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Bears And Diabetes | Oupblog

Bears And Diabetes | Oupblog

Eric Chivian , MD, is the founder and Director of the Center for Health and the Global Environment at Harvard Medical School. In 1980, he co-founded, with three other Harvard faculty members, International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War , which won the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize. Aaron Bernstein , MD has been affiliated with the Center for Health and the Global Environment since 2001 and is currently a resident in the Boston Combined Residency in Pediatrics . Together they wrote Sustaining Life: How Human Health Depends on Biodiversity which presents a comprehensive review of how human medicines, biomedical research, the emergence and spread of infectious diseases, and the production of food all depend on biodiversity. Chivian was recently interview on Canadas The Hour, you can watch him here . In the excerpt below from the book we learn more about the importance of Polar Bears. Nine species of bears are listed on the IUCNs 206 Red List of Threatened Animal Species, including the Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus), the Giant Panda (Alluropoda melanoleuca) and the Asiatic Black Bear (Ursus thibetanus). In 2005, the Polar Bear Specialist Group of the IUCN Species Survival Commission reviewed the status of the Polar Bear and decided to list it as a Vulnerable species, increasing its degree of threat from Lower Risk, given the projected loss of habitat resulting from global climate change. And in 2006, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service began a review to consider whether Polar Bears should also be protected under the Endangered Species Act, a decision that is expected in early 2008. Influencing this decision will be a series of studies released in September 2007 by the U.S. Geological Survey predicting that two-thirds of the worlds Polar Bears will be lost by 2050 beca Continue reading >>

Children With Diabetes - The Travels Of Rufus And Ruby

Children With Diabetes - The Travels Of Rufus And Ruby

The trip was the idea of 8 year old Colleen Crowley of Bronxville, New York and her mother, Rita. Parents who participate in online support through the Children With Diabetes web site learned of the Crowley's idea, asked if their families could participate, and a formal plan for Rufus' travels was underway. Ten Rufus bears and four Ruby bears are now on a two-year-long excursion that will span four continents and visit well over 300 families with Type 1 diabetes. Rufus and Ruby will travel from CWD family to CWD family, spending several days in each city or town. They will be a visiting Ambassador-Bear, sharing information about Type 1 Diabetes, assisting with local advocacy efforts, and basically having a very good time with his CWD friends. Their adventures will be documented in journals that travels with them from place to place. The journal entries and photos will also be documented online (see below). In this way, children with type 1 diabetes can read about other families with type 1 diabetes, share their stories, and add their own stories when Rufus or Ruby comes to visit. This is an opportunity for an incredible learning experience, and an opportunity to share "a day in the life" of other children and families who share the same challenges! Rufus and Ruby have retired from their trips, but you can still read about their adventures below. Continue reading >>

For Diabetic Kids, A Game-changer In The Form Of A Stuffed Bear

For Diabetic Kids, A Game-changer In The Form Of A Stuffed Bear

For Diabetic Kids, A Game-Changer in the Form of A Stuffed Bear For Diabetic Kids, A Game-Changer in the Form of A Stuffed Bear U.S. President Barack Obama poses with Hannah Chung, of Providence, Rhode Island as he views White House Demo Day exhibits on the state floor of the White House on August 4, 2015 in Washington, DC. Pool / Getty Images When faced with difficult situations, some follow the mantra of "just grin and bear it." Hannah Chung and her creative partner adopted a more literal interpretation of the saying for her new invention. Developed by start-up Sproutel, Jerry the Bear teaches young children with type-1 diabetes how to cope with and manage the disease. Co-founders Hannah Chung and Aaron Horowitz created Jerry based on personal experiences. Horowitz, Sproutel CEO, had human growth hormone deficiency growing up, and had to use injections daily. He said that experience gave him a lot of empathy for the children that hes now helping. Chung, the company's chief creative officer, said she had lost her grandparents from complications resulting from type-2 diabetes and when she was about 11 or 12, her father was diagnosed with the same disease. She watched not only how it affected him, but how it impacted the rest of her family. "In order to make sure he wasn't feeling alone, all of our family members had to change our lifestyle and diet," she said. "I just learned how hard it is to adjust your lifestyle to this kind of condition." U.S. President Barack Obama (C) meets Hannah Chung (L) and Aaron Horowitz (R) of Sproutel, their tech company that produces Jerry, a stuffed bear that teaches healthy habits to children.JONATHAN ERNST / Reuters The pair met at Northwestern University's Design for America, which Chung co-founded - an effort to bring together studen Continue reading >>

Jerry The Bear And Other Diabetic News

Jerry The Bear And Other Diabetic News

By Kiki, March 31, 2012 at 6:22 pm Jerry the Bear has diabetes . He needs your help to maintain his blood sugar and be injected with insulin when he eats food, like chicken and fish. He has cool sites to inject his insulin and has a lot of friends who wish they had met him years earlier. The bear was created by Hannah Chung, who lost her grandfather to Type 2 diabetes, and Aaron Horowitz, who was diagnosed with Human Growth Hormone Deficiency and had to take shots for four years. Both sympathetic to the cause found it equally important to focus on the issue of children learning how to maintain their health as they grow up. The screen in the middle of his belly displays information about his health, kind of like our pumps, and he laughs when tickled. Similar to the diabetic Barbie, which I wrote about a couple of blogs ago, this bear teaches children how to deal with their health through this model toy, actively keeping him healthy as they learn to keep themselves healthy. Can I get on the list for this? If I could have learned the consequences, cause and effect relationship between my food and my blood sugar earlier in life, I think it would have been better. Regardless, I think this is a great idea created by two incredibly intelligent individuals, both students at Northwestern University. Because I'm a Twitter stalker, I looked them both up. That and I read all about them, thanks to previous press coverage. It's not enough to say that they're progressive and motivated thinkers. Social Entrepreneur // Artist // Maker // Ocean Lover And their tweets talk about Jerry, mostly, of which they are both pretty passionate. There have always been talk of the artificial pancreas getting closer and closer to becoming a reality. What is the artificial pancreas, you ask? Well, it' Continue reading >>

Why Fat Grizzlies Don't Get Diabetes Like We Do

Why Fat Grizzlies Don't Get Diabetes Like We Do

Why Fat Grizzlies Don't Get Diabetes Like We Do Why Fat Grizzlies Don't Get Diabetes Like We Do Bears can eat like pigs, hibernate for months and still be healthy. This seems so unfair. Tim Shobe/iStockphoto hide caption Bears can eat like pigs, hibernate for months and still be healthy. This seems so unfair. Sometimes nature comes up with elegant solutions to difficult problems, like how to gain weight and not get diabetes. Take, for instance, the grizzly bear. How does this 750-pound mammal survive long, lean winters? Well, it just gets really fat beforehand and then sleeps the hungry season away. Grizzly bears can easily double their body fat in the months leading up to hibernation. For us humans, this kind of weight gain could result in some pretty serious health consequences one of the most common being Type 2 diabetes. But grizzly bears are adept at staying healthy despite their dramatic fluctuations in weight, reports a study published Tuesday in Cell Metabolism. According to the report, the grizzly's ability to pack on the pounds and then use that energy efficiently during hibernation might have to do with the surprising way that its body responds to the hormone insulin. If Polar Bears Can Eat A Ton Of Fat And Be Healthy, Why Can't We? "The results were so different from what we see in humans and rodents that we were all very skeptical at first," says Kevin Corbit, a senior scientist at Amgen Inc. , a biotechnology firm in Thousand Oaks, Calif., who led the research team. "This was a complete surprise," he says. Amgen is interested in the potential this research has to help treat obesity and diabetes. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, and it instructs fat, liver and muscle tissue to suck up blood sugar and convert it into fat. In humans, weight gai Continue reading >>

Build-a-bear Diabetes Kit (hooray!)

Build-a-bear Diabetes Kit (hooray!)

Summary: Build-A-Bear has added a Diabetes Kit to their accessory line that includes an insulin pump, glucose meter, and lancing device. It retails for $10 and is available online and in select stores. I have a few friends who have many, many stuffed animals from Build-A-Bear and their collections seem to be constantly growing. Qs collection would grow exponentially if we had a BAB store in our town, but she only gets to shop for them in person when we travel. I was on Facebook recently and one of my friends (Hi, Stacey!) posted a picture of her newest bear. And it was wearing an insulin pump! A bunch of us T1Ds and parents of T1D kiddos instantly commented wanting to know where we, too, could get an insulin pump for our bears. I immediately reached out to Build-A-Bear wanting to know more. They were kind enough to send us the Diabetes Kit so we could see it in person and share it with you. Im awaiting answers to some questions I have about the how and why BAB decided to add it to their accessory line. But I really wanted to share this with you as soon as possible in case you are looking for one more special holiday gift for your child with diabetes. The Diabetes Kit is available online and in select stores (you can do a search on the product page for stores near you) and sells for $10. It includes an insulin pump on a waistband, a glucose meter, and a lancing device. Q thinks its so cute, especially the heart on the meter, and immediately her bear was diagnosed with diabetes. (And you are never too old to play with bears. Am I right?) If you have a Lenny the Lion , which is made by Build-A-Bear and is available to Medtronic insulin pump users, this would be an awesome accessory. But how cool is it that you can now accessorize any of the many BAB animals with his or he Continue reading >>

Jerry The Bear Helps Diabetic Kids Learn To Manage Their Own Blood Sugar

Jerry The Bear Helps Diabetic Kids Learn To Manage Their Own Blood Sugar

Jerry The Bear Helps Diabetic Kids Learn to Manage Their Own Blood Sugar If youre a young kid diagnosed with diabetes, it can be hard to submit to all the self-monitoring that people with the disease must do each and every day. Testing for blood sugar levels is particularly unpleasant, especially if youre the only one around having to go through the painful process. Thats whya new company calledSproutel has developed Jerry, a toy bear who also has diabetes. The toy is interactive, letting kids check his sugar levels with a simple squeeze of any of his fingers. If glucose is too high, a toy insulin pen along with the interactive touchscreen on the bears chest can be used to correct it. Moreover, Jerry can be fed various foods that come in the form of cards that the child can simply swipe across the bears mouth. The feedings have an effect on Jerrys blood glucose and the child learns the relationship in a direct and interactive manner, helping to overcome the same issues that the kid eventually has to come to terms with. The team behind the toyis currently raising money on Indiegogo to fully commercialize Jerry the Bear and to be able to offer it to as many diabetic kids as possible. Heres a quick demo of how Jerry lives and helps diabetic kids do the same: At Medgadget, we report on the latest medical technology news, interview leaders in the field, and file dispatches from medical events from around the world. Clinical Microbiology Congress 2018 means to unite the Professors, researchers, business mammoths, and technocrats to give a Clinical Microbiology Congress 2018 means to unite the Professors, researchers, business mammoths, an d technocrats to give a global gathering to the spread of unique research comes about, new thoughts and viable improvement and find progre Continue reading >>

#1 Pack And Jerry The Bear Diabetes New Zealand

#1 Pack And Jerry The Bear Diabetes New Zealand

Diabetes New Zealand has branches across the country with experienced staff and volunteers who help people live well with diabetes.Would you like to be contacted by your local branch? Yes. Please forward my details to the branch closest to me You will automatically be enrolled as a Diabetes New Zealand support member and receive: Access to our online resources and support services, including the quarterly Diabetes Wellness magazine and the Take Control Toolkit. Affiliation to Diabetes New Zealand (national office). I do not want to become a Diabetes New Zealand support member I confirm the information Ive supplied is correct: * Thank you for your #1 pack application. You should receive your pack within 15 working days. We will let you know when Jerry the bear is on his way. To join Diabetes New Zealand as a full member visit www.diabetes.org.nz For a small annual fee full members receive: access to our New Member Pack with all of our pamphlets on how to manage your diabetes to live well including access to the Take Control Toolkit a hard copy of our Diabetes Wellness magazine delivered to your door quarterly an electronic copy of Connect our monthly newsletter Continue reading >>

Jerry The Bear

Jerry The Bear

Jerry is currently available in the US through Beyond Type 1 Jerry is currently available in Canada through Diabetes Express By taking care of Jerry's diabetes, children gain hands-on practice with counting carbs, monitoring Jerry's blood sugar, and dosing Jerry with insulin. Kids care for Jerry using the virtual diabetes tools and the digital pantry in our app! Check Jerry's blood sugar by lancing Jerry's finger and adding a test strip to the glucometer! When Jerry's blood sugar goes high or low, Jerry speaks symptoms, encouraging kids to recognize how they feel. Use Jerry's insulin pen or pump to dose insulin. Learn about injection site rotation by using the injection sites on Jerry's arms, legs, belly, and butt. Feed Jerry a healthy diet or give him junk food! Either way, kids learn about the impact that carbs have on blood sugar, and learn carb counts for basic foods in Jerry's virtual kitchen. Follow along with Jerry's journey to train for the All Stars Games! All 21 interactive story books are paired with care tasks to reinforce important diabetes lessons. Our curriculum is co-designed with doctors, educators, and families to create educational content that kids love. Check Jerry's blood sugar by following the steps of lancing Jerry's finger and adding a test strip to the glucometer! When Jerry's blood sugar goes high or low, Jerry speaks symptoms, encouraging kids to recognize how they feel. Use Jerry's insulin pen or pump to dose insulin. Learn about injection site rotation by using the injection sites on Jerry's arms, legs, belly, and butt. Feed Jerry a healthy diet or give him junk food! Either way, kids learn about the impact that carbs have on blood sugar, and learn carb counts for basic foods in Jerry's virtual kitchen. Follow along with Jerry's journey to Continue reading >>

Teddy Bear With Diabetes Helps Children Through Diagnosis And Beyond

Teddy Bear With Diabetes Helps Children Through Diagnosis And Beyond

Teddy Bear with Diabetes Helps Children Through Diagnosis and Beyond Rufus, the teddy bear with diabetes, is full of love, but was born out of anger. Carol Cramer, the Lake Zurich, Illinois, mother who sewed the first Rufus bear, was inspired by the exasperation that followed her son Brians diagnosis with diabetes at age 3. I was angry because my son had to take on such a strong sense of bravery. He had to be even more brave than me, recalls Carol. Children should not have to endure taking on the role of hero. It just hurt me so much. Carol wanted to help her son with his feelings upon diagnosis, so she bought him a teddy bear and sewed patches on all of the bears injection sites and finger tips, where he would have to poke himself. Brian named the bear Rufus, and they began to face the world of diabetes together. Rufus helped Brian to not feel alone or different. Everyone loves a teddy bear, just for being a teddy bear, just as people love children just for being children, says Carol. Rufus helped to let Brian know that a child with diabetes is no more or less lovable a child. There are no labels. You are who you are because thats who you were created to be. Because Rufus helped Brian feel loved, Carol thought that other children, upon first being diagnosed, would also love a teddy bear with diabetes. When your child is first diagnosed, you and the child have to take in very scary terms-blindness, shots, pokes, you cant eat this-and its hard to tell with young children what theyre thinking. Carol approached the hospital where Brian was educated and, borrowing against her own life insurance policy, bought over 1300 bears, sewed the patches on all of them, and donated them to the hospital. But Carol knew she could not afford many more, and needed some help. She called t Continue reading >>

Far Cry 5 Adds A Diabetic Bear Named Cheeseburger To Its Long List Of Co-op Characters

Far Cry 5 Adds A Diabetic Bear Named Cheeseburger To Its Long List Of Co-op Characters

FAR CRY 5's newest Fangs for Hire is Cheeseburger, and he's amazing "The Fangs For Hire, Friends for Hire and Guns for Hire featureare all very intentional parts of Far Cry 5," explains Dan Hay, creative director of the title. "We hope that in including them in the game, players can experience the story with their friends, or use techniques to complete missions they perhaps otherwise wouldn't use themselves." You can recruit all sorts of different characters to help you fight through Far Cry 5: there are characters that specialise in sniping, there are characters that specialise in aerial combat, demolitions experts, truckers, and trained military firearms experts, too. If that's not your style, you can also recruit animals in the game in the form of 'Fangs for Hire'. Ubisoft has previously revealed the likes of Boomer - the loyal dog - that can snatch weapons from enemies and perform stealth takedowns (you can also pat him with a 'good boy!' even in the middle of battle). This new reveal shows there are other animals you can recruit, too. It seems to be able to get the bear - aptly named Cheeseburger - onside, you'll have to perform a mission that may involve breaking him out of captivity and feeding him fish... instead of his beloved cheeseburgers. Far Cry 5: NEW Screenshots and Concept Art Take a look at some brand new Far Cry 5 Screenshots and concept art Once you've recruited the bear, he'll be able to help you in combat. Whether you can mount the animal or not remains unclear (you could mount animals in previous Far Cry games...), but it seems pretty obvious that Cheeseburger will happily maul your enemies, provide a distraction if you want to sneak into somewhere unnoticed and provide all round good value for money. From material on show at an event we attended Continue reading >>

Child's Play: A Teddy Bear To Help Diabetic Kids Master Their Care

Child's Play: A Teddy Bear To Help Diabetic Kids Master Their Care

Child's Play: A Teddy Bear to Help Diabetic Kids Master Their Care Share on Facebook Click me! Share on Twitter Click me! Copy Link Can a teddy bear help kids with chronic illness take better care of themselves?A pair of recent Northwestern University graduates are trying to find out. Their creation Jerry the Bear combines robotics and artificial intelligence into an interactive teaching toy for children with Type 1 diabetes . Jerry has insulin injection patch sites, a pulsing heart, and a chest gadget that displays his blood glucose level. Jerrys diabetic owner will be able to monitor and maintain his health by feeding him food items like milk, fish, or chickenand give Jerry an insulin shot when he needs one. Jerry not only provides a loveable method to teach kids how to manage a serious condition, but helps shape an empathetic bond. By encouraging kids to practice medical procedures they'll need for the rest of their lives, Jerry the Bear empowers children with a chronic illness to take control of their own disease," creators Aaron Horowitz and Hannah Chung write about their invention. "We aim to accelerate independence, increase compliance, and ultimately facilitate healthy and happy lives for those affected by diabetes. The project grew out of a nationwide college nonprofit organization called Design for America , which Chung helped found in 2009 and now comprises more than 600 student members. Jerry the Bear, the group's first social innovation project, grew out of personal experiences:Chungs family has a history with Type 2 diabetes , while Horowitz was diagnosed with a hormone deficiency as a child. Once the pair expanded the project beyond the confines of their college campus, Horowitz received a Dell Social Innovation fellowship to help with startup costs. Lat Continue reading >>

Jdrf Bag Of Hope

Jdrf Bag Of Hope

When your child receives a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D), it can be an overwhelming time. As you navigate this challenging period of adjustment to life with T1D, you can find helpful information and support through the JDRF Bag of Hope®. The JDRF Bag of Hope is filled with useful resources for both the child who has been diagnosed with T1D and his or her caregivers. Along with educational materials, we’ve included a special friend — Rufus, the Bear with Diabetes® — to show your child he or she is not alone while learning to take shots and test blood sugar. Resources in your JDRF Bag of Hope include (but are not limited to): Rufus the Bear with Diabetes “Rufus Comes Home” book “Pink Panther: A First Book for Understanding Diabetes” JDRF materials with educational video links “CalorieKing” book ACCU-CHEK® Aviva Connect blood glucose meter Information about Novo Nordisk/JDRF educational book series Novo Nordisk adjustable measuring scoop Informational postcard about the support Lilly Diabetes offers families with a bookmark Lilly Diabetes literature on severe hypoglycemia management Discount coupon for a stylish medical ID bracelet by Hope Paige Designs for your child Babysitter Guide provided by Omnipod® Glucose tabs in an Omnipod® tin “My Trip to Quest Diagnostics” coloring and activity book The JDRF Bag of Hope Program is made possible by generous funding provided by Co-Presenting Sponsors: Roche and Quest Diagnostics, and Supporting Sponsors: Insulet, Lilly Diabetes, Novo Nordisk and Hope Paige Designs. Only available for children (16 and under) who reside in the United States. Live outside the US? Was this helpful? Continue reading >>

Beer And Health: Nine Questions Answered

Beer And Health: Nine Questions Answered

In honor of International Beer Day, an unofficial holiday that was observed on August 1, I thought I’d take the opportunity this week to focus on this well-loved beverage. Beer has been around for a long time. Evidence of beer dates back about 5,000 years (those ancient Sumerians surely knew how to have a good time). Archeologists have unearthed vessels from about 3,400 BC lined with beer residue. And the ancient Egyptians enjoyed beer as part of their daily lives — even children drank this bubbly brew. What is beer? According to the website A Perfect Pint, beer is an alcoholic beverage usually made from malted cereal grain such as barley that is flavored with hops (female flowers of the hop plant that impart a bitter flavor) and brewed by fermentation with yeast. (The fermentation process is what creates the alcohol.) Some craft beers are made with grains such as rice, corn, or sorghum instead of barley. What are the different types of beer? There are two main types of beer: ales and lagers. The difference lies in the temperature at which the beer is fermented and the type of yeast used. Ales are generally fermented at warmer temperatures than lagers and involve top-fermenting yeasts that rise to the surface of the liquid (lagers are made by a bottom-fermenting yeast). Ales come in a number of varieties, including India pale ale (IPA), Irish red ale, Flanders red ale, and Dunkelweizen. Lager varieties include Märzenbier, Munich Dunkel, and Doppelbock. How much alcohol is in beer? The alcohol content of beer typically ranges from roughly 2% to 12% but can vary considerably depending on the type. Most beers are, on average, about 5% alcohol. Alcohol content is based on volume. Light beer, by the way, is beer that contains less alcohol and/or fewer calories. What i Continue reading >>

How Fat Grizzly Bears Stay Diabetes-free

How Fat Grizzly Bears Stay Diabetes-free

Every fall, grizzly bears pack on the pounds in preparation for their winter hibernation. In humans, such extreme weight gain would likely lead to diabetes or other metabolic diseases, but the bears manage to stay healthy year after year. Their ability to remain diabetes-free, researchers have now discovered, can be chalked up to the shutting down of a protein found in fat cells. The discovery could lead to new diabetes drugs that turn off the same pathway in humans. The findings are “provocative and interesting,” says biologist Sandy Martin of the University of Colorado, Denver, who was not involved in the new work. “They found a natural solution to a problem that we haven’t been able to solve.” As people gain weight, fat, liver, and muscle cells typically become less sensitive to the hormone insulin—which normally helps control blood sugar levels—and insulin levels rise. In turn, that increased insulin prevents the breakdown of fat cells, causing a vicious cycle that can lead to full-blown insulin resistance, or diabetes. Get more great content like this delivered right to you! By signing up, you agree to share your email address with the publication. Information provided here is subject to Science's privacy policy. Developing new diabetes drugs has been hampered by the fact that findings from many mouse models of diabetes have not translated to humans. So Kevin Corbit, a senior scientist at Thousand Oaks, California–based drug company Amgen, decided to start looking at obesity and metabolic disease in other animals. “When I was thinking about things that are quite fat, one of the first things I thought of was bears, and what they do to prepare to go into hibernation,” he says. “But of course you don’t see bears running around with diabetes and Continue reading >>

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