks and shoes. With enough friction, a blister can form on your toes or the sole of your foot. In some cases, a simple blister can turn into a blood blister. But while you may be used to the sight of a common blister, you may be unsure of what to do with a blood blister. To help you better care for your blood blister, we’ll address several dos and don’ts for treating this minor injury. We’ll also talk about what a blood blister is and what causes it. What Is a Blood Blister? A blood blister is essentially a blister where the blood vessels beneath the blister have been damaged. As a result, the blood leaks into the blister. Most often, blood blisters form in bony areas, but they can develop in softer areas as well. What Causes a Blood Blister? Blood blisters can form in areas under excess pressure and friction. For instance, if you go running for an extended period of time and the bony parts of your feet constantly rub against the inside of your shoes, you might develop a blood blister on your toes or the side of your foot. You can also get a blood blister when your skin has been severely pinched. The pressure can easily damage the blood vessels without actually breaking the skin. How Do You Treat a Blood Blister? Blood blisters can be painful, and you may feel tempted to lance the blister as soon as possible. But there are wrong and right ways to treat your blood blister. For a full, quick recovery, you want to take the proper steps. Below, we’ll discuss some of the most common dos and don’ts for treating your blood blister. DO Elevate and Ice Your Blister Once Continue reading >>

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