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Diabetic Backpack

A 13-year-old With Diabetes And His Dad Crowdfund A Discreet Medical Backpack For Kids

A 13-year-old With Diabetes And His Dad Crowdfund A Discreet Medical Backpack For Kids

A 13-year-old with diabetes and his dad crowdfund a discreet medical backpack for kids 3 Comments / Feb 28, 2014 at 7:26 AM Kyle Houlihan, who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes four years ago at the age of 9, and his father have designed a backpack that he and other kids with diabetes, asthma and allergies could use to discreetly carry their supplies. Its been an effort three years in the making. Now, to manufacture VitalPaks and begin distribution, the family is looking to raise $40,000 in donations through Indiegogo in exchange for early versions of the pack. After his diagnosis, Kyle was able to adjust to life with diabetes through education classes and support from family and friends. But he still worried that he would stand out among his classmates and be treated differently because he had to carry medical supplies at all times, his father wrote on their Indiegogo page. That inspired him and his father to design the VitalPak medical backpack. It comes with an essentials kit that can snap out of the pack and be carried in a purse, travel bag or by hand when the full backpack isnt needed. Eventually, they intend to donate a portion of VitalPaks annual sales to the American Diabetes Association, an organization Kyle is deeply involved with . Join us for MedCity INVEST May 1-2, 2018, the premier national healthcare investing conference. INVEST unites over 300 active investors with corporate business development executives to facilitate investment opportunities with the most promising healthcare startups. Register now Continue reading >>

The Staiwell Bag Is Specially Designed To Hold All Your Diabetes Supplies, Juice, Snacks

The Staiwell Bag Is Specially Designed To Hold All Your Diabetes Supplies, Juice, Snacks

and personal items. It can be carried as a backpack, shoulder bag or handbag. With the StaiWell bag, everything you need is organized, safe and convenient. Use it wherever your are...at home, work, school or play! Hello, my name is Staisha and I would like to welcome you to the StaiWell home page. The original StaiWell bag was designed in 1999 for me, by my Mom. We wanted a bag that would hold ALL of my diabetes supplies, plus juice and snacks. My Mom wanted it to be a backpack so I wouldn't accidentally leave it when we were out and about. I wanted it to be in style, and it could NOT look like a "medical kit"....I need to look cool! So as you will see the StaiWell bag has all that and more! Now you can organize your diabetes supplies and you can - Stay Cool, Stay Prepared and StaiWell! Continue reading >>

Jdrf Bag Of Hope

Jdrf Bag Of Hope

When your child receives a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D), it can be an overwhelming time. As you navigate this challenging period of adjustment to life with T1D, you can find helpful information and support through the JDRF Bag of Hope®. The JDRF Bag of Hope is filled with useful resources for both the child who has been diagnosed with T1D and his or her caregivers. Along with educational materials, we’ve included a special friend — Rufus, the Bear with Diabetes® — to show your child he or she is not alone while learning to take shots and test blood sugar. Resources in your JDRF Bag of Hope include (but are not limited to): Rufus the Bear with Diabetes “Rufus Comes Home” book “Pink Panther: A First Book for Understanding Diabetes” JDRF materials with educational video links “CalorieKing” book ACCU-CHEK® Aviva Connect blood glucose meter Information about Novo Nordisk/JDRF educational book series Novo Nordisk adjustable measuring scoop Informational postcard about the support Lilly Diabetes offers families with a bookmark Lilly Diabetes literature on severe hypoglycemia management Discount coupon for a stylish medical ID bracelet by Hope Paige Designs for your child Babysitter Guide provided by Omnipod® Glucose tabs in an Omnipod® tin “My Trip to Quest Diagnostics” coloring and activity book The JDRF Bag of Hope Program is made possible by generous funding provided by Co-Presenting Sponsors: Roche and Quest Diagnostics, and Supporting Sponsors: Insulet, Lilly Diabetes, Novo Nordisk and Hope Paige Designs. Only available for children (16 and under) who reside in the United States. Live outside the US? Was this helpful? Continue reading >>

Small, Cute Backpacks For Kids To Use To Carry D Supplies?

Small, Cute Backpacks For Kids To Use To Carry D Supplies?

This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Small, cute backpacks for kids to use to carry D supplies? I'm looking for a small backpack that Lia can use to carry D supplies when she and dh go someplace without me. Since her dx dh has always just carried a small blue cooler type bag that we got in the hospital. But I would like to encourage her to start carrying her own stuff to learn responsibility. I think a cute bag would help. I guess any small backpack would work, but I wonder if there are any specifically for D. I vaguely remember hearing about some earlier in our D journey, but wasn't much interested then. We use a back pack we got at walmart.. They are smaller than the normal size and they have them in colors like pink, purple and black.. WE have a black one now.. Very nice to use and its dual-gender.. Plus you can always get cute iron ons and customize it your self... NOt to big, not to small.. perfect size If you are looking for something a little insulated, maybe a diaper bag/backpack would work? I don't know if I have seen any small ones, but it's an idea. We use a fanny pack when he is out running around with the neighbors. it is specifically made to carry diabetes "stuff"...... i found this cute small backpack they have a medium size which i got and they even have it smaller. it is a insulated backpack. they had color schemes, one is pink, hot pink, and white and black. and the other had seagreen and white and with brown. they even have water bottles that match if you need and with straps. i found a cute plastic pencil pouch to put her emergency kit in and her gel. i put her snacks inside a cosmetic bag. etc. she uses it to take to school and everywhere. i found it much nicer then this ugly sq Continue reading >>

Carrying The Weight: Backpacking With Diabetes

Carrying The Weight: Backpacking With Diabetes

Carrying the Weight: Backpacking with Diabetes When I was first with diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, backpacking became yet another line on my mental list of things Id probably not be able to do now that I was managing such a complicated condition. Although the first thing they reassured me of (while I was still in the ER, without me asking), was that with the advent of modern technology, I would be able to safely have children, they did not assure me Id still be able to romp through mountain streams, swim in crystal clear pools, and sleep under the stars. They did not go so far as to assure me that Id still be able to stretch my skirt over my kayak and paddle all day, or travel to third world countries. Needless to say, the first consolation did not address my main concerns. Eight years have passed since then, and as I get to know myself more and more as a person with diabetes, I learn that to do what Ive always loved to do and to try new things is definitely possible, but both require more planning. Its been a long road to accepting that my version of spontaneous will not look like it used to, when I could decide on a whim to jump in a car headed for Gauley Fest or throw some granola in my pack and head off for a weekend of camping, like I had a few months before my diagnosis. My version of spontaneous does not need to look like anyone elses, and Ive learned to validate that for myself by moving one adventure at a time off of the, Cant Do It list, and onto the, Plan It! list. The first time I went backpacking with diabetes (and also with an ex-boyfriend, a seasoned backpacker himself) the car ride to the trailhead was mortifying. My brain was in an endless feedback loop of, What did I forget? What if I my blood glucose meter stops working? What if my insulin gets hot Continue reading >>

Oxygen Backpack Wins Top Prize At Global Health Hackathon

Oxygen Backpack Wins Top Prize At Global Health Hackathon

Oxygen Backpack Wins Top Prize at Global Health Hackathon Sharmila Anandasabapathy, M.D., director of Baylor Global Initiatives and the Baylor Global Innovation Center at Baylor College of Medicine, kicked off the final pitch event. High Performance. Delivered. pitched a compression sleeve for diabetic foot ulcers. MotoPen developed an electrosurgical pen and grounding pad for surgeries. SriTech created a diabetic foot prevention and education smartphone application. Flavor came up with a way to make children's antiretroviral therapy medication taste better. Wounderful created a device to improve wound care in space. Shield O2 was awarded first place and $1,000. After a two-week hustle that started with more than 60 hackers, seven companies pitched their health care solutions in front of judges this week, closing outthe Global Health Hackathon hosted by the Baylor College of MedicineGlobal Innovation Center. Twelve teams formed tocreate solutions forfour health care needs: Womens health in procedural care (Malawi):Reducing risk of blood loss, blood clotting and injury during surgery through effective electrosurgery and pneumatic compression devices. Global health security/refugee health (Swaziland):Capacity strengthening to reduce infectious disease threats. Orthopedics and rehabilitation (Sri Lanka):Promoting prevention and treatment of diabetic foot through patient education, provider training and appropriate offloading technologies. NASA/space challenge:Providing medical care in extremely remote and resource-constrained environments. After a few weeks at the TMC Innovation Institute meeting with mentors, attending educational workshops and tinkering with their teams, the companies competed in an elimination round June 19. Seven companies advanced to the final round Continue reading >>

Is Your Diabetic Child Prepared For A School Emergency?

Is Your Diabetic Child Prepared For A School Emergency?

Is Your Diabetic Child Prepared for a School Emergency? These days, it doesn't take much imagination to envision a weapon,bomb, chemical, or biological threat occurring at school. Such asituation, although unlikely, is a possibility in today's world. Consequently, parents must consider whether their diabetic child isproperly prepared for a crisis. An examination of your child'sschool emergency plan may be well worth your time. Schools emergency plans differ based on individual school layouts.Most follow a general guide and then tailor it to their specificneeds. Depending on the type of emergency, school and classroomdoors may be locked, or everyone may be taken to the gymnasium orcafeteria (where many schools store an emergency cache). Accordingto your school's plan, is staff clearly identified to assist yourchild in such an event? If you are fortunate enough to have a school nurse, much of theresponsibility in an emergency falls on him or her. According toSarah Butler, RN, MSN, CDE, NCSN, of the National Association ofSchool Nurses (NASN), "the role of the school nurse is to work withteachers to create an Emergency Care Plan. Such a plan for anelementary or middle school child would recommend that parentssupply a juice box or a snack in the classroom. High school studentsshould carry a snack or juice." A new program called H.A.N.D.S. (Helping Administer to the Needs ofThe Student with Diabetes at School), created by NASN, addresses howto handle such situations, says Butler. These emergency plans maybe critical if your child is locked in a classroom for any length oftime. Emotional distress alone may impact your child's blood sugarin such circumstances. In an evacuation situation, school nurses are trained to carry anemergency backpack with health paperwork and supplie Continue reading >>

{d-mom Tested} Baby Sherpa Alpha Backpack

{d-mom Tested} Baby Sherpa Alpha Backpack

{D-Mom Tested} Baby Sherpa Alpha Backpack Join me every day this week as I highlight diabetes-related products weve tried out this summer. Read more D-Mom Tested product reviews . Knowing that this was going to be a summer of travel including several days spent at amusement parks, museums, and a zoo, I began a search for a backpack to replace the Lands End diaper bag backpack that got us through seven years of babies/toddlers/kids before finally coming apart at the seamprobably from being constantly used and often overstuffed! I began doing internet searches for backpacks with an insulated compartment, thinking that might be helpful to keep diabetes supplies and snacks from boiling in the summer heat. I looked at lots of different hiking packs thinking maybe I wanted something smaller, more of a daypack. I came across the Baby Sherpa brand and struck up a conversation with a representative of the company who told me that if I was spending a day at Disney, I really needed to try out their new Alpha Sherpa backpack. Weve used it on three trips this summer and it has done its job. I used it as a carry on when Q and I went to Florida for Friends For Life. And I may or may not have packed an entire brick of juice boxes in the cooler section and sent it through airport securitytwice. When we went to Disney for the day, I had a days worth of snacks including applesauce pouches and juice boxes, in the cooler compartment. I also put our insulin in a Frio Cooling Wallet and kept it in the cooler. The smaller pouch on the side was the perfect size for my point-and-shoot camera and provided easy access for photo opps. My contact at Baby Sherpa suggested using a frozen water bottle to keep contents cool, but we didnt have access to a freezer at our hotel. Im keeping that tip for fu Continue reading >>

We Train Diabetes Assist Dogs To Help People With Type I Diabetes.

We Train Diabetes Assist Dogs To Help People With Type I Diabetes.

Diabetes Assist Dogs are trained to monitor smells in the air for a specific scent on the human breath that is related to rapidly dropping or low blood sugar levels. They are then trained to “alert” the person with diabetes, usually by touching them in a significant way such as pawing or nudging them. This alerts the person to check his or her blood sugar level. It also informs them that they should get something to eat to prevent hypoglycemia, or their blood sugars getting to a dangerous level. The canine partner can also be trained to retrieve juice or glucose tabs, get an emergency phone, or get help from another person in the house. Diabetes Assist Dogs wear a backpack identifying them as an assistance dog. This backpack has pockets where medical information, a sugar source, and emergency contact information can be stored. This provides an extra safety net in case the person with diabetes is unable to get help in time. Anyone finding the person unconscious or acting abnormally would know it may be a medical emergency and know how to get help. How can a dog detect low blood sugar? The dogs are evaluated throughout “puppy-hood” for a willingness to work and a sensitive nose. Once we have identified their interest in smells, they begin scent training. A person experiencing hypoglycemia produces a particular scent, found on the breath, due to chemical changes in their body. All people produce the same scent when they have low blood sugar. Our training methods are similar to those used to train drug sniffing or search and rescue dogs trained to find people. Due to the generosity of supporters like you all of our assistance dogs are provided to clients free of charge. LEARN MORE AND APPLY FOR A DIABETES ASSIST DOG Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Supply Bags Under $20 For Back To School

Type 1 Diabetes Supply Bags Under $20 For Back To School

Type 1 Diabetes Supply Bags under $20 for Back to School Every kid needs a great backpack for school and Type 1 Diabetes kids need cool options to carry supplies! Parents want a good sturdy bag that doesnt cost an arm and a leg. This collection of bags have been recommended by many Type 1 families and we have even bought a few for our children. I am recommending them since they are under $20! Whether your Type 1 Diabetic is a boy or a girl I am sure that you will be able to find a suitable bag to help them carry their supplies during school. Many of these bags have lots of extra pockets which make carrying supplies more organized and accessible. We are able to fit blood glucose meter, insulin pen, glucagon pen, extra Dexcom Sensor and some snacks for lows like juicebox , pb crackers,etc. We bought all four of our children sling bags for Christmas when the price dropped under $12! They each use them for a variety of things but Eldest uses his for his T1D supplies. His sling bag has come in handy when he rides his bike, is playing at the park or on a homeschool field trip ! We recently went to Lake Loramie State Park which has a beach to swim and play in but Eldest still needed to pack his diabetes supplies. Since we homeschool and blog and get to experience different adventures it is nice for our children to pack light with sling bags for day trips. Princess loves blue so she usually has her blue LC Prime bag when we go away for the day! The picture above is from our recent visit to Put-in-Bay via Miller Ferry! All four of our children enjoy riding the ferry and seeing Lake Erie! Girls Light Small Nylon Fabric Crossbody Shoulder Bag Big Red is wearing his red LC Prime sling bag while we head down the bike path to enjoy a family nature walk! Type 1 Diabetes: Teaching Sib Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Can Wear You Down

Type 1 Diabetes Can Wear You Down

A diabetes advocate describes how the condition has impacted him throughout his life. Editors note: We strive to provide a complete picture of life with Type 1 diabetes. While we love sharing inspirational stories, we want to make sure to acknowledge the difficulties of managing a chronic condition over decades. Aaron D. Johnson sent us this honest account, and we thank him for it. The world of a child is an amazing place. Its a medley of bicycles, ballgames in the sun, building forts, sledding in the snow, birthday cakes and Christmas lights. What child is going to pay any attention to dry skin and constant thirst when there is so much to do? Childhood is a time to run and play, to get dirty, soaking wet, or covered with snow. The only need is to race home after school to catch a favorite TV show and then charge outside again to play superhero among your superhero friends. Then, one day, you are just too tired to get up from in front of the television. Your tummy hurts and your dry skin is flushed. Your mother is talking to you, but you cant understand what she is saying. The bright, kaleidoscope of childhood is replaced with a blur of hospital images: doctors frowning with concern and talking in low, serious voices; nurses looking at you like you were the walking dead; endless medical tests; waiting rooms and gurneys behind curtains; and, of course, the needles. Always the needles. I was six years old when I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. In my case, it is a form known as brittle diabetes, or Labile diabetes. This is a fairly rare form of diabetes that causes wide blood sugar swings without any reason or warning. My childhood became one requiring constant monitoring of myself and by the adults in my life. There was no more just running free; my backpack carried Continue reading >>

A New Diabetic Supply Carrying Case

A New Diabetic Supply Carrying Case

The day after I was released from the hospital after my diagnosis of being a Type 1 Diabetic , I looked over my syringes, vials, test strips, lancets, logbook and other such supplies and decided I needed some sort of carrying case. However, in being either vain or private, I wanted it to be discrete. Thankfully, this was before the age of smartphones, and toting around a day planner wasnt all that uncommon. I wound up using my diagnosis as an excuse to buy a Palm Vx to eliminate the logbook and my paper sliding scale and then I picked up a day planner from Franklin Covey. I wound up emptying it of everything except the zip-lock pouch inside, and thats where I stored my supplies. It had a nice little pocket inside for PDAs, which fit my Palm Vx nicely, and when it was obsolete, thats where my glucometer and lancing device went. I had this day planner so long that it even got nicknames, it was known as The Diabetes. Ive always been afraid of losing The Diabetes. It had its own place everywhere that Ive lived, and the minute it is moved from that place, chaos and anarchy began to take over my life. 999 times out of 1000, The Diabetes just wound up getting pushed out of the way, relocated over to my computer desk, left in my laptop bag or scooped up by my loving wife and tucked away because she takes such good care of me. I remember scolding her a little bit and telling her that I loved how much she helped out but that one day Id take it for granted and wed both forget The Diabetes and wed wind up somewhere and needing it, or worse, forgetting it somewhere. We tackled that challenge and it just became part of our routine, she grabbed it and packed it in her purse and then I asked her before we left to make sure she had it. Every time that I thought I lost The Diabetes, it Continue reading >>

13-year-old Creates Vitalpak, A Medical Backpack

13-year-old Creates Vitalpak, A Medical Backpack

13-Year-Old Creates VitalPak, a Medical Backpack Kyle riding his bike with VitalPak on his back In March 2010, Kyle Houlihan of Franklin, Wis., became sick with what doctors originally thought was strep throat or a virus. He then began showing signs of type 1 diabetes, including frequent urination, fatigue and constant thirst. Doctors found that his blood sugar was over 500 and he was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 9. I was scared and didnt understand what was happening. My family didnt know much about diabetes, so they were scared, too, says Houlihan. He explains that it was difficult to adjust to living with diabetes, but his teachers and friends were supportive and wanted to help him. Even though he had support, he still felt like he stood out from his classmates and friends. After searching for a product that would organize his supplies and still look stylish, Houlihan and his dad, Tom, realized that there werent any out there. They were inspired to design what became the VitalPak. The VitalPak is a durable, water resistant backpack with a large main storage compartment and removable snap-in essentials kit. It gives functionality and organization to keep all diabetes supplies in one place, while still looking like a normal backpack. I use it every day and I love it. It is comfortable and looks cool. It doesnt look like Im carrying around a medical bag and definitely helps me blend in, Houlihan explains. The VitalPak can also be customized for those with other conditions, such as asthma or allergies, who are required to carry devices and supplies around with them. It can even be used as a portable first-aid kit. The VitalPak is different from other medical supply carriers because of its versatility. The VitalPak has a unique zip-out pouch for my testing meter Continue reading >>

How To Find The Right Diabetes Supply Organizer For Your Kid

How To Find The Right Diabetes Supply Organizer For Your Kid

Having diabetes can be a real bummer for children in general. They are restricted from eating certain food or doing certain activates that other kids are enjoying. Not only that, they also have to experience a lot of pain and discomfort unlike other kids. In a lot of ways, they may feel like they are out of place. What’s worse is that they have to carry around all the diabetes supply with them at all times. Toting around a dull looking bag of diabetes supply only makes the whole situation more awkward than ever. How to Pick the Right Diabetes Supply Organizer for Your Child To help your child cope with having diabetes, have a sit-down conversation and ask them about what they would want to use as their supply organizer. Just like every adult has their own style, each child feels different about carrying around their diabetes supply. Some may be proud to tote their cool supplies around whereas others may want to keep it concealed. Once you know what your child wants, choosing the right organizer will be an easier task. If your child is unsure of their choice, let us help you. Go through our compiled list of best kids organizers on the market with your child and decide together. For the Non-Insulin Users Depending on how old your child is, durability is essentially the only factor you have to worry about when it comes to picking a supply organizer for a non-insulin-using child. It is normal for kids to be careless and forgetful when it comes to their belongings. So when you are choosing for a younger child, try to pick a case with more padding.If your child has chosen a pencil case or makeup bag as their organizer, you can reinforce the organizer with some extra foam padding in the interior. While you are at it, it is convenient to stick a label with your child’s info Continue reading >>

Choosing A Travel Backpack With Type 1 Diabetes In Mind (gregory Savant 48)

Choosing A Travel Backpack With Type 1 Diabetes In Mind (gregory Savant 48)

One of the most important pieces of gear you will purchase for traveling is your backpack. For us type 1 diabetics this purchase is of special importance because the pack must accommodate the extra supplies required to manage diabetes abroad. As a precaution I recommend taking more than enough diabetes supplies so be sure the pack you go with can handle all your insets, sensors, pens, vials, needles, test strips, meter, back up meter, PDM, transmitter, glucose tabs, granola bars and ketone strips (did I miss anything?) along with the rest of your essential travel gear. Keep reading to learn how I narrowed down and selected my new backpacking pack, the Savant 48 from Gregory Mountain Products . The first criteria to consider when looking for a pack is capacity and size. As a diabetic I absolutely want all my insulin and supplies with me at all times so it is imperative that my pack fits as a carry on item. Through my research I learned the average capacity of a bag allowed as a carry on by most airlines is 46 liters. This is a rough estimate and allowed sizes vary from airline to airline and plane to plane. Fitting a pack in the overhead compartment also depends on how much gear is in the bag and how well you pack it. I have heard of people fitting 60 liter bags as carry ons and others have told me their 40 liter wouldnt fit. It all depends on how you pack. The safest bet is to check the maximum dimensions allowed by your airline, do a mock pack then measure your bag. (Do this before you rip the tags off in case you need to return it). Here are the allowed carry on dimensions for a few major airlines: United, American, Delta & Jet Blue 9in x 14in x 22in (22cm x 35cm x 56cm) British Airways, Spirit 10in x 18in x 22in (25cm x 46cm x 56cm) Southwest 10in x 16in x 24in (25c Continue reading >>

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