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Flashback: Former Flower Mound Volleyball And Basketball Standout Lauren Cox Refused To Let Diabetes Stop Her

Flashback: Former Flower Mound Volleyball And Basketball Standout Lauren Cox Refused To Let Diabetes Stop Her

Flashback: Former Flower Mound volleyball and basketball standout Lauren Cox refused to let diabetes stop her Flower Mound's Lauren Cox (left) and Lovejoy's Sarah Langs hold their insulin pump as they pose for a portrait. Cox and Langs both have Type 1 diabetes. Contact Greg Riddle on Twitter: @DMNGregRiddle MURPHY Two of the state's premier high school athletes met for the first time two weeks ago, brought together for a photo shoot because of one of the many things they have in common. But as they stood in front of the camera, Flower Mound's Lauren Cox and Lovejoy's Sarah Langs weren't holding their All-America awards, Team USA jerseys or medals from international competition. They were showing the photographer their insulin pumps, which were the size of cellphones. And that got the two volleyball stars talking, as they discovered that they had used the same type of device to control their Type 1 diabetes. "I used to have that one," Cox said, looking at Langs' insulin pump as they compared the computerized apparatus that both must have at matches. Cox and Langs are among the approximately 1.25 million Americans who have Type 1 diabetes. Their bodies don't produce insulin like they should, and there is no cure for their disease. But both middle blockers earned all-state honors in 2014, and they were the only players from the Dallas area who were named preseason volleyball All-Americans by MaxPreps.com in 2015. "I think younger athletes need to know that they can play, too," Cox said. "Diabetes isn't going to affect how they play if they manage it and take care of it." In addition to managing her diet and insulin intake, Cox has to manage intense recruiting scrutiny. She is the nation's No. 1-ranked basketball recruit in the Class of 2016 and has had college coaches wa Continue reading >>

Playing Basketball - Diabetes And Sport

Playing Basketball - Diabetes And Sport

Basketball can be a very stop-start activity which can require careful management Basketball matches are technically quite short, with National Basketball Association (NBA) matches scheduled for 48 minutes across four quarters of 12 minutes. However, with fouls, timeouts, a 15-minute halftime and the ball going out-of-bounds, games can often last between two to two-and-a-half hours. As a result, the moderate intensity over a shorter period is altered by stoppages that can require relatively unique management of your diabetes. There are quite a few basketball players to note who have played professionally with type 1 diabetes, including Adam Morrison. Morrison won the 2006 Chevrolet Player of the Year award and two NBA championships playing for Los Angeles Lakers. Chris Dudley also played in the NBA, but is now retired, while Gary Forbes is currently a free agent having played for Denver Nuggets and Toronto Raptors. Managing diabetes when playing basketball Devising a routine is advised for regular basketball players, with a healthy meal and medication plan allowing for better control of your diabetes. This may require some trial and error in regard to insulin dosages at first, but basketball is a sport that can be quite easily managed once a routine has been established. Reducing your long lasting insulin is not essential for training or playing a game of basketball, however often you play. A routine of eating a balanced breakfast where you can accurately count carbohydrates and know how your body reacts is the best way to start a game day. This can also be applied to your lunch and tea, depending on what time you play. If you are eating within two-three hours of playing, it is advised to reduce your quick acting insulin dose with your meal prior to playing. [109] Howe Continue reading >>

Former Nba Player Hosts Camp For Type Diabetic Kids | Diabetic Connect

Former Nba Player Hosts Camp For Type Diabetic Kids | Diabetic Connect

Former NBA Player Hosts Camp for Type 1 Diabetic Kids Ex-Trail Blazer wants kids to learn how to manage diabetes while playing sports Former NBA player Chris Dudley has hosted a yearly summer basketball camp for kids with type 1 diabetes since the inception of the Chris Dudley Foundation in 1994. Sixteen seems to be his defining number. Defying the odds after a diagnosis with type 1 diabetes at age 16, he moved on to a successful NBA career with the Portland Trailblazers, which lasted 16 years. The Chris Dudley Basketball Camp is for kids 10-17 years old and is held in Vernonia, Ore. The goal of Dudley's camp and clinics is to "give kids a sense of how to play a vigorous sport while managing their diabetes." Kids from all over the country travel to Oregon to participate in this incredible one week opportunity. According to the Chris Dudley Foundation they have had special visits from the likes of Bob Medina (Trainer for the Portland Trailblazers), Terry Porter (former NBA player), Dr. Matt Corcoran (from diabetes training), Herb Brown (assistant coach in the NBA), Jeff Bannink (from Team Type 1) and Jerome Kersey (former NBA player). Due to the popularity of this camp and the limited number of slots available, only 75 campers are accepted. Enrollment opens Jan. 1 at midnight for the yearly July camp. Continue reading >>

List Of Sportspeople With Diabetes

List Of Sportspeople With Diabetes

Improvements in the management of diabetes mellitus in the twentieth century have made it possible for athletes to compete in sport at a professional level. While it is rare for professional athletes to have type 2 diabetes, a number of notable athletes have type 1. Literature on the management of diabetes in competitive sports focuses on the difficulties with balancing energy and insulin intake during periods of strenuous exercise.[1] The following is a list of notable sportspeople who have had diabetes during their careers. It does not include athletes diagnosed after retirement. Water-Polo Keegan Coleman, Pomona-Pitzer Sagehens (2017-current) driver/attacker, type 1 American football[edit] Jay Cutler, Denver Broncos (2006–2008) and Chicago Bears (2009–2016) quarterback, type 1.[2] Mike Echols, Tennessee Titans (2002–2004) cornerback, type 1.[3] Kendall Simmons, Pittsburgh Steelers (2002–2008) guard, type 1.[4] Jake Byrne, San Diego Chargers, tight end, type 1[5] John Chick, Saskatchewan Roughriders (2007–2009, 2013–), Indianapolis Colts (2010–11), Jacksonville Jaguars (2011–2012) defensive end, type 1[6] Patrick Peterson, Arizona Cardinals (2011–); cornerback, type 2 Mark Andrews, Oklahoma Sooners, tight end, type 1[7] Australian rules football[edit] Nathan Bassett, Adelaide, type 1.[8] Jamie Cripps, St Kilda and West Coast, type 1.[9] Jack Fitzpatrick, Melbourne, Hawthorn type 1.[10] Brandon Jack, Sydney, type 1.[11] Paddy McCartin, St Kilda, type 1.[12] Sam Reid, Western Bulldogs and Greater Western Sydney, type 1.[8] Dale Weightman, Richmond, type 1.[8] Baseball[edit] Ron Santo, Chicago Cubs (1960–1973) and Chicago White Sox (1974) infielder, type 1, deceased (2010 at age 70). Sam Fuld, Chicago Cubs (2007–2010), Tampa Bay Rays (2011–2013), Continue reading >>

Iguodala Dribbles To Stopdiabetes

Iguodala Dribbles To Stopdiabetes

Denver Nuggets swingman Andre Iguodala was the pride of Lanphier High in Springfield and the prep star who went onto to basketball fame at Arizona and eventually the NBA. But he wasnt the deadliest shooter in his peer group. One of Iguodalas friends from rival Litchfield H.S., a fellow named Mike McGraw, held that distinction, bolstered by his 208 3-pointers and 1,473 points. And yes, thanks to a gym teacher back in elementary school, McGraws nickname was Quick Draw. Iguodala knew another side of McGraw, though. He had Type 1 diabetes, the Nuggets player said in a phone interview Monday. I saw him giving himself insulin and doing the finger poke. He was always on top of his stuff. But hes lived a pretty healthy lifestyle, so hes been doing fine. McGraw went on to play at Illinois Wesleyan and hes back home now, part of McGraw Enterprises. His parents own about every McDonalds in Springfield, Iguodala said. Diabetes and a sensible intake of fast food were on Iguodalas mind Monday in his role as an NBA ambassador for Dribble to Stop Diabetes. Along with Indianas Danny Granger and WNBA star Tamika Catchings, Iguodala is working with the American Diabetes Association and pharmaceutical company Sanofi US on an awareness campaign. He, Granger and Catchings each participated in public-service announcements which can be seen on the Web at www.dribbletostopdiabetes.com to encourage fans to eat right and stay active to prevent and manage Type 2 diabetes and the complications that can result from it. Iguodala said his family, including one grandmother, has been touched by the disease and several cousins are considered to be at risk. So its easy for me to have that connection, he said. Its something we can prevent. Theres 26 million Americans who have it, and only about 10 percent Continue reading >>

12-year-old Becomes Uc Davis Basketball Team Captain After Fight With Diabetes | Fox40

12-year-old Becomes Uc Davis Basketball Team Captain After Fight With Diabetes | Fox40

DAVIS -- A new member joined the University of California, Davis men's basketball team Friday and he made quite the first impression with a perfect 2-pointer, earning him a big huddle with the players. UC Davis players towered over him, because he's only 12 years old. But Jackson Manning loves the game as much as everyone else on the court. "I just love the action in sports, and the gameplay and the strategy," Jackson told FOX40. Jackson spent 39 days in a hospital bed at UC Davis Medical Center. He had a collapsed lung and had to re-learn how to walk and talk. He found out he had Type 1 diabetes. Now he's healed and his story and strength are making an impact. "If you talk to the student athletes they'll tell you he's an inspiration to them," said Interim Director of Athletics Communications Eric Bankston. "Having him join the team, everyone's just thrilled that we can make this a reality." Jackson dreams of becoming a sports commentator. As he works toward that goal, he's already wise beyond his years. He has this advice to anyone fighting a tough battle: "Find inspiration. There's always something out there to inspire you to work hard, get out of the hospital and live normal lives. Because whatever disease you have, it won't stop you from living the life you're living currently or the life you've been planning to live." Jackson will be honorary team captain at Saturday night's game at UC Davis, which starts at 5 p.m. Continue reading >>

Nba Player Gary Forbes Scores On His Dreams

Nba Player Gary Forbes Scores On His Dreams

NBA Player Gary Forbes Scores on His Dreams Wake: The first thing pro basketball player Gary Forbes does in the morning is check his blood glucose and inject insulin using an insulin pen . Breakfast: "I just have a basic breakfast: eggs and toast or sometimes oatmeal," he says. Workout: During the off-season, Forbes trains in the early afternoon; when it's basketball season, it's off to practice in the morning. He takes his blood glucose meter with him and relies on the team's trainer for glucose tablets if he goes low. Lunch: "Usually for lunch it's either salad or something with protein to rebuild my energy back up," Forbes says. Pregame: On game days, Forbes eats dinner before he plays. "I eat some whole-grain pasta or ricenot too much, though," he says. Then, before the game, he checks his blood glucose to prepare for the exercise he'll be doing. Game time: "Usually at the games [my blood glucose is] pretty normal," he says. "The trainers check at halftime. I'll have a little bit of water, some Gatorade to manage my energy." In case of the occasional low blood glucose, Forbes's trainers also carry glucose tablets or candy. Postgame: Forbes tests his blood glucose again at the end of every game. "I'm pretty even [hours after a game]," he says. Dinner: If he's not playing a game, Forbes eats dinner at a regular time. He's a big fan of fresh, whole foods, which he ate a lot of when he played pro ball in Europe. "This summer I was really into my diet, eating a lot of grains and sweet potatoes and vegetables and seafood and fish," he says. Everything about Gary Forbes hints at vigor. The 6-foot, 7-inch basketball player is 220 pounds of pure muscle and goes head-to-head with some of the biggest, most athletic guys on the planet each week. He spends every day on the cour Continue reading >>

Chris Dudley Foundation

Chris Dudley Foundation

Chris Dudley was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at the age of 16 while living in San Diego. He was a sophomore in high school and was diagnosed soon after his basketball season was over. Chris was devastated and one of his biggest fears was not being able to play the sport he loved which was basketball. Thanks to a supportive health care team, Chris was not only able to play basketball again but went to the pinnacle of the sport and played in the NBA. Chris played 16 years in the league with diabetes where many players only last for a few years due to the intense competition to make an NBA squad. Chris started a non-profit Foundation in 1994 for people living with diabetes. The Foundation was a way Chris could help to ensure kids follow their dreams. In 1996, he started the internationally renowned basketball camp and provided many basketball clinics throughout the country in an effort to educate, inspire and empower kids to live active with diabetes. Chris often talks about how he has diabetes but diabetes doesnt have him. That is something he expresses at his camps and clinics. Chris was fortunate enough to be recognized during his playing career receiving the J. Walter Kennedy Citizenship Award in 1996 and the USA Todays most Caring Athlete Award in 1997 due to his work with the foundation. There have been many other prestigiousawards that recognize his community involvement and diabetes advocacy in support of education and research. Chris never let diabetes destroy his dreams andcontinues to share his experiences of living active with diabetes. One of his former NBA coaches had this to say about Chris. Chris Dudley epitomizes everything an NBA player should be. He worked extremely hard. He shared his gift of being a pro basketball player with children in the commun Continue reading >>

The Australian Pro Basketball Player With Type 1 Diabetes

The Australian Pro Basketball Player With Type 1 Diabetes

The Australian Pro Basketball Player with Type 1 Diabetes Lara McSpadden has helped lead two teams to championships in her young career. Standing at 64 with an imposing post presence, 18-year-old Lara McSpadden has morphed into one of the standout young players in Australias Womens National Basketball League (WNBL) in Australia. She is the youngest player on the roster for the Sydney Uni Flames, a team that is coming off a championship season during her rookie year. Before joining the Flames, McSpadden helped lead the U-17 Sapphires of Australia to a gold medal in the under-17 world championships in womens basketball, according to an SBS TV report. With the victory, the Sapphires became just the third team from Australia to win gold in that tournament. McSpadden might never have pursued a career in pro sports if her parents hadnt believed that children with Type 1 diabetes could stay active after diagnosis. At eight years old, she was diagnosed with Type 1 after her mother noticed the warning signs of the condition. Luckily for McSpadden, her parents encouraged her to continue to play sports after diagnosis, according to a JDRF Australia profile. To stay on the court, she must carefully monitor her glucose levels and eat well, but she says that this health-first approach to her career will help her stay healthy in the long run. McSpadden has drawn inspiration from other professional athletes who have learned to manage their type 1 diabetes and still go on to achieve successful careers. She credits inspiration to Australian Rugby player Brett Stewart, who has opened up publicly about his obstacles with Type 1 diabetes. She also has inspired others, and not just on the court. McSpadden has served as an ambassador for Diabetes NSW & ACT, an important Type 1 diabetes chari Continue reading >>

The Athletes Who Have Triumphed Over Type 1 Diabetes

The Athletes Who Have Triumphed Over Type 1 Diabetes

The athletes who have triumphed over type 1 diabetes Aidan Broddell first displayed symptoms of diabetes when he was 10 Talk of sport and Type 1 diabetes may evoke memories of Gary Mabbutt, the former Tottenham Hotspurdefender who represented his country at the highest level and lifted the UEFA Cup and FA Cup, twice, whilst often having to inject himself with insulin at half-time. But while the physical demands of diabetes are known to many sports fans, the battles that sufferers experience off the pitch, dealing with the psychological repercussions of their condition,are in need of greater recognition. Of the estimated fourmillion people with diabetes in the UK, 10 per centhave Type 1. This means they cannot produce insulin, instead having to self-administer the energy source either though injections or a pump. Its an essential, dailyroutine that can have debilitating emotional side-effects. Research by Diabetes.org.uk shows that people with Type 1 are twice as likely to suffer from depression and more prone to anxiety and eating disorders. But very few diabetics get access to the psychological support they need. Since men in particular struggle to ask for help, young athletes such as Exeter Chiefs' England rugby international Henry Slade , 22, and Southend United footballer Ben Coker , 25, are now encouraging diabetes sufferers to tackle depression head on. Southend United's Ben Coker developed diabetes when he was 15Credit:SNAP With diabetes, you are living with it 24/7, 365 days a year and yet you might just get a couple of hours with your GP each year to discuss it, explains Coker, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at the age of 15. When I was first diagnosed my biggest worry was that I may not be able to play football again, he says. Thankfully, the experts Continue reading >>

Flashback Friday: Adam Morrison Above The Rim With Basketball And Diabetes Control

Flashback Friday: Adam Morrison Above The Rim With Basketball And Diabetes Control

Flashback Friday: Adam Morrison Above the Rim With Basketball and Diabetes Control Adam Morrison, 22, is an NBA star that also has type 1 diabetes. He does not, however, have a horror story about his type 1 diagnosis that makes his ascension to NBA stardom seem like an in-your-face to an endocrinologists pessimistic predictions. His story does not rival the aspiring rock star or Olympic gymnast with type 1 who was told by their doom-and-gloom diagnosing physician, Youll never be a rock star/Olympic gymnast because of your type 1 diabetes! On the contrary, eight years ago, Morrisons endocrinologistDr. Ken Cathcart of Northside Internal Medicine in Spokane, Washingtontold Morrison at diagnosis that everything was going to be alright. For me, I was blessed with [Dr. Cathcart] who, from day one, said I can do whatever I wanted to as long as I take care of myself, says Morrison in a telephone interview with Diabetes Health. From the start, he let me know that if I took care of myself, I could play basketball. He never said, You have to place limitations on yourself. That positive reinforcement let me know that everything was going to be alright. I still have him as my endocrinologist today. Morrison was 14 at the time of his diagnosis, and his sites were firmly set on a future at the NCAA and pro basketball level. Despite being more disciplined than your typical 14 year old, Morrison admits that being told that he had type 1 was still overwhelming. You dont know the whole spectrum of diabetes when you are told that you have it, he says. Obviously, I was worried about a lot of things. You hear the horror stories about what can happen if you dont take care of your diabetes. Being as young as I was, that can put a lot of fear into you. If anything, being diagnosed with type 1 Continue reading >>

Great Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes

Great Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes

As a young diabetic, one of the most challenging adjustments to make after my diagnosis was figuring out how to continue participating in the sports that I had already been playing. Fortunately, by working with my parents and doctors, I was able to continue competing in the sports I loved. With advancements in diabetes management, this is now easier than ever. At one time, a type 1 diabetic person excelling in sports would have been unthinkable. Now, however, diabetes is a small side note in the story of many excellent athletes. With the advent and integration of health informatics into diabetes care, it is easier than ever for diabetic athletes to communicate with their healthcare team and figure out routines that work for them. Through the electronic collection, storage, and continuous analysis of blood sugar data, doctors and patients are now able to make more accurate, informed, and constant adjustments to management routines. This ability is a game changer for diabetic athletes, for whom precise blood sugar control is key. Moving forward, this will only continue to improve as healthcare technology continues to embrace the incredible rise of mobile technology, and patients have even greater abilities to communicate with their doctors. These improvements do not mean that being a world-class athlete as a diabetic is simple, or easy, however. By looking at some of the greatest type 1 diabetic athletes in history, all of us can learn a great deal from both their successes and hardships. It is also important for the diabetic community to celebrate the achievements of these athletes. Jay Cutler: American Football Jay Cutler has been the most notable recent diabetic athlete. This is because Cutler was already in the NFL at the time of his diagnosis, and is already one of t Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Being An Athlete With Diabetes

Everything You Need To Know About Being An Athlete With Diabetes

What do Scott Verplank (5 time PGA tour winner), Jay Cutler (Quarterback for the Denver Broncos and the Chicago Bears), and Jackie Robinson (Brooklyn Dodgers) all have in common? Besides having achieved immense success in their sports career, they have also achieved a measure of success when managing their diabetes. Had they not managed their diabetes very well, it is safe to say that they would have not been at the top of their careers. Their performance would have been impeded by signs and symptoms of low or high blood sugar. When not performing at their best on a professional team, sportsmen can be fired for poor performance. So if an athlete is managing their diabetes, they should not be kept from playing professional or any kind of sports when they have the ability to do so. With all of their team mates counting on them, athletes with diabetes have a lot to think about, prepare for, and do, because of the added complexity that their diabetes brings to the playing field. There is a list of people in sports with diabetes on Wikipedia. Looking at the length of the list, it is clear that it is possible to succeed in just about any sport with diabetes. There are literally people with diabetes in every sport imaginable. There are people in football, baseball, basketball, canoe slalom, cricket, cycling, soccer, golf, ice hockey, and more. What does it take to be an athlete with diabetes? To be a successful athlete with diabetes, it is going to take some stellar self-management skills. The most important thing that an athlete with diabetes has to worry about is low blood sugars. With proper nutrition and strict control, you too can hit the ball out of the park, or reach the finish line, (all without episodes of hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia). Hard work or low blood sugar? Continue reading >>

14 Winning Athletes With Diabetes

14 Winning Athletes With Diabetes

A few weeks ago, Kyle Love was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. This week he lost his job over the diagnosis. That’s the black and white truth. You could explain away the situation because Kyle Love happened to have been a defensive tackle for the New England Patriots. After the diagnosis he dropped 30 pounds off his 310 pound frame, thereby causing the team to cut him with a “non-football illness designation.” In plain English, Kyle Love was fired because he has diabetes. But he’s not alone, there are dozens of athletes with diabetes, many of them legendary. This week I am off on another journey with Team Diabetes. Over the past 5 years, I have raised more than $25 000 to help people living with diabetes, and pre-diabetes. The money I raise goes to research, support programs, and awareness. Awareness is the central point of what Team Diabetes is about. As we do our fundraising, we are telling everyone about diabetes, the importance of being active, and having a healthy diet. It’s too bad I couldn’t sit down with the New England Patriots and explain to them that athletes with diabetes is not a ‘firing offence.’ Bill Belichick, and the rest of the Patriots front office, the message you are sending to kids with diabetes is terrible. Instead of keeping an athlete who could act as a role model to tens of thousands of kids, you are cutting him loose – deeming him broken and worthless. Athletes with diabetes are not broken. It’s treatable, and manageable. In fact, Kyle Love has been managing his Type 2 diagnosis and is ready to ball this fall. Shame on you, Pats. Just check out this list of athletes with diabetes who went on to huge success. **UPDATE** The moment Love was put on waivers, the Jacksonsville Jaguars picked him up. Looks like I’ve got a new f Continue reading >>

High School Basketball Player Adjusts To Life With Diabetes

High School Basketball Player Adjusts To Life With Diabetes

High school basketball player adjusts to life with diabetes Originally published February 5, 2018 at 1:01 am FOUNTAIN CITY, Ind. (AP) When Madi Clay was a sophomore at Northeastern High School, Princess Darnell took over as head coach and started a new tradition: team meals before away games. Clay was the most experienced player on a very young team, and her team relied on her to spend quite a few minutes on the court. On top of that, certain things she was eating during those team meals made her extra tired during games. It was all part of managing the life of a high school teen, rebuilding a basketball team, and adjusting to life as a diabetic. As a freshman, Clay found out she had Type 2 diabetes. Three years later, she says the obstacles shes faced have only made her stronger just like the growing pains of rebuilding Northeasterns girls basketball team. Clay is a member of the National Honors Society and with a 3.85 GPA, among the top students in her class. On the basketball court, shes helping turn around a girls basketball program that won just six games combined in the last two years, and has surpassed that total in this season, at 10-12 entering sectional play. Clay and Northeastern won a Wayne County tournament game for the first time in 19 years, and are right in the mix entering the girls basketball sectional tournament. I think right now, where me and my team are at right now, its a good spot, Clay said. Were trying better, theres little things weve talked about recently. Its just little things that we can piece together and we can do some big things. Every person with diabetes is different Clays diabetic diagnosis was a surprise, but it wasnt a shock. Her grandmother and her mother are both diabetic, so her mom raised them to watch what they ate. She would Continue reading >>

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