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Diabetic Backpacks

Top 10 Diabetes Carrying Cases

Top 10 Diabetes Carrying Cases

When you’re diagnosed with diabetes, you don’t realize how much STUFF you have to always carry with you wherever you go. The items only multiple as time goes on and more treatment methods are added, etc. So where are you supposed to keep everything from your meter, to extra test strips, emergency medications and more? For women, you can opt to keep everything in your purse, but most often this can become disorganized and only creates additional frustration when you have to find everything in a pinch. In this guide we’re going to take a look at some of the best diabetes carrying cases on the market for those with all types of diabetes and of any age. If you haven’t found a case yet, then this guide can help start you on your journey of purchasing the right one. Or if it’s time to update your case, you may find one that suits your needs. I know with my kids with Type 1 diabetes, in the beginning I would have to purchase a new case every few months because of the wear and tear from carrying them virtually 24/7 no matter where we go. That was before I knew which were some of the best ones that not only provide you with somewhere to nicely keep all supplies organized but are durable enough to withstand frequent use. Here are some of my all-time favorites. 1. Medicool Dia-Pak The Medicool Dia-Pak allows you to conveniently keep all your supplies in one organized place. What’s nice about this diabetes carrying case is it comes with a freezable ice pack that allows you to keep your insulin or other supplies cool when traveling. Keeping everything together in one bag without bulkiness can be tricky, especially when it comes to making sure you have all the supplies you may need. The Medicool Dia-Pak folds up nicely to fit into a purse, travel bag, suitcase, or even ca Continue reading >>

A Girl’s Guide To Traveling With Diabetes

A Girl’s Guide To Traveling With Diabetes

The following guest post on traveling with diabetes was submitted by Katie Doyle. I’m a couple years into a second decade of life with Type 1 diabetes. Since I am also becoming a more experienced traveler as time goes on, I have some packing advice to share with my girls who are determined to not let diabetes weigh them down. You CAN reach your destination with enough stuff to keep you healthy and safe! As HPL has preached many times before, packing is a very real struggle— regardless of the occasion. Overpacking? Over it. However, as much as I hate bringing too much stuff, nothing complicates packing for a trip quite like a chronic disease. In particular, Type 1 diabetes comes with all of the accessories that a girl wishes she didn’t need to bring on her journey: insulin (many, many vials), syringes (suspicious?), insulin pump supplies, emergency medications, and more. Step 1: Preparation is key While one can hope for major improvements in the U.S. health insurance sector (soon!), I have dedicated a lot of time to subverting the obstacles health insurance seems to place between me and my supplies. My fellow Type 1-ers understand that simply acquiring enough supplies to last for your trip represents a significant portion of the battle of travel. Each time I want to leave the country, I need to request a “vacation override” from my health insurance for all of my prescriptions. This means they have to approve the medicine and deem it “necessary” for my travel. As if insulin weren’t necessary as it is… Anyway, I recommend making a game plan and discussing it with your doctor before contacting your insurance company. Figure out what resources (such as insulin pump technical support) are available in your destination. How much of every item will you need to Continue reading >>

Icy Diamond Totes Insulated Bags For Transporting Cold Or Hot Food Or Medicine

Icy Diamond Totes Insulated Bags For Transporting Cold Or Hot Food Or Medicine

Diabetic Menus & Meal Plans www.GlucoMenu.com Introducing the NEW InsulatedIcy Diamond Tote Bags! *Cold *Durable *Convenient *Stylish *Compact The inspiration of this bag comes from Xocai the Healthy Chocolate. As a Chocolate Distributor and a Mom of three boys and a diabetic, the need to carry the little things in life without having them melt in the heat or carry a large cooler became a necessity.As I researched the web to find that perfect bag, I realized it was not out there. I was then inspired to create my own insulated tote bag and to much avail my dream has come true. The convenienceof carrying items likesmall Snacks, Drinks, Medicine (i.e. Insulin or Victozafor Diabetics & Epipen for Food Allergies),Baby Items, Cosmetics,& Chocolatesare effortless.In addition, theinsulated tote bag can be worn as a fanny pack, clipped to your pant loop or other bag, or worn across the chest or over the shoulder as a hand bag. You will enjoy this insulated tote, just as much as I have. The versatility andconvenience will make you desire one in every color. Includes Strap, Carabineer Hook, ID Holder& Ice Pack Continue reading >>

Kids First Diabetes Second: Enjoying Summer With Diabetes

Kids First Diabetes Second: Enjoying Summer With Diabetes

Kids First Diabetes Second: Enjoying Summer with Diabetes Kids First Diabetes Second: Enjoying Summer with Diabetes I love going to amusement parks in the summer. As a kid, I would ride the coasters over and over again. We have introduced our kids to the thrill of the amusement park, and they cant wait to go again. If you do a little planning ahead, you will have an enjoyable day. Visit the parks website and e-mail or call their guest services office to ask about specifics regarding accommodations that can be made for people with diabetes. I think you will find they want to be helpful, so you have a great experience. You may or may not need a letter from the doctor stating that the child has a medical condition and needs special accommodations. Ask about passes for people with disabilities that allow you to jump to the front of lines or provide you with a time to return so that you arent standing in lines. Sometimes these passes only work for the larger rides and coasters. I suggest stopping by guest services after entering the park. They can give you a map with medical stations circled. You can obtain the medical accommodation pass for your family, and they can place a sticker on your supply bag that identifies it as containing medical supplies. Also, while many parks allow no outside food or drinks, a person with diabetes should be able to bring in snacks and drinks. I like to pack a couple of water bottles that we can refill throughout the day to stay hydrated. Remember, there is a lot of blacktop at amusement parks, which turns up the heat! Pack enough food to cover regular snack times, plus a few extras in case you need them to recover from lows. I also pack a few extras for other family members. Applesauce pouches and organic fruit strips hold up well in a backpa Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Supply Bags Under $20 For Back To School

Type 1 Diabetes Supply Bags Under $20 For Back To School

Type 1 Diabetes Supply Bags under $20 for Back to School Every kid needs a great backpack for school and Type 1 Diabetes kids need cool options to carry supplies! Parents want a good sturdy bag that doesnt cost an arm and a leg. This collection of bags have been recommended by many Type 1 families and we have even bought a few for our children. I am recommending them since they are under $20! Whether your Type 1 Diabetic is a boy or a girl I am sure that you will be able to find a suitable bag to help them carry their supplies during school. Many of these bags have lots of extra pockets which make carrying supplies more organized and accessible. We are able to fit blood glucose meter, insulin pen, glucagon pen, extra Dexcom Sensor and some snacks for lows like juicebox , pb crackers,etc. We bought all four of our children sling bags for Christmas when the price dropped under $12! They each use them for a variety of things but Eldest uses his for his T1D supplies. His sling bag has come in handy when he rides his bike, is playing at the park or on a homeschool field trip ! We recently went to Lake Loramie State Park which has a beach to swim and play in but Eldest still needed to pack his diabetes supplies. Since we homeschool and blog and get to experience different adventures it is nice for our children to pack light with sling bags for day trips. Princess loves blue so she usually has her blue LC Prime bag when we go away for the day! The picture above is from our recent visit to Put-in-Bay via Miller Ferry! All four of our children enjoy riding the ferry and seeing Lake Erie! Girls Light Small Nylon Fabric Crossbody Shoulder Bag Big Red is wearing his red LC Prime sling bag while we head down the bike path to enjoy a family nature walk! Type 1 Diabetes: Teaching Sib Continue reading >>

Special Summer. The Diabetic Backpack

Special Summer. The Diabetic Backpack

Travel worry-free with the backpack that guarantees diabetes control Many people with diabetes are afraid or anxious about going on a trip. Being in their habitual residence they feel protected. If they feel bad, they know what they have to do and where they can go. Taking a vacation should be cause for happiness. If you take the necessary precautions, there is no reason to be afraid that diabetes will spoil the well-deserved rest days. Do you want to go on vacation this summer? Read these tips and quit any worries with your anti-diabetic backpack. It is necessary to know that the body works differently with the climatic changes. High or low temperatures can impair the metabolism status. To avoid risks of hypoglycemia, we will take a series of measures when making the luggage. It is advisable to buy an isothermal backpack (there is a lot of variety on the market) to transport the insulin and ensure a good conservation of the condition. The insulin should be stored in a cool place, at a temperature between 2 to 8 degrees Celsius. Also, it can be kept at room temperature for a month (Up to 25 degrees). Insulclock advises its users whether or not insulin is in good condition, making life much easier. If you travel by plane, you can never leave the anti-diabetic medicines in the suitcase to be billed, as it could freeze and deteriorate. They should always be transported in the suitcase at the temperatures already explained. As for the quantity, it is better to take the medicines that are used multiplied by three and to distribute them in different suitable places in case there is a loss. Among the diabetic materials to be transported, the glucometer must not be missing. It is essential to monitor frequently the blood glucose level in real time. If you are going to perform Continue reading >>

Real Talk With Dave: Whats In My Diabetes Bag?

Real Talk With Dave: Whats In My Diabetes Bag?

Diabetes , real talk with dave , t1d , type 1 diabetes When you are first diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes, sitting there in the hospital, you dont really know what to expect and dont know how T1D is going to change your life. You are given your very first blood glucometer and have no idea what it is, what it may be used for, and how you are going to have to carry it around with you wherever you go. You are given a plain, boring, and lifeless case to carry the major components to checking your blood sugar in: meter, lancing device, test strips, a few syringes, alcohol swabs, and some lancets, all in a tiny little carrying case. Wheres the fun in that? Over the years of living with T1D, Ive come to realize how if you want to thrive with your Diabetes, you must fully take control and turn it into your own. You have to OWN your disease. Ive noticed several amazing Diabetic brands form such incredible Diabetic bags and meter cases, designed to fit our style and relate to our own individual needs for a person living with T1D on the go. I will be listing some of my favorite Diabetic branded meter cases and bags and hopefully it will inspire you to go out and purchase your own, allowing you to fully accept your Diabetes and love the amazing life you live! Myabetic / The Myabetic meter cases are so amazing and allow you to show off your style however you want (and most people wont even know you are carrying Diabetic supplies!). These meter cases and Diabetic bags come in a variety of colors, designs, and styles. They have a variety of Diabetic backpacks, cases, and purses, all with different compartments for specific T1D supplies! Shop Casualty Girl / These meter cases are so fun for a person who fully understands the true struggles with T1D as they are these nicely sized bags, Continue reading >>

A New Diabetic Supply Carrying Case

A New Diabetic Supply Carrying Case

The day after I was released from the hospital after my diagnosis of being a Type 1 Diabetic , I looked over my syringes, vials, test strips, lancets, logbook and other such supplies and decided I needed some sort of carrying case. However, in being either vain or private, I wanted it to be discrete. Thankfully, this was before the age of smartphones, and toting around a day planner wasnt all that uncommon. I wound up using my diagnosis as an excuse to buy a Palm Vx to eliminate the logbook and my paper sliding scale and then I picked up a day planner from Franklin Covey. I wound up emptying it of everything except the zip-lock pouch inside, and thats where I stored my supplies. It had a nice little pocket inside for PDAs, which fit my Palm Vx nicely, and when it was obsolete, thats where my glucometer and lancing device went. I had this day planner so long that it even got nicknames, it was known as The Diabetes. Ive always been afraid of losing The Diabetes. It had its own place everywhere that Ive lived, and the minute it is moved from that place, chaos and anarchy began to take over my life. 999 times out of 1000, The Diabetes just wound up getting pushed out of the way, relocated over to my computer desk, left in my laptop bag or scooped up by my loving wife and tucked away because she takes such good care of me. I remember scolding her a little bit and telling her that I loved how much she helped out but that one day Id take it for granted and wed both forget The Diabetes and wed wind up somewhere and needing it, or worse, forgetting it somewhere. We tackled that challenge and it just became part of our routine, she grabbed it and packed it in her purse and then I asked her before we left to make sure she had it. Every time that I thought I lost The Diabetes, it Continue reading >>

Riding On Insulin – Tips For Skiing And Snowboarding With T1d

Riding On Insulin – Tips For Skiing And Snowboarding With T1d

WRITTEN BY: Dustin Askim If you’ve ever been skiing or snowboarding with T1D, you probably agree that it is a balancing act! The altitude and humidity, mixed with a physical challenge like skiing/riding can lead to low BGLs, and the near subzero temperatures wreak havoc on insulin pumps, exposed tubing and glucose meters. My name is Dustin Askim and I’m Riding On Insulin’s Program Coordinator. I was diagnosed with T1D the summer before my junior year in college; I was 20 years old. I knew something was wrong when I could drink three 32-ounce Gatorades in one sitting. I was right. At the time, I didn’t know anything about the disease, but I began researching ways to get involved. I discovered Riding On Insulin and was super stoked to find an organization dedicated to T1D and one of my biggest passions: snowboarding! ROI puts on ski and snowboard camps for kids with T1D (and their siblings) across America, Canada and even New Zealand. We recently surveyed our team of Elite Coaches for their most important tips for skiing and boarding safely with T1D. This is what they said: 8 – First up, make sure your ski jacket and snow pants have plenty of pockets … with zippers! Otherwise, be prepared to carry a backpack with slow AND fast-acting carbs, BG meter, glucagon, testing supplies, etc. Just like fruit snacks can melt sitting in the sun, granola bars and other go-to carb snacks can freeze on the hill. Packets of honey or glucose tabs are great because they won’t freeze like many other fast-acting carbs. 7 – Test at the bottom of the chairlift BEFORE getting on. There’s nothing worse than getting on a lift thinking, I’ll test when I get on, and then when you test, and you have a low, you’re stuck on the lift with the chairlift continually stopping and sta Continue reading >>

The Things I Carry: Packing For Travel With Type 1 Diabetes

The Things I Carry: Packing For Travel With Type 1 Diabetes

Packing for a trip with type 1 diabetes requires a bit of extra thought. When I travel I like to bring only carry-on items so that I can keep an eye on everything and ensure my essential diabetes supplies are always close. This can be difficult on longer trips or when a trip requires lots of gear. My current adventure of three weeks requires camping and hiking gear as well as a decent set of camera gear and essentials for a weekend long music festival, not to mention diabetes supplies. It was tricky getting everything I needed into two carry-on sized bags but I made it happen. Here is a list of what I packed and some tips for packing pesky diabetes supplies. The Bags I did endless research on the best backpack and camera bag for my needs. I had to be sure I could pack everything I needed and still fit my luggage on the plane with me. So far so good as I was able to fit both of these bags, bursting at the seams packed with everything below, into the overhead compartment and under my seat. Read why I selected the Gregory Savant 48 backpack here! Diabetes Supplies I usually pack around double the supplies I would need for the same time at home. Here is everything I took with me on this adventure. Medical Supplies Travel Case Army Medic Belt Pouch 3 Flex Pens of Novolog 2 Flex Pens of Toujeo (more units per pen at 500) 50 or so BD Ultra Fine Pen Needles Pro Tip- Carry an extra Frio so that one can dry out while the others are in use. Frios work for 3-5 days then need to be dried out. Also keep your Frios in a mesh pocket or somewhere with air flow because they rely on evaporation to keep your insulin cool. Accu-Chek Aviva Expert Meter 300 Aviva Expert Test Strips Freestyle Lite Meter (back-up) 150 Freestyle Lite Test Strips Aviva Fast Clix Lancer 10 Extra Lancet Sets Ketone Continue reading >>

Choosing A Travel Backpack With Type 1 Diabetes In Mind (gregory Savant 48)

Choosing A Travel Backpack With Type 1 Diabetes In Mind (gregory Savant 48)

One of the most important pieces of gear you will purchase for traveling is your backpack. For us type 1 diabetics this purchase is of special importance because the pack must accommodate the extra supplies required to manage diabetes abroad. As a precaution I recommend taking more than enough diabetes supplies so be sure the pack you go with can handle all your insets, sensors, pens, vials, needles, test strips, meter, back up meter, PDM, transmitter, glucose tabs, granola bars and ketone strips (did I miss anything?) along with the rest of your essential travel gear. Keep reading to learn how I narrowed down and selected my new backpacking pack, the Savant 48 from Gregory Mountain Products . The first criteria to consider when looking for a pack is capacity and size. As a diabetic I absolutely want all my insulin and supplies with me at all times so it is imperative that my pack fits as a carry on item. Through my research I learned the average capacity of a bag allowed as a carry on by most airlines is 46 liters. This is a rough estimate and allowed sizes vary from airline to airline and plane to plane. Fitting a pack in the overhead compartment also depends on how much gear is in the bag and how well you pack it. I have heard of people fitting 60 liter bags as carry ons and others have told me their 40 liter wouldnt fit. It all depends on how you pack. The safest bet is to check the maximum dimensions allowed by your airline, do a mock pack then measure your bag. (Do this before you rip the tags off in case you need to return it). Here are the allowed carry on dimensions for a few major airlines: United, American, Delta & Jet Blue 9in x 14in x 22in (22cm x 35cm x 56cm) British Airways, Spirit 10in x 18in x 22in (25cm x 46cm x 56cm) Southwest 10in x 16in x 24in (25c Continue reading >>

The Staiwell Bag Is Specially Designed To Hold All Your Diabetes Supplies, Juice, Snacks

The Staiwell Bag Is Specially Designed To Hold All Your Diabetes Supplies, Juice, Snacks

and personal items. It can be carried as a backpack, shoulder bag or handbag. With the StaiWell bag, everything you need is organized, safe and convenient. Use it wherever your are...at home, work, school or play! Hello, my name is Staisha and I would like to welcome you to the StaiWell home page. The original StaiWell bag was designed in 1999 for me, by my Mom. We wanted a bag that would hold ALL of my diabetes supplies, plus juice and snacks. My Mom wanted it to be a backpack so I wouldn't accidentally leave it when we were out and about. I wanted it to be in style, and it could NOT look like a "medical kit"....I need to look cool! So as you will see the StaiWell bag has all that and more! Now you can organize your diabetes supplies and you can - Stay Cool, Stay Prepared and StaiWell! Continue reading >>

Navigating School With Diabetes

Navigating School With Diabetes

In October, The Times reported on students with Type 1 diabetes who struggle to get medical care while they are in school. In spite of federal protections, diabetic students have been barred from neighborhood schools and from participating in extracurricular activities. We asked parents of children with Type 1 diabetes to share their stories about the educational obstacles they have encountered and the steps they took to overcome them. Here are a few of their responses, edited and condensed for space. Our small private school doesnt have a nurse, so everything has to be handled by my daughter Olivias teachers. I was actually terrified that we wouldnt be accepted. I wondered if they wouldnt want to deal with her diabetes. But they didnt bat an eye. Before kindergarten, my husband and I sat down around a table and hashed it out with the head of school, her teacher-to-be and the class assistant. It was obvious in the meeting that her assigned teacher felt she might not be the best fit for Olivia. So Olivia was switched to another class with a teacher and assistant who were less intimidated by her insulin pump and more comfortable with what she needed. I appreciated the teachers honesty. I conducted trainings with teachers and staff and have maintained near-constant contact with them during the day. I eventually worked my way into a job at the school in community development, and now Im on campus every day. Building a relationship with this school was a big benefit for my family, for Olivia and for the community. Everyone knows about her illness, and its a part of everyday routine. Five years ago, at age 8, our daughter Eliza was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. I didnt think I had to do any research. We thought the district would already have in place appropriate medical c Continue reading >>

Diabetes Case Studies

Diabetes Case Studies

With all the medical gear we PWDs have to carry around, it can be difficult to find the perfect bag to comfortably tote around all this stuff. (See Wil's rant on the man-purse for PWDs, for example.) At the AADE expo last week, we saw a few new options worth mentioning. All of these companies are also started by entrepreneurs — and we do love supporting small D-businesses here at the 'Mine! First up is Sugar Medical Supply. Inspired by bags that her mother used to make for her and her sister, Carolyn Jäger launched Sugar Medical Supply with a glucose meter case that comes in seven different patterns. As Carolyn says, "Sugar Medical Supply was created to bring style into the lives of people living with diabetes. Our supplies allow them to show a little personality, bring in some color, and make it fun!" The bags are a bit bigger than the traditional black bag provided with a glucose meter, giving space to slot in your meter, strip container, lancet, and an insulin pen. It also comes with an inside pocket and a front pocket for little extras. The "Universal Strap System" is flexible, which means that folks with different meters can use the bags with ease. It fits both my OneTouch Ultra and Amy's OmniPod PDA! Thanks to Carolyn, Amy and I both received our own bags to try out and review. I like mine. It's pretty and not too big and not too small. The only thing I found a little odd is that it unzips from right to left, instead of left to right as my Lifescan meter bag. Certainly not a deal-breaker, but it was the opposite of what I was used to. Here's What Amy Had to Say - "I have to admit that I love, love, love my new case from Sugar Medical Supply! It is the first stylish case I've found that actually fits the OmniPod (due to that clever Velcro-enabled "universal stra Continue reading >>

13-year-old Creates Vitalpak, A Medical Backpack

13-year-old Creates Vitalpak, A Medical Backpack

13-Year-Old Creates VitalPak, a Medical Backpack Kyle riding his bike with VitalPak on his back In March 2010, Kyle Houlihan of Franklin, Wis., became sick with what doctors originally thought was strep throat or a virus. He then began showing signs of type 1 diabetes, including frequent urination, fatigue and constant thirst. Doctors found that his blood sugar was over 500 and he was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 9. I was scared and didnt understand what was happening. My family didnt know much about diabetes, so they were scared, too, says Houlihan. He explains that it was difficult to adjust to living with diabetes, but his teachers and friends were supportive and wanted to help him. Even though he had support, he still felt like he stood out from his classmates and friends. After searching for a product that would organize his supplies and still look stylish, Houlihan and his dad, Tom, realized that there werent any out there. They were inspired to design what became the VitalPak. The VitalPak is a durable, water resistant backpack with a large main storage compartment and removable snap-in essentials kit. It gives functionality and organization to keep all diabetes supplies in one place, while still looking like a normal backpack. I use it every day and I love it. It is comfortable and looks cool. It doesnt look like Im carrying around a medical bag and definitely helps me blend in, Houlihan explains. The VitalPak can also be customized for those with other conditions, such as asthma or allergies, who are required to carry devices and supplies around with them. It can even be used as a portable first-aid kit. The VitalPak is different from other medical supply carriers because of its versatility. The VitalPak has a unique zip-out pouch for my testing meter Continue reading >>

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